Tag Archives: Tibor Nagy

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7 Ogletree Deakins attorneys earn honor

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. (Ogletree Deakins), one of the largest labor and employment law firms representing management, announced today that seven attorneys from the firm’s Arizona offices were selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America© 2015. The 2015 list was compiled based on an exhaustive peer-review survey that included more than 5.5 million detailed evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers.

The Arizona-based Ogletree Deakins attorneys appearing on the 2015 Best Lawyers in America© list include:

• Joseph T. Clees (Employment Law – Management, Labor Law – Management)
• L. Eric Dowell (Employment Law – Management, Labor Law – Management, Litigation – Labor and Employment)
• Leah S. Freed (Litigation – Labor and Employment)
• Mark G. Kisicki (Employment Law – Management, Labor Law – Management, Litigation – Labor and Employment)
• James K. Mackie (Employment Law – Management, Litigation – Labor and Employment)
• Tracy A. Miller (Employment Law – Management, Labor Law – Management, Litigation – Labor and Employment)
• Tibor Nagy, Jr. (Employment Law – Management, Labor Law – Management, Litigation – Labor and Employment)

Best Lawyers® has also named Kisicki as the 2015 Labor Law – Management “Lawyer of the Year” in Phoenix, and Nagy as the 2015 Litigation – Labor and Employment “Lawyer of the Year” in Tucson. The publication awards this honor to a single lawyer in each practice area and designated metropolitan area.

Firm-wide, 184 Ogletree Deakins attorneys were named to the Best Lawyers© list. Many earned recognition in multiple categories—144 were named under the Employment Law – Management category; 104 were named under the Labor Law – Management category; and 105 were named under the Litigation – Labor and Employment category.

iPhone Business Apps

‘Bring Your Own Device’ trend a growing concern

The rise in popularity of smart phones, tablets and laptops has blurred the increasingly thin line between professional and personal life, between work time and personal time. But it’s is also creating security concerns for business owners who let their employees use those tech toys for work.

“Employers need to address the question of how to react to the inevitable or current use of personal or shared devices by their employees,” said Cheri Vandergrift, a staff attorney for Mountain States Employers Council, a leader in human resource and employment law services for the business community. “From IT issues to privacy and litigation concerns, companies that ignore the rising ‘Bring Your Own Device’ tide may find that BYOD brought nothing but disaster.”

While an AccelOps Cloud Security Survey of IT security personnel ranked BYOD as the top source for fear of incurring data loss, there are also concerns regarding employee privacy should litigation ensue and the question of using personal devices goes into the courtroom. The use of personal devices in the workplace stirs questions within the IT, legal and human resources departments of companies.

“Data access and ownership are significant legal issues that surround the BYOD trend,” said John Balitis, director at Fennemore Craig. “Employees accessing employer systems with personal devices can create major network security risks and employer IT staff accessing the devices to support them can infringe on employee privacy. Further, how to define who owns what information on the devices is challenging.”

Laurent Badoux, a shareholder in Greenberg Traurig’s Phoenix office, said there are a number of legal issues that could arise from the BYOD trend. Among them:

* Breach of confidentiality — especially with medical or financial data.
* Commercial espionage or unfair competition.
* Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) claims of unreported or unpaid time.
* Dispute as to ownership of data stored on personal devices.
* Claims of harassment, defamation, invasion of privacy, etc. from improper social media posting of workplace conduct.
* Negligence torts if an exployee tries to answer a work text or email while driving and causes an accident.

“The most glaring risk (an employer takes) is that sensitive confidential corporate data becomes compromised, either because an outsider is able to access that data through an employee’s device or to copy data stored on that device,” Badoux said. “When their sensitive data becomes compromised, companies face damage to the bottom lines and public image.”

According to Travis Williams, senior counsel at the Frutkin Law Firm, if a company believes information is jeopardized, or upon termination of an employee’s employment, the employer may have the right to seize the device for a short time to ensure proper protection or removal of company’s sensitive information.

“Employees need to understand that business information on their device is the property of the employer,” Williams said. “The employer has the right to protect the information. The protection may allow the employer to seize or force ‘wipe’ the device to ensure proper removal of the information.”

While there is no doubt that the BYOD trend has given tech-savvy employees the opportunity to create a more flexible schedule and therefore increase their productivity, experts said it’s imperative that companies find a balance between protecting sensitive work data, while still providing employees flexibility and independence.

“Have a policy that specifically addresses what employees can and cannot do with PEDs (personal electronic devices) used for work-related purposes and enforce that policy,” said Tibor Nagy, Jr., a shareholder at the Tucson office of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart. “Be sure the policy addresses what happens to employer data when the employee leaves employment.”

Experts said companies who worry about issues related to the BYOD trend should look to impose tighter security constraints, develop technology guidelines and policies or employ mobile-device management tools, services and systems.

“An employer absolutely should implement a BYOD policy if the employer allows or encourages employees to use personal devices for work,” Balitis said.

Badoux said an effective BYOD program should include:

1. Mandatory Mobile Device Management software
2. Clarification of expectations on ownership of data, privacy and access to dual-use devices.
3. “Acceptable Use” procedures harmonized with the employee handbook or agreement).
4. A well-crafted social media policy.

“Do not allow highly sensitive employer, personnel, health information, or customer data to be stored on an employee’s PED, unless you are certain that device will be used and protected to the same degree as an employer-owned device,” Nagy said. “Only allow PEDs that are ‘enterprise; enabled. Enterprise requirements include encryption of storage media; the ability to remotely wipe or clean a device; the ability to enforce password changes and password complexity; the ability to apply upgrades and patches; and the ability to revoke rights to data or corporate network access.”

Joe Clees, Tibor Nagy, Jr., and Mark Kisicki

Ogletree Deakins Attorneys Ranked in Chambers USA

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. (Ogletree Deakins), one of the largest labor and employment law firms representing management, announced that Joe Clees and Mark Kisicki, from the firm’s Phoenix office, and Tibor Nagy, Jr., from the firm’s Tucson office, have been included in the 2013 edition of Chambers USA, an annual ranking of law firms and lawyers comprising an extensive range of practice areas. Ogletree Deakins’ Arizona offices also earned a Band 1 ranking, the highest possible, in the Labor & Employment practice area. This is the fifth consecutive year that the Arizona offices have earned a Band 1 ranking. In total, the firm’s offices in 19 states and the District of Columbia along with 72 of the firm’s attorneys have been included in the 2013 edition.

Chambers USA is widely used by firms and businesses for referral purposes and many utilize the rankings and profiles of firms to find appropriate legal counsel. Firms and individuals are ranked in bands and the rankings are developed through research and thousands of in-depth interviews with clients and peers in order to assess their reputations and knowledge across the United States. The guide reflects a law firm’s high level of performance in key areas including technical legal ability, professional conduct, client service, commercial astuteness, diligence, commitment, and other various qualities stated as most valued by the client.

law

2013 Top Lawyers list: Employment and labor

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Adrian L. Barton
Sacks Tierney P.A.
480-425-2629
www.sackstierney.com
Barton has several labor-related publications, including “Employee Voting Rights: Arizona Employer Obligations,” “Social Networking and the Workplace,” and “Reducing the Risk of Wrongful Termination.”

James L. Blair
Renaud Cook Drury Mesaros, PA
602-256-3020
www.rcdmlaw.com
Blair is his firm’s chair of the Employment Law and Litigation Practice Group and was a contributor to the “Compendium of Significant Employment-Related Case Law and Statutes,” ALFA International, from 2003-2009.

Joseph T. Clees
Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.
602-778-3700
www.ogletreedeakins.com
Clees represents employers throughout the United States in discrimination and wrongful discharge cases and labor relations.

Scott Gibson
Davis Miles McGuire Gardner, PLL480-344-0918
www.davismiles.com
Over the years, Gibson has developed a reputation for his uncanny ability to quickly discern the most important issues in a case and to focus on ways to resolve rather than to expand litigation.

Donald Peder Johnsen
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8437
www.gknet.com
Johnsen practices exclusively in the area of employment and labor law and has been listed in “The Best Lawyers in America” from 2007-2013.

Pamela L. Kingsley
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-255-6015
www.tblaw.com
Kingsley’s counseling and advice often includes drafting and analyzing agreements for employment and severance, confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation; policies for sexual harassment and oppressive or violent conduct, drug testing, safety, absences, and disabilities.

Michael D. Moberly
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
602-440-4821
www.rcalaw.com
Moberly is an elected Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers, a national organization established to recognize those attorneys who have distinguished themselves as leaders in the fields of labor and employment law.

Tibor Nagy, Jr.
Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.
520-575-7442
www.ogletreedeakins.com
Nagy represents employers in all facets of labor and employment relations law, including discrimination and wrongful discharge cases, wage and hour law, employment contracts and manuals, and labor-management relations.

Stephanie Quincy
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5230
www.steptoe.com
Quincy maintains a regular case load of employment litigation matters. Cases include civil rights (race, age, religion, gender and disability), wrongful termination, sexual harassment, defamation, and breach of contract claims.

Deanna Rader
Gordon Rees
602-794-2460
www.gordonrees.com
Rader has extensive experience advising public employers on constitutional matters, personnel issues, student rights, conflicts of interest, open meeting law, due process under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and public records issues.

Lawrence J. Rosenfeld
Squire Sanders
602-528-4886
www.squiresanders.com
Rosenfeld has more than 35 years of experience in the area of employment law and is a fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers.

Debora Verdier
Sanders & Parks, P.C.
602-532-5760
www.sandersandparks.com
Verdier counsels companies with an eye toward preventing disputes and providing pre-litigation solutions and has experience in defending employers against EEOC charges and in litigating employment disputes.