Tag Archives: TREO

manufacturing

Quik Tek Assembly Expands into Tucson

Quik Tek Assembly, a minority-owned provider of contract manufacturing services, announced that it has expanded operations to the Tucson region. Quik Assembly Solutions, a division of Quik Tek Assembly, has leased an 8,000 square-foot building at 3450 S. Broadmont, Suite 120, and plans a $700,000 capital investment. The new facility will be open by April 2014.

Quik Tek Assembly, also a Raytheon supplier, provides a wide range of contract manufacturing services including circuit and cable design; PCB layout and manufacture; PCB, cable and mechanical assembly; product testing and the manufacture of complete product ready to ship.

The company plans to hire 50 new positions over the next 5 years. The jobs at the facility will be a mix of engineering, manufacturing, administrative and technician positions. Candidates interested in job opportunities can click here.

Through TREO, the company worked with community partners including the City of Tucson, Pima County One-Stop Career Center, Arizona Commerce Authority and Startup Tucson.

Adan Ortiz, president of Quik Tek Assembly, said: “Southern Arizona is a growing market, and we needed to be close to both existing and new potential customers. Additionally, we look forward to contributing to workforce development by encouraging STEM interest and providing student internships in partnership with The University of Arizona and Pima Community College.”

“Hi-tech manufacturers and suppliers to existing employers are logical fits for the Tucson region,” said Joe Snell, TREO president and CEO. “In addition, Quik Tek is committed to

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TREO Luncheon features university presidents

Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, Inc. (TREO) will feature state university presidents, Dr. Ann Weaver Hart, of the University of Arizona and Dr. Michael M. Crow, of Arizona State University, at its 8th Annual Luncheon on Wednesday, September 25th at the Westin La Paloma Resort in Tucson.

Strong economies are defined by well-paying jobs, held by individuals possessing knowledge and skills that are in demand. Post-secondary education most often provides these skill sets. While US citizens have traditionally been among the best-educated in the world, the nation now ranks 12th in the number of 25- to 34-year olds with college degrees. Businesses often cite the difficulty of finding qualified workers as a barrier to growth. Talent is always the number one factor in site selection decisions.

What is being done in the Sun Corridor to address talent development? Join TREO for a higher education update and a frank discussion on educating the next generation for jobs of today and the future.

When: Wednesday, September 25, 2013
Where: Westin La Paloma Resort, 3800 East Sunrise Drive, Tucson, AZ
Time: 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Luncheon and Presentation
Registration: http://conta.cc/12e195U

 

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Phoenix ranked Top 10 for foreign direct investment

Greater Phoenix was named one of fDi Magazine’s top 10 “American Cities of the Future” for foreign direct investment (FDI) strategy in 2013/14. Greater Phoenix ranked sixth among overall North and South American cities, and second in the United States behind Chicago.

“One of GPEC’s primary objectives has always been an international presence and strong performance in foreign direct investment. The fact that we were ranked second to Chicago – a true world leader in FDI – speaks volumes about our success and how far we’ve come in a relatively short period of time,” said Barry Broome, GPEC President and CEO. “While Chicago is one of America’s most illustrious cities, Greater Phoenix is still developing its brand, giving everyone living and doing business here an incredible opportunity to be a part of its legacy. There’s no question in my mind that being a top international city for business will be one of our marquee features.”

The rankings are part of fDi Magazine’s “Locations of the Future” series, which are designed to identify the most promising destinations around the world for future inward investment. Each world region is assessed over two years.

The Greater Phoenix region has seen particular success this year with the launch of an international toolkit and forum series targeting international business executives. Called “Doing Business in Greater Phoenix, U.S.A,” the toolkit is a compilation of how-to advice ranging from human resources issues, immigration law, investment parameters, taxes, import/export laws and banking.

In addition, GPEC also partnered with the Arizona Commerce Authority, Arizona State University, Green Card Fund and Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, Inc. to form the China-Arizona Alliance, which seeks to establish extensive contacts within the government and Chinese business communities and to promote Arizona as a destination for Chinese investment.

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TREO adds to leadership

The TREO Board of Directors announced the following new leadership additions:

> New Vice Chairman of the Board/Chair-Elect: Guy Gunther, Vice President and General Manager, Tucson and Greater Arizona, CenturyLink. The Vice Chairman serves a key leadership role in partnership with the Chairman of the Board, and serves as Chair-Elect for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year.

New Chairman’s Circle Members:
> Karen D. Mlawsky, CEO, University of Arizona Medical Center
> Sandra Watson, President & CEO, Arizona Commerce Authority

“We’re thrilled to continue adding top business leadership to our ranks,” said Steve Eggen, retired CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems. “We have put together the right critical mass of leaders to accelerate our economic growth.”

As CenturyLink’s Vice President and General Manager, Guy Gunther is responsible for Northern and Southern Arizona markets for voice, data, entertainment and managed services, including P&L, field operations, customer experience, direct and indirect sales channels, network development and community relations. Gunther has over 20 years of senior management experience in telecommunications, consulting firms and finance. “I am honored to become part of the leadership of this effective organization,” said Gunther. “TREO is the connective tissue in the region – promoting our assets and creating value for companies looking to establish or expand operations in Southern Arizona.”

As CEO of the Hospital Division of The University of Arizona Health Network, Karen Mlawsky oversees both The University of Arizona Medical Center – University Campus and The University of Arizona Medical – South Campus, as well as dozens of affiliated clinics and physicians’ offices. She previously served as vice president of oncology services for University Medical Center in Tucson and spent more than 13 years at the Ohio State University Medical Center. “Health care will likely be one of the top job-creating industries, regardless of a slow economic recovery,” said Mlawsky. “There is tremendous opportunity to contribute to our region’s economic development through teaching and training our future health-care workforce.”

Sandra Watson, president and CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA), brings more than 20 years of economic development leadership and experience to Arizona. She and her teams have successfully attracted hundreds of companies that have invested billions of dollars in capital and created more than 65,000 quality jobs. With Governor Brewer’s visionary leadership, and a private sector board of directors made up of some of the state’s most successful CEOs, the ACA has established an aggressive five-year plan and is experiencing strong results in strengthening the state’s overall economy. “Partnering with regional groups such as TREO is critical to our overall success. TREO is central to a larger, collaborative movement in the state,” said Watson. “As a result of our strong, long-standing working relationship, we will continue to attract quality companies creating high-wage jobs in the Tucson region, benefitting the statewide economy.”

TREO Officers include:
> Chairman of the Board – Steve Eggen, (ret.) Chief Financial Officer, Raytheon Missile Systems
> Vice Chairman of the Board/Chair-Elect – Guy Gunther, Vice President and General Manager, Tucson and Greater Arizona, CenturyLink
> Immediate Past Chairman – Paul Bonavia, Chairman and CEO, UNS Energy Corp. & Tucson Electric Power Company
>  Secretary/Treasurer – Lisa Lovallo, Market Vice President, Southern Arizona, Cox Communications

TREO is governed by a 16-member Chairman’s Circle, which serves as a key advisory group for business development strategy and represents the Tucson region to national business prospects, and a 46-member Board of Directors.

TREO continues its Chairman’s Circle/Board of Directors expansion efforts begun in 2010. Economic development is a high priority, demanding increased engagement from the key companies, organizations and people that drive the Southern Arizona economy. TREO leadership recognizes the importance of providing strong thought leadership for community development and strengthening the Tucson “product” and positioning as a business center.

The above new members join other leaders providing both private and public sector perspective in accelerating economic development. For a complete listing of the TREO Chairman’s Circle and Board of Directors, visit http://www.treoaz.org/About-TREO-Board-of-Directors.aspx.

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Aris Integration Establishing HQ, Manufacturing Center in Tucson

Aris Integration announced that it is establishing its corporate headquarters and a manufacturing center in the Tucson region.

The building systems company plans to bring nearly 600 jobs to support its innovative, sustainable building technologies used in residential and commercial construction.

Aris will manufacture a cost-effective, panelized-wall system that integrates light-gauge-steel structural framing, ultra-lightweight foam insulation and vapor-barrier products and processes with other sustainable materials and energy-efficient design.

Aris’s new production process will yield fully customizable commercial and residential structural insulated panels up to 32-feet long, 10-feet tall and up to 12-inches thick, which will be lighter and faster to install.

Changes to panel dimensions, insulation value, interior/exterior coatings, stud spacing, as well as the addition of unique architectural features, such as arches and window/door designs, can be easily modified during the manufacturing process, reducing jobsite construction time and cost.

The same technology will be used in non-thermal wall panels, roof trusses and floor systems, to ensure high performance throughout the entire building.

The company is in the final stages of the decision-making process on a physical location of its new facility. UK-based Fusion Building Systems will be a key partner in the new facility.

Aris plans to begin manufacturing operations in Tucson during fall 2013. The company anticipates hiring nearly 600 skilled workers over the next five years, with 250 over the near term. Positions include executive management, sales & marketing, quality control, HR, and manufacturing, among others. Wage levels will be competitive with the industry.

Experienced construction industry personnel will be needed. The hiring process will be announced via arisintegration.com.

Aris chose Southern Arizona for its experienced pool of construction tradesmen as well as coordinated public/private support. The Tucson area facility will be the company’s second of six planned regional manufacturing locations across the U.S. by 2017.

“We’re pleased to locate our second manufacturing operation and Aris headquarters here in Arizona, where many on our team call home,” said Duane Armijo, CEO and founder of Aris Integration, LLC. “As a Southwest native, I truly believe the fuel for our nation’s housing recovery will stem from the type of next-generation jobs and innovative technologies that we are bringing to our Tucson facility.”

Beyond serving as a significant area employer, Aris will also be a provider of energy-efficient and sustainable building systems to cut energy and construction costs for many state and municipal projects. In addition to manufacturing, the company will also offer design, engineering and construction services for its high performance building systems.

“We’re thrilled to welcome Aris Integration to Southern Arizona. The growth of headquarter and manufacturing facilities contributes to a healthier, stronger overall economy,” said Sandra Watson, President and CEO, Arizona Commerce Authority.

“Additionally, the construction of Aris Integration’s cutting-edge, renewable building materials is an investment in a more sustainable future in Arizona and around the world. We want to thank our partners Pima County and TREO for their strong, collaborative effort in ensuring Aris selected Arizona as its new headquarters location.”

“One of the hallmarks of Pima County’s support of new and existing businesses is its focus on workforce development,” said Sharon Bronson, vice chair, Pima County Board of Supervisors. “Pima County opened the nation’s first workforce center aimed at helping military veterans find jobs in July of this year. The center is ready to assist Aris right away.”

“Aris Integration fits very well with our region’s assets as well as our vision of providing innovative products and services that contribute to important industries,” said Joe Snell, president & CEO, TREO. “I am proud of the unified approach displayed throughout this recruitment process, which included direct involvement from several members of the TREO Chairman’s Circle and Board of Directors.”

 

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Accelr8 Technology relocates to Tucson

After a competitive multi-state process, Accelr8 Technology Corporation
announced that it is moving its headquarters from Denver to Tucson.

Founded in 1982, Accelr8 develops instruments used for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms. Its BACcel rapid diagnostic system, in development, is the first technology that is able to count and identify dangerous pathogens and their drug resistance expression within the same day of obtaining a patient specimen, instead of the two to three days required for standard methods. This speed allows for a significant improvement in the treatment of the over 1.7 million people in the US who contract a hospital acquired infection each year, and access to a multi-billion dollar market.

Accelr8 has selected Tucson as best meeting its needs for future high-growth plans. Accelr8 will bring high-skilled, high-wage jobs to Southern Arizona with plans to fill 65 positions over the next three years and the potential to grow to 200-300 employees in subsequent years. Headquarter positions include engineers, scientists, sales/marketing, management, finance, quality/regulatory and manufacturing. The company will occupy approximately 15,000 square feet of space in Pima County’s Herbert K. Abrams Public Health Center at 3950 S. Country Club Road. After a build out of wet lab space, the company is expected to be operational by early 2013.

“Accelr8 is developing a revolutionary product in the diagnostics area and we were impressed with the region’s emerging bioscience strength, innovation and support that can help ensure our future success,” said Lawrence Mehren, president and CEO, Accelr8 Technology Corporation.

“Accelr8 strengthens the biotechnology excellence our state has been building, while creating high-quality jobs for Arizonans,” said Governor Jan Brewer. “I am grateful to the Arizona Commerce Authority, TREO and other regional partners whose excellence and creativity produced infrastructure solutions to secure Accelr8 for Arizona.”

“Given the Accelr8 management team’s past success driving high-growth plans for similar companies, it should prove to be a solid return on investment for many years,” said Sharon Bronson, vice chair, Pima County Board of Supervisors.

“Our region has the technical talent and workforce that Accelr8 needs,” said Jonathan Rothschild, mayor, City of Tucson. “We are quickly becoming recognized for our ‘innovation know how.’”

“This win shows that Tucson is poised to take off as a region that is attractive to bioscience companies,” said Stephen G. Eggen, TREO Chairman of the Board and CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems. “Locally, many partners worked very hard to win this deal in a unified fashion.”
“We’re thrilled to attract a publicly-traded headquarters in a key, targeted industry,” said Joe Snell, president & CEO, TREO. “Accelr8 represents another building block as we emerge as a leading biotech hub.”

Arizona Commerce Authority - AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

Arizona Commerce Authority: Team Effort in Arizona CRE

If there’s one person who can help give Arizona the home-field advantage when it comes to attracting new businesses, new jobs and making the state more competitive in the global market, it’s Jerry Colangelo, the vice chairman of the Arizona Commerce Authority.

Perhaps that’s why Gov. Jan Brewer picked the Valley businessman as vice chairman of the newly formed Arizona Commerce Authority, a private sector board that will replace the Arizona Department of Commerce. The 35-member board includes a diverse group of business and educational leaders from across the state.

No matter what you’re in, it takes teams and people to win,” Colangelo said. “It’s true in every walk of life. Look at the disconnect that has existed in our state for such a long time, with the Legislature, with the business community, the lack of a game plan. Everyone has to be on the same page. And so the good news is this: There’s only one way to go. There is plenty of space here for us to be very, very successful.”

There definitely is room to grow when it comes to business attraction in Arizona.
According to Department of Commerce statistics, 47 companies located or expanded in Arizona in 2007, bringing a capital investment of $1.6B, almost 10,000 new jobs and an annual payroll of $483M. Then the recession hit and in just two years those figures took a nose dive: 24 companies located or expanded in Arizona with a capital investment of $255M, 2,649 jobs and a $124.6M payroll.

“When I became governor, I promised to get Arizona back on track by creating quality jobs, attracting high-growth industries, and advancing our competitive position in the global economy,” Brewer said. “With this board, I have now delivered a model to advance Arizona.”

Arizona Commerce Authority: Addressing the Industry’s Needs

How that model will advance Arizona is a question those in commercial real estate are asking. To its credit, the Arizona Commerce Authority includes several board members with direct business ties to the industry.

They are: Drew Brown, chairman of the board, DMB Associates; Peter Herder, chairman of the board and CEO, Herder Commercial Development; Mike Ingram, CEO and president, El Dorado Holdings; Doug Pruitt, chairman and CEO, Sundt Construction; and Mo Stein, principal and senior vice president, HKS Architects.

How do those in the industry envision an entity such as the Arizona Commerce Authority boosting a sagging commercial real estate market in Arizona?

“I look for the Arizona Commerce Authority to create a business model for all aspects of development in the state,” Stein said. “The authority will allow leverage of both public and private strengths that go beyond individual projects to opportunities that impact large segments of our communities and industries throughout the state.”

Mike Haenel, executive vice president, Industrial Division at Cassidy Turley BRE Commercial, noted: “I would like the Arizona Commerce Authority to communicate to the State Legislature exactly what it would take to relocate a company to Arizona. Thanks to a sophisticated local commercial real estate development industry, we have well-located and functional real estate available. Given the current economic conditions, pricing is extremely attractive, which translates into a perfect time to rent and or buy real estate in Arizona. The Arizona Commerce Authority needs to figure out what our state government should do to be competitive in attracting and retaining companies.”

Jim Gibson, senior associate in real estate at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey adds: “There has always been a long-standing partnership between economic development and the commercial real estate industry. Because of its role attracting new businesses to the state, I suspect that the Arizona Commerce Authority will be a tremendous resource for lead generation to brokers, developers and others in the industry. In addition, because of the Arizona Commerce Authority’s make-up of leaders in the private sector, it seems well-positioned by having both the business savvy to understand the wants and needs of companies looking to expand or relocate to Arizona, as well as having established relationships in the real estate industry to help each company assemble the right team depending on its particular real estate needs.”

Brewer made sure the new Arizona Commerce Authority is a statewide endeavor. While most board members are from the Metro Phoenix area, there also are four board members from Tucson, two from Flagstaff, and one each from Prescott and Yuma.

By creating a more competitive landscape and making economic development a higher priority, commercial real estate opportunities and transactions will result,” said Joe Snell, president and CEO of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO). “The ability for the authority to assist groups like TREO in attracting and expanding primary jobs will result in significantly more commercial opportunities downstream.”

Listening to the Industry’s Concerns

While those involved are excited over the prospects of what the Arizona Commerce Authority may be able to achieve, there also is guarded optimism. Mark Singerman, regional director of Rockefeller Group Development Corp., said that just to stay even with what most other states offer, Arizona needs to become more competitive in attracting businesses to relocate here. He cites SB 1403, a bill giving special tax breaks and incentives to the solar energy industry.

Within several months of that incentive for renewable energy companies becoming law, there were at least a dozen solar companies looking to locate here,” Singerman said. “This type of incentive program needs to be expanded to all desirable industries.”

Up until 2006, Singerman said, Arizona became complacent about attracting residents and businesses. By virtue of being in close proximity to high-cost California, the state enjoyed steady growth with little effort.

“We now have to up our game to stay even with other states,” Singerman said. “If we have competitive economic incentive programs similar to what other states offer, our total package will be hard to beat when companies do their comparisons. But we are not there yet.”

Added Tim Lawless, president of NAIOP-AZ, adds: “While strategically targeting specific industry sectors like aerospace in the hopes of further diversifying our state’s economy is laudable, it is very unclear what the Arizona Commerce Authority can or will do to assist the vast number of firms that are already in the state, especially with their very limited budget. We need to keep in mind that we have more than 350,000 firms in our state and we need policies that will create an environment for them to survive and add jobs.

This can only happen should the Commerce Authority advocate for broad-based tax reform, rather than exclusively relying on esoteric tax breaks that create winners and losers,” Lawless continued. “Cake and ice cream tax breaks for industries like solar are fine, but only after a more substantial and well-balanced economic development diet is put on the table for all firms.”

For the Arizona Commerce Authority to make the state more competitive in business attraction, Lawless said Arizona needs to lower overall commercial property tax burdens, which are among the highest in the U.S.; create a significant deal-closing fund (non-tax benefit related) to land large employers that leverage the highest paying jobs; and lower corporate income tax rates that would put the state in a better position to compete with other Western states.

Arizona’s political climate could be another stumbling block in attracting new businesses, said Marty Alvarez Sr., CEO of Sun Eagle Corp.

“Part of the problem is the perception throughout the country that Arizona is a racist state with no upside for their companies to move here,” Alvarez said. “The Hispanic business community needs to be part of the marketing effort to dissuade the thought that our state is in political turmoil. This is the time to bring national and international firms to Arizona.
The collaboration led by the ACA needs political, social and business direction from the Hispanic business community in order to create a positive atmosphere for incoming companies,” he added. “The idea and implementation of the ACA is not only good but is a necessary solution for the future economic well being of our state. The leaders chosen to enact this organization and jumpstart the dialogue must be a public-private partnership.”

AZRE Magazine November/December 2010

TREO Is Working To Position The Tucson Region For Post-Recession Growth

The past year was unprecedented in the U.S. economy. As experienced nationwide, the recent credit and housing crises resulted in rapid job losses and extreme economic uncertainty. While the situation at the national and state level is critical, leaders in the Tucson region are working to take our destiny into our own hands, providing leadership in developing local tools and programs to create jobs for our citizens.

Gains experienced in 2009 were a result of our ability to react quickly and develop programs and initiatives to mitigate the effects of the worst recession in 30-plus years. Significant progress was made in addressing the work force skills gap, improving and expanding our best practices, communications to internal and external customers, and thought leadership.

In response to the economic conditions, Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO) developed a plan called Tucson: Job One. In conjunction with all our community partners, we created a proposed immediate action plan with clearly defined priorities to address strengthening the local economy, creating and maintaining jobs, and spending. This is our chance to synergize the region’s recent strategic planning efforts and priorities, demonstrating how all local economic drivers can work together to emerge stronger and with a much more diversified economy.

To address local economic conditions, in early 2008 TREO embarked on a comprehensive survey of 170 of the top local companies in an effort to gather data on those planning to hire new employees within the next year. Companies that responded to the survey reported a total of more than 2,200 open positions anticipated to be filled within the next 12 months. TREO then created a job portal on its Web site as part of the Tucson: Job One program. Available at www.treoaz.org/Tucson-Job-Portal.aspx, the job portal provides links to the career pages of a sampling of companies that reported plans to hire despite the state of the economy.

The region realizes it needs to be poised and ready when the economy improves, so TREO has instituted some programs to help facilitate readiness.

Shovel ready and fast track permitting
TREO’s Shovel Ready and Fast Track Permitting program involves the certification of shovel-ready sites for fast-track permitting and development processes. The program makes the Tucson region more competitive in attracting and expanding new, high-skilled/high-wage jobs.

Certified shovel-ready sites are parcels that are on the market for sale or lease, appropriately zoned, pre-qualified to meet local planning requirements, served by utilities, and with identified access to transportation linkages. The certification requirements are designed to ensure the ability of a firm to proceed immediately to the building permit phase and be able to receive approval of plans within 90 days.

California job development program
Arizona Sun Corridor: Open for Business is an unprecedented partnership between the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC), TREO, the Greater Yuma Economic Development Corp., and the city of Flagstaff that is designed to bring high-wage jobs and investment to the Sun Corridor, a megapolitan projected as one of the 10 U.S. markets expected to see most of the nation’s growth in the next 35 years.

The program pools resources to place a contractor in California who will be responsible for researching companies and qualifying those poised to expand operations. The contractor actively generates business development leads in targeted industries such as aerospace/defense, health care/bioscience, transportation/logistics, renewable energy, and information communications technology.

Transportation and logistics focus
TREO’s efforts in the transportation and logistics industry focus on developing and presenting a regional implementation plan that positions the Tucson region as a recognized global logistics and distribution hub. The goal is to facilitate economic growth, prosperity and opportunity for the Tucson region through the promotion of freight, transportation and logistics.

The Tucson region possesses a strong transportation infrastructure, including interstate highway, railroad and air freight connections. The convergence of Interstate 10 and Interstate 19 provides the region with connections to major east-west and north-south trade corridors. The same advantage holds for the region’s rail connections — the Union Pacific Sunset Route runs east-west through Tucson, along with the north-south connection to Mexico via Nogales. The existing Port of Tucson intermodal operation is a huge asset for the expansion of rail opportunities in Southern Arizona. Additionally, current air freight operations include integrated carriers such as Federal Express and cargo operations provided via passenger carriers. Expansion possibilities exist for air freight with the ongoing expansion of the air cargo warehouse facilities at Tucson International Airport. Recent surveys indicate more than 150 logistics-based businesses are currently serving the needs of freight movement in the region, and more than 72,000 jobs are associated with the existing manufacturing, warehouse, and transportation sectors.

Aerospace and defense industry recognized
According to economy.com, Tucson’s highly concentrated aerospace product and parts manufacturing sector has an 8.35 location quotient, a ratio calculated to compare a region’s industrial activity level to the rest of the United States. The location quotient means Tucson is 8.35 times more concentrated in the aerospace product and parts manufacturing industry than the average of all metropolitan statistical areas across the country.
In August 2009, Business Facilities magazine named Tucson No. 6 on its list of the top 10 metro areas for aerospace/defense manufacturing in its fifth annual ranking report. The ranking is primarily based on a comparison of industry sector employment and wages. Also evaluated were major projects and facility expansion/relocation activity for a region in the past 12 months, and the number of major aerospace and defense contractors headquartered in the region.

Solar heats up
Tucson is home to a growing number of companies involved in the development and production of solar technology, including several recent investments from Germany, Europe’s solar hub. In 2009, TREO conducted an economic analysis revealing that there are close to 50 companies in the region involved in solar-related activities, directly or indirectly supporting more than 2,000 jobs with a total annual economic impact of more than $400 million.

New expansions and relocations
Switzerland-based Roche bought Ventana Medical Systems in early 2008, and purchased 17.1 acres for $8.9 million to expand its campus. Ventana is now the headquarters of one of Roche’s global business units that focuses on diagnostics. Roche CEO Severin Schwan says the company plans to expand research and development laboratories at Ventana’s campus and increase staffing levels from about 750 to more than 1,000.

Tucson-based Salutaris Medical Devices, a startup medical devices firm, received $1.5 million in Series A financing by Arizona venture capital firm Translational Accelerator (TRAC). TRAC, a private, Arizona-based, $20 million bioscience venture capital group, is Arizona’s first venture fund established to target early-stage bioscience companies. TRAC investments only support firms located in Arizona or those planning to move to the state.

The Rockefeller Group Development Corporation broke ground on the first of three distribution buildings on a 21.5-acre, pad-ready approved industrial site in the Tucson Airport Commerce Center. The first building, a 113,000 square foot state-of-the-art speculative distribution building was completed and ready for occupancy in June 2009.

Schletter, a manufacturer and distributor of solar mounting systems based in Germany, chose Tucson for its first U.S.-based operations center. Schletter has operated more than 40 years in the design and manufacturing of steel and aluminum products, and rose to be the largest provider of solar mounting systems in Europe, supplying utility-sized PV-projects. Following the German lead, the Tucson facility offers everything from design and development to manufacturing of Schletter products.

Since TREO was formed in 2005, more than 40 companies have announced their relocation or expansion in the region, adding thousands of new jobs and contributing more than $1 billion in fiscal and economic impact.

Laura Shaw, senior vice president of marketing and communications for TREO contributed to this report.


Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010