Tag Archives: university medical center

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Fortis boosts power with Acquisition of UNS Energy

Fortis Inc. completed its acquisition of UNS Energy Corporation, adding UNS Energy subsidiaries Tucson Electric Power (TEP) and UniSource Energy Services (UES) to its growing international family of electric and gas utility companies.

TEP and UES will remain headquartered in Tucson under local control with current management and staffing levels and no planned changes to existing operations. Under the terms of a written order issued by the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) on Aug. 12, both companies will have enhanced financial strength and other benefits as part of Fortis, while their Arizona customers will receive $30 million in bill credits over the next five years.

“Joining the Fortis family will generate benefits for our company, our customers and the communities we serve,” said David Hutchens, President and CEO of UNS Energy, TEP and UES. “While this transaction opens a new chapter in our company’s history, our story remains the same. We will continue working every day to provide the safe, reliable and affordable service our customers have come to expect.”

With the $4.5 billion acquisition, which includes the assumption of $2 billion in debt, UNS Energy becomes the second largest subsidiary of Fortis and expands that company’s customer base to more than 3 million. Fortis is Canada’s largest investor-owned electric and gas distribution holding company, with regulated utility holdings in Canada, the United States and the Caribbean.

“TEP and UES are well-run companies whose employees are committed to serving their customers and communities,” said Fortis President Barry Perry, who will succeed H. Stanley Marshall as the company’s CEO effective December 31, 2014. “We welcome both companies to the Fortis team and look forward to supporting their continued success in serving their customers’ energy needs.”

Local, Independent Board Majority

The UNS Energy Board of Directors was reconstituted today as a result of the acquisition. In addition to Perry and John C. Walker, Fortis’ Executive Vice President of Western Canadian Operations, the board’s nine members include Hutchens and six other longtime Arizona residents who will continue on as independent directors from the previous UNS Energy Board:

• Lawrence J. Aldrich, Chairman and Executive Director of the Arizona Business Coalition on Health.
• Robert A. Elliott, President and Owner, Elliott Accounting.
• Louise L. Francesconi, former President of Raytheon Missile Systems.
• Ramiro G. Peru, former Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Phelps Dodge Corporation.
• Gregory A. Pivirotto, former CEO and Director of University Medical Center.
• Joaquin Ruiz, Dean of the University of Arizona College of Science, Executive Dean of the Colleges of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

UNS Energy remains the parent company of TEP and UES and will continue to oversee their local operations. UNS Energy’s stock will not trade on the New York Stock Exchange after today. Shareholders will be notified by transfer agency Computershare with instructions on how to redeem their shares.

AZ hospitals, how to attract top talent, AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona Hospitals Share Strategies For Recruiting, Retaining Top Performers

The health care industry in Arizona managed to hold its own during the worst of the recession. But the challenges aren’t over yet.

Human resources experts have been warning companies across industries about the next big wave of change as the economic recovery takes hold: retaining the top talent that helped a company survive.

In good economic times, the health care industry often was faced with shortages of nurses and other professionals, so it’s an old hand at devising ways of attracting and retaining talent. Arizona Business Magazine asked four hospitals and health care systems about how they attract the best.

Abrazo Health Care

Currently, Abrazo Health Care’s website is the No. 1 way candidates are found when applying for an open position. Additionally, Abrazo Health Care utilizes social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to attract and hire future employees. A large number of new hires comes from referrals within the organization.

Other recruitment efforts include the new graduate development program, a unique opportunity available to 100 nursing graduates per year. This competitive program gives new nurses 12 weeks of education and training to become an acute care nurse at an Abrazo Health Care facility. New graduates entering a specialty area also will be part of a bridge program for additional training.

Another opportunity available is the nurse-specialty training program for current nurses, which is offered four times per year. Nurses can apply to receive training to transition to a specialized nursing position in the operating room, emergency room or intensive care unit.

All applicants must complete a web-based interview developed in partnership with the Gallup Organization. The assessment helps to ensure a candidate will align with the cultural environment at Abrazo Health Care.

Abrazo Health Care employs more than 5,000 people. Currently, there are 400 positions available. Abrazo Health Care offers competitive salaries, health benefits and tuition reimbursement.

[stextbox id="grey"]Carmen Hern is regional manager of talent acquisition at Abrazo Health Care, abrazohealth.com. [/stextbox]

Banner Health

Banner Health recruits talent through strategic work force planning such as:

  • Targeted media events
  • Academic relationships
  • Social media
  • Banner Health’s website


Banner’s approach to recruiting top talent aligns with the strategies of the organization by emphasizing Banner’s vision on patient care. Its hiring incentives are centered on total rewards compensation.

The Banner journey begins with a potential employee’s first experience (the website, at an event, videos or even as a patient). Once they have joined Banner, there is an ongoing, one-year, onboarding program. Throughout their time at Banner, there are opportunities for learning, coaching and developing employees’ careers.

There are three main reasons an employee stays at Banner are:

  • The relationship with their manager
  • The people they work with
  • Learning and growth opportunities


In addition, employees have a choice in their selection of benefits. They also get to participate in a 401k plan, life insurance, food discounts, transportation discounts, and childcare at some facilities. We look at each employee’s needs to determine which benefits are best for them

Banner prides itself on having created an environment of innovation and teamwork. It offers opportunities for employees to spread their wings, in addition to pay for performance. There is compensation for all when Banner meets and exceeds goals in the areas of patient satisfaction, financial performance and employee retention.

Recognizing that Banner Health is competing with many other health care systems in Arizona for quality employees, the company tries to stay in tune with the community. Banner may have more hospitals than anyone else, but we have to pay attention because we know there are other good hospitals out there.
[stextbox id="grey"]
Shyrl Johnston is senior director of talent acquisition at Banner Health, www.bannerhealth.com.[/stextbox]

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Phoenix Children’s strategy to attract new talent includes expanding space, growing programs and services, and aggressive recruiting.

Phoenix Children’s continues to grow and expand, thus offering exciting new prospects for top talent in the health care industry. An 11-story patient tower, which opened in June, will raise the hospital’s bed count from 345 rooms to 626 private rooms by early 2012. The hospital also added 96 PCIU/CICU rooms, 12 operating rooms, new services and programs, innovative research supported by leading clinical trials, and advanced education/training for clinical providers.

Collaborations and partnerships with Arizona State University, University of Arizona, Mayo Clinic, Banner Good Samaritan, and a Strategic Alliance with St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center also add jobs and opportunities for attracting the best and brightest.

The hospital’s six Centers of Excellence also are growing. Phoenix Children’s is the only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in Arizona; the Children’s Heart Center is recognized as one of the nation’s best; there is the Phoenix Children’s Center for Pediatric Othopaedic Surgery; the Newborn Intensive Care Unit, with 110 licensed beds, is one of the largest NICUs in the country; the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders is Arizona’s only fully dedicated facility of its kind; and the Children’s Neuroscience Institute provides comprehensive care for children with neurological and behavioral disorders.

For the past four years, Phoenix Children’s Hospital has been steadily and aggressively increasing recruitment of nationally known physicians and superior staff. Medical staff at the hospital has increased to include more than 1,000 pediatric specialists with 40 pediatric specific specialties.

Recent prominent additions, to name a few, include: David Adelson, MD, a renowned neurosurgeon, recruited to lead the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s; Richard Towbin, MD, a top neuro-radiologist who has served at children’s hospitals in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Michigan; Lee Segal, MD, who came from Hershey Children’s to initiate the Center for Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery; Heidi Dalton, MD, section chief critical care, who was recruited from Children’s Medical Center in Washington, DC; and Tamir Miloh, MD, a hepatologist recruited from Mt. Sinai, NY, who will create and lead Arizona’s first pediatric liver transplant center.

[stextbox id="grey"]Jane Walton is head of media relations at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, www.phoenixchildrens.com.[/stextbox]

UA Healthcare

UA Healthcare is a private, nonprofit health-care entity located in Tucson. It was formed by the merger of two highly respected and well-established organizations: University Medical Center (UMC) and University Physicians Healthcare (UPH). The organization consists of the largest physician practice plan in Arizona, including a Health Plan Division, two academic medical centers and Southern Arizona’s only Level 1 Trauma Center.

UA Healthcare employs more than 6,000 people and is ranked one of the top 10 employers in Southern Arizona. University Medical Center was the first hospital in Arizona to earn the Magnet designation — the American Nurses Association’s highest honor for nursing excellence. The designation recognizes hospitals that provide the best nursing care and a supportive, professional environment. As the only academic medical center in Arizona, UMC offers many opportunities for professional growth, personal enrichment and career development.

UA Healthcare’s 2011 benefits package is designed to promote wellness and encourage healthy lifestyle choices. UA Healthcare considers staff members to be its most valuable resource and it is dedicated to providing a culture that keeps patients healthy.

The system provides managers with the tools required to retain its first-rate staff. It offers learning opportunities that ensure high levels of patient and employee satisfaction, as well as a strong financial position. UA Healthcare gives total rewards that are competitive in the Arizona employment market. UA Healthcare ensures individual and group accountability for performance, rewards and growth through ongoing communication.
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John Marques is vice president for human resources at UA Healthcare, www.azumc.com.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Good Samaritan Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Health Care Industry Has Flourished From Cottages To World-Class Facilities

A Century of Care

From cottages to world-class facilities, Arizona’s health care industry has flourished

Mayo Clinic Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 In the nearly 100 years since Arizona became a state, the health care sector has become a powerful economic force.

According to a study by Arizona State University’s L. William Seidman Research Institute, Arizona’s hospital community alone employs more than 80,000 people and contributes $11.5 billion to the gross state product. Indirectly, hospitals create about 120,000 additional jobs, more than the combined populations of Coconino, Graham and Santa Cruz counties.

Sisters of Mercy

It all started some 17 years before statehood in January 1895, when the Sisters of Mercy had collected enough money to rent a six-bedroom cottage at Fourth and Polk streets in Downtown Phoenix. Each room was equipped with two beds for TB patients, and thus was born St. Joseph’s Sanitarium, predecessor of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and the first hospital in Phoenix. Downtown Phoenix 1900s - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

In the mid-1940s, the nuns purchased 10 acres at Third Avenue and Thomas Road, which was part of an old dairy farm. Today, St. Joseph’s is a 670-bed, not-for-profit hospital that is one of the cornerstones of the state’s health care industry.

A second giant in health care, Good Samaritan Hospital of Phoenix, launched its first facility in an apartment building at Third Street near Van Buren in 1911. Initially incorporated as the Arizona Deaconess Hospital and Home, it opened with 15 beds.

One-hundred years later, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Downtown Phoenix is the flagship of Banner Health, with more than 662 licensed patient care beds. Banner Good Samaritan employs more than 4,200 health care professionals and support staff. Nearly 1,700 physicians representing more than 50 specialties work with Banner Good Samaritan staff to care for more than 43,000 inpatients a year.

Another early entry in the health care scene was the State Asylum for the Insane, which was rebuilt after a fire in 1911. In 1924, the asylum was informally renamed Arizona State Hospital.

Established in 1943 as a community hospital, Tucson Medical Center is among the 300 largest hospitals in the country. It is licensed for 650 adult and skilled nursing beds, and serves more than 30,000 inpatients and 122,000 outpatients a year.

St. Luke Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011In 1971, University Medical Center — a private, nonprofit hospital located at the Arizona Health Sciences Center adjacent to the University of Arizona in Tucson — was established. UMC is Arizona’s only academic medical center, and earlier this year it became an international focal point for neurosurgery and trauma care after a gunman shot and wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and killed six people.

In Northern Arizona, the Flagstaff Medical Center, a not-for-profit hospital, was founded in 1936. A part of the Northern Arizona Healthcare family, it has some 270 beds and its medical staff includes about 200 physicians. Among its specialties are cancer, heart and sports medicine.

Health care continues to be a concern on Indian reservations throughout Arizona, particularly in some of the remote regions. A relatively new program, the American Indian Research Center for Health is designed to improve the health status of Native Americans and increase the number of Native American scientists and health professionals engaged in research. Classes for the student-training component of the program are held at the University of Arizona.

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Best Medical Project 2011

Diamond Children’s Medical Center at University Medical Center

Best Medical Project 2011: University Medical Center, KitchellDeveloper: University Medical Center
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: NTD Architects
Size: 100,000 SF
Location: 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson
Completed: September 2010

The Diamond Children’s Medical Center at UMC in Tucson is a “family centered” pediatric facility that serves young patients throughout southern Arizona. Providing construction services on an existing campus was a challenge, but Kitchell worked closely with various entities, and the interactions became the basis of work plans that evolved over time. The design of the hospital accommodates families’ physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Following designs of NTD Architecture, Kitchell built 36 NICU beds, 20 PICU private rooms, and a pediatric emergency department, to name a few components. There are also murals, a canopy, a large telescope and stage, and children’s library.





Honorable Mention: Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical Center

Honorable Mention: Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical CenterDeveloper: St. Joseph’s Hospital
Contractor:
Kitchell
Architect:
Orcutt-Winslow
Size:
25,107 SF
Location:
110 W. Merrell St., Phoenix
Completed:
February 2010