Tag Archives: ULI

ULI Arizona Shark Tank Flyer art

ULI seeking real estate proposals for ‘Shark Tank’ event

The Urban Land Institute (ULI) Arizona District Council is seeking proposals from local real estate entrepreneurs to showcase and pitch their projects at the popular ULI Shark Tank event.  Real money and expert deal making advice is at stake for successful candidates with real estate development experience, an active and interesting deal to discuss, and the ability to make a concise and captivating presentation.

 

All proposals will be evaluated by a panel of ‘sharks’ including Steven J. Hilton, Meritage Homes Corporation; F. Francis Najafi, Pivotal Group; and Robert Sarver, Western Alliance Bancorporation.  C. Joseph Blackbourn, Everest Holdings, will be the moderator.

 

The top proposals will be selected as the feature presentations at the November 5 event held at The Phoenician Resort in Scottsdale.  Presenters will gain exposure to over 200 industry professionals, including a wide array of lenders, private investors, developers, architects, and others, providing both capital and expertise to help bring their project to fruition.

 

Deadline for Submittal:            September 30, 5 p.m.

 

Submit Proposals to:                 Carrie.Martin@ULI.org

 

Requirements:   - Biography and CV of the proposed presenter

– Summary-level outline of the investment request with project description, maps, etc.

– Cover letter expressing interest in participation in Shark Tank

– Finalists will participate in two to three planning conference calls with                                                         ULI staff and the Shark Tank event moderator

 

Benefits to Presenters:   - Constructive feedback from actual real estate icons

– A thorough vetting of all high-level project plans/assumptions

– Presentation experience and practice pitching your deal

– Immediate access to the knowledgeable ULI industry leaders

– Exposure to potential capital investors in the audience

 

More Information:              www.arizona.uli.org

ULI Stage, WEB

Spreading Prosperity: Innovation and Job Growth for Arizona’s Future

With the quality of panelists and speakers assembled for ULI Arizona District Council’s 9th annual Trends Day, the theme — “Spreading Prosperity” — was apropos.

Where else but at ULI’s Trends Day does an audience of almost 900 real estate and business leaders get to hear some of the industry’s top experts talk about spreading prosperity as it relates to innovation and job growth for Arizona’s future?

ULI Arizona District Council Chair Duke Reiter opened with remarks about this being a time of transformation. Trends Day Chair Tom Johnston said the day was all about best practices. Dr. Matthew Croucher, an economist with APS, offered his take Arizona’s economy – past present and future.

Lynn Thurber, ULI National Chairman and Patrick Phillips, ULI National CEO were both in attendance to discuss the connections between health and the built environment, and the opportunities to use real estate investments to help improve the health of people and create more thriving communities.

Panels included such Valley leaders as GPEC President Barry Broome, pro sports icon Jerry Colangelo, Valley Metro CEO Steve Banta, former Arizona Congressman Jim Kolbe, Super Bowl XLIX Host Committee CEO Jay Parry, Mesa Mayor Scott Smith and Chandler Economic Development Director Chris Mackay.

The keynote address, delivered by Alex Steffen, co-founder of Worldchanging, was an inspiring, yet provocative analysis of global trends – past, present and future.

Optimism ruled the day; a welcome change from years past.

By Peter Madrid, Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona, Inc.

David Knoll

David Knoll Joins Ryan Companies

Ryan Companies US, Inc. announced David Knoll has been hired as Director of Development in the SouthCentral Region. In his new position, David is responsible for leading the pursuit of development projects in Texas. Additional responsibilities include site selection and land acquisition, due diligence, municipal and approvals, design and construction coordination, marketing and leasing, and sale negotiation.

“David will be instrumental in the strategic growth of Ryan’s SouthCentral Region,” said Hunter Barrier, President of Ryan’s SouthCentral Region. “He brings a unique perspective to his new role due to his broad base experience in business approaches and we’re thrilled to have him on board.”

Prior to joining Ryan, David was Executive Director of the non-profit Urban Land Institute (ULI) – Austin District Council. David executed the vision of ULI – Austin and was successful in growing the membership from 265 to over 400 members during his tenure. He is known for his strong analytical and problem solving skills as well as his ability to manage complex projects.

“I’m extremely proud to work with such a talented group of professionals and I’m excited to take on the challenge of expanding Ryan’s presence in Texas,” said Knoll.

David received a Bachelor of Arts in Civil Engineering from Dartmouth College and a Masters in Community and Regional Planning from the University of Texas at Austin. He is a member of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and the American Planning Association (APA).

rsz_uli_arizona_markban_logotype_rgb300

ULI Seeking Proposals for Inaugural Shark Tank Event

The Urban Land Institute (ULI) Arizona is seeking proposals from local real estate entrepreneurs to showcase and pitch their projects at the first annual Shark Tank event. Successful candidates will have real estate development experience, an active and interesting deal to discuss and the ability to make a concise and captivating presentation.

All proposals will be evaluated by a panel of ‘sharks’ including; Daryl Burton, Presson Corporation, I. Michael Kasser, Holualoa Companies and Craig Krumwiede, Harvard Investments and moderated by C. Joeseph Blackbourn, Everest Holdings.

The top proposals will be selected as the feature presentations at the November 20th event held at the Montelucia Resort in Paradise Valley. Presenters will gain exposure to over 200 industry professionals, including a wide array of lenders, private investors, developers, architects, and others, providing both capital and expertise to help bring their project to fruition.

 

Deadline for Submittal: October 25, 2013, 5:00 pm

 

Submit Proposals to: Carrie.Martin@ULI.org

 

Requirements: – Biography and CV of the proposed presenter

– Summary-level outline of the investment request with project description, maps, etc.

– Cover letter expressing interest in participation in Shark Tank

– Finalists will participate in 2 – 3 planning conference calls with ULI staff and the Shark Tank event moderator

 

Benefits to Presenters:Constructive feedback from actual real estate icons

– A thorough vetting of all high-level project plans/assumptions

– Presentation experience and practice pitching your deal

– Immediate access to the knowledgeable ULI industry leaders

– Exposure to potential capital investors in the audience

 

More Information: www.arizona.uli.org

arizona.desert

ULI Receives $12,500 Grant For ‘Reinvent PHX’ Program

The Urban Land Institute of Arizona has received a $12,500 grant to strengthen development opportunities between the City of Phoenix, educational and medical institutions, and the surrounding community that could include infrastructure or real estate development, workforce training, local purchasing and tailored services to expand customer base in surrounding neighborhoods for the “Reinvent PHX,” effort.

ULI’s ongoing involvement with “Reinvent PHX,” unites decision-makers in one-on-one or small group settings surrounding public-private partnership strategies for community revitalization and “shared-value” community investment options.

“We are thrilled to receive the grant to aid the City’s Reinvent PHX, it validates the work completed to date and provides new opportunities for implementation,” said Deb Sydenham, ULI Arizona’s Executive Director. “We look forward to using the money to create lasting partnerships that encourage positive community development.”

The expected outcome is a community-wide understanding of public-private opportunities between the City of Phoenix and anchor institutions. “Reinvent PHX” is targeting key decision-makers representing Gateway Community College, Arizona State University, St. Joseph’s Hospital, University of Phoenix and many others.

In addition, the ULI Arizona District Council will lead a series of ongoing expert facilitated forum(s) on public-private partnership opportunities. Discussions will surround district parking facilities, employee/student housing and real estate development to encourage strategic and mutually beneficial industry clusters.

The money received for the program will support ULI priorities such as considerable relevancy and focus on the “Creation of Resilient Communities,” and “Connecting Capital and the Built Environment Through Value,” goals.

Interested parties should contact Deb Sydenham, Executive Director, ULI Arizona (602-449-7921) to find out more about the grant ULI received or about “Reinvent PHX.” For more information on ULI Arizona visit www.arizona.uli.org.

Arizona Sunset - Future of West Valley

Valley Leaders Join Forces To Envision The Future West Valley

Leadership West LogoOver 100 Valley leaders convened on November 31, 2010 to develop a future vision for the West Valley in an exercise led by Leadership West.  Leadership West is a volunteer-led, non-profit organization that convenes, educates and activates proven leaders in business, non-profits and government to leverage their time, talents and treasures to enhance the quality of life in the West Valley.

Moving AZOne LogoThe “West Valley Reality Check” was free for its participants, thanks to the collaborative effort and partnership between Leadership West and the Urban Land Institute (ULI). The program’s goal was to bring together leaders in government, business, non-profits, environmentalists, educators, neighborhood activists, interfaith groups, tribal and elected officials to focus on a regional approach to shaping our built environment. The event was a continuation of Leadership West’s annual West Valley Summit which was held in March.

By 2050, the Central Arizona region will have an additional 6 million people and 3 million new jobs, many of which will be in the West Valley. This exercise presented the opportunity for Valley stakeholders to influence how the region plans land-use, transportation and infrastructure while sustaining our economy and quality of life.

Leadership West Executive Director, Kathy Knecht kicked off the event by describing the organization as a catalyst for long-term planning in the West Valley.  The Reality Check model was designed by ULI, but this event was the first time where such an exercise was conducted with West Valley stakeholders.  What emerged from the exercise was an overarching theme of municipal and regional cooperation that looks beyond the current economic cycle in preparation for the next wave.

Deb Sydenham introduced the Reality Check model as a great opportunity to work collaboratively and cooperatively to help regions with visioning at least 20 years into the future. Don Keuth presented Valley growth trends and how this exercise will help establish the framework for future growth. Interestingly enough, only about 10 cities across the country have performed this activity but Phoenix is the only city that has done it twice. ULI Arizona’s efforts over the past 3 years have resulted in the “Connected Centers” strategy that promotes growth and prosperity.  These exercises represent a forward-thinking approach to identify a sustainable regional growth scenario and by doing so determine housing types, responsible land uses and a transportation framework.

MapJay Hicks presented the ground rules for the placemaking exercise in which participants use Legos© that represent various levels of housing and employment density and strands of yarn that represent major transportation corridors to identify the region’s growth patterns.  Participants used these tools in their groups to establish a 40-year vision with the understanding of the West Valley’s opportunities and challenges, including jobs, transportation, Luke AFB, higher education and the environment.

By keeping an open mind, being bold and creative and working together to find solutions, the participant groups completed their visioning exercise while maintaining AZOne Reality Check’s guiding principles of preserving open space, supporting current infrastructure by growing along existing corridors, connecting employment and housing with multi-modal transportation, creating new urban centers and infilling currently developed areas, and locating housing near jobs.

The collective group discussed barriers and challenges that might hinder the implementation of these future scenarios as well as policy changes that would be necessary to making the scenarios possible. However, the group clearly identified a need for the West Valley to stay relevant in conversations about regional issues by working collaboratively and speaking as one voice.  Leadership West did not intend this exercise to be the end, but rather the next step in moving this initiative forward by carrying the message back to each respective organization.  The Reality Check exercise provided a forum for West Valley representatives to use regional visioning and planning and discuss how we can promote economic development, plan comprehensive infrastructure, preserve natural resources, create a sense of place in the community, and engage the community and create political will to implement these visions.  Our common goal…leadership.

Todd Holzer, NAIOP-AZ - AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

NAIOP-AZ Chairman Todd Holzer Provides Leadership At Crucial Time

After more than a quarter century in commercial real estate, Todd Holzer, chairman of NAIOP-AZ, has been witness to many industry ups and downs.

Holzer began his career with Opus Southwest in Phoenix and San Diego. After 12 years at Opus, he moved on to DeRito Partners, where he spent eight years developing retail projects. Now in his sixth year at Ryan Companies US Inc., specializing in office and industrial projects and overall marketing for its Southwest regional operation, Holzer says market conditions in Arizona make for some intriguing times.

“Two things that I find interesting about our local market: First, the volatility of the Metro Phoenix market has to be among the greatest of all major U.S. markets,” Holzer says. “It seems that in my career, the overall market conditions for office and industrial have either been on fire or in the dumps. There are days I wish we were a little more steady, like some other Ryan offices in the Midwest. The feast-or-famine scenario we have can be an emotional and economic roller coaster for those in the business.

“Secondly, and again unfortunately, I always think about what could have been a very cool, relevant Downtown Phoenix. Despite some good vision out of the City of Phoenix political leaders, we are still a metro area that has grown outward with sprawl. I wonder if true urbanism can happen here. Most people live here to take advantage of activities that are suburban in nature: golf, hiking and other outdoor activities that don’t occur in a downtown setting.”

Holzer takes the reins at NAIOP-AZ during rocky economic times, but he says he is up to the challenge. When he started at Opus, he joined NAIOP-AZ mainly for networking purposes.

“When I moved into retail development, I spent more time and energy in other organizations such as ICSC, Valley Partnership and ULI,” he says. “But when I came to Ryan with an office and industrial focus, I decided that I needed to get back into NAIOP and take on a leadership role.”

Holzer has been on NAIOP’s local board of directors for five years and on the national board for three. After about two years on the local board, he was asked to take on the time and challenge of training for his eventual role as chairman.

“I have served under a few visionary and hard-working chairmen that have given me the experience to run the local chapter in what are very challenging times,” he says.

Holzer is not one to dwell on the negative. Instead, he says focus should be put on the quality of projects being built today, including NAIOP-member LEED certification initiatives.

“I take my hat off to some developers in our market that build with quality and with vision,” he says. “RED Development building CityScape and SunCor building Hayden Ferry are great projects that went to a level that most developers would not go.

“In my opinion, there has not been an increase in the quality of office projects over the last 15 to 20 years. The granite exterior projects built in the ’80s and early ’90s have stood the test of time. Most developers don’t build true quality because they are building to the level requested by the tenant and user market, and tenant and user groups have been fixed upon cost rather than quality and amenities.

“On the other hand, industrial projects have been built in the last cycle to a much higher standard of function than in the past.”

Among those higher standards is building to LEED specifications and the move toward more energy-efficient projects. Nationally, Holzer says, NAIOP has become fully engaged in LEED initiatives by having educational events tied around the green movement, with the major event being an annual conference dedicated to energy-efficient development. Phoenix hosted the conference a few years ago.

“Locally, we are giving awards to the best energy efficient new development each year at our Best of NAIOP event,” he says.

Examples of recent projects, Holzer cites, are Liberty Property Trust and its Scottsdale building for Vanguard; Lincoln Property Company and the Arizona Game and Fish Department building; Ryan’s 3900 E. Camelback building; and Hines’ office building at 24th Street and Camelback. There also are numerous local municipal and higher-education projects that have been built to LEED standards.

For those in the commercial real estate industry preparing for the future, Holzer offers this advice:

“At the present time, our industry is going through a monumental change,” he says.

“Speculative development will not re-appear for approximately five years in the Valley, so new development will be way down and that side of the business will not be hiring. People and companies will need to reinvent themselves. Take your strengths and use them in different ways within our industry.

“We are still the fifth-largest city in the country and our role as a major place of commerce in the Western U.S. will continue to grow.”

Holzer predicts 2011 will be a sequel of 2009 and 2010; users and tenants are price sensitive and looking for deals.

“We are in a period where land, rents and construction costs are on sale,” he says. “Those with a long-term approach and sufficient funding can solve real estate needs at very attractive costs.”

Some of the biggest challenges Holzer sees in 2011 are lack of capital and nominal job growth. The industrial sector needs capital to be available to companies for expansion and purchasing of inventories and equipment, he says, and the office sector is tied to job creation.

“Unless we can get local and national job creation to pick up dramatically, high-vacancy rates and shadow space inventory will continue with us,” Holzer explains. “The main challenge facing most sectors of commercial real estate is the national political scene and the decisions coming out of Washington, D.C. There is too much uncertainty currently for small business owners to make real estate decisions.”

For more information about NAIOP-AZ and Todd Holzer, visit naiop-az.org.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

Tim Lawless, AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

Q&A with NAIOP-AZ President Tim Lawless

Q&A with NAIOP-AZ President Tim Lawless

Q: A year ago you cited several factors that needed to occur for the regional economy to get going again. Have those changes occurred and what impact have they made, if any, in regard to the outlook of local commercial real estate?

Last year, I said that four things needed to occur before we could get on our feet again as an industry. They were:

1) credit markets need to act more normally;

2) job losses need to stabilize;

3) the glut of housing inventory needs to be absorbed so folks can sell their homes in the Midwest and California and continue to migrate here; and

4) we need a more competitive state tax code and to enact policies that diversify the economy in order to attract the flight of capital and brainpower, especially from California.

The credit market is not yet normal. People are still hoarding cash and there is an expectation that hundreds of banks nationwide will still fail when they take further haircuts on distressed properties that have yet to move into the barber’s chair.

We have stabilized job losses, but the rebound is much slower than hoped and few think we will replace all the jobs lost even after 5 years in our state. Nationally, many of these jobs will never come back. They are in India and other countries.

Regarding the glut of homes available, we are seeing some activity that gives hope, but I wouldn’t “bet the house” on it recovering just yet.

And finally, we have done little to nothing regarding the tax code besides talk about privatizing a Department of Commerce and enacting a solar tax credit that only helps on the far periphery. If anything, we have gone backwards as business has had to absorb two major tax increases with the prospect of more coming.

Of the four things, the job losses and housing are the most improved, while we are still waiting for the brunt of commercial property foreclosures to move through the system. Once the foreclosure “pig” is digested in the “python,” the credit markets will be more normal. This digestion, however, is soon upon us, which becomes necessary for recovery.

The factor that holds the least optimism is the prospect of changing our uncompetitive business tax code, especially as it relates to high commercial property taxes. Perhaps this can only be accomplished in tandem with yet another tax increase as the political courage to further cut spending has waned.

The silver lining about all of this is that properties are fast becoming a bargain and a lot of cash on the sidelines may soon come in.

Using a baseball analogy, we are in the late innings regarding a residential property recovery, and perhaps only in the mid-innings regarding a commercial property recovery. What we all hope to avoid is the prospect of extra innings through a double dip.

Q: What are some of the new challenges you see facing the industry in 2011?

While it was anticipated that at least one major tax increase would occur (two in fact occurred, the reinstitution of the $250M per year state equalization property tax and the $1B per year sales tax increase) the prospect of multiple tax increases at either the federal, state or local levels is the new challenge.

The feds seem intent on taxing commercial partnerships more like ordinary income rather than the lower capital gains tax treatment, while the state’s structural budget deficit will be more than a billion dollars beyond 2014. The locals will also be eying ways to raise revenue, most likely via the property tax rates.

Multiple tax increases on small businesses that are tenants in our buildings and at financial risk will only result in more potential vacancies if not more rent concessions. Further tax burden increases will also harm our ability to attract more firms to our state.

Q: How do you envision NAIOP-AZ helping to address those challenges?

NAIOP-AZ will continue to advocate at the state Capitol for a more competitive tax code that creates more high-paying jobs for our economy. Besides advocating for property tax reform, we also are now advocating a corporate income tax rate reduction and a deal-closing fund for the governor in order to attract more firms and allow existing firms to expand.

Q: What are some opportunities you foresee in the industry in 2011?

As the foreclosures and the sale of distressed properties mount, this creates the opportunity for more out-of-state entrants to become active in our community. In other words, the companies that were well known before will be replaced by new firms that may re-charge our communities and have the potential to provide new perspectives.

This is the essence of the rising Phoenix myth and the image of Arizona that most Americans have — that it is an egalitarian state where one rises and falls on their merits and where even a desert can be remade into an oasis.

Q: What are some NAIOP-AZ initiatives for the coming year?

During an economic downturn, the key is to do more with less. Our trade association is not immune, as many of our members have lost their job or taken new jobs for less pay in the last year. As a result, we are trying to offer more networking and educational opportunities.

A key example is the institution of a Market Leaders Sunrise Series. We invite our membership to hear from industry panels that are experts in certain fields such as lending, economic development, brokerage or “green” initiatives.

We also have attempted to pursue strategic alliances with other trade associations, where we can co-leverage resources toward more bang for the membership buck. An example is we plan to co-sponsor ULI’s Trends Day in January, where our members may get a reduced fee for attending. We also have partnered with BOMA-AZ in offering multiple continuing education courses.

Internally, we are looking at pursuing a mentoring program, where individual board members would partner with commercial real estate professionals 35 years of age and under from our Developing Leaders Committee.

In closing, we would be remiss in not thanking our corporate sponsors and members who have made our trade association a relevant force in public policy advocacy and in providing a platform for education, networking and philanthropic involvement.

For more information about NAIOP-AZ and Tim Lawless, visit naiop-az.org.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2010