Tag Archives: Tucson

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor’s Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor's Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

TREO-Chairmans_Circle_2013

TREO adds to leadership

The TREO Board of Directors announced the following new leadership additions:

> New Vice Chairman of the Board/Chair-Elect: Guy Gunther, Vice President and General Manager, Tucson and Greater Arizona, CenturyLink. The Vice Chairman serves a key leadership role in partnership with the Chairman of the Board, and serves as Chair-Elect for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year.

New Chairman’s Circle Members:
> Karen D. Mlawsky, CEO, University of Arizona Medical Center
> Sandra Watson, President & CEO, Arizona Commerce Authority

“We’re thrilled to continue adding top business leadership to our ranks,” said Steve Eggen, retired CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems. “We have put together the right critical mass of leaders to accelerate our economic growth.”

As CenturyLink’s Vice President and General Manager, Guy Gunther is responsible for Northern and Southern Arizona markets for voice, data, entertainment and managed services, including P&L, field operations, customer experience, direct and indirect sales channels, network development and community relations. Gunther has over 20 years of senior management experience in telecommunications, consulting firms and finance. “I am honored to become part of the leadership of this effective organization,” said Gunther. “TREO is the connective tissue in the region – promoting our assets and creating value for companies looking to establish or expand operations in Southern Arizona.”

As CEO of the Hospital Division of The University of Arizona Health Network, Karen Mlawsky oversees both The University of Arizona Medical Center – University Campus and The University of Arizona Medical – South Campus, as well as dozens of affiliated clinics and physicians’ offices. She previously served as vice president of oncology services for University Medical Center in Tucson and spent more than 13 years at the Ohio State University Medical Center. “Health care will likely be one of the top job-creating industries, regardless of a slow economic recovery,” said Mlawsky. “There is tremendous opportunity to contribute to our region’s economic development through teaching and training our future health-care workforce.”

Sandra Watson, president and CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA), brings more than 20 years of economic development leadership and experience to Arizona. She and her teams have successfully attracted hundreds of companies that have invested billions of dollars in capital and created more than 65,000 quality jobs. With Governor Brewer’s visionary leadership, and a private sector board of directors made up of some of the state’s most successful CEOs, the ACA has established an aggressive five-year plan and is experiencing strong results in strengthening the state’s overall economy. “Partnering with regional groups such as TREO is critical to our overall success. TREO is central to a larger, collaborative movement in the state,” said Watson. “As a result of our strong, long-standing working relationship, we will continue to attract quality companies creating high-wage jobs in the Tucson region, benefitting the statewide economy.”

TREO Officers include:
> Chairman of the Board – Steve Eggen, (ret.) Chief Financial Officer, Raytheon Missile Systems
> Vice Chairman of the Board/Chair-Elect – Guy Gunther, Vice President and General Manager, Tucson and Greater Arizona, CenturyLink
> Immediate Past Chairman – Paul Bonavia, Chairman and CEO, UNS Energy Corp. & Tucson Electric Power Company
>  Secretary/Treasurer – Lisa Lovallo, Market Vice President, Southern Arizona, Cox Communications

TREO is governed by a 16-member Chairman’s Circle, which serves as a key advisory group for business development strategy and represents the Tucson region to national business prospects, and a 46-member Board of Directors.

TREO continues its Chairman’s Circle/Board of Directors expansion efforts begun in 2010. Economic development is a high priority, demanding increased engagement from the key companies, organizations and people that drive the Southern Arizona economy. TREO leadership recognizes the importance of providing strong thought leadership for community development and strengthening the Tucson “product” and positioning as a business center.

The above new members join other leaders providing both private and public sector perspective in accelerating economic development. For a complete listing of the TREO Chairman’s Circle and Board of Directors, visit http://www.treoaz.org/About-TREO-Board-of-Directors.aspx.

federal transportation bill

Arizona Forward hopes to guide Arizona’s transportation systems

As Valley Forward transitions to Arizona Forward to encompass a statewide focus, it’s only fitting that the association with a 43-year history of success tackling environmental issues — including land use, water management, air quality and energy — turns its attention to an issue that impacts every resident and every business in Arizona.
Transportation.

“Valley Forward has always valued transportation as one of the organization’s key areas of interest,” says John Godec, president of Godec, Randall & Associates Inc., which helps governments and businesses solve public and stakeholder challenges. “The Phoenix and Tucson metros have seen radical transportation changes and improvements in the past decade, so we’re asking, ‘What’s next? Are we good to go now?’”

Just as it did last year with parks and open spaces, Valley Forward hopes to answer those questions as it unveils its stance on transportation, covering topics such as transportation planning, how it impacts the quality of life in the Sun Corridor and how transportation affects Arizona’s economy.

One issue that Valley Forward wanted to address in its Transportation Primer is one on the minds of every Arizona: traffic congestion and how to better connect cities with each other. According to a policy report written by Byron Schlomach for The Goldwater Institute, the average Phoenix commuter spends an average of 38 hours a year in traffic, while a commuter in Tucson spends roughly 42 hours in traffic.

In an attempt to remedy traffic congestion in Phoenix, voters adopted Proposition 400 in November of 2004, which allowed for the renovating and extending of current freeways and the addition of more public transportation, such as the Valley Metro Light Rail, all of which connect small communities with larger cities. In Tucson, Pima County voters approved the $2.1 billion Regional Transportation Plan, which saw the construction of a modern streetcar project throughout the city, giving more people a chance to get around, while getting cars off the highways.

However, the question that has been asked by Valley Forward is, is it enough, especially since Arizona only seems to be growing in size?

“At least half the transportation systems that the state will need in 2050 have yet to be built,” says Sally Stewart, deputy communications director at the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) and Valley Forward member. “Despite the recent economic downturn, Arizona’s growth is not over. It is not a question of whether the Sun Corridor — one of the emerging megapolitan regions in the country — will be a reality; it is simply a matter of when.”

According to a study published in March 2010 by ADOT, it is expected that Arizona’s population will more than double, from 6.4 million to about 16 million people in the next 30 years. Maricopa County’s population is expected to increase by 90 percent, from 4 million people to about 7.6 million. The study suggests that because of this population explosion, travel times for various destinations in the Sun Corridor could increase by about 100 percent by 2050. This could mean that a trip between Phoenix and Tucson, which currently is about a 95-minute drive, could take up to 5.5 hours in 2050 (assuming that the Interstate-10 freeway is widened to about 10 lanes).

Valley Forward experts say that Arizona must plan ahead to improve this possible transportation dilemma, especially if the state wants to see more business activity and economic improvement.

“Transportation is key for economic development,” says said Eric Anderson, transportation director at the Maricopa Association of Governments. “The ability of a company’s workforce to commute on a predictable basis is critical. The movement of freight in and out of the region is also important. Companies looking to locate in the region always look at the adequacy of the transportation system in providing mobility and travel options.”

According to the American Public Transportation Association, every $1 billion invested in public transportation supports and creates 36,000 jobs. Despite the fact that policies, such as Proposition 400, have created and funded transportation projects, Valley Forward says that there is still not enough money allocated for Arizona’s travel needs.

“Arizona’s future economic development will be tied closely to the state’s willingness to commit funding and resources to improving and expanding its statewide transportation system,” says Craig Hughes, CEO and founder of Total Transit, the parent company of Discount Cab in Phoenix and Tucson. “Without a firm commitment to building and maintaining an efficient, integrated transportation network, the future could be one of congested freeways, inadequate rural highways, gridlocked city streets and under-funded and under-utilized mass transit.”

Valley Forward hopes that its stance and data findings will help create a dialogue not only among Phoenix and Tucson residents, but also policymakers.

“Arizona’s business community is a vital participant in guiding policymakers regarding the infrastructure challenges facing the state,” Stewart says. “If Arizonans want to enjoy a better quality of life based on a vibrant economy, then the business community must work closely with policymakers to make the difficult, but necessary decisions regarding transportation infrastructure.”

Adds Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, “We want to bring together the public and private sectors. Valley Forward’s goal is to try and drive the conversation to the middle and take the politics out. We want to drive up solutions so that Arizona, as a whole, can advance and can sustain itself.”

boeing-phantom-ray

It takes fuel to win tech race

Many of us can relate to thinking of Arizona’s economy as an automobile race. To win, you need a smooth race course, a fast car, a winning driver and high-powered fuel.
Carrying that analogy into Arizona’s technology sector, it’s clear that a lot of resources have been invested and progress has been made in building a world-class race course.  We’ve made tremendous strides in creating a business climate and technology environment for facilitating both private and public sector support to address the needs of Arizona’s technology businesses.

The Arizona Technology Council has worked collaboratively with many different technology champions to build this course. Technology issues are supported by the Governor’s office, the state’s legislature, the Arizona Commerce Authority, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and more.

Technology incubators and shared space facilities such as Gangplank in Chandler, Avondale and Tucson; Hackspace and Venture Catalyst at ASU’s SkySong in Scottsdale; BioInspire in Peoria; Innovation Incubator in Chandler; AzCI in Tucson; and AZ Disruptors in Scottsdale are making sure that today’s innovators are being given the right support, tools and environment to create the next big thing.

Collectively, our wins have included the passage of a tax credit for qualified research and development that is the best in the nation, the creation of the first statewide Arizona SciTech Festival and the birth of the Arizona Innovation Institute, to name a few.
Arizona’s technology industry also has great race cars. These are the technologies and intellectual property that create wealth and jobs driven by both Fortune 500 companies and entrepreneurs.  Companies such as Intel, Microchip Technologies, Freescale, ON Semiconductor and Avnet can all be found here.  Nearly all of the largest aerospace and defense prime contractors in the nation are located in Arizona, including Boeing, Honeywell, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics.

The state’s entrepreneurial spirit is reflected in companies such as WebPT, Infusionsoft, Axosoft, iLinc and Go Daddy that were founded in Arizona along with the many innovators that are coming to the table every day with new ideas rich in technology.

These companies large and small are driven by some of the greatest race car drivers the nation has produced.

But when it comes to fuel, Arizona’s economy has always been running close to empty. We lack the vital capital needed to win the race. Having access to angel investors, venture capital and private equity as well as debt instruments is critical to Arizona’s success.
The situation has not been improving on the equity side of the fuel equation. To offer some relief, the Arizona Technology Council is proposing legislation that would create a system of contingent tax credits to incentivize both in-state and out-of-state investors to capitalize Arizona companies.  This program, called the Arizona Fund of Funds, would allow the state to offer $100 million in tax incentives to minimize the risk for those seeking to invest in high-growth companies.  The state government’s role would be to serve as a guarantor through these contingent tax credits in case the investments don’t yield the projected results.  Expect more information on this important piece of legislation as it advances.

On the debt side of the fuel equation, there are encouraging signs that the worst of the credit crunch may be over. Early-stage companies need access to debt instruments, or loans. Capital is needed for equipment and expansion. A line of credit can help early-stage companies through ongoing cash-flow issues. But loan activity is still modest in Arizona for small companies. It remains heavily weighted toward the strongest corporate and consumer borrowers.

Capital goes hand in hand with innovation, high-paying jobs and cutting-edge technology, products and services. Before Arizona’s economy can win the race, we will need to become more self-sufficient at providing the fuel necessary to be a winner.

Steven G. Zylstra is president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council.

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group

electric.cars

Scottsdale company opens first vehicle charging station

A Scottsdale-based company is opening the first of 26 planned charging stations for electric vehicles along Interstate 10 in Arizona.

Officials with GOe3, Secretary of State Ken Bennett and members of the Clean Cities coalitions are having a ribbon-cutting ceremony Saturday at the Bowlin Travel Centers’ Picacho Peak Plaza between Phoenix and Tucson.

The company says travelers can make a 20-minute stop at Picacho to charge up their electric vehicle with either a DC fast charger or 70 amp charger.

GOe3 officials say the Arizona charging stations will be part of a network of 1,000 stations that will stretch along I-10 as well as I-8 and I-40. They say they want to make coast-to-coast travel via electric vehicle a reality by 2015.

Waldrum

University of Arizona Health Network gets new CEO

The largest healthcare entity in southern Arizona has named a new chief executive officer.

The University of Arizona Health Network says Dr. Michael R. Waldrum will start work on Jan. 27.

Waldrum is currently CEO of the University of Alabama Hospital at Birmingham and vice president of the UAB Health System.

The UofA Health Network includes two hospitals, clinics, health plans and a physician practice plan.

Stephanie Healy

Healy joins Cox southwestern leadership team

Cox Communications has announced Stephanie Barat Healy as its new director of public affairs for Southern Arizona.  Healy will be responsible for all Cox Public Affairs and Community Relations activities in Pima and Cochise counties.

“We are honored to have Stephanie heading up our southern Arizona Cox Communications Public Affairs team,” said Lisa Lovallo, Vice President and Market Manger, Southern Arizona.  “Stephanie and her family have been in Tucson for many years.  She cares deeply about our community and has a proven track record of bring diverse groups together to address public policy issues in a collaborative, sensitive and positive way.  She will be a great addition to our team.”

Prior to Cox, Healy held the position of executive vice president for the Southern Arizona Leadership Council (SALC). Her experience directing and implementing public policy and external relations activities for SALC will make for a smooth transition into her new role at Cox.

Healy has also served as president of the Hospital Council of Southern Arizona where she managed all aspects of a not for profit membership organization that included fourteen regional hospitals with a purpose of working collectively to improve the region’s health care climate and system.

Healy also held the position of Director of Economic Development for the Tucson Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce where she oversaw the division’s development of programs that promoted Tucson as a center for global trade and investment.

Healy became a Flinn-Brown Academy Fellow in fall 2011 after being nominated and accepted into the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership; a unique statewide program to nurture and develop leaders. She has also been recognized by Tucson Lifestyle as a key community leader working to build Tucson’s high-tech economy.

After relocating from Chicago nearly seventeen years ago, Healy resides in Tucson and is married to Tim Healy, vice president of Brokerage Services for CB Richard Ellis in Tucson.  The Healys have two children.

manufacturing

Tucson lands building systems manufacturer

Building systems manufacturer Aris Integration has announced that it will be locating its corporate headquarters in Tucson.

Manufacturing operations are expected to begin in 2013, and the company expects to hire nearly 600 workers over the next five years.

Aris will make customizable wall panel systems from light-gauge steel framing and foam insulation for residential and commercial buildings.

The company will also offer design and engineering services for its building systems.

United Kingdom-based Fusion Building Systems will be a partner in Aris’ new factory.

Aris officials say the pool of experienced construction workers was among the reasons the company chose southern Arizona.

Regional economic development officials welcomed Wednesday’s news, saying more manufacturing businesses will contribute to a stronger economy.

rsz_the_district_on_5th

IPA Arranges $67M Student Housing Sale in Tucson

Institutional Property Advisors (IPA), a multi-family brokerage division of Marcus & Millichap, arranged the sale of The District on 5th Avenue, a new 208-unit, student housing community one-half mile from the University of Arizona campus in Tucson.

The 764-bed complex commanded a sales price of $67M, or $322,115 per unit and $268 PSF.

Peter Katz, an executive director, advised the seller, Residential Housing. The buyer was Education Realty Trust (EdR).

“The District on 5th Avenue is a core, Class A pedestrian-to-campus, purpose-built student housing community that ideally fits the institutional investor’s property profile of an urban infill, close-to-campus asset,” Katz said.

“Institutional investors, in an effort to place allocated capital, have become more aggressive in their pricing. This has resulted in compressed cap rates and lowered unleveraged yields, especially for properties at tier-one universities with residents from strong socio-economic backgrounds.”

Located at 550 N. Fifth Ave. between N. Herbert and N. Arizona avenues, The District on 5th Avenue is a high-end student community with 12 two-bedroom/two-bath units, four three-bedroom/two-bath units, 40 three-bedroom/three-bath units, 45 four-bedroom/two-bath units and 107 four-bedroom/four-bath units, with an average weighted unit size of approximately 1,203 SF. All units are leased by the bed.

Community amenities include a 24-hour fitness center, a swimming pool and spa, a parking garage, tanning beds, a volleyball court and a media room with a movie theater. Each unit includes a full kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances, nine-foot ceilings, and a washer and dryer.

A key attraction for tenants is the community’s central location and nearby transportation access. Residents can easily walk or bike the short distance to the University of Arizona; a light rail system will be opened in 2013 and pass within half a block of the clubhouse, serving both the university and downtown Tucson.

The Congress Avenue shopping and entertainment district, also within one-half block of the community, features a wide range of retail shops and dozens of student-friendly restaurants, bars and clubs.

 

Southern AZ Weekend Trips - EAZ Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Southern AZ Weekend Trips (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Southern AZ Weekend Trips — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Bisbee

1326 W. Highway 92, #9,
Bisbee, AZ 85603
(520) 432-5421
bisbeearizona.com
Bisbee was founded in 1880 and has since evolved into an artist colony and retirement community emphasizing monthly events and tourism. Travelers from all over the world come to Bisbee to savor its unique charm … a blend of creativity, friendliness, style, romance and adventure wrapped in the splendor of the Old West.


Tubac

P.O. Box 1866,
Tubac, AZ 85646
(520) 398-2704
tubacaz.com
Located in the Santa Cruz River Valley, Tubac has a 250-year-old Spanish history. Tubac is the perfect shoppers’ paradise with more than 80 galleries and shops that feature hand-crafted items, sculpture, paintings, clothing and some of Southern Arizona’s best import shops. Tubac is also the gateway to birding, hiking,  and mountain biking.


Tombstone

P.O. Box 813,
Tombstone, AZ 85638
(520) 457-3884
cityoftombstone.com
The name Tombstone creates images of gunfights and dusty streets, whiskey and Faro games, Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and a plethora of old Western movie scenes. Tombstone has been called “The Town Too Tough to Die.”


Tucson

100 S. Church Ave.,
Tucson, AZ 85701
(800) 638-8350
visittucson.org
Although a growing metropolis, Tucson is rich with history and culture. Whether you come to visit the Old Tucson Studios, the Kitt Peak National Observatory, hike a trail or two at Saguaro National Park, or visit the University of Arizona’s campus, Tucson makes for a memorable day trip.


Sonoita

P.O. Box 607,
Sonoita, AZ 85637
(520) 455-5498
sonoitaelginchamber.org
Sonoita: “A short drive from where you are, to where you want to be.” Located in the heart of Arizona’s Wine Country, head to Sonoita for its nine, award-winning wineries, go horseback riding or bicycling, or simply take the trip to surround yourself with the views of breathtaking mountain peaks and rolling hills.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

sanctuarypool

Sanctuary Named Top Resort in the Southwest

The results of Condé Nast Traveler’s 25th annual Readers’ Choice Awards are in, and Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain has been voted the number one resort in the Southwest. With an overall score of 92.5 reflecting readers’ opinions on rooms, service, food, location, design and activities, Sanctuary shares the region’s top spot with Tucson’s The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain. This year, Condé Nast Traveler received a record 46,476 responses, with readers evaluating more than 10,000 resorts, destinations, airlines, and cruise lines worldwide.

“We are honored to be recognized by Condé Nast Traveler’s readers and thrilled for the Sanctuary team,” said Mike Surguine, vice president and general manager of Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain.  “The Phoenix/Scottsdale region has long been a sanctuary for leisure travelers, and we owe a debt of gratitude to the people and businesses that make this one of the world’s best places to visit.”

Condé Nast Traveler’s complete list of top resorts in the Southwest is available at http://www.cntraveler.com/readers-choice-awards/united-states/top-25-resorts-southwest-usa.

Ray Bargull

Sundt CFO and Executive VP Retires After 35 Years

Raymond C. Bargull has retired from his position as chief financial officer and executive vice president of The Sundt Companies, Inc., the holding company of Sundt Construction, Inc. Bargull joined the company in 1977 and served as CFO for 22 years.

“Ray has been an absolute asset to this company for more than three decades,” Sundt CEO Dave Crawford said. “While we are saddened to see him go, we remain grateful for the contributions he has made here through his unwavering dedication to guiding the overall direction of Sundt’s financial plans and policies. The groundwork he established will continue to pay dividends well into the future.”

Upon Bargull’s retirement Sept. 30, senior vice president Kevin Burnett assumed the CFO role, a position he had already begun to fill while working alongside Bargull throughout the summer.

Bargull launched his career with Sundt as payroll manager in the late 1970s. Over the years he has held titles of senior vice president, controller and general accounting manager.

He was promoted to the position of chief financial officer in 1990, where he was responsible for directing treasury, budgeting, auditing, tax, accounting, real estate and insurance activities for the corporation and its subsidiaries. One year later, Bargull was named executive vice president. He also served on The Sundt Companies board of directors.

An active member of the Southern Arizona business community, Bargull has played a key role in the Tucson Metro Chamber of Commerce, serving as a member of the organization’s board of directors for nearly a decade and as board chairman from 2009-2010. He will be stepping down from his role on the board at the end of this year.

He has also been actively involved in leadership roles with the Construction Financial Management Association’s Sonoran chapter, and is a member of the Arizona Society of Certified Public Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

145916028

FastMed Acquires El Dorado Urgent Care

FastMed Urgent Care announced the acquisition of El Dorado Urgent Care, based in Tucson, which will include rebranding and changing the name of the clinic to FastMed.

“With 16 locations in Tucson and Phoenix, FastMed is thoroughly committed to the neighborhoods we serve,” said FastMed President and Chief Operating Officer Kevin Blank.  “We are very excited to expand our presence in Tucson with the excellent location and staff at El Dorado, and we look forward to bringing our special brand of urgent care.”

The 3,200-square-foot facility will have six exam rooms with a medical provider and medical staff providing urgent medical care, X-rays and occupational health services.  By the November 3rd launch party, internal and external signs will have changed at the El Dorado location, as well as interior collateral, staff scrubs and other visible revisions.  The website will also migrate to fastmed.com. Visitors can check-in online, get the latest in health tips and breaking health news and visit the medical library for even more answers to their health questions.

“Our name might be changing, but our patients can still count on the same great care and service; we’ll just be able to offer more of what we’ve done so well now that we are part of FastMed,” said Lane Tassin, M.D. and co-founder of El Dorado Urgent Care.  “We are happy to become part of a team of FastMed’s caliber because they have the kind of patient-centered attitude matching that of the El Dorado team. They bring so many quality medical programs, as well as community outreach efforts through FastMed Cares, that we believe this will be a win-win relationship for our Tucson marketplace.”

As a FastMed clinic, El Dorado patients will enjoy extended hours from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 365 days a year, urgent care, family medicine, flu shots, school/sports/work physicals, workers’ compensation injury care, on-site lab/X-ray/Rx and more, as well as the FastMed Discount Program for those without health coverage.

88012242

Cost of Kitt Peak wildlife crossings soar

Construction costs for two wildlife crossings planned on Ajo Highway near Kitt Peak have soared by nearly 60 percent.

The Arizona Daily Star reports the crossings now are expected to cost about $1.2 million.

A Tohono O’odham Police Department report provided to Pima County’s Regional Transportation Authority shows nearly 20 percent of crashes in the area involve animals. The two under-crossing structures are meant to reduce that number.

RTA transportation services director Jim DeGrood says the Arizona Department of Transportation wants to build them now in conjunction with an ongoing highway-widening project.

The RTA Board approved $746,280 for the project last year and on Thursday approved another $154,000. The Arizona Department of Transportation will pay for the remaining shortfall of about $291,000.

rsz_3500_e_sunrise_dr

CBRE Leases 12,877 SF Commercial Building in Catalina Foothills

CBRE negotiated a 12,877 SF lease for a vacant restaurant/office building at 3500 E. Sunrise Dr. at Campo Abierto in Tucson.

Five Palms LLC, an Arizona-based corporation, offering four unique dining concepts in one location, has leased the building and plans to open in November 2012, marking its first location in the U.S.

Buzz Isaacson, Nancy McClure and Ike Isaacson of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Landmark Assets LLC of Scottsdale in negotiating the long-term lease agreement.

The tenant, Arizona Five Palms LLC of Tucson and its sole owner/operator Nino Aidi, who grew up in Europe, was represented by Thomas Sylvester of Sylvester Realty & Investments, also in Tucson. The exact financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

“This property is ideal for a new restaurant concept like Five Palms,” said CBRE’s McClure. “It’s premium location in the Catalina Foothills offers excellent visibility, and it’s beautiful, new interior decor and unique architecture will only enhance the dining atmosphere.”

The restaurant features four distinct dining elements. Its centerpiece is a fine dining area with a patio featuring an extensive menu offering prime steak aged in house and carved tableside, as well as fresh fish flown in daily. Patrons will also enjoy a fine bar with its own patio.

A wine and gourmet shop, Dovino, will be located on site featuring wines from 13 countries, cheese, charcutries, chocolates, a walk-in humidor with cigars and home delivery. Nino’s Bar and Grill, a casual bar, will be located on the second floor and will have a different menu than the first floor dining room, focusing on the best of old- and new-world cuisine.

Nino’s Bar and Grille will include the addition of a newly added, elevated, outdoor open-air covered terrace featuring amazing views of the surrounding mountains, La Paloma golf course and serene Tucson city lights. It is sure to be a favorite gathering spot to enjoy a relaxed meal and beverage. In addition, extensive banquet facilities for special events will be available. Catering will also be featured.

“The Five Palms Restaurant in San Carlos is a favorite of visiting Americans and Tucsonans who vacation in the beautiful Mexican beachfront resort town,” Aidi said. “Their enthusiasm for the restaurant’s fine food and ambiance is the main reason I’ve created and brought this unique concept and dining experience to Tucson.”

In addition to the restaurant in San Carlos, the Five Palms restaurant chain also operates gourmet restaurants in Obregon and Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

 

Seahorse (Alex Kerstitch) (

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Announces Its New Warden Aquarium

Any interpretation of the Sonoran Desert region would be incomplete without recognizing the importance of the fresh water rivers that flow through it and the Sea of Cortez or Gulf of California. The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum will unveil its dramatic, new permanent aquarium dedicated to revealing the remarkable story of this miraculous region in December 2012.

“Without this sea and the summer monsoon that brings moisture from it, the lush Sonoran Desert known today would be an entirely different place,” state Craig Ivanyi, Executive Director of the Museum. “This body of water truly represents a full half of the Sonoran Desert Region – literally 100,000 square miles of desert-ocean and an astounding 900 islands!”

This exhibition, “Rivers to the Sea”, in the new Warden Aquarium, will highlight the roles of the region’s rivers, including the mighty Colorado, and the Gulf of California. Two galleries are planned: one highlighting the region’s freshwater rivers and aquatic life and the other featuring the Sea of Cortez and representative sea life. Primary funding for the new exhibition was generously provided by the Bert W. Martin Foundation.

The galleries will encompass over 1,100 square feet and include 14 tanks displaying a variety of fresh- and salt-water animal species. Some of the Museum’s numerous aquatic conservation projects impacting many aquatic species will be highlighted in the galleries.
The exhibition area will also include a touch tank with marine invertebrates, like sea stars and hermit crabs, for a hands-on encounter for visitors. A visit to the new Warden Aquarium will be included with the purchase of a general admission ticket.

The Sea of Cortez is extremely diverse containing one of the world’s smallest and most endangered marine mammals, the vaquita, a rare type of porpoise, migratory whales that no longer migrate, over 800 types of fishes, five species of sea turtles, and the rarely encountered American crocodile. In addition to the varied species of wildlife, the Sea of Cortez provides much of the moisture for the region’s summer rains which have tremendously influenced vegetation on the terrestrial part of the Sonoran Desert Region.

The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is one of the nation’s leading outdoor, living museums, featuring more than 230 animals and 1,200 varieties of desert plants. Its mission is to inspire people to live in harmony with the natural world by fostering love, appreciation, and understanding of the bi-national Sonoran Desert region. The museum is located at 2021 N. Kinney Road, in Tucson Mountain Park adjacent to Saguaro National Park (West). It is open daily year round with operating hours varying by season. Call (520) 883-2702 or visit www.desertmuseum.org for more information.

86486342

Tucson Hispanic Consumers Will Spend Nearly $9B By 2015

About half of all Tucson Hispanics frequent Facebook, 82 percent own cell phones, and they spend nearly $300 million a year on clothing and $450 million buying food outside of the home.

These are only a few of the facts featured in DATOS: Tucson 2012. The study is scheduled for release by the state’s two largest Hispanic chambers of commerce at Tucson’s Doubletree Hotel September 20.

“Tucson is one of the state’s powerhouses in terms of Hispanic buying power and the entire Southern Arizona region is growing more important every day. DATOS: Tucson is our way of telling that story,” said Lea Marquez Peterson, president and CEO of the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Gonzalo de la Melena, president/CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, adds, “The release of DATOS: Tucson speaks not only to the growing economic influence of Hispanics in Tucson and Southern Arizona, but also statewide and across the nation. Without a doubt, Hispanics are helping drive our state’s economic recovery.”

The third annual DATOS: Tucson provides a detailed review and analysis of the growing economic impact of the Hispanic market in Southern Arizona.

DATOS: Tucson quick facts:

> Arizona Hispanics will account for $40 billion statewide in consumer spending in 2012.
> The Hispanic population in Pima County grew at about 12 times the rate of non-Hispanics from 2010 and 2011.
> More than half of the children under five in Pima County are Hispanic.
> There are approximately 65,000 Hispanic-owned small businesses in Arizona, one-third of which are owned by Latinas.
> With $1.2 Trillion in buying power in 2012, if U.S. Hispanics were a country they would be the 15th largest economy in the world.

More than 200 business and community leaders are expected to attend the September 20 luncheon organized by the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

DATOS: Tucson is researched by a team of experts led by Dr. Loui Olivas, professor emeritus at Arizona State University, and published by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. It provides detailed analysis and information regarding major trends in technology, employment, housing, education, small business activity and more. DATOS: Tucson’s presenting sponsor is Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ). Additional support is provided by PetSmart and the University of Phoenix.

“We’re always pleased to be a part of the DATOS: Tucson luncheon and see great value in sharing research that points to the growing economic influence of the Hispanic community.,” said Deanna Salazar, senior vice president and general counsel for BCBSAZ.

DATOS: Tucson is based in part on research gathered for DATOS: Focus on the Hispanic Market, a statewide report released as part of “Transforming Arizona’s Economy”, a yearlong series of events created by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The AZHCC’s next major event is the Minority Business Enterprise Summit Nov. 16, 2012 in Phoenix. The THCC’s next major event is Noche de Exitos Gala and Bi-National Awards, October 13th, 2012, Casino del Sol Hotel in Tucson.

DATOS: Tucson will be released during a luncheon at the Doubletree Hotel Tucson at Reid Park in the Grand Ballroom, 445 S. Alvernon Way. Karla Gomez-Escamilla, a news reporter at Univision in Tucson, will emcee the luncheon.

Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. Tickets are $60 for THCC and AZHCC members. $75.00 for non-members. Discounted rates for tables of 8 also are available. This event is open to the public.

To register online, visit tucsonhispanicchamber.org or call the Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at 520-620-0005. For sponsorship information, contact the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at 602-279-1800.

92686722

Accelr8 Technology relocates to Tucson

After a competitive multi-state process, Accelr8 Technology Corporation
announced that it is moving its headquarters from Denver to Tucson.

Founded in 1982, Accelr8 develops instruments used for the detection of pathogenic microorganisms. Its BACcel rapid diagnostic system, in development, is the first technology that is able to count and identify dangerous pathogens and their drug resistance expression within the same day of obtaining a patient specimen, instead of the two to three days required for standard methods. This speed allows for a significant improvement in the treatment of the over 1.7 million people in the US who contract a hospital acquired infection each year, and access to a multi-billion dollar market.

Accelr8 has selected Tucson as best meeting its needs for future high-growth plans. Accelr8 will bring high-skilled, high-wage jobs to Southern Arizona with plans to fill 65 positions over the next three years and the potential to grow to 200-300 employees in subsequent years. Headquarter positions include engineers, scientists, sales/marketing, management, finance, quality/regulatory and manufacturing. The company will occupy approximately 15,000 square feet of space in Pima County’s Herbert K. Abrams Public Health Center at 3950 S. Country Club Road. After a build out of wet lab space, the company is expected to be operational by early 2013.

“Accelr8 is developing a revolutionary product in the diagnostics area and we were impressed with the region’s emerging bioscience strength, innovation and support that can help ensure our future success,” said Lawrence Mehren, president and CEO, Accelr8 Technology Corporation.

“Accelr8 strengthens the biotechnology excellence our state has been building, while creating high-quality jobs for Arizonans,” said Governor Jan Brewer. “I am grateful to the Arizona Commerce Authority, TREO and other regional partners whose excellence and creativity produced infrastructure solutions to secure Accelr8 for Arizona.”

“Given the Accelr8 management team’s past success driving high-growth plans for similar companies, it should prove to be a solid return on investment for many years,” said Sharon Bronson, vice chair, Pima County Board of Supervisors.

“Our region has the technical talent and workforce that Accelr8 needs,” said Jonathan Rothschild, mayor, City of Tucson. “We are quickly becoming recognized for our ‘innovation know how.’”

“This win shows that Tucson is poised to take off as a region that is attractive to bioscience companies,” said Stephen G. Eggen, TREO Chairman of the Board and CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems. “Locally, many partners worked very hard to win this deal in a unified fashion.”
“We’re thrilled to attract a publicly-traded headquarters in a key, targeted industry,” said Joe Snell, president & CEO, TREO. “Accelr8 represents another building block as we emerge as a leading biotech hub.”

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Phoenix, Tucson mayors lead Mexico trade mission

The mayors of Phoenix and Tucson lead a trade mission to Mexico this week as part of effort to foster relations with Arizona’s largest trading partner.

Phoenix’s Greg Stanton and Tucson’s Jonathan Rothschild will be joined by Phoenix City Councilman Michael Nowakowski, Phoenix City Manager David Cavazos, representatives from the Greater Phoenix Economic Council and various Arizona chambers of commerce.

The group will travel to Hermosillo to meet with Sonora Gov. Guillermo Padres Elias and others and then tour a manufacturing facility.

They later will head to Mexico City to meet with representatives from the Mexico Secretary of Tourism, Aeromexico, U.S. Ambassador and Mexico Secretary of Foreign Affairs and others.

Cavazos says Mexico is Arizona’s largest trading partner with the state exporting $5.7 billion in merchandise to Mexico last year.

LivingSocial

LivingSocial To Open Call Center In Tucson

CBRE completed a 30,500 SF lease with LivingSocial at a four-story, Class A office building located at 250 S. Williams Circle in Tucson.

LivingSocial, an online discount promoter for local products and services, plans to open a new call center in Tucson in July.

David A. Volk, SIOR, and Bruce A. Suppes of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Kent Circle Investments LLC, in negotiating the five-year lease agreement. LivingSocial, based in Washington D.C., was represented by Steve Burman and Jay Farmer of Jones Lang LaSalle, also in Washington D.C., and Andrew Medley in the firm’s Phoenix office. The exact financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

“This building is among the most modern in Tucson and was specifically designed with technology-intensive users in mind,” said CBRE’s Volk.

LivingSocial will occupy the building’s entire top floor, bringing its occupancy to 100 percent. In addition to the new Tucson location, LivingSocial also has large offices in Washington D.C., New York, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Kent Circle Investments LLC is controlled by Seldin Real Estate Inc. of Scottsdale. The company also owns the high-rise office building at 5151 E. Broadway in Tucson.

For more information on LivingSocial, visit their website at livingsocial.com.

treo board

TREO Board Of Directors Votes In New Officers

The TREO Board of Directors today announces the election of its officers for the Fiscal Year 2012-13. Terms are July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013.

The officers are:

Steve Eggen, CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems – Presiding Chairman of the Board

Lisa Lovallo, VP and Systems Manager, Cox Communications Southern Arizona – Secretary/Treasurer

The TREO Board is comprised of 46 community leaders from the private sector, public sector and academia, including presidents of both universities and the community college in Southern Arizona, mayors of public jurisdictions in the Tucson region, Pima County and major corporations and businesses operating in Southern Arizona. The TREO Board and major stakeholders represent 85,000 employees in Southern Arizona. For a full listing of the TREO Board of Directors, visit http://www.treoaz.org/Living-and-Working-Tucson-Leaders-Board-of-Directors.aspx.

In addition, the TREO Board of Directors unanimously voted to extend the President & CEO contract for a three year term. “We have full confidence in Joe Snell. Snell has led this organization since 2005 and has guided the efforts of TREO, resulting in high value to the community. Our region has challenges ahead of us and he continues to be the right leader at the right time,” said Steve Eggen, incoming Chairman of the Board.

“The organization is focusing on and achieving the goals set out for it by the TREO Board of Directors,” he continued. “We have exciting plans in motion for this fiscal year.”

For more information on TREO Board of Directors, visit TREO’s website at treoaz.org.

tucson airport

Study Puts Tucson Airport’s Economic Impact At $3.2 Billion

A new study shows Tucson International Airport (TIA) brings an annual economic impact of more than $3.2 billion to the region.

The study was commissioned by the Tucson Airport Authority (TAA) and conducted by MBA students from the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. It has been more than 10 years since TAA conducted such an analysis.

“These updated findings provide an accurate and current picture of the job creation and economic activity brought about by TAA’s ongoing operations, significant infrastructure investments and partnerships with more than 100 tenants. We take great pride in helping to improve the economic vitality and quality of life in southern Arizona,” said TAA President/CEO Bonnie Allin.

The airport’s direct, indirect and induced economic effects are included in the total. Direct impact is generated as a result of employment and operation of the airport and tenant businesses. The Eller MBA consulting team calculated a total annual direct impact of $1.7 billion stemming from payroll, goods and services purchased by the airport and airport businesses, expenditures on capital improvement projects and payment of local taxes from airport activity.

The remainder of the $3.2 billion total is attributed to indirect and induced impact.

Indirect impact includes money spent at the airport and in the community by airport patrons, plus revenue generated by businesses that chose to locate in the region because the airport is integral to their operations.

Induced impact, also known as the multiplier effect, is based on an economic principle that quantifies how revenue generated by airport activities grows as it cycles through the community. For example, when TAA hires a local construction company for a project, the company hires additional employees, who increase demand for goods and services in the region through spending their salaries. The businesses they patronize hire additional workers, and the process repeats.

Similarly, 13,000 workers are directly employed at TIA. Indirect and induced effects of airport employment bring the total to 35,000 local jobs supported as a result of the airport’s presence in the community.

The UA graduate students are part of the Eller MBA’s experiential learning program, which allows the students to participate in a strategic consulting project. TAA is one of the College’s 12 clients this year, including Raytheon, Microsoft and Intuit, said Eller College of Management Director for Experiential Learning Nannon Roosa.

“This program is the cornerstone of our MBA’s first year,” Roosa said. “Projects like these challenge students to apply core business skills to address a real-world business issue.

“Eller’s innovative curriculum, combined with pioneering research, distinguished faculty, excellence in entrepreneurship and social responsibility, has brought international recognition to the program,” she added.

The report helps to demonstrate the importance of TIA to a strong local economy, which is useful in regional business recruitment and retention efforts, as well as air service development initiatives. TAA will share the findings from this study for inclusion in an Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) study that will quantify the statewide impact of aviation, as well as other economic development groups such as TREO, the Arizona Commerce Authority, local chambers and the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau.

For more information on the Tucson International Airport, visit their website at flytucsonairport.com.