Tag Archives: The Pavilions at Talking Stick

Spring Training Stadium Guide

Talking Stick packs in the fun

Come be a part of what everyone is talking about at Talking Stick!

THE PAVILIONS AT TALKING STICK
The Scottsdale Street Fair is now a Saturday/Sunday affair! Beginning this Saturday/Sunday, February 9 & 10, the SSF is going bi-weekly, resulting in twice the fun off the 101! On Saturday, February 9th, The Scottsdale Street Fair will welcome MagiKaria, a fantastic magical experience for children or all ages (11a) and Spring Into Fashion- a fashion show brought to you by the Phoenix Children’s Museum of Phoenix and sponsored by Dillards (1p).

The Big One is Back! February 14th is opening night for Circus Vargas! February 14-18, for tickets visit www.circusvargas.com

SALT RIVER FIELDS AT TALKING STICK
Spring Training begins on February 23rd! The Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies will kick off another great season on Saturday, 2/23! The World Baseball Classic will take the field March 5-7 as well. Tickets are on sale now at  http://www.saltriverfields.com/spring-training-tickets.aspx

TALKING STICK RESORT
Love is in the air at Talking Stick Resort! The Spa at Talking Stick is offering several candlelight specials  this month, including a candlelight pedicure for $60. visit http://www.talkingstickresort.com/spa/specials.aspx for more information.

Looking for something to do Valentine’s Day weekend? Talking stick Resort is the place to be! Wynonna & The Big Noise will be taking the stage on Saturday, February 16 and Jay Leno is sure to make you smile on Sunday, February 17. For tickets and more information, please visit http://www.talkingstickresort.com/entertainment.aspx

TALKING STICK CULTURAL AND ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATION
Beginning February 23rd, Talking Stick will be offering area visitors complimentary Trolley Service in and around the Talking Stick area and downtown Scottsdale. Service will begin at 11:30am daily and run thru March 28th. Please visit http://talkingstickarizona.com/play.htm for route and a full schedule.

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

Lee Hanley - Vestar

Vestar's Hanley, 70, Dies Of Pancreatic Cancer

Lee T. Hanley, CEO of  Vestar Development, one of the largest privately held shopping center companies in the Western U.S., died Sunday. He was 70. The cause was pancreatic cancer.

Hanley spent more than three decades in the industry and was regarded by many as an icon in the development community. Under his leadership, Vestar, which Hanley and several other founders spun off from a home building company in the late 1980s, became a dominant player in its metro area and the Los Angeles and San Diego markets. The company has undertaken some of the most challenging, yet innovative and ultimately successful open-air projects in the country, starting with the development in 1989 of Arizona’s first power center, the former Scottsdale Pavilions.

Vestar negotiated a land lease with the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community to develop the 1.1 MSF center on about 100 acres owned by the sovereign tribe. The center attracted major retailers because of its proximity to Scottsdale.

By incorporating lakes, waterfalls and other design elements that were relatively new to shopping centers, Vestar set out to create a sense of place at Scottsdale Pavilions, and that remains a mission for the company with its projects today. (The center is now owned by Phoenix-based De Rito Partners Development Inc. and has been renamed The Pavilions at Talking Stick.)

Born in Los Angeles, Hanley graduated from the University of Arizona with a degree in accounting and served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, including duty in the Vietnam War. Early in his career, he worked for the Xerox Corp., rising to become one of its top salesmen in the West, and for brokerage firm CB Commercial, the predecessor to CBRE Group Inc. In 1977, he was recruited by the former Estes Homes of Tucson to start its commercial development division, which built centers as amenities for its master-planned communities.

In the late ’80s Estes was seeking to raise cash to pay down debt, and Hanley spearheaded a buyout of his division in partnership with three colleagues, Richard J. Kuhle, David J. Larcher and J. Paul Rhodes, all of whom remain with Vestar. The acquisition was partially funded by the pension plan of the former Ameritech Corp., one of the seven so-called Baby Bells created as a result of the breakup of AT&T in 1984. Ameritech was eager to expand its portfolio of real estate investments in the West and became a capital partner to Vestar, giving it a competitive advantage over other developers during the credit crunch and recession of the late ‘80s and early ‘90s.

During that period, Vestar made its move into the highly competitive Southern California market, acquiring properties and securing entitlements for projects in places where other developers had tried to no avail. Its first ground-up project in the state was Cerritos Town Center, a 600,000 SF power center that brought one of the first Wal-Mart stores to the Los Angeles area. Vestar sold the center in early 2012.

Rick Hearn, Vestar’s director of leasing, says Hanley was a mentor who led by example. Hanley inspired him and many others at Vestar to get involved in politics, charitable causes and professional organizations.

“I consider myself blessed to have had a mentor like Lee,” says Hearn, one of many longtime Vestar employees. “He left his mark on a lot of different organizations.”

Hanley was involved in numerous other organizations. He was a trustee of the Urban Land Institute and the Barrow Neurological Foundation, which raises funds for the Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. He also served on the board of the TGen Foundation, which raises funds to support the Translational Genomics Research Institute, a non-profit biomedical research institute in Phoenix.

He was active in the Greater Phoenix Leadership council, the Valley of the Sun United Way and other organizations in the Phoenix area.

Hanley and his wife Nancy were married for more than 40 years and had three children and seven grandchildren.

Retail Centers - AZRE Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona's Retail Centers Are Top Economic Drivers

Arizona’s Retail Industry, Retail Centers Top Economic Driver

The world of retail has come a long way since Arizona’s first shopping center, Park Central Mall, opened in 1957. Back then, the state was known mostly for cowboys, cactus and critters.

How times have changed.

Arizona’s retail industry is now one of the state’s top economic drivers, as spectacular shopping centers have sprung up from the desert floor over the years.

The History of Arizona’s Shopping and Retail Centers

Built in 1961, trendy Scottsdale Fashion Square is Arizona’s largest retail center at 2 MSF. The Westcor-developed mall is home to high-end retailers such as Barneys New York, Nordstrom, Gucci and Neiman Marcus.

To appreciate the history of retail in Arizona, however, one simply needs to return to its roots: Park Central Mall.

Located on Central Avenue in midtown Phoenix, Park Central Mall originally was anchored by Goldwater’s, Diamond’s and a “five-and-dime” store. It was an open-air facility that helped put Arizona on the real restate map. It served as the first stepping stone to Arizona’s long history of retail. The next two major projects — Christown Mall and Metro Center — also are key milestones on that timeline. Rick Hearn, director of leasing at Vestar Development Company, recognizes their historical importance.

“Christown, Metro Center, Park Central — what was happening in Arizona was also happening around the country. We were in step with the rest of the world,” Hearn says.

Christown, now known as Phoenix Spectrum Mall, was Arizona’s third shopping center. As the state’s first closed center, it also was one of the first air-conditioned malls in the Western United States.

According to Stan Sanchez, president and partner of De Rito Partners, much of Christown’s appeal and success were a result of the surrounding mixed-use amenities. There were multiple components including hotels, auto malls and other retail stores. These elements enhanced Christown’s viability in particular, and Arizona retail in general.

Metro Center, at 1.39 MSF, is Arizona’s second largest retail center. When it opened in October 1973, it was considered one of the largest malls in the country. With two levels and a series of popular anchors, Metro Center set a great precedent for later retails projects in Arizona and the U.S.

According to Hearn, Metro Center was a step away from the typical “mom-and-pop centers,” but certainly a step in the right direction. It wasn’t just a retail center; it was a commercial location as well, building on the mixed-use components for which Christown had previously become famous.

Malls such as Metro Center catered to typical shoppers and enabled them to purchase multiple, everyday needs in one easy trip.

“As (retail) developers we really have to cater to the retailers,” says Jim Pederson, chairman of The Pederson Group. Pederson, along with other real estate developers, also made it a point to identify the needs of the consumers.

Metro Center was a stepping stone to the next level for Arizona, De Rito’s Sanchez says. And that next level would be achieved with each additional project after Metro Center. Scottsdale Pavilions, recently renamed The Pavilions at Talking Stick, was built in 1989. It was one of the first retail centers built on Native American land in Arizona.

Today it’s a 1.1 MSF open-air “power center” with retailers such as Sports Authority, Target, Home Depot and Walmart. According to Chuck Carlise, president of De Rito Partners, the strongest anchors for shopping centers are grocery stores. As the “bread and butter” of De Rito and other developers, grocery stores have proven to be a very successful format for retail.

But more goes into building a successful retail center in Arizona than just anchor stores, especially in the unavoidable heat of the desert. In the middle of summer, shoppers need a place to go and a place to eat that will shelter them from the blistering sun. With retail centers such as Mesa Riverview and Tempe Marketplace, there is the option to shop, eat or play inside and out.

“It’s important to withstand the extreme temperatures while still taking care of the people’s needs” Pederson says.

Mesa Riverview, a De Rito development that opened in 2007, targets a broad audience and all aspects of the consumer with office buildings, auto malls, retail stores and other commercial businesses. From a trendsetter’s standpoint, Hearn of Vestar understands the need for people to avoid the heat and the need to design projects that can keep them cool and happy.

Part of what keeps shoppers happy is the lifestyle component of destinations such as Kierland Commons and Scottsdale Quarters, which include residences, hospitality, entertainment, office and retail.

Designed in 1997 to be the first urban village to integrate mixed-use with outdoor shopping, Kierland Commons (on the Phoenix-Scottsdale border) opened in 2000 and has served as a benchmark for similar mixed-use projects around the nation.

“If you were able to take a look from a satellite view, it was really the evolution of the communities that led to the method the developers used to custom tailor the development to Arizona’s lifestyle and how they wanted to live” Sanchez explains.

CityScape in Downtown Phoenix is another example of how Arizona retail has evolved. As Phoenix grew, CityScape, a mixed-use skyscraper, became a part of the downtown skyline. Part of the appeal, according to Hearn, is the downtown office, urban feel that CityScape provides. It’s unique to the area, but gives Phoenix a great deal of character. The only aspects missing are quality residential developments.

Despite the recession and record-high vacancy rates in Arizona’s retail sector, there is hope for the future.

“Phoenix has always rebounded,” Hearn says. “We’re in the top 11 states for job growth and for relocation. We have a quality of life that no one else has.”

That quality of life is evident at such retail projects as Scottsdale Fashion Square, Chandler Fashion Square and San Tan Village in Gilbert

From its start in 1957, Arizona retail has grown into a formidable industry across the state. With mixed-use, open air and luxury options, shoppers have every aspect of retail at their fingertips.

“The beauty of how Arizona’s retail has evolved is the fact it created your Saturday mid-day experience,” Sanchez says. “Arizona developers have given the public all they need for every day of the week.”

AZRE Magazine July/August 2011