Tag Archives: toyota prius

cab

Local Cab Company Enhances Sustainable Brand

After four years of successfully tackling the streets of metropolitan Phoenix, Clean Air Cab is enhancing the look of its Hybrid fleet. Given a more sustainable design, the new cabs are officially on the road this fall.

The local family owned and operated business, which specializes in eco-friendly transportation, is excited to announce its rebranding, which will reinforce its commitment to creating a sustainable community. Clean Air Cab has worked hard to enhance its local partnerships and more importantly, improve passenger experiences.

After allowing the local community to vote on a new design concept, there patrons have picked the new look for its Hybrid fleet that will continue to make a positive statement on Valley roadways. All of Clean Air Cab’s vehicles including its well-known charity cabs will get the rebrand makeover this fall.

Clean Air Cab launched in October 2009 with only 10 Toyota Prius cabs and over the past four years, they have continued to grow in response to the popular demand.

“We are humbled by the acceptance of our community to embrace what I believe to be a superior product,” said Clean Air Cab Founder Steve Lopez. “Clean Air Cab is in position to consistently grow and we plan to with this new design that will take us to a whole new level.”

The newly designed cabs will also have a signature scent in each of the vehicles that will make the ride more inviting to its passengers. Other elements of Clean Air Cab’s recent rebranding include a new website, updates to social media and a “Happy Ride Guarantee.”

Ken Crocker, who has been with Clean Air Cab for over three years and was the first to drive the newly designed hybrid, said he has received nothing but positive feedback about the new cab features. “My passengers find our new signature scent a fun element to their experience, and they like the new upgrades and color of the cab as well,” said Crocker.

Green Marketing

Adding A Splash Of Green To Your Marketing Campaign Can Help You Hit The Right Target Market

What makes marketing a green product or service different from any other type of marketing campaign? In some ways, nothing; in other ways, green marketing can be a different animal. In addition to selling a product or service, green marketing seeks to change the way the buyer thinks about the product or service, encouraging a change in behavior.

Everything from building products and services to automobiles to apparel are now going green. As a result, marketing managers are now faced with the challenge of not just getting target markets to want their product, but also helping them to see value in changing their behavior. But how do you create a marketing campaign that will compel the public to change its view?

Tips to influence change

Don’t just tell how your product is better for me — show me.

It’s not enough to tell your audience your product conserves water or reduces energy. You have to visually demonstrate how it benefits the user. The green company PeopleTowels does a great job of showing its environmental benefits with an image of eight industrial-sized garbage bags filled with paper towels representing the average amount of paper towels a person uses each year. The visual effectively denounces excessive paper towel use and promotes the company’s brand of eco-friendly, on-the-go cloth towels.

Make benefits tangible

We’re asking people to voluntarily change their behavior for the greater good. Make the benefits of doing so too obscure and you’ve lost them. Consider the popularity of the Toyota Prius. In 2010, this hybrid car landed a spot on Forbes’ list of “high in demand” cars. So what is the tangible benefit to driving this eco-friendly cruiser? The annual cost of gas is only $846, which is especially low compared to other cars on the list that ranged from $1,510 to $4,745 annually.

Keep it positive.

Don’t tell your audience what they are currently doing wrong by using other products; show them what they can do to make an impact. People are less likely to listen to your message if you are scolding them. Make the message motivate your target market to do the right thing.

Make it relevant.

Create an emotional connection with your audience that communicates the importance of using your product or service. That communication can take several forms. The company Grass Roots Environmental Products does this by offering products for children and moms alongside other green products to express their interest in child-safety. This allows them to connect with their customers on a deeper level.

The key to a successful green marketing campaign is to appeal to the target audience through messaging that encourages them to take action. Developing a buzz can be an effective tool for influencing others. Building a sense of community — we are all in this together — and showing how your product or service can help, not only provides a reason for change, but the desire to be a part of that change.

Chevy Volt electric car, GM

GM Electrifies Drivers With The Chevrolet Volt

General Motors announced today that its newest vehicle, the rechargeable electric Chevrolet Volt, should get 230 miles per gallon in city driving. Highway mileage estimates have not yet been released.

Although the claims must first be verified by the Environmental Protection Agency, if they are true, they would beat out the current model of green driving, the Toyota Prius.

GM is marketing the Volt as an extended-range electric vehicle (E-REV). Unlike a traditional electric car, where a small electric motor powers the car when it’s moving slowly and the gasoline motor kicks in when the car accelerates, the Volt is a bit different. The Volt’s power comes from a high-voltage battery pack made from lithium-ion technology that is capable of storing enough energy to drive the car up to 40 miles in normal conditions. What to do when your battery is low? Simply plug it in just like you would any other appliance. A full charge takes three or six hours through a 110 or 220-volt wall outlet.

In addition, the Volt will still have a small internal combustion engine to produce electricity when the stored power is low, providing the driver with a total range of 300 miles. Think of this as a generator that kicks in, in the event you drive more than 40 miles. Some areas of the car are still being tested and refined, but the Volt is scheduled for release in late 2010.

The first-generation Volt is expected to cost almost $40,000, but hopefully the price will drop with future models. Alas, as I’ve said before, sometimes being green costs more from the get-go — but the long-term effects are most definitely worth it!

Consumers are much more conscious about the environment and many want to reflect that through the vehicles they drive. If the Volt can live up to its claims, it will be a great step forward and hopefully other automakers will follow suit.

www.chevrolet.com