Tag Archives: tohono oodham nation

AIGA's Spicer Was Featured Speaker in London

Valerie Spicer, Executive Director Arizona Indian Gaming Association (AIGA), was a featured panelist at ICE Totally Gaming seminar, “Opportunities in Indian Country” on Wednesday, February 5, 2014, in London, UK.  The seminar is co-produced by ICE Totally Gaming and Victor Rocha of PECHANGA.net in cooperation with Clarion Gaming’s Ewa Bakun.  Spicer is featured on the panel “Tribal Perspectives on internet gaming and overview of the tribal iGaming ventures.”

“I’m very fortunate that Valerie is able to join me at the ICE Totally Gaming conference in London as a panelist for the Opportunities in Indian Country:  Tribal Gaming Seminars,” said Victor Rocha.  “Val brings an extraordinary background in tribal gaming having worked in both the public and private sectors.  She not only has the respect of our industry, she was recently recognized as a Great Woman of Gaming, Proven Leader by Casino Enterprise Management.  I couldn’t ask for a better person to represent Indian Country in Europe.”

ICE Totally Gaming is the biggest gaming exhibition in the world. ICE 8 Conferences provide in-depth opportunities to learn through case studies, interactive discussions and focused networking about the most exciting areas in gaming. The seminars on Opportunities in Indian Country are free to participants at ICE Totally Gaming and designed to educate the European gaming industry about tribal gaming, the opportunities and impacts.

“The European market has conducted internet gaming for many years.  This program is a timely opportunity for us to engage with this market.  We anticipate an excellent exchange of information,” said Valerie Spicer, Executive Director AIGA. “Tribes will get qualified information on internet and social gaming and the potential business opportunities that can result, more importantly we can tell our story to the European market.  Personally I’m looking forward to explaining the difference between commercial and tribal gaming and how the economic impact from tribal gaming ripples through our communities and also positively affects our neighboring communities.”

The Arizona Indian Gaming Association has a membership of 17 tribes representing more than 90% of the Indian people living on reservations in Arizona. AIGA was established November 21, 1994 by Arizona tribal leaders.  The Association is committed to advancing the lives of Indian peoples – economically, socially and politically – so that Indian tribes in Arizona can achieve their goal of self-reliance.  Current membership includes:  Ak-Chin Indian Community, Cocopah Tribe, Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Fort Mojave, Fort Yuma-Quechan Tribe, Gila River Indian Community, Havasupai  Tribe, Hualapai Tribe, Kaibab-Paiute Tribe, Navajo Nation, Pascua Yaqui Tribe,  Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, San Carlos Apache Tribe, Tohono O’odham Nation,  White Mountain Apache Tribe, and the Zuni Tribe.

For more information about ICE, visit http://www.icetotallygaming.com/opportunities-indian-country or ICE Totally Gaming: http://www.icetotallygaming.com/.

casino indian gaming

Indian tribe will appeal Glendale casino ruling

An Indian tribe in Arizona has told a judge it intends to appeal his decision that concluded another Indian tribe’s plan to build a casino on the edge of Glendale was legal.

The Gila River Indian Community is appealing U.S. District Judge David Campbell’s May 7 ruling in which he said the Tohono O’odham Nation’s plan to build the casino was legal because the state’s voter-approved gambling compacts didn’t contain language prohibiting new casino construction.

The state of Arizona, Gila River Indian Community, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community sued the Tohono O’odham Nation to stop the casino.

They said it violates zoning and state laws and would disrupt residential neighborhoods.

The Tohono O’odham Nation unveiled its plans for the massive resort and casino in 2009.

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Tribe Scores Legals Win In Bid To Build Casino In Glendale

An Arizona tribe with plans to build a casino and resort on property it purchased near Glendale scored a key victory Tuesday when a federal appeals court ruled that the U.S. Department of Interior rightfully awarded reservation status to a section of the land.

The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals issued a split decision rejecting arguments by the city of Glendale that the property is ineligible for such status because it falls within its corporate limits. The property is an unincorporated island of Maricopa County and bordered on three sides by Glendale.

Tohono O’odham Nation Chairman Ned Norris Jr. characterized the lawsuit that challenged the U.S. Department of the Interior’s decision to award reservation status in 2010 as another delaying tactic.

“Just as courts and federal agencies have done eight straight times before, the 9th Circuit weighed the arguments and then ruled in the nation’s favor,” he said in a statement. “The court reaffirmed today that when the federal government makes a commitment to Native peoples, it will stand by those commitments.”

At issue was whether federal law permitted the tribe to convert the property it quietly purchased in 2003 into an Indian reservation, which would strip authority from state and local officials who argued the casino project clashes with zoning and state laws.

Federal law generally bars gambling on reservations created after 1988, but there are a few exceptions.

The tribe purchased the property with congressionally allocated money it was given after a federal government dam caused extensive flooding of its original reservation.

Glendale, the state of Arizona and another tribe had sued to overturn the DOI decision. A spokeswoman for the city and for the state Attorney General’s Office did not immediately respond to requests for comment Tuesday.

About 30,000 people live within two miles of where the casino is to be erected.

The tribe still faces other legal and regulatory challenges in building a casino. Opponents, including other tribes, contend the Tohono O’odham Nation went “reservation shopping” with the government’s money and shouldn’t be allowed to turn just any piece of property it purchases into a reservation and then a casino the size of the Venetian Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas.

casino indian gaming

Appeals Court Hears Tribe’s Glendale Casino Project

A federal appeals court on Monday has taken up an Arizona Indian tribe’s complicated legal fight to build a massive casino and resort near a Glendale neighborhood, on property the tribe owns 160 miles from the headquarters of its sprawling reservation.

The three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco gave no hint of how or when it would rule after sharply questioning lawyers on both sides for nearly an hour.

At issue is whether federal law permits the Tohono O’odham Nation to convert property it quietly purchased in 2003 into an Indian reservation, which would strip authority from state and local officials who argue the casino project clashes with zoning and state laws.

A high school is located a few blocks from where the casino is to be erected, which is about a mile from a retail and entertainment district where Phoenix’s professional football and hockey teams play their home games. About 30,000 people live within two miles.

The suburban property is in an unincorporated island of Maricopa County and bordered on three sides by the city of Glendale, which is adjacent to Phoenix.

Local and state officials argue that the proposed 150,000-square-foot casino will require them to beef up fire, police and other civic requirements in an area not equipped to accommodate a Las Vegas-style resort.

The tribe says it bought the property with congressionally allocated money it was given after a federal government dam caused extensive flooding of the original reservation.

The Department of the Interior declared the Glendale property a reservation in 2010.

The tribe had received $30 million to replace nearly 10,000 acres of ancestral reservation land damaged by the dam. The tribe says the 135 acres purchased within the city limits of Glendale in 2003 is part of that replacement program, and the project is located about 60 miles from the damaged land.

Glendale, the state of Arizona and another tribe filed a lawsuit to overturn the Department of the Interior decision. Several other tribes submitted so-called friend-of-the-court briefs opposing the casino. A judge last year sided with the Tohono O’odham Nation, which is represented by former U.S. Solicitor General Seth Waxman.

“This is an acre-for-acre replacement that was an Indian reservation even before Arizona was a state,” Waxman argued to the three-judge panel Monday. He said Interior Secretary Ken Salazar correctly deemed the land a reservation.

Lawyers for Glendale and tribes opposing the project argued that the Tohono O’odham Nation went “reservation shopping” with the government’s money and shouldn’t be allowed to turn just any piece of property it purchases into a reservation and then a sprawling casino the size of the Venetian Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas.

Arizona Solicitor General Dave Cole said allowing the tribe to build a casino within Glendale but denying city, county and state officials any authority over the project makes the concept of local control “nothing more than an illusion.”

Federal law generally bars gambling on reservations created after 1988, but there are a few exceptions.

For more information on the Tohono O’odham Nation and this issue, visit www.tonation-nsn.gov.