Tag Archives: target

Target-Village Center, CBRE, WEB

Valley retail portfolio sells for $150M

CBRE has completed the sale of the Phillips-Edison Fund IV Portfolio. The nine-property retail portfolio sold for $150 million and totals over 1.35 million square feet.

Jesse Goldsmith and Steve Julius of CBRE in Phoenix, Ariz., along with Christian Williams and Gleb Lvovich of CBRE’s National Retail Investment Group, negotiated the sale between the seller, Cincinnati, Ohio-based Phillips Edison Shopping Center Fund IV REIT, LLC and the buyer, Newquest-Epic Investments, LLC of Austin, Texas.

Arizona Retail Investment Specialists, Jesse Goldsmith and Steve Julius focused heavily on the portfolios’ Phoenix asset – the Village Center, located at 4304 E. Cactus Rd. in the Paradise Valley submarket. The 159,425-square-foot retail center is anchored by a Target and sits directly west of Paradise Valley Mall.

“The Village Center has been a high-performing property since it was developed in 1986. I anticipate that center will only become more successful in the future. The property is highlighted by a high-performing Target store anchor on a below market ground lease,” said CBRE’s Goldsmith. “Village Center is a class A asset, as were two other properties in the portfolio, which makes this offering unique as there is a lack of class A product currently on the market.”

 

The Phillips-Edison Fund IV Portfolio includes nine retail centers across six states. These include Village Center in Phoenix, Ariz.; Prairie Point and Glidden Crossing in Aurora and DeKalb, Ill., respectively; Marketplace in Independence, Mo.; Deerfield Place and Plaza North in Omaha, Neb.; Silver State in Sparks, Nev.; and Johnson Creek and Hermiston Plaza in Happy Valley and Hermiston, Ore., respectively. Six of the properties are grocery anchored.

Four peaks plaza

Sand Capital acquires Four Peaks Plaza

Sand Capital, a privately-held real estate investment company, located in Scottsdale, Ariz., has just closed on 140,390 square foot Target-anchored power center in Fountain Hills. Sand Capital is the financial arm and sister company to Sandor Development Company, which was founded in 1963 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Today, Sandor owns and manages over 8 million square feet of shopping centers in 25 states throughout the United States. Once acquired, Sand Capital assets are managed and leased by Sandor.

 

 

Four Peaks Plaza at 16735-16845 East Shea Boulevard is located in the northern Phoenix suburb of Fountain Hills. The center is comprised of 28 units and three outlots. Some of the major national tenants include Ross Dress for Less, Petco, Pier 1 Imports, Hi Health, Dollar Tree, Starbucks, Subway and O’Reilly Auto Parts. The leasing flyer is attached.

 

 

Earlier this month, Sand Capital acquired 29 CVS stores in 12 states and six shopping centers in three states.

Kristin Bloomquist is executive vice president and general manager of the Phoenix office of independent marketing and communications agency Cramer-Krasselt.

Leveraging visual storytelling tools can boost business

According to the old adage, a picture is worth 1,000 words. But what about a six-second video? Or an impeccably curated pinboard?

A host of new photo and video-sharing platforms—and the evolving universe of digital devices that enable them—are opening up new opportunities for marketers to engage consumers. But like many forms of “new media” before them, apps like Instagram, Pinterest and Vine (Twitter’s six-second video app) demand that brands embrace new forms of communicating.

Facebook, YouTube and Twitter are now pillars of every brand’s social footprint, but it wasn’t so long ago that likes, shares, user-generated video and 140-character status updates were new to the brand lexicon. Now more than ever, the challenge for brands is to become fluent in the language of visual storytelling—from infographics to photography to short, simple videos.

Since its launch in January, Vine has attracted marketers such as GE, Target, Oreo and Marvel Entertainment (with the world’s first movie “teaser”), who are anxious to gain access to the app’s steadily growing base of 13 million users who share 12 million videos a day.

Not to be outdone, Facebook launched video capabilities on Instagram in June. Users can create and edit 15-second video clips, personalize them with the filters the app is famous for and then post to Instagram and Facebook. Putting this kind of functionality in the hands of Instagram’s 130 million users will only ignite interest in this kind of short-form video. But creating compelling content within this kind of time constraint can be challenging, to say the least.

So how do marketers make the most of these tools?

First, Be an Observer: Look (and listen) before you leap. How are other businesses in your category using the space? Are users already posting about your brand? What are the platform’s unique traits and tools? Vine and Instagram video in particular are still in their infancy. First movers may have the advantage, but if their approaches aren’t right for the brand or venue (see next point), they’ll do more harm than good. So first do your research.

Make It Contextual: These platforms demand a regular stream of engaging content—but make sure your approach is a strategic fit and appropriate for both your brand and the venue(s). Our work for Johnsonville offers a prime example, where we leverage each platform based on what it does best, all working in concert and with a common brand strategy – from the “Share Your #Bratshot” promotion on Instagram to daily Bratfirmations on Pinterest offering grilling quotes, wisdom and humor.

Make It Useful: Don’t just show up to the party – offer guests something of interest or value. Remember: these platforms attract a sought-after, tech-savvy audience that often shun more “traditional,” disruptive forms of marketing. Time spent curating an inspiration board on Pinterest, for instance, is “me” time—not “please bombard me with your brand message” time. Lowe’s strikes the right balance with its helpful how-to vignettes on Vine.

As revolutionary as they seem, these tools are just the tip of the iceberg. In this attention- starved, mobile-first world, marketers will have to become master visual storytellers and more, as new tools and technologies continually redefine how brands connect and communicate with consumers.

 

Kristin Bloomquist is executive vice president and general manager of the Phoenix office of independent marketing and communications agency Cramer-Krasselt.

Calfee06

Cassidy Turley Completes 69,471 SF Lease for 1st United Door Technologies

Cassidy Turley announced it completed a lease for 69,471 square feet for 1st United Door Technologies, LLC at Geneva Industrial, 1016 W. Geneva Drive in Tempe. Senior Vice President Bruce Calfee and Vice President Josh Wyss, of Cassidy Turley’s Industrial Group, represented the Tenant while Executive Vice Presidents Steve Sayre and Pat Harlan represented the Landlord, CLPF Geneva Industrial, LP (Phoenix).
1st United Door Technologies is a Tempe, Arizona based garage door manufacturer. The company specializes in steel and wood doors for both commercial and residential use. Ownership is comprised of the former owners and senior management of Anozira Door Systems. Since 1982, 1st United Door Technologies has been serving Homebuilders across the Nation with unique and distinctive garage doors that enhance the beauty and value of the Builders homes. With over 150 years of door installation and manufacturing experience, the management team is known for providing innovative and quality products at very competitive prices. The new Geneva Industrial location is part of a company expansion.
Built in 1981, Geneva Industrial is a ±69,471 square-foot, industrial manufacturing building. The property is part of the South Tempe Industrial Corridor and is in close to the I-10 and US-60 Freeways. The building is currently 100 percent leased.

Target + Neiman Marcus Holiday Collection

Target + Neiman Marcus Holiday Collection: Gift Picks

Target has brought in a heavyweight for its most recent designer collaboration: luxury department store Neiman Marcus. Boasting top designers, such as Diane Von Furstenberg, Tracy Reese, Marc Jacobs and many more, Neiman Marcus is bringing the fashion heat to this holiday collection.

Target, an accessible chain and, frankly, one of my favorite pastimes to discover all the things I never knew I needed, has had continuous success with its now reputable designer partnerships.Were any of you a part of the madness that was Targetʼs collaboration with Italian fashion house Missoni last spring? Iʼm still salty about not snagging that lovely Missoni throw blanket; so, like most, I was ready to put on my fashionable running shoes come the official arrival of Target x Neiman Marcus. OK, more like my fashionable pajamas — online shopping? Yes, please.While the collection debuted in its entirety on Target’s website at midnight on December 1st, it has since done a brilliant job in maintaining well-stocked shelves since the launch of all the designer goodies. Many, if not all, are still available in your local Targets and Neiman Marcus department stores. All of my favorites arrived via prompt Target shipping.
How I styled the
Tracy Reese blouse:
Target + Neiman Marcus Collection

Check out my top must-haves and favorites from the collection:

Target + Neiman Marcus Holiday Collection picks

1. Tracy Reese dessert plates, $39.99. 2. Tracy Reese blouse, $79.99. 3. Alice + Olivia bike, $499.99. 4. Alice + Olivia roller, $179.99. 5. Tory Burch lunch pale and thermos, $19.99, $24.99. 6. Diane Von Furstenberg yoga mat, $49.99.


To view more of the Target + Neiman Marcus Holiday Collection items,
visit target.com.

Know Your Customer: Gathering Data to Build Marketing Campaigns

Know Your Customer: Gathering Data To Build Marketing Campaigns

There was a time when we relied largely on focus groups and surveys to learn who was buying the products and services we were touting and what they thought about the experience. Thanks to technology, today we have access to a wealth of data to help build marketing campaigns that will catch the attention of potential consumers. To some, the tools used to gather information are seen as an invasion of privacy, while others view it as smart business. For any company, big or small, the reality is that data is now accessible and a valuable tool for creating more efficient and effective communications.

In early spring, Target stores received a great deal of attention for their “data grab” practices that made it possible to predict a woman’s pregnancy, thus sending specific coupons and mailers anticipating her shopping needs. An article in Forbes detailed Target’s practices and explained that they are not the only one gathering data: “Retailers are studying details to figure out what you like, what you need, and which coupons are most likely to make you happy.”

Similarly, Safeway stores recently launched an online and mobile coupon application that gives customers discounts based on their shopping history. The program called “Just for U” tracks customer purchases through the Safeway Club Card and uses the information to create personalized discounts on specific products. Safeway’s marketing gurus recognized it was not enough to offer coupons and weekly deals to entice shoppers to choose their store over the many other options; the deals need to be personal, they need to matter to the customer.

As a small business owner lacking the deep pockets to employ an in-house statistician tracking your customer’s every move or a team of marketing experts to roll-out individualized messaging, you may think it would be nice to know more, but it just isn’t possible. While it is true that you may not have the resources of the marketing departments at Target or Safeway, you do have the ability to gather valuable information about your customers and create more targeted and effective messaging.

1. Google Analytics

Google Analytics provides tools for gaining insight about how visitors use your website, how they find your site, which pages they are visiting, and how you can keep them coming back. It also helps to understand why some visitors buy from you and others don’t. Gathering data and information on your Web traffic gives you valuable feedback for making adjustments to your website and your marketing programs to help increase conversions and meet your goals.

2. Facebook

The insight section on your Facebook brand page is full of valuable details. It not only provides the information on the number of people talking your business and the reach your posts are getting, but it also provides the demographic breakdown of those that like your page as well as the geographic location from which they are coming. You can also learn which posts generate the most response about your company and its products. Utilizing this data can help you target your marketing campaign with online and/or print ads and create messaging that will get your customer to take notice.

3. Email

A monthly e-newsletter or weekly e-blasts can be a fairly inexpensive way to market. It can also provide you with valuable data and feedback. You can track who opened your emails, who forwarded them and who clicked on which links. Understanding what people are interested in reading about helps to tailor your content to get the best response and increase sales.

Knowing not only who your customer is, but what they like can help you decide where to focus your marketing efforts and how to allocate your budget. Taking the time and effort to learn about your consumers’ behavior and interests is like a courtship. If you want to generate repeat customers — and actually secure that second date — learn more about them.

For more information about gathering data about your customers to help build your marketing campaigns, and/or marketingworx and its services, visit marketingworxpr.com.

affordable design - Scottsdale Living Magazine Spring 2012

A Nursery Transformation With Affordable Design, DIY Projects

Nursery Times: Local designer transforms a room with affordable design and unique DIY projects


Mix birds and crystals, mix in harlequin-patterned drapes and a grand chandelier, paint the walls pink, sprinkle a few do-it-yourself projects throughout the room, and you have yourself an elegant vintage nursery.

Using large pieces of furniture already owned by homeowners David and Brooke Ide, a remodeling project handled by Hidden Line Design in Scottsdale took a vintage approach to designing the nursery. And by taking an affordable design route, the owners were able to save between 30 and 40 percent off the total cost.

Julie Swagar, an interior designer with Hidden Line Design, scoured close-out stores such as Ross, TJ Maxx and The Rack; online retailers, including eBay; local antique shops; and even Target and Michael’s for discounted finds and deals. She also implemented a few DIY projects of her own.

“Affordable design isn’t just about finding ‘cheap’ things,” Swagar says. “It’s also about ‘transforming’ affordable pieces.”

And that she did. Swagar purchased plastic mirrors, paint and supplies through Ebay and transformed them to look like metal; she also added stick-on crystals to them, as well as the vinyl monograms hanging above the cribs, for just a few dollars.

“When I can’t use a large-scale item due to budget or design constraints, I like to find a piece that I can use in repetition to create a work of art,” Swagar says. “Little girls love dress-up, so the mirrors were a perfect fit for our European design.”

Another affordable project included a vintage side table with a removable shadow box top from Rust and Roses in Phoenix. Swagar added baby cards, hospital bracelets and photos, along with some mirrored birds. This side table is the Ides’ favorite aspect of the nursery.

“It is full of little items that have a lot of meaning to my family,” Brooke Ide says. “Plus, over time, we can change what is featured in the table with what stage the girls are going through. It is also the perfect height for our 17-month-old to look at the items and play with her toys on the table.

Hands-on: DIY Project

Affordable Design1. Prepare a work area, and work in a well-ventilated area. I used a large box to lay the mirrors on.
2. Tape off the mirrors carefully using blue painters tape.
3. Use a spray primer geared towards the material you are working with. In this case, we used Valspar’s plastic primer. Let dry according to the directions.
4. Spray with metal enamel paint. I used Valspar Brilliant Metals. Let dry, flip over and paint. Touch up both sides with a second coat. Be patient with the drying time. Don’t rush it!
5. Add décor. I added a small green jewel to each one to round out our concept.
— Julie Swagar

“It is old, tells a story and will be a piece in our family for a very long time,” she adds. “Hopefully one day one of the girls will have it in her children’s nursery.”

But it’s the inspiration behind the projects and nursery as a whole that’s so unique — the girls’ middle names.

“The girls’ middle names are Wren & Jewels, so I used their names to complete the concept with the vinyl monograms and accents of ‘birds and bling’ throughout the room,” Swagar says.

Stick-on crystals were added to the monograms above the cribs and mirrors dangling atop the pink walls, and birds were added to the shadow-box table.

Due to the high ceilings and open floor plan, the high-mounted, harlequin drapes became the focal point, making the space feel grander but “offering a soft warmth,” Swagar says.

“We wanted to create a room that they could grow into, a design that was timeless,” Swagar says. “The harlequin pattern was a perfect fit, as it exudes a traditional European flair while still being fun.”

Swagar stresses that it’s important not to under-value the size of furnishings, accessories, lighting and window coverings.

As for the drapes and chandelier, she says, “they made such a big impact and changed the room. The chandelier is the perfect scale and brought a sense of elegance to the room.”

So what will happen to the nursery as the children get older? Swagar has it covered. The cribs will turn into day beds until they move up to twin beds; and with a detachable table top on the vintage table, the owners have the option to replace the baby items with artwork or recent photos of the girls as they get older.

But the time spent on the room was well worth it.

“Take time to make a room special,” Ide says. “We decorated this nursery over four months, taking our time to find things that were affordable, went with our theme and had special meaning to our family.”

For more information about how you can transform one of your rooms with affordable design, visit hiddenlinedesign.com.

Hidden Line Design
7792 E. Journey Ln., Scottsdale
(480) 290-4700
hiddenlinedesign.com

Decorating a room with a high ceiling?

Swagar offers the following tips to create a balanced look:

1. Mount drapes as high as possible; this helps to make a space feel grander, but also offer warmth.
2. When working with a large bookcase, choose three to five large-scale accessories versus 12 small trinkets; it will have more of an impact.
3. Avoid accessories that are too small and adding too many of them; it can make the room look cluttered.
4. If you choose to add greenery, be sure they’re tall or else it can cut off a room. A seven-foot topiary was placed in the corner of the nursery.


More photos of the redesigned nursery:

Affordable Design Affordable design Affordable design Affordable design
Affordable design Affordable design Affordable design affordable design

Scottsdale Living Magazine Spring 2012

50 Largest Employers in Arizona - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

50 Largest Employers In Arizona

These are the 50 largest employers in Arizona, including public and privately held companies and not-for-profit corporations, ranked by the number of employees based on full-time equivalents of 40 hours per week and based on industry research.


50 Largest Employers in Arizona

Walmart Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 30,634
Employment change since 2010: Added about 300 jobs
2010 revenue: $421.8 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Bentonville, Ark.
Phone: (479) 273-4000
Website: www.walmart.com

Banner Health

Arizona employees in 2011: 28,353
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1911
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 747-4000
Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Wells Fargo & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 14,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $93.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1852
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 411-4932
Website: www.wellsfargo.com

Bank of America Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 13,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,000 jobs
2010 revenue: $150.5 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1904
Headquarters: Charlotte, N.C.
Phone: (800) 944-0404
Website: www.bankofamerica.com

McDonald’s Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 12,770
Employment change since 2010: Added about 955 jobs
2010 revenue: $22.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1955
Headquarters: Oakbrook, Ill.
Phone: (800) 244-6227
Website: www.mcdonalds.com

Apollo Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 460 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1973
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (480) 966-5394
Website: www.apollogrp.edu

Kroger Co. *

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 400 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.7 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1883
Headquarters: Cincinnati
Phone: (623) 936-2100
Website: www.frysfood.com
* Includes Fry’s Food Stores and Fry’s Marketplace

Raytheon Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 11,500
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $25.2 billion
Company’s focus: Missile manufacturing
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Waltham, Mass.
Phone: (520) 794-3000
Website: www.raytheon.com

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 10,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $102.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1799
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (602) 221-2900
Website: www.chase.com

Honeywell International Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,716
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 700 jobs
2010 revenue: $33.4 billion
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Morristown, N.J.
Phone: (602) 231-1000
Website: www.honeywell.com

Intel Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,700
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $43.6 billion
Company’s focus: Semiconductor manufacturing
Year founded: 1968
Headquarters: Santa Clara, Calif.
Phone: (480) 554-8080
Website: www.intel.com

Target Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $65.4 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Phone: (612) 304-6073
Website: www.target.com

US Airways

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,926
Employment change since 2010: Added about 150 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.9 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1981
Headquarters: Tempe
Phone: (480) 693-0800
Website: www.usairways.com

Catholic Healthcare West

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,291
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1986
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (602) 406-3000
Website: www.chw.edu

Home Depot Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 8,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 350 jobs
2010 revenue: $66.2 billion
Company’s focus: Home improvement
Year founded: 1978
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (714) 940-3500
Website: www.homedepot.com

Walgreen Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,750
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $63.3 billion
Company’s focus: Retail drugstores
Year founded: 1901
Headquarters: Deerfield, Ill.
Phone: (847) 940-2500
Website: www.walgreens.com

Safeway Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,500
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $41.1 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1926
Headquarters: Pleasanton, Calif.
Phone: (480) 894-4100
Website: www.safeway.com

American Express Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,465
Employment change since 2010: Added about 200 jobs
2010 revenue: $30.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1850
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (623) 492-7474
Website: www.americanexpress.com

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 7,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 935 jobs
2010 revenue: $19 billion
Company’s focus: Mining
Year founded: 1834
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 366-7323
Website: www.fcx.com

Pinnacle West Capital Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,900
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 earnings: $330.4 million
Company’s focus: Electric utility
Year founded: 1985
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 250-1000
Website: www.pinnaclewest.com

Bashas’ Supermarkets

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,641
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 1,800 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1932
Headquarters: Chandler
Phone: (480) 895-9350
Website: www.bashas.com

Scottsdale Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,556
Employment change since 2010: Added about 55 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 882-4000
Website: www.shc.org

UA Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: About 6,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,050 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 694-7737
Website: www.u.arizona.edu

Circle K Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 590 jobs
2010 revenue: $16.4 billion
Company’s focus: Convenience stores
Year founded: 1951
Headquarters: Laval, QC, Canada
Phone: (602) 728-8000
Website: www.CircleK.com

General Dynamics

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,026
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,810 jobs
2010 revenue: $32.5 billion
Company’s focus: Defense, communications
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Falls Church, Va.
Phone: (480) 441-3033
Website: www.generaldynamics.com

Boeing Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,800
Employment change since 2010: Added about 100 jobs
2010 revenue: $64.3 billion
Company’s focus: Aircraft manufacturing
Year founded: 1916
Headquarters: Chicago
Phone: (480) 891-3000
Website: www.boeing.com

Carondelet Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 124 jobs
2010 revenue: About $601 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1880
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 872-3000
Website: www.carondelet.org

Mayo Foundation

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 138 jobs
2010 revenue: $7.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1864
Headquarters: Rochester, Minn.
Phone: (480) 301-8000
Website: www.mayo.edu

CVS Caremark Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 50 jobs
2010 revenue: $96.4 billion
Company’s focus: Pharmaceutical services
Year founded: 1993
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (615) 743-6600
Website: www.caremark.com

Salt River Project

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,346
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 392 jobs
2010 revenue: $2.7 billion
Company’s focus: Utility supplier
Year founded: 1903
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 236-5900
Website: www.srpnet.com

Costco Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,151
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.2 billion
Company’s focus: Membership discount stores
Year founded: 1976
Headquarters: Issaquah, Wash.
Phone: (602) 293-5007
Website: www.costco.com

Abrazo Health Care *

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,089
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.5 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (602) 674-1400
Website: www.abrazohealth.com
* A division of Vanguard Health Systems

Albertsons Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 450 jobs
2010 revenue: $5.9 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery and drug stores
Year founded: 1939
Headquarters: Boise, ID
Phone: (602) 382-5300
Website: www.albertsons.com

FedEx Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,918
Employment change since 2010: Added about 330 jobs
2010 revenue: $34.7 billion
Company’s focus: Delivery, copy centers
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Memphis, Tenn.
Phone: (866) 477-7529
Website: www.fedex.com

Southwest Airlines Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,857
Employment change since 2010: Added about 259 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.1 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Dallas
Phone: (602) 304-3983
Website: www.southwest.com

Marriott International

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 722 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.7 billion
Company’s focus: Resorts and hotels
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters: Bethesda, Md.
Phone: (301) 380-3000
Website:  www.marriott.com

Qwest Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,200
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 190 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.3 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1896
Headquarters: Denver
Phone: (800) 244-1111
Website: www.Qwest.com

United Parcel Service

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,170
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 48 jobs
2010 revenue: $49.5 billion
Company’s focus: Package delivery
Year founded: 1907
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (888) 967-5877
Website: www.ups.com

John C. Lincoln Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,166
Employment change since 2010: Added about 539 jobs
2010 revenue: $551 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters:  Phoenix
Phone: (602) 870-943-2381
Website: www.jcl.com

USAA

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,045
Employment change since 2010: Added about 74 jobs
2010 revenue: $17.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: San Antonio
Phone: (800) 531-8111
Website: www.usaa.com

Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,001
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1974
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 435-4000
Website: www.schwab.com

Freescale Semiconductor

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.5 billion
Company’s focus: Microchip manufacturing
Year founded: 1953
Headquarters: Austin
Phone: (512) 895-2000
Website: www.freescale.com

IBM Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $95.8 billion
Company’s focus: Technology services
Year founded: 1924
Headquarters: Armonk, N.Y.
Phone: (800) 426-4968
Web site: www.us.ibm.com

Cox Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,997
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 67 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.1 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (623) 594-0505
Website: www.cox.com

TMC HealthCare

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,966
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 84 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1943
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 327-5461
Website: www.tmcaz.com

Verizon Wireless

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,901
Employment change since 2010: Added about 201 jobs
2010 revenue: $63.4 billion
Company’s focus: Wireless provider
Year founded: 1984
Headquarters: Basking Ridge, N.J.
phone: (480) 763-6300
Website: www.verizonwireless.com

Cigna HealthCare of AZ

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,865
Employment change since 2010: Added about 401 jobs
2010 revenue: $21.3 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1972
Headquarters: Philadelphia
Phone: (602) 942-4462
Website: www.cigna.com

Grand Canyon University

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,818
Employment change since 2010: Added about 537 jobs
2010 revenue: $385.8 million
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1949
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 639-7500
Website: www.gcu.edu

Starbucks Coffee Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,783
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,003 jobs
2010 revenue: $10.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Seattle
Phone: (602) 340-0455
Website: www.starbucks.com

Go Daddy Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,754
Employment change since 2010: Added about 441 jobs
2010 revenue: $741.2 million
Company’s focus: Internet services/technology
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 505-8800
Website: www.GoDaddy.com

These are the state’s 5 largest government employers, ranked by the number of employees.

State of Arizona: About 49,800 employees
City of Phoenix: About 15,100 employees
Maricopa County: 12,792 employees
Arizona State University: 11,185 employees
Mesa Public Schools: 8,376 employees

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Corporate Giving - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Corporate Giving More Discriminating, But Still Charitable

Like the economy, a dip in corporate giving appears to have bottomed out, but that charitable landscape has changed both for givers and receivers.

Corporations are re-evaluating which not-for-profit organizations they support, and in some cases businesses are providing more volunteers and less cash. At the same time, fund-raising efforts are changing. Some elaborate parties designed to attract big donors are a little less gala. Instead of the usual full-blown dinner, some groups are opting for less expensive cocktail parties.

Nationally, corporate giving rose 10.6 percent (8.8 percent adjusted for inflation) in 2010, according to the Giving USA Foundation. In Arizona, Laine Seaton of the Greater Arizona Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals says corporate giving is improving, with some caveats.

“It’s starting to get a little better – slowly,” she says. “Two years ago was definitely worse than it is now. I’m seeing that more companies are looking at alternate ways to support nonprofits. Definitely, volunteerism is up. Corporations and nonprofits have to be more flexible. Those chicken dinners are hard to fill.”

At the St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance, demand for food has nearly doubled in the past three years to a record 74 million pounds, which equates to 285,000 meals a day going to 700 agency-partners in 10 Arizona counties. St. Mary’s depends on a three-pronged operation to serve the increased number of needy and unemployed: financial donations, volunteers to help run the massive distribution center at 31st Avenue and Thomas Road, and food donations.

Terry Shannon, president and CEO of the food bank, says everyone is tightening their belt during these tough economic times. “But, fortunately, the economy has caused many corporations to refocus some of their support,” he says. “Maybe the total they can give is down, potentially donating to fewer nonprofits and focusing on basic needs. Obviously, we supply a very basic need. Our corporate financial support is strong.”

Volunteering is strong as well, saving the food bank $5 million a year in labor costs. “Corporations in Arizona are encouraging employees to volunteer more and more,” Shannon says. “At our main distribution center, we can handle 150 to 200 volunteers at a time. We get many corporate groups from companies like American Express, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and Target. It keeps their employees together – sorting, bagging and boxing food for distribution – and it almost functions as a team-building effort, rather than everyone doing their own thing.”

Food donations from manufacturers and retailers represent the third leg of the food bank’s operations. Some 55 trucks are dispatched to 280 grocery stores daily to pick up what Shannon calls “non-salable but edible” food items, such as a dented can of soup or a package of buns with one that is crushed.

“We’re a food distribution business,” Shannon says, “but we do it with donated and rescued food. Imagine what would happen if we had the food, but no money to put fuel in those 55 trucks (we use to distribute) or if we didn’t have the volunteers.”

In addition to having its employees volunteer at St. Mary’s Food Bank, Wells Fargo announced it is contributing $38,000 to 20 non-profits in recognition of volunteer efforts throughout the community. Twenty Wells Fargo Arizona team members were named Volunteer Service Award winners. Two will have $10,000 given to the charity of their choice and 18 will have $1,000 given to their selected charities.

In 2010, Wells Fargo team members reported nearly 80,000 volunteer hours in Arizona. They served as mentors, board members, project leaders, fund raisers, educators and more. Wells Fargo also donated $5 million in 2010 to nonprofits and schools in Arizona.
Despite the struggles of some corporations and non-profits, Phoenix Suns Charities is cashing in on its community-based reputation. In the past year, the organization distributed a record $1.36 million to 178 charitable organizations. That tops last year’s record of more $1.2 million awarded to 156 recipients, and marks the two best years since Phoenix Suns Charities was formed 23 years ago.

Kathryn Pidgeon, executive director of the NBA team’s charitable arm, has an explanation for the impressive results. “We are connected at the hip to a stellar organization – the Phoenix Suns,” she says. “The community loves the Suns. There is a strong history of giving to the community. Our donors really believe in us, trust us. They know the money is going for the kids.”

The $11.6 million in donations the Phoenix Suns Charities has distributed since 1988 is separate from the free tickets, signed memorabilia and personal appearances by team members, dancers and the mascot, the Gorilla. “My number is all cash,” Pidgeon says.
Grants from Suns Charities start at $1,000. The largest donation of $100,000 went to Improving Chandler Area Neighborhoods to build a basketball court in its new facility in downtown Chandler.

Phoenix Sun Charities is one that still relies on a gala to raise money. “We’ve given people a fabulous party,” Pidgeon says. “It’s wildly successful with great entertainment. All the players are there and they’re accessible.”

Pidgeon says the gala, which is partly underwritten by corporate sponsors, netted $1.1 million last March.

There are numerous other ways Phoenix Suns Charities generates money for its donations. The newest venture is an official state of Arizona Phoenix Suns license plate that produced $39,000 the first year and $51,000 the second year.

A new development in fundraising, says Seaton of the Fundraising Professionals group, is the target audience. The most giving demographic has been women in the 55 to 65 age group. “Nonprofits these days are also looking at twenty-somethings,” she says. “They didn’t have money to give. That’s not the case anymore. Young people want to make a difference. They have energy and new ideas. Social media is part of that effort.”

Arizona Corporate Angels

National Kidney Foundation of Arizona

 National Kidney Foundation, Corporate Giving
4203 E. Indian School Rd., Suite 140
Phoenix, AZ 85018
(602) 840-1644
azkidney.org

Arizona’s Children Association

Arizona Children's Association, Corporate Giving
2833 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ 85004 | (602) 234-3733 | arizonaschildren.org
2700 S. 8th Ave., Tucson, AZ 85713 | (800) 944-7611 | hope3ways.org

United Cerebral Palsy of Central Arizona

United Cerebral Palsy of Central Arizona, Corporate Giving
1802 W. Parkside Ln.
Phoenix, AZ 85027
(602) 943-5472
ucpofcentralaz.org

Arizona School of Choice Trust

Arizona School of Trust, Corporate Giving
P.O. Box 1616
Glendale, AZ 85311
(623) 414-3429
asct.org

Phoenix Rescue Mission

 Phoenix Rescue Mission, Corporate Giving
1801 S. 35th Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85009
(602) 233-3000
phoenixrescuemission.org

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For more information about these Arizona Corporate Angels and their respective corporate giving, view the AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2011 digital issue.

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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

 

Black Friday, Cyber Monday

Black Friday Deals And Cyber Monday Madness

It’s all about Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals this Thanksgiving, but what about deals before Black Friday?

Plenty of retailers, such as Target, Toys ‘R’ Us and Amazon.com, have already kicked off the holiday season with incredibly low prices on high-end items with online-only specials.

Pre-Black Friday Sales

Here are two retailers holding pre-Black Friday sales:

Target

Target has pre-Black Friday deals online and in-store until Wednesday, Nov. 23.

In addition to the great deals, Target is also supplying coupons for the items on sale on its website. Sale items include electronics, toys and household items.

But Black Friday sales are what it’s all about, and Target has a slew of hot items at great prices. In the electronics department, you can find hot buys on the Kindle 3G, a PS3 bundle and a TOMTOM GPS system. Then there are the toys, clothes and household items with door buster prices. And for those deals, you have to wait until Friday.

Toys ‘R’ Us

Toys ‘R’ Us has special deals on Leapfrog books and Leapster learning games, select LEGO games and Radio Flyer Scooters. Additional promotions include, buy one, get one 40 percent off for DS and 3DS video games, and an Olympus 12 mpx digital camera for $69.99, as well as saving up to 50 percent on board games. Customers get free shipping for an order of $49 or more. But hurry, you only have until Nov. 23 to pick up the savings.


Pre-Black Friday Online Retailers

Here are a couple online retailers holding pre-Black Friday sales:

Overstock.com

Overstock.com is overflowing with great pre-Black Friday red line deals. From cameras to televisions, some of these red line items are already sold out. There is also an extra 10 percent savings on select outerwear and boots, and don’t forget to stay cozy with some new winter bedding. Overstock.com also offers some great steals on jewelry and designer frocks.

Amazon.com

Another pre-Black Friday, retailer is Amazon.com. Amazon has started their time-released lightning deals on Monday, Nov. 21, and they will run all week long. Amazon.com did this last year to entice online holiday sales, and this year it’s taken off in force; in less than an hour from its 4 p.m. release time, a Haurex Italy Men’s Red Arrow U.C. Sampdoria Chronograph Tachymeter Rubber Watch that retails for $800, sold out for $99. The same goes for the Blu-Ray Pulp Fiction DVD for $3.99 from its $19.99 list price — and when it’s gone, it’s gone.

Deals are released approximately every hour with only a clue as to what the product might be.


Black Friday Deals

Many, many retailers are boasting great Black Friday deals, but here are a few:

Apple

Apple is known for set prices on its products and accessories, but this Black Friday Mac products will be 10 to 15 percent off. Mac’s will be approximately $101 off the regular price and iPad’s will be $41 – 61 off depending on storage size. The biggest savings will be the base level Macbook Air starting at $898. Apple is also discounting its accessories such as the iPad 2 Smart Cover, the Apple Wireless Keyboard and the Apple Wireless Magic Trackpad.

Macy’s

Macy’s is known for its historic Thanksgiving Day Parade (that airs 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. ET Thanksgiving Day), but they also have some incredible deals, such as ladies cashmere sweaters for $40 (regular retail value $109), as well as men’s Oscar de la Renta sweaters starting at $30. Men’s and women’s winter boots are up to 50 percent off and select kitchen appliances starting at $9.99.

Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart has some of the best deals on the market, according to its Black Friday sale paper. Select movies regular DVD and Blu-Ray are being advertised for $1.96 – $10.

A selection of Blu-Ray movies under 15 dollars? Only on Black Friday.

Wal-Mart is also attempting to one-up all the other retailers by starting Black Friday sales two hours earlier. While most retailers are starting sales at midnight following Thanksgiving, Wal-Mart is honoring some of their sale prices starting at 10 p.m.

Local Deals

Blissful Yoga Studio

Blissful Yoga, locally owned and operated with locations in Arrowhead, North Phoenix and Scottsdale Quarter, is offering an exclusive, online Black Friday special starting this Friday at midnight.

The special? Sign up for a membership, pay two months and receive two months FREE. This is valued at $270 and is only offered to the first 100-150 memberships. You can cancel after the four months if you wish; no penalties.

For more information about Blissful Yoga, visit blissfulyoga.net.

Phoenix Art Museum

The Phoenix Art Museum is having a Black Friday deal for art lovers. Only on Friday Nov. 25 can you purchase a museum membership for 20 percent off. You can purchase the membership online and enter the code: BLACKFRIDAY or you can visit the museum between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. to get this great offer.

For more information about the Phoenix Art Museum, visit phxart.org.

Desert Ridge Marketplace

Desert Ridge Marketplace in Phoenix is also offering tons of coupons from its restaurants on locations and retailers, including Aeropostale, Barnes & Noble, DSW and many more. Although you cannot use these coupons on Black Friday, they are valid through December 31, 2011 — perfect for holiday shopping post-Black Friday.

Browse the list of coupons on Desert Ridge Marketplace’s website.


Cyber Monday

Many of the businesses mentioned above will be holding a Cyber Monday sale. Many of the items won’t be disclosed until the night before. But, you can get the inside scoop if you follow your favorite store on Facebook and/or Twitter.

Here are some Cyber Monday links:

Twitter: Cybermonday_fm
Facebook: Cyber Monday FM


Don’t Forget Small Business Saturday

There are incredible deals out there, but don’t forget to shop small businesses on Small Business Saturday, Nov. 26.

Small businesses support the economy and create jobs in your community. Arizona has a plethora of local artisans, jewelers and boutiques. If you can complete even a portion of your holiday shopping at a local business, you’ll be doing something great for your community and yourself.

If you’d like to shop local, calculate your impact and find a local business by visiting shiftarizona.com.

Image Provided by Flickr

ASU Cancels Study Abroad Program In Egypt

On January 25th, Egyptian citizens erupted in violent revolution against corruption, extensive poverty, enormous national unemployment and numerous governance problems of autocratic leader Hosni Mubarak — and two Arizona State students were caught in its crossfire.

The students were studying abroad in Cairo at the time political unrest hit its threshold in late January; and with ASU’s Study Abroad Office’s help, they were pulled out of the area.

Image Provided by FlickrASU has had a long-standing relationship with the American University of Cairo (AUC) where the previously mentioned students had been studying, but as CNN reported attacks on American journalists in the area, concerns arose from families of the students involved.

“We feel confident that both students will be back in the U.S. by this weekend, weather permitting”, said Amy Shenberger, director of the Study Abroad Office at ASU.

Their decision in the cancellation was met with widespread agreement by both the U.S. government agencies involved and university partners in Cairo.

In result from years of political turmoil, Egypt reached its tipping point of strong government rhetoric from Mubarak.  Headlines of bloodied civilians and anti-riot police have scattered newspapers nationwide, giving American news affiliates reason for concern.

According to the Washington Post, the White House is aiding in the extraction of news reporters in the area, as many have been savagely beaten or detained by the Egyptian government.Image Provided by Flickr

iJet, a travel intelligence that monitors international activity for ASU’s study abroad office, has maintained communication with Shenberger to give live updates on the situation.

Shenberger also strongly advocates the continuation of its program in Egypt in future years but believes the current political atmosphere presents a clear and present danger to the students.

“We have had a partnership with AUC since 2004, and it’s our intention to maintain that going forward,” said Shenberger.

The program plans to resume once the dust settles in Egypt, according to Shenberger, and ASU will continue to monitor the situation with the students’ best interests.

“The safety and security of all of our students is our primary concern, [and] any time the danger in a location outweighs the benefits of the academic program, we take the steps necessary to ensure our students’ safety,” said Shenberger.

Shop Cyber Monday Deals

Cyber Monday Deals For 2010

We all know – and sometimes dread – Black Friday. But Cyber Monday is something even the most antisocial person can get behind.

Cyber Monday allows you to shop from the comfort of your computer. No need to even change out of those pajamas.

Check out these smoking deals online.

BestBuy.com

Best Buy has great Black Friday deals, but Best Buy’s Cyber deals last for two days (Sunday & Monday).

  • Get ready for some amazing Cyber Monday deals on everything from navigation devices to fridges.
  • Plus, free shipping on orders of $25 or more, so it’s like you went out and bought it yourself, but without all that hassle.


Overstock.com

Overstock.com has anything from women’s boots to magazine subscriptions to iPods.

  • You’ll have to wait until 10 p.m. (midnight Eastern Standard time) Sunday to view Overstock’s Cyber Monday deals. But you can sign up on Facebook to receive an exclusive look at the deals. And Overstock is offering a mobile app for those who can’t wait by their computers for Cyber Monday deals.


Walmart.com

Walmart is known for its rollback prices but you can expect even better deals on Cyber Monday.

  • The deals can’t be seen yet, but visit Walmart.com and bookmark the page to be ready when it strikes midnight on Cyber Monday.


Target.com

Like Target’s Black Friday deals, its Cyber Monday deals are just as top secret. But take a look at Target’s Cyber Monday Web site and you can sign up to get exclusive e-mail steals.

Buy.com

Visit Buy.com for steals and deals on almost anything imaginable. Visit the Web site to see the Cyber Monday offerings.