Tag Archives: Tim Prouty

Best of the Best Awards 2011, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Best of the Best Awards 2011: Real Estate Commercial

Winner: CB Richard Ellis

CBRE, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 CB Richard Ellis has been serving clients in Arizona since 1952, growing to become a dominant player in the commercial real estate market. From landlord and tenant leasing to the acquisition and sale of all property types, the company has earned a reputation as a respected leader in the business community with its vast market knowledge and enduring culture of client service. CBRE believes that the truest measure of its success comes from providing superior service to its clients — delivered by knowledgeable, creative and tenured employees, many boasting more than 20 years in the marketplace. It is this dedication to teamwork and commitment to excellence that makes it possible to serve the diverse needs of clients.
Year Est: 1952  Brokers: 101
Principal(s):
Craig Henig (Arizona/Phoenix),
Tim Prouty (Tucson)
CBRE logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 2415 E. Camelback Rd.
Phoenix, AZ 85016
602-735-5555
www.cbre.com/phoenix



Finalist: Ryan Companies US Inc.

Ryan Companies US, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Ryan Companies US Inc. is a 73-year-old family-owned business whose reputation for building high-quality projects and positive customer experiences has earned it repeat business with customers, subcontractors and business partners. Since opening its Southwest regional office in Phoenix in 1994, Ryan has developed and constructed more than 16 million square feet of office, retail and industrial space in Arizona. Its 80 employees are committed to exceeding expectations of customers that include UniSource Energy (Tucson Gas & Electric), W.L. Gore and Associates, The Musical Instrument Museum, Target, Avnet, AT&T, Humana, US Bank, ConocoPhillips, Taser International and more.


Year Est: 1994
Principal(s): J. Strittmatter, T. Holzer, M. Ryan Carson, C. Carefoot, A. Riley, M. McGowne, S. Jordan

Ryan logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

3900 E. Camelback Rd., #100
Phoenix, AZ 85018
602-322-6100 www.ryancompanies.com



Finalist: Adolfson & Peterson Construction

Adolphson & Peterson Construction, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 Over the past 20 years, Adolfson & Peterson Construction (A&P) has been committed to building sustainable projects throughout the Southwest. A&P is an industry leader in delivering Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified projects and high performance green buildings. Going beyond green building, A&P takes into account the purpose of the projects it undertakes, the communities impacted by its operations and A&P’s own business practices. Sustainable is much more than building green. It defines A&P’s business practices with a LEED Gold office, hybrid vehicles in the fleet, in-house carbon reduction programs, and job-site recycling on all of its projects.
Year Est: 1946
AZ Staff: 66
Principal(s): Bryan Dunn, SVP
Adolfson Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 5002 S. Ash Ave.,
Tempe, AZ 85282
480-345-8700
www.a-p.com


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

2010 Best of the Best Awards

2010 BOB Awards: Real Estate Commercial

The following companies won the Gold, Silver and Bronze rankings in the Real Estate Commercial category of the 2010 BOB Awards.

2010 Best Of The Best Awards: Real Estate Commercial


2010 Best of the Best AwardsCB Richard Ellis
Brokerage Firms: 25 Brokers or more

Year Est.: 1952
Brokers: 104
Principal(s): Craig Henig (Arizona/Phoenix), Tim Prouty (Arizona/Tucson)
cbre.com/phoenix

2010 BOB AwardsReliability and value: a combination Arizona businesses and consumers have come to depend on from Verizon Wireless. We offer the value of Friends & Family, plus a Mobile to Mobile calling community of more than 80 million — all backed by the nation’s largest and most reliable wireless voice and 3G network. Since 2000, we have invested more than $755 million in our wireless network in Arizona and more than $50 billion nationally. This means customers can make more calls, send e-mails, text and picture messages, plus enjoy expanded wireless access to the Web.


2010 Best of the Best AwardsSmithGroup

Architectural Firms: 11 Architects or more

2010 BOB AwardsYear Est.: 1973
Lic. Architects: 35
Principal(s): Michael Medici, Bob Colletta, Mark Kranz, Mark Roddy, Brad Woodman, Mark Patterson, Eddie Garcia, Eric Kirkland, Mark Adams, Kristy Kevitt
smithgroup.com

2010 BOB AwardsMcCarthy Building Companies

Contractors: General 100 Staff or more

2010 BOB AwardsYear Est.: 1977
AZ Staff: 218
Principal(s): Bo Calpert, Deniss Tucker
mccarthy.com

2010 Best of the Best Hall of Fame

 

CBRE, AZ Business Magazine Oct/Nov 2006

CBRE’s Top Arizona Executives Describe The Company’s 100-Year Legacy

Looking Ahead

CBRE’s top Arizona executives describe the company’s 100-year legacy and their vision for the future.

By Melanie Winderlich

Pete Bolton, senior managing director-Phoenix, seven and a half years at CBRE
A marathon, not a sprint: The key to CBRE’s sustainability is flexibility, awareness of market conditions and selection of excellent people (including staff, brokers, management)—we have been able to do this work for 100 years. Nearly 20 years ago, the company decided to do commercial real estate exclusively and walked away from the residential side. They understood market conditions and could plan for the future of the market.

Looking AheadAlso, risk taking has been extremely effective here. Some competitors scoffed at some of the major risks we’ve taken and swore those risks would bury us. But we’ve always made strong, calculated risks. For example, Sears, Roebuck and Co. acquired 100 percent of Coldwell Banker commercial and residential in the early 1980s. However, in 1989, the employees invested their own money, and with others, acquired the company’s operations to form CB Commercial. The men and women who worked here invested hundreds of millions of dollars to buy the commercial side away from Sears. That was the launch, a very risky move, which could have been very tough if the market would have experienced a downturn.

Industry progression: In our business, if things aren’t changing, then things aren’t happening. We had a challenging, tough time from the beginning of 2001 toward the middle of 2004 because there was so much uncertainty and nobody was doing anything. Today, in Arizona we’re seeing far more than our share of expansions, which is extremely important for this state. Many companies are either completely relocating to Arizona or expanding by adding a regional hub in the Valley. Phoenix has proven in the last 15 years, to the national marketplace, that we’re a player, not a ‘boom or bust’ economy. It’s consistency from various sources—from the governor’s office to everyday people on the street—that generates interest about developing here.

I hope there can be more openness, from the community, in regards to change. I’ve been in the Valley for more than 52 years and seen so many people move here and give back to the community. What I see a lot of is newcomers (all types) pushing back against change and growth. Any kind of big project is always a battle with the neighborhoods. The change can be good, but they just vehemently resist. Our community needs to become more open to change, more open to density, more open to becoming the city we are destined to become. Luckily we have a very business-friendly government and a governor that listens to the business community and respects our concerns.

Greg Coxon, left, senior managing director-Phoenix and Pete Bolton, senior managing director-Phoenix

 

Greg Coxon & Peter Bolton

 

Tim Prouty, managing director—Tucson, six years with CBRE

Tim Prouty

 

The 100-year legacy: CBRE is all about the client. We want to reduce our clients’ risk. These transactions can be massive, one bad decision can ruin a career, so you better be giving good advice and data. That’s our prime legacy, we’re very sure about the information we’re providing.

Vision quest: CBRE would like to continue to be the place to work. If you have happy people internally and continue to educate them, then your company continues to grow and benefits clients. We’re the only commercial brokerage company I know of that has its own university. About 40 minutes outside of Chicago, our teaching facility educates employees at all different levels. The intensive CBRE curriculum and professional coaches are all geared to create the strongest, most intelligent group to represent the company. CB Richard Ellis is the biggest, most profitable commercial real estate services company in the world, earning about $3 billion worldwide. Our closest competitor pulls in about $780 million. We would like to continue that tradition.

On-the-job satisfaction: I work at CBRE because it’s fun. When you think about it, we spend more time at work than with our families. I work about 10 to 12 hours a day—I get home at 7:30 p.m., spend a couple hours with my kids then go to bed. When you spend 40 to 60 hours a week with the same group of people, you want to be with people you enjoy. Not only is CBRE the No. 1 commercial real estate company in Arizona, the country and the world (by revenue), but our people are wonderfully intelligent, creative and fun. We truly make a difference because of the advice we give. This is a great place for me to apply my trade.

Greg Coxon, senior managing director-Phoenix, 19 years with CBRE
In it for the long haul: The biggest reason CBRE is still around today is our people. We’re blessed to have high caliber people working here. They are unbelievably motivated to execute our business goals. The other part of that secret is our ability to retain these people. CBRE is a great company— the No. 1 company by any comparative standard, that fact coupled with our awesome people who offer expertise and longevity, is a fabulous recipe for success.

A star is born: From an organizational standpoint, we’ve been lucky and had incredibly talented people sitting at the leadership chair of this company. These leaders have been unbelievable with growing this company. Each owner, CEO, manager, and so on has taken this organization to a different level. And this fact has allowed the next CEO or director to grab onto that success and take it to the next level—success begets success. It’s almost incumbent on the incoming leaders to take their role and responsibility to that level of quality. I expect CBRE to get bigger and better as we look forward to the future.

What the community should know: The one thing I would like the community to know about CBRE is how giving we are. Our employees are involved in countless organizations—we have people who sit on boards, volunteer with charities, work with nonprofits. We give money and time to our community. For example, CBRE has held a charity golf tournament every year for the past eight years and over time, has raised nearly $750,000 for several charities. ChildHelp is the biggest benefactor of this event, but it is one of many things we do. I would like people to know about how our people join together when they see a need for their involvement and what they are prepared to do in time of crisis. It’s unbelievable.

Vision quest: We would like to continue to be bigger—growing by employees, geography and revenue. One of our corporate initiatives, at the highest level, is to be the No. 1 provider of commercial real estate services in the world. We can do that by hiring professional, knowledgeable people. We’re looking into other areas that are related to our industry. We’ve started an equipment and asset financing business within CBRE | Melody. A few years ago, we created a team of real estate professionals focused on the acquisition and disposition of mining properties, especially appropriate in Arizona—few people think about mining operations or equipment that are very beneficial to specific clients. We’re continually spawning other niche service lines because CBRE is very entrepreneurial at its roots.

The need for CBRE: Commercial real estate is a fragmented business; there is not another dominant company that provides real estate services across the world. As we go into a global economy, every country has different laws and regulations regarding real estate. The United States’ real estate practices are some of the most advanced in the industry. Given such a good foundation, in terms of ownership and standards, CBRE applies these standards to every market in the world. One of our top attributes is that we have our best practices implemented everywhere in the world, which is good for the client who might not understand the real estate regulations in Japan or Russia, but must have a presence there.

There is not any one company that has the vast majority of the marketplace. We apply our standards to a very vast area of geography—an important fact if you have someone who cannot navigate laws specific to certain areas around the world. We are an economic development engine on a global scale.

A look into the next 100 years: The next 100 years will be better than the last 100 years. We’ve always made the future better than what was in the past. We’re making major advancements. We won’t give up things we value most—our high ethical standards, client needs, giving employees latitude to achieve the level of success they desire—we will meet these successes as a call of duty.

Tim Prouty, managing director—Tucson, six years with CBRE
Benefiting Arizona: CBRE’s 100-year presence all boils down to the people who we’ve been able to attract to the platform. If you get people who want to make things happen, then things will happen. When each individual person contributes, their work creates a huge contribution statewide.

In Tucson, CBRE orchestrated the sale of the IBM plant to the University of Arizona, which then led to the development of the University of Arizona Science Park. This project, which sold for nearly $100 million, created huge employment numbers and added another avenue of research for the school and the state—that’s a pretty significant contribution

AZ Business Magazine October November 2006Changes through the years: Corporate real estate, over time, has continued to focus on outsourcing to real estate service providers, which means more services for us to be ready to provide (from the occupier side). From the investor side, the world is awash with investment capital so we must find appropriate spots to invest that capital. Vision quest: I see continued growth in our company, to serve our clients, in CBRE’s future. We strive to help our clients as one, integrated Arizona company with a consistent level of service in the state. Also, the opportunity to go in fields of different business and serve new clients. For example, clients have changing needs as it relates to finance, construction, facility management. Anything that has to do with real estate, our company wants to be a part of that.

Where work and play merge: I work at CBRE because it’s fun. It’s a great company with a state-of-the-art platform, working on the leading edge of the commercial real estate industry. This business is a blast and it’s always changing—the challenge is never the same. Every client, every building, every concern is unique. The real estate business runs through everybody’s life; every business has a real estate component and I get to interact with almost every industry out there.

 

 

Arizona Business Magazine Oct/Nov 2006