Tag Archives: Thunderbird School of Global Management

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Thunderbird hosts global trade finance seminar

In partnership with the U.S. Department of Commerce, a coalition of business, trade, and educational organizations will host The Global Connect: Arizona Trade Finance Seminar on Friday, February 21, 2014 at Thunderbird School of Global Management.

The seminar brings together trade finance experts from both the public and private sectors to discuss the resources available to U.S. exporters, especially local small and medium-sized companies, for their financing needs. This seminar is also offered in support of the advancement of U.S. Hispanic-owned businesses in global markets. Participants will have the opportunity to meet with experts one-on-one.

Keynote speakers include: U.S. Commerce Deputy Assistant Secretary for Services Ted Dean, who leads the Department’s efforts to enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. services industries; MBDA Acting National Director Alejandra Castillo, one of the highest ranking Hispanic officials in the Obama Administration; and Ernesto Poza, Thunderbird Clinical Professor of Global Entrepreneurship.

The seminar is co-sponsored and presented by Thunderbird School of Global Management, FCIB – The Finance, Credit & International Business Association, the Arizona District Export Council, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and NACM of Arizona – Southwest Business Credit Services.

economy

Thunderbird hosts First Global Business Conference

On Thursday, Nov. 21, the Phoenix Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) Business Center and the Thunderbird School of Global Management are hosting the First Annual Global Business Conference in Glendale.

The conference is expected to bring in over 250 local, national, and international visitors, and an additional 25 speakers and honored guests.  The event is focused on international business and export opportunities.  Attendees will hear and meet renowned speakers and other global business industry professionals discuss the following topics:

·         Global Business Trends
·         International Business Opportunities
·         Export Information (by region) & Resources
·         Building International Partnerships to Help Businesses Succeed Abroad
·         “Nuts & Bolts” of Doing Business Abroad (and much more!)

Registration Process
For additional information about the Annual Global Business Conference, visit www.phoenixmbdacenter.com. This link also provides information on the location, registration, accommodations, program agenda, sightseeing resources, and sponsorship opportunities.

Contact:
If you have any questions, contact Kaaren-Lyn Morton by e-mail Kaaren@phoenixmbdacenter.com or call 602-248-0007 X216.

cronkite global initiative

2013 Global Summit on Negotiation and Trust

The only professional conference that directly makes the connection between negotiation, trust and achieving a sustainable outcome is the Global Summit on Negotiation and Trust, a three-day event that will take place November 8, 9 & 10, 2013 at the Thunderbird School of Global Management in Phoenix, Arizona.

This program is designed to help participants become better at forming and sustaining collaborative relationships; increase cross-cultural competence and trust in international negotiation settings; make trust a competitive edge through practical tools and techniques from proven experts; and deploy trust to resolve conflict more effectively and improve negotiation results.

Independent research has established a link between high trust and negotiation results, revealing how these characteristics contribute to improved productivity, higher employee morale, lower organizational conflict, faster decision-making, better teamwork and lower costs of litigation and failed partnerships. The conference will provide a road map for enhancing credibility, improving employee engagement, building commitment, loyalty, and a high performance culture. Additionally, participants will expand their personal and professional network while harnessing the collective wisdom of experienced practitioners, top scholars and executive peers.

Among the speakers will be:  Stephen MR Covey, Author of New York Times and Wall Street Journal #1 bestseller “The Speed of Trust”; Dr. Robert Cialdini, renowned Author of the NY Times Bestseller “Influence: Science & Practice”; Divya Narendra, CEO of SumZero and a co-founder of ConnectU, the predecessor to Facebook; Hon. Hlengiwe Mkhize, Deputy Minister of Economic Development, South Africa; Edgardo Pappacena, Global Business Model Transformation Leader for PriceWaterhouseCoopers; and a number of top scholars, leading practitioners, business leaders and Harvard luminaries.

Conference Chairman and event speaker Andre Bisasor, brings with him a legacy of successful events as the founder of the Negotiation & Leadership Conference. This Global Summit is the next iteration of preeminent conferences produced in the tradition of the previous gatherings held in Cambridge. The following leading authorities on the subject of negotiation in the field are scheduled to speak at the Global Summit.

  • Dr. Robert Cialdini (Renowned Author of the NY Times Bestseller “Influence: Science & Practice”);
  • Michael Wheeler (Harvard Business School Professor);
  • Bruce Hay (Harvard Law School Professor);
  • Divya Narendra (CEO, SumZero and An Originator of the Facebook idea at Harvard College);
  • Chris Voss (Former Head of the FBI International Hostage Negotiation Unit; Former Subject Matter Expert on Hostage Negotiation For G-8 and White House; Former Lecturer at Harvard);
  • Leonard Kopelman (Lecturer on Management & Law at Harvard University; Renowned Expert in international & diplomatic law)
  • Dr. Lakshmi Balachandra (Professor, Babson College; Former Lecturer on Negotiation at Harvard and MIT)
  • Hon. Hlengiwe Mkhize (Deputy Minister of Economic Development, Govt. of South Africa);
  • Dr. Karen Walch (Professor at Thunderbird School of Management);
  • Edgardo Pappacena (Global Business Transformation Leader & Former Chief Strategy Officer, PriceWaterhouseCoopers);
  • Clark Freshman (UCLA Law Professor; Expert in Lie Detection in Negotiation);
  • And many more

Pricing begins at $1,395 USD with an Early Bird registration special of $995 USD for registration before October 15, 2013. Student tickets are deeply discounted at only $150 USD for Early Bird, or $295USD at the regular rate.

To register, go to  http://globalsummitonnegotiation.com/registration-page/

Early registrants, who also follow on twitter at @globalsummitAZ, qualify for giveaways including: one complimentary 8-week, 100% online Executive Certificate course from the Executive Certificate in Global Negotiations, a value of $1,980 USD, as well as one complimentary admission to the on-campus program, Communicating & Negotiating with a Global Mindset, at the Glendale campus with a value of $3,800 USD.

The conference also includes a concurrent youth program that provides a limited number of high school students ( including those from under-resourced communities) the chance to attend the event for free.

Additional information on the Global Summit is available at http://globalsummitonnegotiation.com/

education.business

Educators say executives can increase workplace value

Despite signs of what most people view as a recovering economy, more than half of Arizona’s workforce stresses over job security.

A recent University of Phoenix survey revealed that 61 percent of working adults worry about losing their jobs in the current economic climate and 20 percent anguish over it at least once a week.

“In a challenging economic environment, workers should be doing more to position themselves as leaders in their organizations, but the survey finds that many are holding back at work, and this can have a negative effect on performance and productivity,” said Dr. Sam Sanders, college chair for University of Phoenix School of Business and a former human resources executive with more than 20 years of hiring and employee relations experience. “Those who understand the big picture and how their own skill sets help their companies achieve goals should have more confidence and can have an advantage in the workplace.”

To separate themselves from others and to create more job security, many executives are strengthening their skill sets through education.

“The trends in executive education is for shorter duration programs than those that preceded the recession, with emphases on acquiring skills that lead to promotions or career advancement and new market opportunities,” said Dr. Kevin McClean, interim dean, Ken Blanchard College of Business at Grand Canyon University. “Another key ingredient is the opportunity to network. These objectives are not really different from those that motivated people to pursue executive education in the past.”

Executive trends

Some of the shifts that educators are incorporating into graduate business programs include more emphasis on leading in turbulent times, developing organizational talent, innovation and creativity, and flexible, participative strategic planning.

“Executives are being asked to take on more responsibility and act more holistic in understanding the interdependencies of people and functions in organizations,” said Dr. Kirk Wessel, dean of Angell Snyder School of Business at Ottawa University. “This is being reflected in curricula.”

Educators are also being asked to help prepare executives and business students to deal with increasingly more complex business issues.

“For example, rather than teaching executives innovation or risk, we are talking about ‘risk-bound innovation,’” said Dennis Baltzley, Ph.D., senior vice president of executive education at Thunderbird School of Global Management. “Leaders want to know how to create an environment of innovation, while creating a ‘boundary’ of risk management. We must innovate, but more than ever, a bad decision can be fatal.”

Baltzley said Thunderbird is also seeing a dramatic interest in global global leadership.
Our customers want to know how to lead effectively across borders, cultures, different business models and philosophies,” Baltzley said. “Since 2008, growth has been slow in the U.S. and other mature markets. This led many businesses to leap into emerging markets with the promise of double digit growth whether they were ready or not, and most were not as ready as they would have liked.”

Paul Melendez, assistant dean of executive education at the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona, said he is seeing four specific trends:
* Customization: Executive education is becoming much more tailored to specific organizations, with programs, content, and learning customized to the unique needs of the organization. While many business schools still offer one- or two-week open-enrollment programs, organizations are finding it more beneficial to develop a program that is tailored to their executives.
* Consulting: The natural extension of customized programs is a consulting model where education and problem-solving are combined into a program. “We have helped organizations develop their culture, strategically plan, and develop a wide variety of business improvement plans through programs that also provide education for leaders,” Melendez said.
* Strategic partnerships: Eller Executive Education has developed strategic partnerships with Miraval and Canyon Ranch to offer programs that join cutting-edge leadership and management principles and with world-class health and wellness programs which they have dubbed “integrative leadership.”
* Privatization: A year ago the university spun Eller Executive Education out of the UA to allow greater operating flexibility. “As a result, we are now providing many more custom program for private, governmental, and non-profit organizations,” Melendez  said. “We have seen a number of other state business schools also privatizing their executive education organizations.”

Increasing your stock

Michael Bevis, director of academic affairs at University of Phoenix, said more executives have started to approach their careers in the same way they approach business management by focusing on building their personal brands.

“When you think about a company brand, it isn’t just about what you are communicating, but how that brand addresses the needs of the intended audience,” Bevis said. “One of the things I work on with executives and other business students at University of Phoenix, is developing a personal business plan that starts with the personal mission statement. You wouldn’t run a business without a plan and the same should be true about your career. If you are not setting goals, measuring progress and making sure your knowledge stays current and relevant, your personal brand — like that of a company’s — can become stagnant.”

So what programs are out there for executives to utilize to strengthen their brand?

* University of Phoenix: Within the MBA programs, concentrations allow executives to grow specific skills. It is common for executives or business owners to have specific knowledge about an industry or certain aspects of business management, but skills or knowledge gaps in other areas. Concentrations can help professionals hone certain skills, such as people management, finance or marketing.

* Thunderbird School of Global Management: Thunderbird offers a range of options from its short programs — less than a week — to its more in-depth MBA offerings. “We have a Global MBA Online that allows you to learn global business from anywhere in the world and an Executive MBA that’s on-campus, but provides a schedule suited to the working professional. “ Baltzley  said. “We also offer online certificate programs which are designed specifically for working professionals looking to improve their marketability and gain a leading edge over their competition.

* W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University: “Our executive-education programs, such as our leadership development workshops and our certificate programs in real estate, supply chain management, and service excellence, can give executives deeper skills and expose them to new ideas,” said Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “However, if they want to move into leadership roles beyond their current functional areas, then the MBA is the best option, though short non-degree courses that develop leadership skills are also helpful.”

* Eller College of Management: Eller Executive Education offers a variety of week-long programs and year-long programs for leaders of different types of organizations. “We are also launching a program in early 2014 that is specifically oriented toward CEOs of mid-sized to large companies,” Melendez said.

* DeVry University: Keller Graduate School of Management offers seven specialized master’s degree programs and 13 graduate certificate programs.

* Ken Blanchard College of Business: GCU offers very practical programs that include a master’s in leadership, a masters in accounting, and a masters in public administration.

* Angell Snyder School of Business: Case teaching methodologies teach executives to think critically about all internal and external factors that come into play in developing effective organizational strategies, irrespective of the industry.

Moving forward

The most important message that educators have for executives who may be worried about maintaining their position in the current economic climate is to stay current on trends in your industry, keep your brand current by understanding how your skills and experience fit into the big picture of an organization.

“This past year, we were asked repeatedly how to be effective in managing a diverse, multicultural, and geographically dispersed workforce, and how to stay relevant in a Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous (VUCA) world,” Baltzley said. “Without question the term ‘VUCA’ has come of age and has several implications for executives who want to remain relevant today.”

To stay in the game, Baltzley has three pieces of advice for executives:
1. Get your head into what it means to think globally. If you think your company is domestic and American, and it will never go global, you are wrong, global is coming to you. In fact, global is probably already there, in the form of complex supply chain issues or direct competitors, so you better get prepared.
2. A term coined in the late 1970’s is important here – “Permanent Whitewater” – That is, if you think the whitewater is going to slow down, or that a calm patch is just around the corner, you are mistaken. You have to prepare yourself for leading in constant change in scale and speed.
3. Check your personal leadership style. Are you able to influence people very different than yourself? Do you enjoy variety, the unknown, surprises? Is your self-confidence and personal energy level pretty high? Do you like to test yourself, take some risks? If you can’t answer “yes” to most of these, you have some work to do to become a more adaptive leader.

Kitty_Plumbing_02

Maloney-Langmade becomes leader of men

There are not many people in the world who can say they are a licensed plumber, have an MBA in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management, and are a mother to three daughters, ages 7, 11 and 12.

Kathryn “Kitty” Maloney-Langmade can make those claims.

The president of W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling leads a vibrant plumbing contracting company in a male-dominated industry. Some of her company’s recent projects include the new Chicago Cubs spring training complex in Mesa, the Veteran’s Administration Southeast Healthcare Clinic in Gilbert, Phase IV of CityScape Phoenix, a major solar thermal project at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and the Sky Train Project at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Az Business magazine caught up with Maloney-Langmade — whose company won consecutive Best of the Best Awards for safety from SCF Arizona — for a Q&A.

How did you get into the plumbing business?
My father and mother started W.J. Maloney Plumbing in 1964.  I grew up in and around the business. My dad was always working in the field and my mother performed the bookkeeping. Upon returning from my honeymoon, I learned my mother’s secretary had left the company.  My mother asked me to come to the plumbing shop to help her out with payroll and I never left.

Are there any aspects of the industry that are made more difficult because you are a woman?
Growing up, I always heard and learned about construction but I was not in the field with my father.  Often times, I wish I had the mechanical, hands-on expertise and years of experience that my father had.  To carry on his tradition of quality workmanship, I have had to surround myself with key people who have the same mechanical skill that he possessed.

Are there any benefits to being a woman in a male-dominated industry?
My experience is that both men and women in construction go out of their way to be supportive, kind, courteous and helpful.  People want me to succeed.  They know construction is a tough road.  I am lucky to have received good advice and help.

What has been your biggest challenge?
Turning the company around during difficult times.  We were in a pattern of winning work and doing jobs, but were losing money. Meeting and listening to my key foremen who have been with the company for years, I was able to learn and understand changes that needed to happen. I was able to get the company moving in the right direction when I put together a solid leadership team.  We are now able to estimate, win and perform good work.  We have a great team in place now and the momentum continues to build and grow.

Barbara.Barrett

Barrett named to Smithsonian board

Paradise Valley resident Barbara Barrett was appointed this month to the Smithsonian Institution’s Board of Regents.  She will serve a six-year term as a citizen regent on the board that is the governing body of the renowned institution that consists of 19 museums and nine research centers. In addition, the Smithsonian has numerous relationships with other cultural and research institutions. Her appointment to the board of regents was signed by President Barack Obama on January 10th and her term began immediately. No stranger to the Smithsonian, she also served as a member of the National Air and Space Museum in the 1980s, and has spent much of the last ten years serving on the Smithsonian National Board.

Prior to accepting the position, Barrett completed a stint as interim president of Glendale’s Thunderbird School of Global Management. She is CEO of luxury resort Triple Creek Guest Ranch, located in Darby, Montana. She also serves on the governing boards of the RAND Corporation, Aerospace Corporation, Sally Ride Science Foundation, Lasker Foundation and Space Foundation.

Tilted-Kilt_Roselle-IL-600x400

Tilted Kilt Hires New CFO to Focus on Expansion

Tilted Kilt has recently hired Eddie Goitia as the new Chief Financial Officer for the company. Goitia’s most recent experience includes a 19-year run at Monti’s La Casa Vieja Steakhouse in Tempe, serving most of his time as CEO and managing partner. At Tilted Kilt, Goitia will be responsible for developing and executing a strategic financial plan to assist in the expansion of the Tilted Kilt brand. As of now, Tilted Kilt has over 70 locations, in the United States and Canada.

“This is truly an incredible opportunity to work with a dynamic company with phenomenal growth,” says Goitia. “I look forward to working with the team at the Titled Kilt organization as we continue its expansive success.”

During his nearly 2 decade-long position at Monti’s, Goitia helped the restaurant’s sales grow exponentially, specifically in the catering and banquet arenas, utilizing the expansive space the restaurant boasts. His creativity, determination and success allowed him the opportunity to be scouted by Tilted Kilt.

Prior to joining Monti’s, Goitia served as Director of International Sales for Windsor Industries based in Colorado.  He began his working career as a member of the staff of Senator John McCain.

Goitia received a BS in Marketing from Arizona State University and an MBA from Thunderbird School of Global Management.  He has served his community as a member of the Tempe Diablos and is currently on the Board of Directors for the group.

He and his wife Stacey, an author, reside in Tempe. Their son Brice attends Barrett Honors College at ASU and their daughter Elise attends Seton Catholic Preparatory High School.

Untitled

Valley Leadership announces Man & Woman of the Year

Valley Leadership announces Tom Ambrose and Ambassador Barbara Barrett as the organization’s 2012 Man & Woman of the Year. The pair will be honored for their distinguished service to the community at an awards luncheon in March.

Ambrose is well known in the greater Phoenix Metropolitan area as a community leader for nearly four decades. He joined the management team at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arizona (BBBSAZ) as Executive Director in June, 2010.  Prior to that, Ambrose spent 37 years with the Phoenix Suns working in public relations, marketing, advertising and foundation management roles. For 17 years, he was the executive director of Phoenix Suns Charities.
Under his leadership, the Phoenix Suns Charities grew from a good idea in 1988, to a high impact community grant-maker by raising and distributing over nine millions dollars in grants and scholarships over the years

“Tom’s commitment to our community has impacted dozens of organizations across the Valley,” said Jerry Lewkowitz, co-chair of this year’s Selection Committee.  “The nonprofit landscape is filled with landmarks to his efforts.”

Barbara Barrett is President and CEO of Triple Creek Guest Ranch, perennially ranked among the top hotels in the world.  Until November 2012, she was also Interim President of Thunderbird School of Global Management, the world’s #1 school for international management.  Previously, she was Ambassador to Finland, Senior Advisor to the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, CEO of the American Management Association, a Fellow teaching Leadership at Harvard and Chairman of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.

“Starting with her participation in Valley Leadership Class I, Barbara has proven her commitment to our community over many years of leadership,” Sue Glawe, Selection Committee co-chair, said.   “Her list of accomplishments is a shining example for our community.”

Ambrose and Barrett join a prestigious list of past Man and Woman of the Year award recipients spanning 63 years.  U.S. Sen. Barry Goldwater was honored as the inaugural Man of the Year and most recently Sue Glawe and Jerry Lewkowitz were recognized as the 2012 recipients.

The newest inductees will be formally recognized at a luncheon on March 21, 2013, at the Arizona Biltmore. For more information or to purchase seats or sponsorships, call the Valley Leadership office at (602) 952-6760.

education.business

Penley Appointed President of Thunderbird

The Board of Trustees announced that Larry E. Penley, Ph.D., has been elected president and chief academic officer of Thunderbird School of Global Management effective Thursday, November 1, 2012. The appointment  follows a search that attracted top-tier candidates from both business and academic organizations.

Dr. Penley’s record of results over a distinguished 35-year career makes him a great leader for Thunderbird. As president of Colorado State University, he reversed declining enrollment and oversaw the doubling of fundraising. As dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, Dr. Penley led the creation of a strategic plan that produced a top 25 ranking among public MBA programs.

Dr. Penley also applied his learnings for diplomacy and management skills as chairman of The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), a world leader in accreditation services. INROADS Arizona and the Greater Phoenix Economic Council have honored Dr. Penley for his service.

As a leader, Dr. Penley’s extensive overseas experience gives him great passion for Thunderbird’s global mission. He has lectured on four continents, speaks Spanish, and has held faculty and administrative roles in Mexico and Venezuela. While at ASU, he also oversaw the launch of successful MBA programs in Chinaand Mexico.

“Thunderbird is very fortunate to have Dr. Penley at the helm,” said Ann Iverson, Chair of Thunderbird’s Board of Trustees. “He is a lifelong learner who embraces innovation, fosters collaboration, and welcomes diverse viewpoints.”

Thunderbird School of Global Management

Thunderbird School Of Global Management Ranked No. 1

Thunderbird School of Global Management has once again been ranked No. 1 in International Business by the Financial Times in its annual worldwide ranking of full-time MBA programs.

This is the sixth year the Financial Times has included an International Business specialty in its annual look at the world’s best MBA programs, and Thunderbird has landed the No. 1 spot every year. This year, the school ranked ahead of University of South Carolina (Moore), Hult International Business School, Insead, and Georgetown University (McDonough).

“From Davos to Oakland and places in between, the world is demanding a new kind of global leader,” said Thunderbird President Ángel Cabrera. “People around the globe are beginning to realize what Thunderbird has known for 65 years — that we need more men and women who combine global mindset, enterprising spirit and global citizenship to move nations, businesses and communities forward in times of change.”

With its unique mission and vision in the world of business schools, Thunderbird School of Global Management consistently sets itself apart from other schools in the International Business category. It has been one of the foremost advocates of business ethics, corporate responsibility, and professional integrity for business school graduates and managers worldwide. In 2004, well before the global financial crisis took hold, it became the first graduate business school in the world to challenge students to adhere to a professional Oath of Honor to guide their careers. The school also played a key part in developing the United Nations Global Compact “Principles for Responsible Management Education,” or PRME, which serve to strengthen the role of business schools in promoting ethics and corporate social responsibility.

In addition to its No. 1 ranking for International Business, Thunderbird made the Financial Times’ general list of the top providers of full-time MBA programs. The school is ranked No. 89 on the top-100 list of schools around the world.

For more information on the Financial Times’ annual ranking of MBA programs in 2012, visit financialtimes.com. Or, for more information about Thunderbird School of Global Management, visit thunderbird.edu.

10 Re-careering Tips - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

10 Re-careering Tips

10 Re-careering Tips:

1. Check out the hot — and not-so-hot — fields.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics gives indications of which fields expect to grow versus lose jobs, so keep that in mind when you’re deciding whether or not to become a social worker (should be a good bet) or a television anchor (not so much). But don’t throw a dart and pick a so-called hot job. Read on.

2. Don’t start from scratch.

Re-careering doesn’t have to mean throwing out your years of work experience. If you’re an IT professional laid off from a tech company, you don’t have to become a nurse. Brush up on privacy law, network security or database management, and apply with a health care organization.

3. Follow your heart.

Biotechnology might be the next big thing, but if you find it boring, don’t bother. One of the best predictors of success in a field is your passion for it. Good engineers of any type are usually in demand; mediocre ones are rarely in demand. What interests you?

4. Take into account the work environment and physical requirements.

Do you work well when the pace is fast? Or do you prefer to be introspective and analytical? Do you despise being on your feet all day, or are you miserable sitting in a cube?

5. Do a 360-review.

Call upon peers and colleagues — both former supervisors and employees — to assess your strengths and weaknesses. You might be surprised what others say are your best (and worst) qualities, and what you uniquely bring to a position.

6. Network, network, network.

Whether it’s getting to know fellow students, impressing an instructor, volunteering or doing an internship, it’s essential to make connections with people who can help you with your goals.

7. Seek professional help.

Maricopa County Community Colleges’ career centers are free and open to the public.

8. Go back to school.

It can be as simple as taking one course to earning a certificate or a degree.

9. Look for financial assistance.

Subsidized loans, Pell grants and scholarships are available, especially if you’ve lost a job. Even small scholarships add up. Call professional organizations in your field of interest and check the library for lists of scholarships many people don’t even know exist.

10. Differentiate yourself.

Instead of just earning a teaching degree, look into certificates such as English immersion or special education to make you more marketable and malleable.
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Re-careering tips sources:

Joe Patterson, assistant vice president and executive director of Thunderbird Online at Thunderbird School of Global Management; Ruthie Pyles, director of M.B.A. recruitment and admission, the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University; Scott Schulz, director of career and employment services at Glendale Community College
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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

Re-careering - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Unemployed Workers Become More Competitive, Re-careering

Re-careering vs. Education: Unemployed workers can go back to school or re-shape their skill to enhance job prospects

When Ronald Schilling, 54, of Black Canyon City lost his job as a truck driver in July 2008, the future looked bleak.

“I just didn’t see myself at the age I am, getting a job driving a 12-foot box truck and busting my butt for $8 or $9 an hour,” he says.

His uncle suggested he go back to school. Now, Schilling is in the honors program at Glendale Community College with a 3.9 grade point average and is on track to enter nursing school.

Schilling is one of a growing number of returning students who are re-careering after losing jobs, and many are getting training and education to increase their chances in the competitive job market.

Mature students are on the rise in higher education. Between 2000 and 2009, the enrollment of students under age 25 increased by 27 percent, but enrollment of ages 25 and up rose 43 percent, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

The majority of online students at Thunderbird Online are ages 38 to 42, says Joe Patterson, assistant vice president and executive director of Thunderbird Online at Thunderbird School of Global Management.

Still, the idea of going back to school can be daunting, especially because of time and cost. Tuition can range from $299 for a two-week bartending course through ABC Bartending and Casino School in Tempe, to more than $86,000 for a 60-credit master’s degree in business administration degree from Thunderbird.

One way to mitigate the cost, say those in higher education, is to take non-degree courses. This can keep up your skill set to ensure “life employability,” said Scott Schulz, director of career and employment services at Glendale CC, one of the Maricopa County Community Colleges.

Online programs allow students to take classes when it’s convenient, and offer accelerated degree programs. Thunderbird Online offers executive certificates for three eight-week accredited non-degree classes, all the way to a full M.B.A in a year. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University offers multiple ways to earn an M.B.A., including online.

No longer is there a stigma to online education, Patterson says. Even top-tier universities such as Stanford and Cornell offer e-learning.

Whether on campus or online, academic classes are more than ivory tower ideas.

Instructors usually are also connected to and working in their industries, so they not only know what’s needed in the job market, they can make important referrals. Networking with other students is essential, too. You never know who might pass along that integral inside job tip.

Volunteering is another way to get a foot in the door. Schilling, the trucker-turned-nursing student, volunteers each week at John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital in Phoenix. And Mark Scarp of Scottsdale, a newspaper columnist who was laid off in January 2009, parlayed his 20 years of volunteering with the Society of Professional Journalists into a job as membership director with the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

While it’s a good idea to invest in continuing education, career counselors say to assess your strengths, weaknesses, passions and goals first, and keep in mind the idea of career management rather than simply career advancement.

“I think we’ve all heard the term ‘climbing the career ladder,’” Schulz says. “I think what it’s changed to is a career lattice or career web. It’s not as linear. You may have to move sideways or diagonally to get to that next opportunity.”

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Where to take classes if you’re considering re-careering:

Anthem College, (602) 279-9700, www.anthem.edu
Apollo College, (602) 864-1571, www.apollocollege.edu
Arizona State University, (6020 496-INFO, www.asu.edu
Collins College, (602) 997-2166, www.collinscollege.edu
DeVry University, (602) 870-9222, www.phx.devry.edu
Grand Canyon University, (877) 860-3951, www.gcu.edu
Maricopa County Community College District, (480) 731-8000, www.maricopa.edu. Campuses include Chandler-Gilbert Community College; Estrella Mountain Community College; Glendale Community College; GateWay Community College; Mesa Community College; Paradise Valley Community College; Phoenix College; Rio Salado College; Scottsdale Community College; and South Mountain Community College.
Northern Arizona University, (800) 426-8315, www.nau.edu
Midwestern University, (623) 572-3215, www.midwestern.edu
Thunderbird School of Global Management, (602) 978-7000, www.thunderbird.edu
University of Arizona, (520) 621-3237, www.arizona.edu
University of Phoenix, (866) 766-0766, www.phoenix.edu
Western International University, (602) 943-2311, www.west.edu

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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

cubes floating in air creating a map of the world

Global Negotiations: New Executive Certificate Program Coming Online

With globalization accelerating at an exponential rate, acquiring the knowledge and capability to achieve sustainable business success is paramount. It is important for executives to develop their understanding of cross-cultural negotiation tactics, and discover their power position and power approach for successful business.

“Global negotiation courses and cross-cultural communication are the two main focuses for business executives in 2010,” says Erin Wilson, associate director of executive education at Thunderbird School of Global Management in Glendale.

In response to this growing demand, the school created a new online program, the Executive Certificate in Global Negotiations.

“Negotiation is an art,” the school states on its Web site. “All negotiations are delicate operations, and crafting agreements is a challenge no matter who the players are. Stakes are higher and negotiations trickier, however, when the parties involved come from different cultures and customs, it may result in a negotiation session hijacked by misunderstandings or unexpected culture clashes.”

Wilson says the executive certificate is an online program involving three, eight-week courses that may be taken anywhere in the world. Those who participate in the course will be able to interact with other executives via online discussions.

“The courses are designed so that they may be globally offered with no in-person interaction,” she explains.

The executive certificate program was first introduced in February, with additional program dates opening April 5 and June 7
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The certificate program is designed for any professional — at various levels of responsibility — who works in a cross-cultural environment, or for those who want to gain more knowledge about working in this type of environment, Wilson says.

Taken together, these courses provide the participant with a comprehensive education in core global negotiation concepts and cross-cultural relations. While each component course may be taken separately for an individual certificate of completion, they must be taken as a three-course track to earn the Executive Certificate in Global Negotiations.

“The three courses that make up the Global Negotiations certificate have different focuses, but together make a comprehensive package,” Wilson explains.

Certificate participants will learn:
Negotiation approaches for global management.
Strategies appropriate for a wide range of negotiation situations.
Techniques for recognizing and leveraging trust in a multicultural context.
Strategies for identifying cultural preferences and gaps in a multicultural negotiation.
Key methods of preparing and planning for negotiation success.
Strategies for working through an impasse or breakdown.
Techniques for identifying and using “hardball” negotiation strategies.

The courses are broken down into:
Cross-Cultural Communications — Participants will learn to identify cultural communication nuances and strategies for achieving an even cross-cultural playing field. Students will gain insight into overcoming cultural communication obstacles through case vignettes, video role-playing and instructional checkpoints.
Course objectives:

  • Examine the definition of culture, cultural expectations and how these impact business relationships.
  • Review a “framework” for analyzing differences and similarities across multiple cultures based on 10 cultural dimensions.
  • Explore the impact of cultural differences on managerial communications and meeting etiquette.

Essentials of Global Negotiation — Students will examine the theory and practice of negotiation among individuals, organizations and groups in the context of globalization and multicultural social interactions. They will discover techniques for reacting to and addressing cultural differences in communication/negotiation style, while learning to adjust their own style to be most effective in the negotiation setting.
Course objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of the nature of global negotiations.
  • Define a basic framework for preparing to negotiate in a global/cross-cultural situation.
  • Learn why strictly following key strategy steps for problem solving is critical in a cross-cultural context.
  • Recognize the role of psychological, cognitive and social dimensions of negotiation.

Managing Conflict with a Global Mindset — Participants will examine the behaviors and conflict management negotiation styles of individuals, organizations and groups in the context of competitive, impasse, breakdown and difficult situations. They will learn to manage communication and conflict by understanding the cultural wants, needs and expectations of others — and adjusting their style and techniques to most effectively confront and overcome conflict.
Course objectives:

  • Explain how the attributes of a “global mindset” affect global negotiation and conflict management.
  • Learn the tools necessary for evaluating and managing conflict and divergent needs in negotiation.
  • Become more sensitive to key psychological factors, emotional issues and behaviors that can be destructive to problem-solving negotiation.
  • Enhance your awareness of the costs, privacy, flexibility and efficiency of alternative dispute resolution and problem-solving mechanisms and techniques.
  • Increase your knowledge of “breakthrough” strategies.

Program participants work independently, Wilson says, but there are three forums that will require class discussion.

“The facilitator will post a topic, which will then require input from the class or the online discussion board where participants are required to interact and respond to one another,” she says. “As this is the first time that Thunderbird will be running the class in this particular format on our own, we are not entirely sure what the class makeup will be. My estimation is that the majority of participants will be currently located within the U.S., though many will be executives that work abroad on a regular basis.”

For more information on the Thunderbird School of Global Management’s Executive Certificate in Global Negotiations, visit www.thunderbird.edu. Allie Bell contributed to this report.

Thunderbird Uses Faculty, Students And Alumni To Advise Businesses That Want To Go International

As the world emerged from World War II, a visionary leader in the U.S. Air Force named Gen. Barton Kyle Yount dreamed of creating a business school that would focus exclusively on international management.

That dream was realized April 8, 1946, when Thunderbird School of Global Management received its charter, with Yount as the school’s first president. The campus opened on the site of Thunderbird Field, a historic airbase established to train American, Canadian, British and Chinese pilots during the war.

Today, Thunderbird is home to a strategy consulting unit called the Thunderbird Learning Consulting Network, which advises clients on their global business challenges.

Traditional strategy consultancies offer advisory services built on industry knowledge and client-led solutions. This has some upsides because it allows participants to replicate successful business models adopted by other clients. But the traditional model also has some drawbacks because it can force participants to fit a “round” strategy into a “square” organization.

More and more business schools also offer their own version of consulting services to corporations. The academic model normally involves teams of enthusiastic students who generate innovative ideas. The Thunderbird Learning Consulting Network takes the traditional academic model of solely student-led projects a step further.

By melding the talents of a pool of strategy consultants, world-class faculty, MBA students, alumni specialists and the world’s top advisers, the Thunderbird network provides globally integrated advisory services to clients in virtually any market.

The Thunderbird Learning Consulting Network works with organizations looking to grow their business nationally and internationally that need the support of experienced professionals who have done this many times before.

If an organization is challenged with getting its products onto the shelves of a supermarket in India, if it is looking for the right partner across North America, or if it is looking to know what its competitors are up to, the Thunderbird network attempts to shed light on how best to move in the right direction.

The network also helps customers execute their strategy and provides them with the right tools to take on their strategic challenges. These tools range from providing intelligence on the industry playing field — such as competitors, potential partners, market size and pricing — to a defined go-to-market strategy or simulation tools aimed at mapping potential market-development scenarios.

The Thunderbird Learning Consulting Network has been working closely on a wide range of projects with businesses in Arizona such as Fender and P.F. Chang’s to small upstarts. P.F. Chang’s, for example, came to Thunderbird wanting to benchmark its corporate social responsibility strategy with the best in class.

Along with focusing on the protection of a company’s intellectual property rights, the Thunderbird network also teaches clients how to carry on the work once the engagement is over, focusing on knowledge transfer and not just project execution.

In addition, the combination of practical consulting skills and the theoretical thinking and academic research brought by faculty ensures that the network tailors its solutions to the clients’ specific business challenges.

This can be done because the Thunderbird Learning Consulting Network can pull resources from almost anywhere on the planet. Thunderbird has 38,000 alumni scattered around the globe and across most industries.

So if a client needs to know more about solar energy suppliers in Indonesia or Native American business ventures in Colorado, there will almost always be an expert on hand from Thunderbird’s network who can give first-hand insight.

Examples of this broad expertise were plentiful at the 2009 Thunderbird Global Reunion in Macau in November. Alumni from all over the world came together to celebrate their successes and share global business knowledge.

Events such as these lead to new opportunities for the Thunderbird Learning Consulting Network, both in terms of new sales and new methodologies for future projects. So even on an airport runway in Macau, there is a piece of Arizona working to improve the way business is done.


Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010


Students/employees succeed post-recession

New Program At Thunderbird Aims To Help Students And Employees Succeed Post-Recession

Lately, the national and international media have been reporting that the economy is recovering. The chatter is that many of the key indicators (other than unemployment) are starting to predict that we may be just a quarter or two from the “light” at the end of the tunnel.

That light, however, could be snuffed by yet another crisis — a crisis in sustainable leadership. The loss in human potential caused by the high demands and increased stress related to reductions in human resources and development of remaining talent could be catastrophic for businesses.

Sure, many of the cost reductions in companies and organizations have had a positive impact on margins and liquidity, but will this be sustainable? Many executives have shared their doubts about whether the changes and strategies they put in place during this recession will make their organization more capable of reaching their future targets. Even worse, they question their own energy and capacity to continue to try to keep up, let alone get ahead.

This is the crisis at the end of the tunnel. There will be many opportunities that emerge from the post-recession economy. Unfortunately, too many leaders and organizations still will be in survival mode because they are numb, tired, foggy and lack the passion to really capitalize. In short, they won’t have the gas in their tank to use the knowledge they have to bring their business back to the level it should be.

The last year has been a time of less. Less people, less investment in the people remaining, less optimism, less outward focus (on the customers and the opportunities) and less training. Unfortunately, it also has led to a lack of high-performance behaviors. In order to see the light at the end of the tunnel businesses and organizations must change the paradigm to one of MORE. More energy, more passion, more productivity, more preparation, more focus and more design.

The Thunderbird School of Global Management recognizes this missing link in the executive world. This is why it is collaborating with Tignum to incorporate sustainable high performance training into the school’s own work force and educational experiences. The aim is to ensure its employees, graduates and executive education clients not only garner the business and cultural skills needed to run sustainable organizations, but also the personal capacity to maintain their own long-term performance and competitive edge.

Sustainable high performance training was first introduced to Thunderbird’s faculty and staff during a kickoff event on Aug. 18. Later that month, similar presentations were made to new full-time students. Thunderbird now is integrating the program into campus life through follow-up workshops and an on-campus communication campaign. School officials say the goal is to help participants overcome habits that lead to burnout by building a solid foundation that can sustain high performance throughout their careers.

Thunderbird and Tignum also are working to develop a sustainable high performance program for corporate clients who come to the school for executive education.

“Incorporating sustainable personal leadership training with Thunderbird’s No. 1-ranked global business education furthers the school’s mission to produce global leaders who make a lasting impact in the world by creating sustainable value for their companies and communities,” Thunderbird President Ángel Cabrera said in a statement. “In order for individuals to create lasting value, it is imperative they be equipped with strong global business skills combined with a socially responsible and global mindset and the capacity for their own sustainable high performance.”

The fact is, the knowledge, skills and strategies that have gotten businesses to this point will no longer be sufficient to achieve long-term goals in the future if companies do not invest in the sustainability of their people.

Recently there was a special issue of the Harvard Business Review called Leadership in the New World. The name of this issue alone explicitly implies that what we knew in the “old” world won’t work in the future. The habits that you’ve used to be successful in the past won’t be enough to ensure your success in the future.

The New World will require energized, responsive, agile, creative and attentive leaders. It will require that they energize and inspire others so they can meet their customers’ desires and stay two steps ahead of the growing and gainingcompetition. This will require new personal habits to increase their energy, resilience, brain performance and capacity. In the past, too many executives saw these things as a “nice to have,” but now these things are a “strategic must.” Your own personal energy and resilience are your foundation upon which all of your performance is built.

Sustainable high performance is a condition where you are highly motivated, your self-esteem is strong, your excitement to handle challenges is evident and your physical energy is abundant. People perceive you as present,grounded, responsive and focused. You implement sound judgment and innovative solutions, maximizing your impact on your team, company, brand and the world. Sustainable high performance is showing up consistently with your best game on.


Oath

Thunderbird School Of Global Management Continues To Deliver In-Demand Education

Managers consumed with maximizing short-term profits and the value of their stock options have destroyed billions of dollars in shareholder and taxpayer money. A culture of greed lies at the root of this economic meltdown that has seen banks collapse, markets tank and unemployment rates soar.

The aftershocks of this global disaster continue to claim victims, and companies around the world are scrambling to brace themselves for the uncertain times ahead. The survivors will be those who are properly equipped to navigate the economic crisis with strong, ethical leadership, innovative global mindsets and sustainable strategies that will solidify their long-term viability and create lasting value for their organizations and the communities they serve.

With this in mind, the Thunderbird School of Global Management continues to create innovative ways to deliver relevant and in-demand education to companies and executives in a market where the need for continuing education is great, but company resources are slim.

Thunderbird Corporate Learning, the executive education division of the school, already has begun tailoring its programs to help companies and organizations navigate this financial crisis, including a new global leadership certificate program called Leading and Managing in Turbulent Times. This program helps global leaders understand what elements of management have changed during the economic downturn — and what things never change. A 12-week session began in March, and a three-day concentrated version took place in May.

The program, taught by Thunderbird faculty members who have extensive first-hand experience working with global managers, will help students broaden their understanding of global business issues that are transforming the international landscape. The program will arm students with useful decision-making tools for increased job performance, and help them build more effective cross-cultural relationships by giving them insights into how the economic crisis is affecting different cultures, regions and markets.

The program will also take topics such as corporate social responsibility, international marketing, organizational culture and financial management and relate them to the economic crisis.

Another new executive education program will debut June 9. Communicating and Negotiating with a Global Mindset is a three-day course that will help working professionals develop strategies for influencing people from other cultural backgrounds. Participants will learn their own global mindset profile and develop an understanding of their own negotiating preferences. The need for such skills has been amplified in the global economic crisis as companies scramble for competitive advantages.

Helping social sector organizations get through the crisis is another area in which Thunderbird has extended its offerings. The Thunderbird Social Sector Leadership Program conducted in March with the support of a grant from the American Express Foundation, reached out to nonprofit, governmental and nongovernmental organizations such as Habitat for Humanity, the International Rescue Committee and the Grameen Foundation.

The five-day program guided participants on how to develop new leadership skills in these tough economic times with training in leadership, sustainability, strategy, brand management, fundraising and innovation. The program, designed solely for a group of nonprofits, governmental and nongovernmental organizations, is the first executive education program of its kind for Thunderbird, and the school is hoping to use it as a model for similar opportunities in the future.

Keeping in mind that times are tough and resources are tight, Thunderbird has launched a free, interactive Web site and quarterly executive newsletter, which are both designed to help busy global executives navigate this economic crisis. The Thunderbird Knowledge Network is an interactive, multimedia forum that gives executives open access to the expertise and insights of Thunderbird’s faculty, alumni and other corporate executives around the world on the latest, most relevant global business issues and trends, including the global recession. This content is delivered in stories, columns, videos, podcasts and blogs, including my blog on global leadership. Each posting in the Knowledge Network offers an opportunity for reader comments and feedback.

Executives also can tap Thunderbird’s global business knowledge through the school’s new Executive Newsletter, a free electronic newsletter that is distributed quarterly to busy working professionals, including the school’s corporate clients and alumni.

Family-owned businesses share their secrets for success and sanity, 2008

Family-owned businesses share their secrets for success and sanity

All in the Family

Family-owned businesses share their secrets for success and sanity

Family-owned businesses share their secrets for success and sanity, 2008

By Greg and Cori Sexton

At 15, Buddy Stubbs had his first major ride: a 1954, KHK 900cc, two-wheel rocket he proudly roared around the streets of Decatur, Ill. By the early 1960s, Stubbs was on the racing circuit, eventually winning the Daytona 100 in 1963. Stubbs would seek further adventure over the next several decades doing motorcycle stunts in Hollywood.

Still, perhaps his biggest gamble was opening the first Harley-Davidson dealership in the Valley in 1966. Today, Stubbs owns and operates Buddy Stubbs Arizona Harley-Davidson with his two sons, Frank and Jack. For the Stubbs clan, working together with family has been a natural evolution over the years. And surprisingly, the Stubbs family, like

numerous other Arizona businesses run by family members, has found the experience extremely rewarding with little disharmony and one with great success.

So, what’s the key?

“We communicate with each other constantly, not only about business matters, but also personal matters,” Buddy says. “Occasionally business matters will create tension, but we are always able to make the best of any scenario. Family comes first and always will.”

Like many family businesses, the Stubbs’ have a definitive breakdown of responsibilities — which helps define the business while creating boundaries and clear areas of expertise. For Jack, the transition into family and business was natural.

“We grew up around motorcycles, spending a considerable amount of time at the dealership when we were young,” he recalls. “Since we developed the same passion for the business and industry as our father, it only seemed natural to get involved at an early age.”

And when you throw in the cool factor of working with motorcycles, it is a dream job waiting to happen.

“Who wouldn’t want to be involved with such a great brand and company as Harley-Davidson?” Frank asks. “I love working with motorcycles, people and family every day. It’s an exciting, fun and rewarding job. I couldn’t imagine doing anything else. As a child, my father always seemed to enjoy his job and expressed a passion for motorcycles. We were also taught success does not come for free or without hard work.”

A Green Thumb
Passion and hard work are certainly something Andre Lugo can relate to. Lugo owns and operates The Green Goddess, a nursery and outdoor accessories company that has been around since 1977.

Over the years, Andre has worked with his wife, Claudia, among other family members. Like others, Andre cites “trust and confidence” as key factors propelling the family-operated business.

“You know your backsides are covered,” he laughs.

Andre has also pioneered other successful businesses over the years in the Valley. Still, he notes the challenges and differences family members have had over the years have made every step of the way a learning and growing experience.

“It is a great joy to work with your family,” he says. “I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

A Family’s Best Friend
Ed Marshall started E.D. Marshall Jewelers in 1971, and has since built a solid reputation in the Valley’s highly competitive fine gem industry. Today, Marshall runs his business with his wife and brother. The best part of working with family, Marshall says, is the strong relationship he has with family members.

Marshall says besides working with family, another strategic move his business made was buying and renovating its own building, the Scottsdale Road and Shea Boulevard location he’s owned since 1995. Again, family played a major role in that decision and family continues to grow the business.

“We all get along well, we understand each other and know the needs of the company,” Marshall says. “Of course, trust is a big thing in any business and it’s good to know that your family won’t stab you in the back.”
Life is Like …

James B. Cerreta gets to work every day with his family at the Cerreta Candy Company in much the same way his father did decades ago, growing the business and passing it along to future generations of the clan.

“It’s like a family picnic at the park every day,” laughs Cerreta, who works with his father, James. J. Cerreta, his sister, Jennifer, and his three brothers, Joe, Jerry and Jonathan. “We enjoy each other and we have for all these years. Of course, there are little things that pop up, but because we love each other and the business, we make it work.”

Much like the Cerreta’s story, which began in Ohio in the 1930s with James’ grandfather, Ben Heggy, making chocolate, a family-owned business starts as a dream — an alluring entrepreneurial concept or idea percolating in some form or another. In Arizona, there are thousands of family-owned businesses toiling away each and every day — at the office and at the home and, sometimes, both.

Cover-July 2008

Ernesto Poza, professor of Global Family Enterprise at the Thunderbird School of Global Management, has worked with family-owned enterprises for more than 30 years. He says families often start businesses with the underlying idea of growing a successful company and passing it down from generation to generation. The first generation, the foundation, is usually easy.

“When the kids join is when it gets complicated,” notes Poza, adding that functions are often assigned (i.e., sales, marketing, business development) to certain sons and daughters tackling certain aspects of the company.

Difficulties often ensue during transition periods, when children might want to change the original focus of the co

mpany, or when a parent has to face the fact that perhaps the designated heir may not be up the challenge of running the family business.

AZ Business Magazine July 2008 |