Tag Archives: Tucson

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Cost of Kitt Peak wildlife crossings soar

Construction costs for two wildlife crossings planned on Ajo Highway near Kitt Peak have soared by nearly 60 percent.

The Arizona Daily Star reports the crossings now are expected to cost about $1.2 million.

A Tohono O’odham Police Department report provided to Pima County’s Regional Transportation Authority shows nearly 20 percent of crashes in the area involve animals. The two under-crossing structures are meant to reduce that number.

RTA transportation services director Jim DeGrood says the Arizona Department of Transportation wants to build them now in conjunction with an ongoing highway-widening project.

The RTA Board approved $746,280 for the project last year and on Thursday approved another $154,000. The Arizona Department of Transportation will pay for the remaining shortfall of about $291,000.

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CBRE Leases 12,877 SF Commercial Building in Catalina Foothills

CBRE negotiated a 12,877 SF lease for a vacant restaurant/office building at 3500 E. Sunrise Dr. at Campo Abierto in Tucson.

Five Palms LLC, an Arizona-based corporation, offering four unique dining concepts in one location, has leased the building and plans to open in November 2012, marking its first location in the U.S.

Buzz Isaacson, Nancy McClure and Ike Isaacson of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Landmark Assets LLC of Scottsdale in negotiating the long-term lease agreement.

The tenant, Arizona Five Palms LLC of Tucson and its sole owner/operator Nino Aidi, who grew up in Europe, was represented by Thomas Sylvester of Sylvester Realty & Investments, also in Tucson. The exact financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

“This property is ideal for a new restaurant concept like Five Palms,” said CBRE’s McClure. “It’s premium location in the Catalina Foothills offers excellent visibility, and it’s beautiful, new interior decor and unique architecture will only enhance the dining atmosphere.”

The restaurant features four distinct dining elements. Its centerpiece is a fine dining area with a patio featuring an extensive menu offering prime steak aged in house and carved tableside, as well as fresh fish flown in daily. Patrons will also enjoy a fine bar with its own patio.

A wine and gourmet shop, Dovino, will be located on site featuring wines from 13 countries, cheese, charcutries, chocolates, a walk-in humidor with cigars and home delivery. Nino’s Bar and Grill, a casual bar, will be located on the second floor and will have a different menu than the first floor dining room, focusing on the best of old- and new-world cuisine.

Nino’s Bar and Grille will include the addition of a newly added, elevated, outdoor open-air covered terrace featuring amazing views of the surrounding mountains, La Paloma golf course and serene Tucson city lights. It is sure to be a favorite gathering spot to enjoy a relaxed meal and beverage. In addition, extensive banquet facilities for special events will be available. Catering will also be featured.

“The Five Palms Restaurant in San Carlos is a favorite of visiting Americans and Tucsonans who vacation in the beautiful Mexican beachfront resort town,” Aidi said. “Their enthusiasm for the restaurant’s fine food and ambiance is the main reason I’ve created and brought this unique concept and dining experience to Tucson.”

In addition to the restaurant in San Carlos, the Five Palms restaurant chain also operates gourmet restaurants in Obregon and Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

 

Seahorse (Alex Kerstitch) (

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Announces Its New Warden Aquarium

Any interpretation of the Sonoran Desert region would be incomplete without recognizing the importance of the fresh water rivers that flow through it and the Sea of Cortez or Gulf of California. The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum will unveil its dramatic, new permanent aquarium dedicated to revealing the remarkable story of this miraculous region in December 2012.

“Without this sea and the summer monsoon that brings moisture from it, the lush Sonoran Desert known today would be an entirely different place,” state Craig Ivanyi, Executive Director of the Museum. “This body of water truly represents a full half of the Sonoran Desert Region – literally 100,000 square miles of desert-ocean and an astounding 900 islands!”

This exhibition, “Rivers to the Sea”, in the new Warden Aquarium, will highlight the roles of the region’s rivers, including the mighty Colorado, and the Gulf of California. Two galleries are planned: one highlighting the region’s freshwater rivers and aquatic life and the other featuring the Sea of Cortez and representative sea life. Primary funding for the new exhibition was generously provided by the Bert W. Martin Foundation.

The galleries will encompass over 1,100 square feet and include 14 tanks displaying a variety of fresh- and salt-water animal species. Some of the Museum’s numerous aquatic conservation projects impacting many aquatic species will be highlighted in the galleries.
The exhibition area will also include a touch tank with marine invertebrates, like sea stars and hermit crabs, for a hands-on encounter for visitors. A visit to the new Warden Aquarium will be included with the purchase of a general admission ticket.

The Sea of Cortez is extremely diverse containing one of the world’s smallest and most endangered marine mammals, the vaquita, a rare type of porpoise, migratory whales that no longer migrate, over 800 types of fishes, five species of sea turtles, and the rarely encountered American crocodile. In addition to the varied species of wildlife, the Sea of Cortez provides much of the moisture for the region’s summer rains which have tremendously influenced vegetation on the terrestrial part of the Sonoran Desert Region.

The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is one of the nation’s leading outdoor, living museums, featuring more than 230 animals and 1,200 varieties of desert plants. Its mission is to inspire people to live in harmony with the natural world by fostering love, appreciation, and understanding of the bi-national Sonoran Desert region. The museum is located at 2021 N. Kinney Road, in Tucson Mountain Park adjacent to Saguaro National Park (West). It is open daily year round with operating hours varying by season. Call (520) 883-2702 or visit www.desertmuseum.org for more information.

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Tucson Hispanic Consumers Will Spend Nearly $9B By 2015

About half of all Tucson Hispanics frequent Facebook, 82 percent own cell phones, and they spend nearly $300 million a year on clothing and $450 million buying food outside of the home.

These are only a few of the facts featured in DATOS: Tucson 2012. The study is scheduled for release by the state’s two largest Hispanic chambers of commerce at Tucson’s Doubletree Hotel September 20.

“Tucson is one of the state’s powerhouses in terms of Hispanic buying power and the entire Southern Arizona region is growing more important every day. DATOS: Tucson is our way of telling that story,” said Lea Marquez Peterson, president and CEO of the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Gonzalo de la Melena, president/CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, adds, “The release of DATOS: Tucson speaks not only to the growing economic influence of Hispanics in Tucson and Southern Arizona, but also statewide and across the nation. Without a doubt, Hispanics are helping drive our state’s economic recovery.”

The third annual DATOS: Tucson provides a detailed review and analysis of the growing economic impact of the Hispanic market in Southern Arizona.

DATOS: Tucson quick facts:

> Arizona Hispanics will account for $40 billion statewide in consumer spending in 2012.
> The Hispanic population in Pima County grew at about 12 times the rate of non-Hispanics from 2010 and 2011.
> More than half of the children under five in Pima County are Hispanic.
> There are approximately 65,000 Hispanic-owned small businesses in Arizona, one-third of which are owned by Latinas.
> With $1.2 Trillion in buying power in 2012, if U.S. Hispanics were a country they would be the 15th largest economy in the world.

More than 200 business and community leaders are expected to attend the September 20 luncheon organized by the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

DATOS: Tucson is researched by a team of experts led by Dr. Loui Olivas, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, and published by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. It provides detailed analysis and information regarding major trends in technology, employment, housing, education, small business activity and more. DATOS: Tucson’s presenting sponsor is Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ). Additional support is provided by PetSmart and the University of Phoenix.

“We’re always pleased to be a part of the DATOS: Tucson luncheon and see great value in sharing research that points to the growing economic influence of the Hispanic community.,” said Deanna Salazar, senior vice president and general counsel for BCBSAZ.

DATOS: Tucson is based in part on research gathered for DATOS: Focus on the Hispanic Market, a statewide report released as part of “Transforming Arizona’s Economy”, a yearlong series of events created by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The AZHCC’s next major event is the Minority Business Enterprise Summit Nov. 16, 2012 in Phoenix. The THCC’s next major event is Noche de Exitos Gala and Bi-National Awards, October 13th, 2012, Casino del Sol Hotel in Tucson.

DATOS: Tucson will be released during a luncheon at the Doubletree Hotel Tucson at Reid Park in the Grand Ballroom, 445 S. Alvernon Way. Karla Gomez-Escamilla, a news reporter at Univision in Tucson, will emcee the luncheon.

Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $60 for THCC and AZHCC members. $75.00 for non-members. Discounted rates for tables of 8 also are available. This event is open to the public.

To register online, visit tucsonhispanicchamber.org or call the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at 520-620-0005. For sponsorship information, contact the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at 602-279-1800.

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Accelr8 Technology relocates to Tucson

After a competitive multi-state process, Accelr8 Technology Corporation
announced that it is moving its headquarters from Denver to Tucson.

Founded in 1982, Accelr8 develops instruments used for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms. Its BACcel rapid diagnostic system, in development, is the first technology that is able to count and identify dangerous pathogens and their drug resistance expression within the same day of obtaining a patient specimen, instead of the two to three days required for standard methods. This speed allows for a significant improvement in the treatment of the over 1.7 million people in the US who contract a hospital acquired infection each year, and access to a multi-billion dollar market.

Accelr8 has selected Tucson as best meeting its needs for future high-growth plans. Accelr8 will bring high-skilled, high-wage jobs to Southern Arizona with plans to fill 65 positions over the next three years and the potential to grow to 200-300 employees in subsequent years. Headquarter positions include engineers, scientists, sales/marketing, management, finance, quality/regulatory and manufacturing. The company will occupy approximately 15,000 square feet of space in Pima County’s Herbert K. Abrams Public Health Center at 3950 S. Country Club Road. After a build out of wet lab space, the company is expected to be operational by early 2013.

“Accelr8 is developing a revolutionary product in the diagnostics area and we were impressed with the region’s emerging bioscience strength, innovation and support that can help ensure our future success,” said Lawrence Mehren, president and CEO, Accelr8 Technology Corporation.

“Accelr8 strengthens the biotechnology excellence our state has been building, while creating high-quality jobs for Arizonans,” said Governor Jan Brewer. “I am grateful to the Arizona Commerce Authority, TREO and other regional partners whose excellence and creativity produced infrastructure solutions to secure Accelr8 for Arizona.”

“Given the Accelr8 management team’s past success driving high-growth plans for similar companies, it should prove to be a solid return on investment for many years,” said Sharon Bronson, vice chair, Pima County Board of Supervisors.

“Our region has the technical talent and workforce that Accelr8 needs,” said Jonathan Rothschild, mayor, City of Tucson. “We are quickly becoming recognized for our ‘innovation know how.’”

“This win shows that Tucson is poised to take off as a region that is attractive to bioscience companies,” said Stephen G. Eggen, TREO Chairman of the Board and CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems. “Locally, many partners worked very hard to win this deal in a unified fashion.”
“We’re thrilled to attract a publicly-traded headquarters in a key, targeted industry,” said Joe Snell, president & CEO, TREO. “Accelr8 represents another building block as we emerge as a leading biotech hub.”

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Phoenix, Tucson mayors lead Mexico trade mission

The mayors of Phoenix and Tucson lead a trade mission to Mexico this week as part of effort to foster relations with Arizona’s largest trading partner.

Phoenix’s Greg Stanton and Tucson’s Jonathan Rothschild will be joined by Phoenix City Councilman Michael Nowakowski, Phoenix City Manager David Cavazos, representatives from the Greater Phoenix Economic Council and various Arizona chambers of commerce.

The group will travel to Hermosillo to meet with Sonora Gov. Guillermo Padres Elias and others and then tour a manufacturing facility.

They later will head to Mexico City to meet with representatives from the Mexico Secretary of Tourism, Aeromexico, U.S. Ambassador and Mexico Secretary of Foreign Affairs and others.

Cavazos says Mexico is Arizona’s largest trading partner with the state exporting $5.7 billion in merchandise to Mexico last year.

LivingSocial

LivingSocial To Open Call Center In Tucson

CBRE completed a 30,500 SF lease with LivingSocial at a four-story, Class A office building located at 250 S. Williams Circle in Tucson.

LivingSocial, an online discount promoter for local products and services, plans to open a new call center in Tucson in July.

David A. Volk, SIOR, and Bruce A. Suppes of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Kent Circle Investments LLC, in negotiating the five-year lease agreement. LivingSocial, based in Washington D.C., was represented by Steve Burman and Jay Farmer of Jones Lang LaSalle, also in Washington D.C., and Andrew Medley in the firm’s Phoenix office. The exact financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

“This building is among the most modern in Tucson and was specifically designed with technology-intensive users in mind,” said CBRE’s Volk.

LivingSocial will occupy the building’s entire top floor, bringing its occupancy to 100 percent. In addition to the new Tucson location, LivingSocial also has large offices in Washington D.C., New York, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Kent Circle Investments LLC is controlled by Seldin Real Estate Inc. of Scottsdale. The company also owns the high-rise office building at 5151 E. Broadway in Tucson.

For more information on LivingSocial, visit their website at livingsocial.com.

treo board

TREO Board Of Directors Votes In New Officers

The TREO Board of Directors today announces the election of its officers for the Fiscal Year 2012-13. Terms are July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013.

The officers are:

Steve Eggen, CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems – Presiding Chairman of the Board

Lisa Lovallo, VP and Systems Manager, Cox Communications Southern Arizona – Secretary/Treasurer

The TREO Board is comprised of 46 community leaders from the private sector, public sector and academia, including presidents of both universities and the community college in Southern Arizona, mayors of public jurisdictions in the Tucson region, Pima County and major corporations and businesses operating in Southern Arizona. The TREO Board and major stakeholders represent 85,000 employees in Southern Arizona. For a full listing of the TREO Board of Directors, visit http://www.treoaz.org/Living-and-Working-Tucson-Leaders-Board-of-Directors.aspx.

In addition, the TREO Board of Directors unanimously voted to extend the President & CEO contract for a three year term. “We have full confidence in Joe Snell. Snell has led this organization since 2005 and has guided the efforts of TREO, resulting in high value to the community. Our region has challenges ahead of us and he continues to be the right leader at the right time,” said Steve Eggen, incoming Chairman of the Board.

“The organization is focusing on and achieving the goals set out for it by the TREO Board of Directors,” he continued. “We have exciting plans in motion for this fiscal year.”

For more information on TREO Board of Directors, visit TREO’s website at treoaz.org.

tucson airport

Study Puts Tucson Airport’s Economic Impact At $3.2 Billion

A new study shows Tucson International Airport (TIA) brings an annual economic impact of more than $3.2 billion to the region.

The study was commissioned by the Tucson Airport Authority (TAA) and conducted by MBA students from the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. It has been more than 10 years since TAA conducted such an analysis.

“These updated findings provide an accurate and current picture of the job creation and economic activity brought about by TAA’s ongoing operations, significant infrastructure investments and partnerships with more than 100 tenants. We take great pride in helping to improve the economic vitality and quality of life in southern Arizona,” said TAA President/CEO Bonnie Allin.

The airport’s direct, indirect and induced economic effects are included in the total. Direct impact is generated as a result of employment and operation of the airport and tenant businesses. The Eller MBA consulting team calculated a total annual direct impact of $1.7 billion stemming from payroll, goods and services purchased by the airport and airport businesses, expenditures on capital improvement projects and payment of local taxes from airport activity.

The remainder of the $3.2 billion total is attributed to indirect and induced impact.

Indirect impact includes money spent at the airport and in the community by airport patrons, plus revenue generated by businesses that chose to locate in the region because the airport is integral to their operations.

Induced impact, also known as the multiplier effect, is based on an economic principle that quantifies how revenue generated by airport activities grows as it cycles through the community. For example, when TAA hires a local construction company for a project, the company hires additional employees, who increase demand for goods and services in the region through spending their salaries. The businesses they patronize hire additional workers, and the process repeats.

Similarly, 13,000 workers are directly employed at TIA. Indirect and induced effects of airport employment bring the total to 35,000 local jobs supported as a result of the airport’s presence in the community.

The UA graduate students are part of the Eller MBA’s experiential learning program, which allows the students to participate in a strategic consulting project. TAA is one of the College’s 12 clients this year, including Raytheon, Microsoft and Intuit, said Eller College of Management Director for Experiential Learning Nannon Roosa.

“This program is the cornerstone of our MBA’s first year,” Roosa said. “Projects like these challenge students to apply core business skills to address a real-world business issue.

“Eller’s innovative curriculum, combined with pioneering research, distinguished faculty, excellence in entrepreneurship and social responsibility, has brought international recognition to the program,” she added.

The report helps to demonstrate the importance of TIA to a strong local economy, which is useful in regional business recruitment and retention efforts, as well as air service development initiatives. TAA will share the findings from this study for inclusion in an Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) study that will quantify the statewide impact of aviation, as well as other economic development groups such as TREO, the Arizona Commerce Authority, local chambers and the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau.

For more information on the Tucson International Airport, visit their website at flytucsonairport.com.

Hospitality And Casino Construction Increase On Tribal Lands - Gila River Indian Community

Hospitality And Casino Construction Increase On Tribal Lands

The Gila River Indian Community is building two new hotels that total more than 200 rooms, a new, 70,000 SF casino, and a conference center. The Navajo Nation is building its first Arizona casino near Flagstaff.

“(Construction in Indian country) is actually one of the market sectors that is really thriving,” says Rogers Owers, an attorney with Andante Law Firm, whose speciality is construction laws in Indian country. “Whether it’s design, construction, or brokering the real estate deals, cash flows into the industry as a whole.”

In Tucson, a new 44,500 SF convention center and a 1,120-car parking structure opened at Casino del Sol in November. Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino increased its guest capacity to 300 rentable rooms, and renovated its restaurant in July.

As several Arizona tribes reveal major hospitality and casino construction projects, one thing is a sure bet — 2012 is shaping up to be another jackpot year.

The Arizona Department of Gaming reports that trial casino revenues steadily declined from 2008 to 2010, but returned to the green in 2011. During this period, hospitality and casino construction in Indian country slowed.

Talking Stick Resort, which opened its doors on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community in 2010, was the last significant Native American casino and hospitality project in almost a year.

Today, several sizable construction projects in Indian country are underway or open for business. The largest, a multifaceted undertaking by the Gila River Indian Community, includes a new 90-room hotel and the demolition and remodel of Vee Quiva Casino in West Phoenix, plus a new conference center, 130-room hotel and restaurant at Lone Butte Casino in Chandler.

The Gila River Indian Community, going all in, also is reportedly opening a new hotel at Toka Sticks Golf Course in Mesa, which is a short distance from Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

The construction venture at Vee Quiva is still in its developmental stages, according to Melody Hudson, public relations manager for Gila River Casinos. It is expected to open in the summer of 2013 at a cost of $135M.

“Rebuilding Vee Quiva Casino is part of a strategic plan the Gila River Indian Community has set in place to refresh our casinos while ensuring the long-term sustainability of the Community and creating new job opportunities in Arizona,” says Anthony Villareal Sr., Casino Expansion Owners Team chairman.

After its reconstruction, Vee Quiva Casino will total nearly 175,000 SF — almost double its original size.

Further north, the Navajo Nation broke ground last March on Twin Arrows Casino outside of Flagstaff, its first casino in Arizona.

The 320,000 SF, $150M casino, scheduled to open in July, will include a hotel and conference center. General contractor is Hunt Construction and the architect is Friedmutter Group.

Some casinos, on the other hand, already have their cards on the table. Casino Del Sol and Harrah’s Ak-Chin opened their newly renovated facilities in 2011.

The Pascua Yaqui Tribe renovated and expanded Casino Del Sol’s hotel and convention center in Tucson to the tune of $75M. The additions included 215 new rooms, a conference center, a parking structure and a spa. It is the second phase of the tribe’s ongoing hospitality and casino refurbishment project. McCarthy Building Companies served as GC and LEO A DALY was the architect.

McCarthy project manager Kurt Nyberg says construction went smoothly because the tribe first commissioned his company in 2003.

“What helped with this expansion is that the Casino Del Sol had gained building experience when both firms worked on the original casino project,” Nyberg says, “so the process was not entirely new from the owner’s perspective.”

Another big player in Arizona, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino and Resort, finished its hotel and restaurant renovations in July after 11 months of construction. Lead designer Jason Ploszaj of RSP Architects says the construction was vital, because the “hotel was turning away guests nightly.”

The expansion, a $20M, 5-story hotel tower, doubled the number of rentable rooms at the Maricopa resort.

“In order to better serve guests, Harrah’s decided that after more than 10 years of success, and expansion of 152 new hotel rooms was necessary to refresh the hotel experience,” Ploszaj says.

For more information on casino and hospitality construction visit, ciic.construction.asu.edu

 

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

centennial top 10, AZ Big Media

10 Top Discoveries In Arizona

10 Top Discoveries in Arizona

There are many mysteries about Arizona. Before it was officially established as the 48th state in 1912, and far before colonization, there was life here. Archaeologists and investigators have been discovering ancient life and civilizations across the state, telling stories about the land before it became what it is today — as well as helping us learn about our potential future. Here are 10 of the top discoveries made that have changed Arizona as well as the world that we know.

10.

Ruins of 10 Villages Found — 1924

Byron Cummings, a professor of anthropology at University of Arizona, and his students discovered villages over 1,000 years old near Tucson. Read More >>

Hills by squeaks2569

9.

700-Year-Old Relic Found — June 22, 1965

21-year-old Lynda Bird Johnson, President Lyndon Baines Johnson’s daughter, helped uncover remains in eastern Arizona during a two-week vacation study at the University of Arizona archaeological camp on the Fort Apache reservation. Read More >>

8.

20,000-Year-Old Butcher Shop — 1931

The discovery of large elephant-like mammoth bones in Yuma County, hacked with flint knives, indicates that America has been inhabited for at least 20,000 years. Dr. Harold J. Cook of the Cook museum of natural history explains this and the significance to the finding. Read More >>

Columbian Mammoth by edenpictures

7.

Hohokam Village of Pueblo Grande — 1920s

The site which can be viewed by the public at the Pueblo Grand Museum, includes an 800-year-old platform mound — where ancient buildings were constructed — and excavated prehistoric ballcourt. The central part of what is now the museum was first preserved in 1924. Read More >>

6.

Rich Uranium Ore Found — April 7, 1950

Three new high-grade uranium minerals — which were used in building atomic bombs — were reported by the Geological Survey. The minerals were discovered by Dr. Charles A. Anderson in the Hillside Mine in Yavapai County. Read More >>

Uranium by Marcin Wichary

5.

Columbian Mammoth Found — 2005

Now known as Tuskers, the remains of a Columbian Mammoth were discovered in a construction site when one of the workers found the first cervical membrane of the mammoth. The area located in Gilbert is now known as Discovery Park as a result. Read More >>

4.

Dinosaur Tracks Found — 1929

It was reported to be one of the most important discoveries of dinosaur tracks, with a group of 300. They were found near Tuba City and the largest print was found to be nine inches long. Visitors are now invited to walk where these ancient reptiles did. Read More >>

Dinosaur Tracks by Dave Boyer

3.

Winona Meteorite — 1928

This meteorite was found near the ruins of the prehistoric Elden pueblo. It was in a stone cist on the ancient burial ground, suggesting that the people of the area treated it like a living being and buried it after witnessing it fall. Read More >>

2.

Oldest Dinosaur Found — 1985

A 200-pound, plant-eating creature’s remains were discovered in the Petrified Forest by paleontologist Robert Long. The almost-intact skeleton was 225 million years old, four million years older than any previous dinosaur fossil discovered at the time. Read More >>

Dinosaur by Ivan Walsh

1.

Las Capas Canals — 1998-2009

Irrigation canals built as early as 1200 B.C. were discovered in the Tucson area. They are the oldest known canals north of central Mexico. This site has revealed much about ancient irrigation and agriculture. Read More >>

AZ News Health

AZ News Roundup – Health & Wellness

Welcome to the AZ News Roundup for April 4th

This week we are focusing on information and services offered for the health and wellness of Arizona residence both in and outside the medical field. They cover resources and information that help improve the mental and physical health of many.

 


BODY WORLDS & The Brain I Quit! Anti-Smoking Campaign

Arizona Science Center's Anti-Smoking CampaignOn April 11th, the campaign against smoking in Arizona Science Center’s Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS & The Brain is offering free admission for any guest pledging to quit smoking. The American Lung Association and American Cancer Society will be on site to celebrate the launch and inform Arizona Science Center visitors in order to help guests become and stay a quitter. Read More >>

 

Holistic Healers Directory Offers Free Perks

Part of CloudNine Marketing, Inc., Hhdirectory.com and www.holsitichealingnews.com, is offering the opportunity to those in the field of integrative and alternative medicine to receive a free listing and publish articles pertaining to holistic health and wellness for free. Read More >>

 

Tucson’s AZ Pest Control Company Launches Pest ID App

AZ PEST, pest control itunes appAZ PEST provides a free app that allows you to simply take a snapshot of the insect or bug you want to identify then use the app to submit it to the Tucson-based pest control specialists, who will respond to your inquiry within 24 hours. It is the first pest company in the U.S. to launch an app like this. Read More >>

 

Microbiology and Indoor Air Quality Testing Laboratory Expands

EMSL Analytical, Inc., a nationwide leader and local provider of indoor air quality, environmental, food and materials testing has recently moved to a new facility in Phoenix, AZ. The new facility will allow EMSL the ability to add additional service lines to its current offering of microbiology, mold, bacteria, legionella, asbestos and sewage contamination testing services. Read More >>

 

Oak Creek Ranch School’s 10 Tips For Parents

The Oak Creek Ranch School’s principal provides ten tips for parents to help their children with ADD/ADHD be successful in school. The school’s curriculum and programs are designed to help ADD/ADHD, under-motivated and underachieving teens, ages 12 to 18, accomplish their academic goals while developing valuable social and interpersonal skills. Read More >>

Grand Canyon - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Make Arizona Your Destination To Get Away From It All

There’s No Place Like Home

Arizona has something for everyone, which is probably why most of us choose to live here: sunshine, great scenery, Western history and multiple cultures.

Our state is also a favorite destination for travelers seeking a reprieve from cold weather in the Midwest and East. It has golf and spring training baseball and some of the best resorts in the U.S. But when was the last time you made Arizona a destination for you or your family? Hopefully this will remind you of treasures in your own backyard as Arizona’s Centennial celebration draws near.

Lake Havasu City

London Bridge, Lake Havasu - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Try counting the number of bricks it took to reconstruct the London Bridge, which spans the Colorado River. Our London Bridge is based on the 1831 London Bridge that crossed the River Thames until it was dismantled in 1967.

The Grand Canyon

Take a trail ride on a burro to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, one of the world’s greatest natural wonders. Go out on a ledge — OK, it’s horseshoe-shaped — at the Grand Canyon Skywalk. If that makes you nervous and you prefer solid footing, take a ride on the Grand Canyon Railway.

Tombstone/Bisbee

If you have the desire to see ghosts, some are bound to be strolling down the streets of Tombstone, “The Town too Tough to Die.” They even conduct nightly ghost tours. If you’re curious about the once-flourishing mining industry in Bisbee, you can go on the Queen Mine Tour.

Prescott

Prescott Rodeo, Photo: Arizona Tourism & Travel - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Have a cold one at an old-time saloon on Whiskey Row. If you enjoy watching rodeos, 4th of July weekend brings alive the oldest rodeo in the world during Frontier Days.

Route 66

Follow the “Mother Road” from Holbrook to Oatman or vice versa. Stop off at Meteor Crater or stand on a corner in Winslow. The Petrified Forest National Park is a sight to see as well.

Tucson

See and be seen at the semi-annual Fourth Avenue Street Fair. Then there’s Mount Lemmon, a winter (skiing) and summer (cabins in Summerhaven) playground. You can also take a tour of the missions in and around the Old Pueblo. In addition, check out a part of American 20th-century history with a visit to the Titan Missile Museum. It’s the only publicly accessible Titan II missile site in the U.S. The coolest part of the museum is experiencing a simulated launch.

Flagstaff/Sedona

Sedona Fiesta del Tlaquepaque, Photo: Arizona Tourism & Travel - AZ Business Magazine Apr/Mar 2011Ski during the winter or take the Snowbowl Skyride during the summer. Jazz it up in October in Sedona at Jazz on the Rocks. You can also go for an artsy shopping trip at Tlaquepaque, or slip, slide away at Slide Rock State Park.

Sonoita/Patagonia

In the mood for wine? You don’t have to travel to Napa Valley or the vineyards of Italy and France. Just jump off I-10 south of Tucson and hit the vineyards of Elgin, Patagonia and Sonoita.


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords was shot at a grocery store during a constituent event in Tucson.

A Great American Tragedy: Gabrielle Giffords the target

We live in a great country.  We have a stable government.  We have incredible wealth when compared to so many other parts of the world.  I don’t know about you, but I often take these things for granted.  When I go to bed at night, I don’t worry about enemy rebels overrunning my home.

I hear about other countries that are unstable, parliaments that have physical confrontations on the same floor where they establish laws, political systems where assassination is a political tool, and I assume that those things are third-world problems that we have gotten past.  Sure, the United States has a history of bloodshed that has built us into who we are as a nation, but the Civil War is over.  Federal politicians no longer have duels with pistols.  Although there have been unsuccessful attempts, we haven’t had a president assassinated in nearly 50 years.

U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords was shot at a grocery store during a constituent event in Tucson.  It is a stark reminder that there is evil in the world and that we are still susceptible to the worst when it comes to political dissension.

There are two things about our modern American society that scare me when it comes to politics.

The first is that we now live in a “for-profit” 24-hour news cycle.  Gone are the days of news only at 6 and 10 p.m.  Multiple networks and websites focus on reporting news, and they compete for ratings.  Ratings mean sponsors, and sponsors mean money.  People turn on the news in the morning and listen to it all day.  Our web-browsers usually always have some type of news displayed and updated.  What does it take to get them tuned in to our network or hitting our website?  This leads back to the old news principle “if it bleeds, it leads.”  It is logical to understand the desire for hard-hitting news — not just fluffy, lighthearted pieces.  Politics — basically how we choose our leaders and govern our country — are brought to us mainly through these mediums.  It is not hard to become obsessed with politics living in the information era.

And that leads to the second thing that scares me.  We now see politics as entertainment. It isn’t just about having a great debate.  It is now about satire and anger.  Don’t think I am going to point a finger at republicans or democrats.  I am going to suggest it cuts both ways.  For example, the conservatives have brought us Rush Limbaugh, who for years has made fun of the left.  I have always struggled with the way he mispronounces names just to make fun of people like a schoolyard bully.  On the other hand, the liberals have brought us Al Franken –a current U.S. Senator — who wrote a book titled “Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot.”  The great debate is no longer about exchanging ideas; it is about being right at the expense of opposing ideologies and trying to embarrass and humiliate the other guy.

Adding to the fact that American politics are overexposed and confrontational is that the general public as a whole places elected officials at the same place as used car salesmen on the integrity scale.  (No offense intended to used car salesmen.  I used to be an elected official so I am only relating a popular stigma.)

So is this what led to the shooting in Tucson of Rep. Giffords?  I don’t believe it is.  But I do believe it could have been the spark that touched off a mentally imbalanced man to do the unthinkable.  Gone are the days of statesmen who present arguments and value debate.  As a nation, we should fear extremism and angry rhetoric.  We should also understand that people are listening to what we say and some of them may not be able to understand right from wrong.

My heart goes out to Rep. Giffords, Judge Roll, the five others killed, those wounded, their families and all of those who were traumatized by this massacre.

We should always engage in political debate thinking about if the next Jared Lee Loughner (the shooter) is listening and wondering how our words are helping to influence him.

At your service 2008

At Your Service

By Kerry Duff

When Margret Thomas of Tucson was suffering from an agonizing headache in the middle of the night, her husband, Harold, called their primary care physician on his cell phone. The doctor met them at the hospital and an hour later she was in surgery having a brain aneurysm removed. Without the surgery, Margret would have died.

The Thomases were able to reach their doctor after hours because they contract directly with Dr. Steven D. Knope, an internist and sports medicine expert in Tucson, for concierge medical care. The couple pays him an annual out-of-pocket fee in exchange for personalized medical services such as 24/7 accessibility by beeper or cell phone and house calls.

“My wife and I can’t live without Dr. Knope,” says 76-year-old Harold. “Whether we’re at home in Tucson, Cincinnati or somewhere else, we can call him day or night and he gets back to us in 10 minutes or less. That’s worth a lot to us. A concierge doctor is like having insurance.”

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Knope has been a concierge physician in the Tucson area for eight years. He has 125 patients that pay $6,000, or $10,000 per couple for concierge care. The fee includes a two-hour comprehensive physical, stress test, full cancer screening, health and fitness consultation and a personalized exercise and nutrition program. The doctor also accompanies patients to see specialists, and if they are hospitalized, he is the attending physician at the hospital — not a hospitalist who is unfamiliar with their health care, he says.

“Concierge medicine is very much patient driven,” Knope says. “Patients want a different model of care today and they’re willing to pay for it. The difference between concierge medicine and fast-food medicine is that the concierge doctor has time to perform correctly. If a doctor only has seven minutes to deal with a complex patient, he can only do so much. Doctors need time with their patients to do a good job.”

Scottsdale internist and geriatric physician, Scott Bernstein, converted his 2,000-patient practice to concierge medicine in July. What pushed him in that direction, he says, were Medicare constraints and the rising costs of running his practice.

“I was being squeezed from both ends,” Bernstein admits. “Now my patients and I contract directly without the constraints of the Medicare program. I can see patients the same day they call and I have time to provide the type of care they need and I want to provide. I can also do house calls and telephone appointments, which are not covered by Medicare.”

Bernstein sent a letter to his patients in April to let them know he was converting to concierge medicine. Since then, more than 200 people have joined the practice and agreed to pay his $2,000 annual fee.

“It was very bold to make this kind of change after working so hard for 12 years to build my practice,” he says. “I had to say goodbye to 80 percent of my patients and that was scary. But now I couldn’t be more thrilled. I give my patients the time and care they need, and most nights I have dinner with my family, which never happened before.”

Douglas Liebman of Scottsdale, a longtime patient of Dr. Bernstein’s, says he fully supports this type of care, but had to carefully weigh the costs before making a decision.

“I had to think about this carefully because I already have a $2,500 annual payout to Blue Cross Blue Shield,” Liebman says. “But then I realized that staying with Dr. Bernstein was a quality decision at any cost because it concerns my health care. He is genuinely concerned about my well-being and that’s really important to me. I also like being able to reach him after hours and weekends. But what I like most is the house calls. In the world of medicine today, it’s amazing that a doctor will come to your house if you can’t make it to the office.”

Bernstein transitioned to concierge care with the help of Dr. Helene Wechsler, a family physician in Scottsdale, who after 15 years of being in private practice with four other doctors started her own concierge practice in 2004. Wechsler’s practice is limited to 300 patients who pay $2,000 ayear.Patients with children under 18 pay $1,000 annually per child.

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“When I first started practicing 19 years ago, I scheduled patients for 30-minute appointments,” Wechsler says. “But when the healthcare system moved to managed care, I could only see each person 15 minutes or less. In that amount of time you can only treat part of a person and I like to treat the whole person. As a traditional family physician, I also had mountains of paperwork and stress. But I eliminated both when I reduced my patient load and stopped accepting insurance and Medicare. “My concierge practice is peaceful and happy, and when patients walk in the door it’s a pleasant experience,” she adds.

5.Men

Shepherding Success: Chamber Works To Help Hispanic Businesses Grow

By Don Harris

For 60 years, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has been at the forefront of promoting the growth and welfare of Hispanic-owned businesses throughout the state.

Arizona Business Magazine, September 2008The vast majority are small operations with one to five employees, but that doesn’t begin to tell the impact the Hispanic community has on Arizona’s economy. Chamber President and CEO Harry Garewal estimates the buying power of the Hispanic community in Arizona is $27 billion. That’s “b,” as in big bucks.

Overall there are about 35,000 Hispanic-owned businesses in the state, Garewal says. The chamber has a membership of 650 of the larger firms, many of which are not owned by Hispanics. Included are 52 corporate members, such as Wells Fargo and the Salt River Project.

Considering the Hispanic community’s economic muscle, it’s no wonder why non-Hispanic corporations support the chamber.  “They want to get into the Hispanic market,” Garewal says.

That fits nicely with the chamber’s mission to “promote the success of Hispanic businesses by facilitating business relationships, development and knowledge.”

Hispanic-owned businesses make up a diverse segment of the economy — professional consultants, lawyers, Realtors, mortgage companies, banks, retail, restaurants, landscaping and cleaning services. Founded in 1948, the chamber has established a reputation as a leader in setting the pace for business growth in today’s highly diversified market.

Historian Frank Barrios, who is writing a book on the chamber’s 60 years, says, “The value of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce to the Hispanic community and to the Arizona economy is in enabling Hispanic businesses to promote their unique business perspectives, often represented by language and/or culture. It may also allow other non-Hispanics to reach out to the Hispanic community for social and/or political reasons, providing a window into the Hispanic community.”

In the last decade, the number of Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona has increased significantly. At the same time, roughly one out of four residents is of Hispanic origin or descent.

After Garewal came on board five years ago, the chamber asked its members what they needed.

“As a result,” he says, “the chamber provides diverse technical assistance, including programs in business planning, seminars, marketing consultations, leadership development, networking opportunities, how to become certified to qualify for government contracts, what kinds of licenses are needed, the differences between an LLC, a ‘C’ corporation and an ‘S’ corporation. It’s all about what small business owners don’t know because they have been busy working their business.”

Providing access to capital is another prime function of the chamber. “We help identify financial institutions that will help give them access to capital,” Garewal says. “Maybe it’s just a matter of tweaking their business plan, their financials, so they can become bankable, which enables them to grow their business and create more jobs.”

Another service focuses on procurement. “We identify specific kinds of contracting opportunities,” Garewal says. He provides examples of successes through the efforts of the chamber and the businesses themselves.

A $1 billion Phoenix bond program provided Hispanic businesses with several opportunities for infrastructure services and products.

In Pinal County, a Casa Grande manufacturer wanted to set up a $45 million gypsum plant in Eloy. The chamber arranged workshops in Phoenix, Tucson and Eloy for subcontractors. Garewal says 61 businesses attended the sessions, and $32 million in contracts went to firms the chamber identified.

Garewal also served on a committee for emerging small businesses for the Super Bowl staged in Glendale last February. It was an 18-month project to provide input and access to NFL decision-makers and educate chamber members regarding the opportunities available to them.

More recently, Garewal and Joseph Ortiz, senior vice president of public relations and community affairs for the chamber, were invited to meet with NBA officials to discuss opportunities for vendors in connection with the 2009 All-Star Game, which will be held in Phoenix.

“They want to give everyone a fair chance at the opportunities, and we’ll share that information with our members,” Garewal says.

While the chamber closely monitors and tracks bills at the Arizona Legislature, it does not get involved in lobbying — yet.

“We have a good understanding of how the process works,” Garewal says. “For example, 40 of our members met this spring with the Hispanic caucus. It was the largest such meeting with Latino legislators, and members of the caucus were impressed that we had that many members who are interested in what was going on at the Legislature.”

Issues of interest include access to capital, procurement of contracts and affordable health care, but the main focus is on immigration.

“In the next year or two, we will be in a position to affect how public policy is established in the Arizona Legislature,” Garewal says.

At the national level, chamber officials meet with members of the Arizona congressional delegation. “We have been very engaged in immigration discussions, including border security,” Garewal says. “The federal government needs to take its responsibility seriously.They need to come up with a comprehensive immigration reform act that would address the 12.5 million folks who are here working. The government needs to provide a transition period — a mechanism to have those folks who are here today transition into becoming citizens of the United States. If the federal government tried to send 12.5 million people back to their countries of origin, that would bankrupt the United States. We wouldn’t have the work force necessary for the U.S. economy.”Arizona Business Magazine, September 2008

With the assistance of the chamber, the future of Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona appears bright.

“One thing that stands out,” Garewal says, “is that the chamber has always been, in its 60-year history, representative of the contributions that Hispanics have made in the state of Arizona.”