Tag Archives: Tulane University

asu skysong collaborates with Taiwan's ITRI

Crow explores potential of new educational technologies

Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow is among more than a dozen leaders from a diverse group of colleges and universities examining the disruptive potential of new educational technologies, such as massive open online courses (MOOCs), to boost the number of Americans earning a college degree. The launch of the Presidential Innovation Lab was announced recently by the American Council on Education, the nation’s largest higher education organization.

“I look forward to helping lead a national dialogue about how newer educational innovations could be used by particularly older, post-traditional students, low-income young adults and other underserved students toward degree completion,” Crow said. “This opportunity aligns directly with our ASU vision as the model for a New American University – measured not by who we exclude, but rather by who we include and how they succeed.”

According to ACE, the Presidential Innovation Lab will bring together higher education leaders to engage in proactive thinking about this new learning space. The lab is part of a wide-ranging research and evaluation effort examining the academic potential of MOOCs announced by ACE in November 2012.

Initially, the lab will meet July 21-23 at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, Calif., an independent, nonprofit research organization that will help guide the work of the university leaders. A second two-day meeting is scheduled for October 2013 in Washington, D.C.

The new think tank of higher education CEOs will consider questions such as how newer educational innovations could be used by students toward degree completion and the potential impact of such innovations on the fundamental design and delivery of instruction. The lab participants also will examine how institutions recognize learning and which financing models underpin all of higher education.

Findings from the lab will be shared with ACE membership, policymakers and the media. Its work is being supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

In addition to Crow, other higher education leaders taking part in the lab include the following:

•           Joseph E. Aoun, president, Northeastern University (Massachusetts)
•           Chris Bustamante, president, Rio Salado College (Arizona)
•           Scott S. Cowen, president, Tulane University (Louisiana)
•           John F. Ebersole, president, Excelsior College (New York)
•           Renu Khator, president, University of Houston, and chancellor, University of Houston System (Texas)
•           Robert W. Mendenhall, president, Western Governors University (Utah)
•           Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president, San Jose State University (California)
•           Vincent Price, provost, University of Pennsylvania
•           L. Rafael Reif, president, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
•           Kevin P. Reilly, president, University of Wisconsin System
•           Clayton Spencer, president, Bates College (Maine)
•           Linda M. Thor, chancellor, Foothill-De Anza Community College District (California)

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Tiffany & Bosco Names Fischbach as Shareholder

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney William M. Fischbach III has been named as a Shareholder.  Fischbach concentrates his practice in commercial and civil litigation with an emphasis in real estate, banking, contract disputes, and personal injury. He brings over 13 years of leadership experience at the local, state, federal, and international levels, and in both the private and public sectors.  Will serves as Board Chairman for the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Valley Young Professionals and as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Emerging Leaders Group.

Prior to joining Tiffany & Bosco, Fischbach gained invaluable courtroom and leadership experience in the United States Army Judge Advocate General’s (JAG) Corps.  He served as the chief prosecutor for the 101st Airborne Division, a criminal defense attorney in the 82nd Airborne Division, and an appeals attorney at U.S. Army Headquarters in Washington, D.C.  Fischbach completed tours of duty in Iraq, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, and the Republic of Korea, and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Combat Action Badge for his service in Iraq. He was honorably discharged in 2008 at the rank of Major.

He received his JD and MBA in 1999 from Tulane University, New Orleans, LA and a BS in Political Science from Arizona State University in 1994.

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Tiffany & Bosco Names Fischbach as Shareholder

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney William M. Fischbach III has been named as a Shareholder.  Fischbach concentrates his practice in commercial and civil litigation with an emphasis in real estate, banking, contract disputes, and personal injury. He brings over 13 years of leadership experience at the local, state, federal, and international levels, and in both the private and public sectors.  Will serves as Board Chairman for the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Valley Young Professionals and as a Member of the Board of Directors of the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Emerging Leaders Group.

Prior to joining Tiffany & Bosco, Fischbach gained invaluable courtroom and leadership experience in the United States Army Judge Advocate General’s (JAG) Corps.  He served as the chief prosecutor for the 101st Airborne Division, a criminal defense attorney in the 82nd Airborne Division, and an appeals attorney at U.S. Army Headquarters in Washington, D.C.  Fischbach completed tours of duty in Iraq, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, and the Republic of Korea, and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Combat Action Badge for his service in Iraq. He was honorably discharged in 2008 at the rank of Major.

He received his JD and MBA in 1999 from Tulane University, New Orleans, LA and a BS in Political Science from Arizona State University in 1994.

My Electronic Pillbox can help with complex medicine regimes

Cheap medicine more vital, study reveals

People may think it’s more vital to take their medicine, if that medicine is cheap. A new study from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University shows consumers believe prices for lifesaving products are based on need and not profit. Therefore, they often assume their risk of getting a serious illness is higher when the medicine is less expensive, and they’re also more likely to plan to get the treatment, including flu shots.

“We find that people have a fundamental belief that everyone should have access to lifesaving care, such as vaccines, doctor’s visits, screening tests like mammograms, and cancer treatments,” says Assistant Professor Adriana Samper of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Nobody wants anyone to die because they didn’t have the resources to cover the treatment. Therefore, they believe communal pricing (based on need), rather than the normal market pricing for other goods, applies in these situations. They expect medicine for a serious illness to be inexpensive.”

Samper’s new marketing study, co-authored with Assistant Professor Janet Schwartz of Tulane University, will appear in the April edition of the Journal of Consumer Research. In a series of experiments, the researchers demonstrated several interesting points about medication pricing, and those points held true, even if insurance — not the consumer — was going to pay for the treatments.

In the first experiment, participants in an online study were asked to evaluate 10 products and services based on whether they were priced for “communal” purposes or market value. Vaccines, doctor’s visits and drugs used to prevent serious illnesses all ranked as being driven by communal pricing, while items like tax-preparation services, restaurant menu items and home electronics all ranked as market-driven.

In the next experiment, online participants were asked about a fictitious cream described as either preventing skin cancer or preventing age spots. The cream was also offered at a low price of $25 or a high price of $250. Price had no effect on attitudes toward the cosmetic cream, but when the skin-cancer treatment was only $25, respondents believed they needed it more — that they were at higher risk for the disease.

“We see the same thing for a flu shot,” says Samper. “People are more concerned about getting the disease and addressing prevention if the vaccine is cheaper. That’s an important note for health officials during our especially tough flu season right now.”

A third experiment showed participants an ad for the same cream, with the same image, but slightly different versions of text, again reflecting whether the cream was for skin-cancer prevention or cosmetic purposes. The two different price points were offered in each case. Consumers were much more likely to keep reading the ad and planned to pursue the treatment in the case where the cream was for skin cancer and the price was lower. This happened even when insurance was going to pay for the cream at either price.

“This implies a possible problem with the recent push for price transparency,” adds Samper. “In some cases, high prices may signal lower self-risk, and people may not think it’s important to get needed treatments just because the cost is high.”

In the last experiment, the researchers tested the effects of different types of messages meant to encourage people to get flu shots. They used the two prices again and also varied whether the flu’s consequences were described as self-focused — such as missing work or paying medical bills if you got the flu — or societally-focused — such as getting other people sick or hurting economic productivity with the flu’s spread. Very clearly, individuals again increased their assumption of risk and intentions to get the vaccine in response to lower price, but only when the message focused on personal consequences of the flu.

“Therefore, public health officials should take note: Ads emphasizing the protection of other people do not appear to convince people to get vaccinated,” say Samper. “People respond best to messages that emphasize how illness will personally affect them.”

The full study can be found at http://www.jstor.org/stable/info/10.1086/668639.