Tag Archives: TGen Foundation

quayle

Quayle elected to TGen Foundation Board

Former U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle, who served under President George H.W. Bush from 1989-93, was elected today to the Board of Directors of the TGen Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the non-profit Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Vice President Quayle attended grade school and high school in Phoenix and Scottsdale and he and his wife, Marilyn, are now residents of Paradise Valley. He brings to the TGen Foundation his vast career experience in politics and financial investment.

“It is my honor to be selected to be a part of TGen and the phenomenal work this biomedical institute is doing to find better treatments for the most serious diseases affecting humanity,” said Quayle, who also is a former U.S. representative and senator from Indiana, and who today is chairman of Cerberus Global Investments, a private equity company with $25 billion under management.

TGen Foundation Board Chairman Bennett Dorrance welcomed Quayle, noting that he is instantly one of the best known among a cadre of top-flight Arizonans who serve on the non-profit panel.

“Today we welcome Vice President Dan Quayle to our TGen family with high expectations and confidence that he will further enhance our philanthropic reach across the nation and help fuel TGen’s genomic research of the world’s most pressing diseases,” Dorrance said. “We welcome his involvement, his extraordinary relationships and his business acumen.”

Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director, also welcomed Quayle, whose term as Vice President (1989-1993) coincided with Dr. Trent serving as Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

“In 1990, the NIH and the Department of Energy joined with international partners in a quest to sequence all 3 billion letters in the human genome. Vice President Quayle is acutely aware of the importance of this public effort, and remains an advocate for genomic research and what is means for our patients,” Dr. Trent said.

TGen Foundation President Michael Bassoff said that the addition of Quayle to the TGen Foundation Board of Directors would undoubtedly be of huge importance to the future of the institute.

“He brings a powerful internationally recognized voice to advance TGen’s scientific research,” Bassoff said.

Quayle graduated from DePauw University in 1969, and received his law degree from Indiana University in 1974.

He was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1976 at age 29; to the U.S. Senate in 1980 at age 33; and Vice President of the United States in 1988 at age 41, during which he made official visits to 47 nations and served as chairman of the National Space Council. He has authored three books, including Standing Firm, a vice-presidential memoir, which was on The New York Times best-seller list for 15 weeks.

Quayle also was a distinguished visiting professor of international studies at Thunderbird, The American Graduate School of International Management in Glendale, Arizona.

At Cerberus, one of the world’s leading investment firms, he has been actively involved in new business sourcing and marketing in North America, Europe and Asia. His extensive global network of public and private sector decision-makers, combined with his investment expertise, has significantly contributed to the growth of Cerberus.

Tony Pena, Brian Cashman

Yankees’ GM supports TGen Research

A top official of the New York Yankees whose father passed from pancreatic cancer has joined a prestigious national panel organized by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) to fight this aggressive disease.

Brian Cashman, Senior Vice President and General Manager of the vaunted Yankees Major League Baseball franchise, has joined TGen’s National Advisory Council for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

TGen’s National Advisory Council leads a critically needed funding effort and promotes a deeper public understanding of pancreatic cancer, the nation’s fourth-leading cause of cancer death, which in 2012 took the lives of nearly 44,000 in the U.S. and nearly 235,000 worldwide.

Cashman lost his father, John, in September after a 10-month battle with pancreatic cancer. He had wanted his Yankees to reach the World Series as one last gift to his father.

“My father loved the Yankees. There are a lot of people who face these kinds of challenges, and they look to the Yankees to provide positive inspiration. For my father, the Yankees were always something he could look forward to,” he said. “I welcome the responsibilities and challenges of my role in the fight against pancreatic cancer. I have a personal experience to draw from, and coupled with my unique standing within the fabric of baseball, I’d like to believe I can make the type of contribution my father would be proud of.”

Cashman was invited to join TGen’s National Advisory Council by another council member, Arizona Diamondbacks President and CEO Derrick Hall, who in 2011 lost his father, Larry, to pancreatic cancer, even as Derrick was fighting his own battle with prostate cancer.

The Yankees and Diamondbacks played one of the game’s iconic 7-game World Series in 2001.

In addition to Cashman and Hall, another MLB official, David Dombrowski – President, CEO and General Manager of the Detroit Tigers – also is a member of the National Advisory Council for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

Other members of TGen’s National Advisory Council are: Raymond Bojanowski, Co-founder and Co-chairman of the Seena Magowitz Foundation; Karl Glassman, Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President of Leggett & Platt Inc.; Diane Halle,
President of the Bruce T. Halle Family Foundation and the Herbert K. Cummings Charitable Trust; Steve Hilton, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Meritage Homes Corp.; David Lane, President of the Lane Affiliated Companies; Roger Magowitz, President and Founder of the Seena Magowitz Foundation; Vincent McBeth, President of the The McBeth Group International and a retired U.S. Navy Commander; Larry Rogers, President and CEO of the Sealy Corp.; Steve Stagner, President and CEO of the Mattress Firm; Louis A. “Chip” Weil III, retired Chairman, President and CEO of Central Newspapers Inc.; and Howard Young, President of the General Wholesale Company.

“Brian Cashman is a powerful addition to TGen’s National Advisory Council. His personal experience, championship reputation, and national visibility will be a huge boost to TGen’s fight against pancreatic cancer,” said Michael Bassoff, TGen Foundation President.

Cashman joined the Yankees as a 19-year-old intern and now commands one of the most demanding jobs in sports. During 25 seasons, he has earned five World Series rings. At age 30, he became the youngest GM to win a World Series. And during 1998-2000 he became the only GM in Baseball history to win World Series titles in each of his first three seasons.