Tag Archives: Symphony Hall

Tito Munoz conducting the Cleveland Orchestra

Maestro Muñoz Makes Debut Sept. 19-20

The Phoenix Symphony launches its 2014-15 season and Virginia G. Piper Music Director Tito Muñoz’ inaugural season with Carl Orff’s Carmina burana on September 19 and 20 at Symphony Hall. For this special occasion, Sandra Day O’Connor, Former Supreme Court Justice and prominent supporter of arts in Arizona, will conduct our nation’s national anthem before Sept. 20’s concert.

Audiences are invited to witness a historic weekend with The Phoenix Symphony as Maestro Tito Muñoz makes his debut as the Symphony’s eleventh Virginia G. Piper Music Director. Maestro Muñoz leads a powerful program with the majestic and scenic cantata, Carmina burana, featuring the famous “O’Fortuna” movement heard in numerous movie and television commercial scores. The Phoenix Symphony is joined by The Phoenix Symphony Chorus, the Phoenix Boys Choir, and features soloists soprano Mary MacKenzie, tenor Christopher Pfund, and baritone Corey McKern.

This 1936 cantata is based on a set of poems and dramatic texts from the 11th through 13th centuries that deal with subject matter such as greed, love, lust and gluttony. Upon its debut, Orff’s Carmina burana attained instant success and continues to be one of the most oft-performed classical works in the repertoire. This magical program also features Igor Stravinsky’s adventurous Firebird Suite, a masterwork of personal significance to Maestro Muñoz. “I am eager to bring on of my personal favorite pieces of music to Phoenix, The Suite from The Firebird, which is one of the first pieces of orchestral repertoire I learned in my youth, alongside the majestic and celebrated Carmina burana,” says Muñoz.

Tickets start at $18 and can be purchased by calling the box office at 602-495-1999 or online at phoenixsymphony.org.

Things to do this weekend

School’s out and there’s a long weekend ahead of us. If you’re not going camping, sitting poolside or catching up on “Game of Thrones,” give one of these events a try! Don’t forget to share photos of you enjoying these events with the hashtag #SL5 and follow us at @scottsdaleliving on Instagram!

Christopher Titus
It’s a disgusting understatement to say Christopher Titus has gone through some valleys in his life (schizophrenic mom and an unfaithful wife who also forged checks and drained his bank accounts during their 15-year marriage). Titus has a lot to be angry about, it’s just for our pleasure that his anger comes out in hilarious observations on life. On Titus’ “Angry Pursuit of Happiness” tour, he brings his hard humor reminiscent of the late greats (think George Carlin, Richard Pryor, Bill Hicks, Sam Kinison, Lenny Bruce, you get it).

Stand Up Live, 50 W. Jefferson St., #200, Phoenix, May 24 and 25, times vary, standuplive.com, $25

“The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein”
Young Frankenstein, Paul KolnikWant a side order of kitsch with your night at Arizona Broadway Theatre? “Young Frankenstein” is a musical of monstrous proportions of entertainment. Dr. Frankenstein and a cast of funny characters overcome the complications of reanimating a corpse through numbers such as “The Transylvania Mania” and “Puttin’ on the Ritz.” (Also, check out the delicious menu for this particular show.)
Arizona Broadway Theatre, 7701 W. Paradise Ln., Peoria, May 23 to June 22, times vary, azbroadway.org, tickets (http://azbroadway.org/index.php/the-shows/2013-2014-series/the-new-mel-brooks-musical-young-frankenstein)

“The Composer is Dead”
Composer is Dead, iTunes, WEBLooking for a way to make a night at the symphony fun for the family? Lemony Snicket has brought his “A Series of Unfortunate Events” to the orchestra pit for a dreadfully entertaining and interactive “whodunnit” show. The composer is dead and the crowd must figure out who did it. The diva violins, overlooks violas, sneaky clarinets and wallflower tuba are all possible culprits…
Symphony Hall, 75 N. 2nd St., Phoenix, Sunday, May 25, 2:30 p.m., $11 to $19

“Hollywood Costume”
478207119Those ruby slippers. That Dalmatian coat. A fedora and whip. Costumes are sometimes what propel beloved movie characters into pop culture icons, more so than scripts or special effects and makeup magic. The Phoenix Art Museum’s “Hollywood Costume” exhibit has set the Valley abuzz with its famous folds of fabric on display. The exhibit features more than 100 of the most iconic costumes — from “The Wizard of Oz” to “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,” “Titanic” and many, many others in an up-close showcase.
Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, Tues/Thurs. noon to 5 p.m., Wed. noon to 8:30 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sat/Sun 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., phxart.org, $20 adults, $10 children, free for children 5 and younger

Memorial Day Ride
469789901This annual charitable motorcycle ride through the northwest Valley is in its fourth year. Things rev up at 8 a.m. at Sanderson Ford, takes a stop at Veterans Memorial Cemetery before continuing to Westgate for an evening of entertainment.
Sanderson Ford, 6400 N. 51st Ave., Glendale, Saturday, May 24, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., aztributerides.com, $25 per rider

Debbie Cotton - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Debbie Cotton – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Debbie CottonInterim director, Phoenix Convention Center

Cotton oversees daily operations of the Phoenix Convention Center, Executive Conference Center, Orpheum Theatre, Symphony Hall and five parking garages. She manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million, and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.

Surprising fact: “I have a bachelor’s degree in speech and hearing science from Western Illinois University and began my career working for Xerox Corporation.”

Biggest challenge: “Stepping up to manage the Phoenix Convention Center in the midst of a global economic crisis that greatly impacted the hospitality industry. Not only did I have to deal with the effects of the economic crisis, but I had to quickly learn about an industry that was new to me.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Phoenix Symphony Contest

Contest Allows Fans To Become Stars With The Phoenix Symphony

The Phoenix Symphony announces a video contest asking fans to record and send in their own renditions of Rat Pack classics and be entered to win a full evening of prizes to coincide with the Symphony’s Saturday, April 28, 2012 performance of The Rat Pack!.

Contestants submit videos via email between Tuesday April 3, 2012 through Friday April 20, 2012. The winner will be determined on the overall quality and creativity of the entry. The winner will be treated to an exciting evening out in downtown Phoenix that will begin with dinner for two at the elegant 1130 The Restaurant before making their way to Symphony Hall. Upon arrival the winner and their guest will be invited backstage to meet the three Broadway stars portraying Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. and The Phoenix Symphony’s Resident Conductor Joseph Young.

The Phoenix Symphony’s The Rat Pack! performances features Broadway stage veterans Sal Viviano, Nat Chandler and Eric Jordan as they recreate the music and charisma of the Rat Pack’s famous Sands Hotel performance.  Resident Conductor Joseph Young will lead the Symphony as they perform the Rat Pack’s famous hits.

In addition to the Grand Prize Winner, any individual who submits a video will automatically receive one free ticket to the Friday, April 27, 2012 performance of The Rat Pack!.

Videos must be either (1) attached to an email addressed to publicrelations@phoenixsymphony.org in .mov, .mp4, .mpg, or .wmv formats or (2) uploaded to YouTube and the entrant must provide the URL link to the video’s page. Included in the email must be the entrant’s full name, age, phone number and e-mail address.

Part of the APS Pops Series: The Rat Pack! will be held at Mesa Arts Center on April 26 at 7:30 p.m. and at Symphony Hall on April 27 at 8 p.m., April 28 at 8 p.m. and April 29 at 2 p.m.

Phoenix Orchestra Does More Than Deliver Music, 2011

Pangean Orchestra Does More Than Deliver Music

The Pangean Orchestra, based in Phoenix, opened just a year ago and has established an orchestra with people, instruments and sounds from all over the world. In fact,this is the first orchestra of its kind.

The unique thing about this group of 29 performers is they don’t play the typical instruments. Their music comes from different sounds of the bass guitar, sarode, woodwinds, horn, kaval, oud, doumbek, ukulele and more.

“I knew I needed a certain amount of winds, plucked strings, percussion and bowed strings,” says Colin O’Donohoe, director of the Pangean Orchestra. “My idea is that with a world orchestra, the actual instrument is interchangeable as long as we have enough of each type to create the sound we need.”

The plan of this group is to tie cultures together through music. Creating a new genre that will impact those that listen to it by adding bits and pieces of new and old to craft a completely unique sound.

“The idea came from me; I’ve spent the last 10-plus years working with ethnic groups of different types,” says O’Donohoe. “I founded and lead the New Moon Orchestra in Pittsburgh which was a Chinese ensemble. I’ve worked with African, Brazilian, Latin, Turkish, Arabic and other groups. After a while I thought, ‘What if…’ and that’s where the Pangean Orchestra was born.”

The orchestra opened on April 11, 2010 at Symphony Hall with an inaugural concert.

“The musicians were recruited by me,” says O’Donohoe. “Through diligent searching over the past two years I’ve been able to find several highly talented musicians in Phoenix. I asked them to join the group and most of them jumped at the chance to work with other talented professionals from all different backgrounds.”

O’Donohoe says the Pangean Orchestra explores the different cultures through music, expanding the learning of sound, native instruments and unity. As they travel around the country performing, the significance isn’t only the music but the ties of the people of different backgrounds.

“The main idea is a platform where people from all over the world are welcome,” says O’Donohoe. “I want to create an orchestra that shows the harmony of what is possible when the world shares one stage performs together.”

Visit the Pangean Orchestra’s website to listen to a few of their tracks or to purchase its mp3 track — 100 percent of the proceeds go to The Red Cross Japan.