Tag Archives: University of Phoenix

cybercrime

Survey: Cybersecurity Tops List of Concerns

Security related topics are often front and center in the 24-hour news cycle, but what concerns Americans the most? According to a new national survey from University of Phoenix® College of Criminal Justice and Security, identity theft (70 percent) and personal cybersecurity (61 percent) are the security issues of greatest concern. These fears may be grounded in experience as nearly two-in-five (39 percent) have suffered a personal security breach, such as identity theft, unauthorized use of credit card information or email/social media account hacking.

Other security concerns include: terrorism (55 percent), national security (54 percent), personal safety (49 percent), neighborhood crime (47 percent), property theft (44 percent) and natural disasters (44 percent). Despite recent high profile incidents, only 18 percent of working adults are concerned about workplace violence. More working adults (31 percent) are concerned about organizational security issues such as corporate cybersecurity, network security, fraud and corporate espionage.

The recent online survey of more than 2,000 Americans was conducted on behalf of University of Phoenix by Harris Poll in August 2014.

The survey also examines shifts in security concerns. Only 12 percent of Americans feel generally more secure than they did five years ago, while 41 percent feel equally secure and nearly half (47 percent) feel less secure. At least half of Americans are more concerned about personal cybersecurity (61 percent), identity theft (60 percent) and national security (50 percent) than they were five years ago.

“Security issues affect every American in some way, both personally and professionally,” said James “Spider” Marks, recently appointed executive dean of University of Phoenix College of Criminal Justice and Security. “All industries and most businesses have to dedicate resources to identify and address security threats, creating significant job growth in the sector and demand for training.”

Marks, a retired major general with more than 30 years of service in the United States Army, has held numerous leadership and consulting roles in the private sector, including entrepreneurial efforts in education, energy and primary research. Previously, Marks was president and CEO of Global Linguist Solutions, a private company that provided linguistics services to the U.S. military. In his current role with the University, Marks is responsible for the management of the College of Criminal Justice and Security, overseeing the College’s academic standards and the development of programs and curriculum.

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University of Phoenix founder dies

The founder of the University of Phoenix, Dr. John G. Sperling, has died, according to the Apollo Education Group. He was 93.

Sperling passed away Friday at a hospital in the San Francisco Bay area. No cause of death was given.

“Dr. Sperling’s vision, pioneering spirit and boundless resolve to improve the world through accessible higher education for working adult students provided a roadmap for families, nations and economies to evolve, advance, grow and prosper,” wrote Apollo chairman and Sperling’s son, Peter Sperling, and company Chief Executive Officer Greg Cappelli.

“Dr. Sperling’s indomitable ideas and life’s work served as a catalyst for innovations widely accepted as having made higher education more accessible to adult students,” the statement read.

Sperling founded the Institute for Professional Development in 1972, followed by the University of Phoenix, a degree program aimed at working adults, in 1978. The for-profit university was one of the first to develop online degree programs.

The University of Phoenix is one of the largest private universities in the United States with more than a million students, alumni, faculty and employees, according to the Apollo Group, its parent company.

Sperling was born on January 9, 1921, in rural northwest Missouri. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps and worked as a history professor.

Sperling is survived by his longtime companion, Joan Hawthorne; his former wife, Virginia Sperling; his son, Peter; daughter-in-law Stephanie and two grandchildren.

Deliver on Your ROI, Business Meetings

Survey: Half want to own their own business

Half (50 percent) of working adults in the U.S. either currently own or want to own their own businesses, according to a new national University of Phoenix School of Business survey. Of working Americans who do not currently own a business, nearly two in five (39 percent) hope to do so in the future.

Age makes a significant difference as nearly half (52 percent) of workers in their 20s who do not currently own a business hope to do so in the future, followed by 50 percent of workers in their 30s and 35 percent in their 40s. Second careering may also lead some workers to consider entrepreneurship later in their careers. In fact, more than a quarter (26 percent) of workers in their 50s and 17 percent of workers age 60 or older who do not own a business, want to do so in the future.

The recent online survey of more than 1,000 working adults in the U.S. was conducted on behalf of University of Phoenix School of Business by Harris Poll in July 2014.

University of Phoenix School of Business is hosting more than 40 events nationwide in August to help prospective and current entrepreneurs learn how to launch and sustain successful businesses. More information about the events and locations can be found at www.phoenix.edu/thinkbig.

Barriers to business ownership

Why haven’t more American workers started their own businesses? According to the survey, the top barrier for working adults who want to own their own businesses is a lack of adequate finances (67 percent). Prospective business owners also say they are held back because they need more education or training (33 percent), do not know enough about running a business (32 percent), have not found the right idea or concept (30 percent), do not have the time (22 percent) and need to develop leadership skills (17 percent).

“Starting your own business can be an exciting and fulfilling pursuit, but requires significant planning, resources and business knowledge,” said Michael Bevis, director of Academic Affairs for University of Phoenix and faculty member for the School of Business. “Many potential entrepreneurs have great ideas and a strong understanding of specific industries, but often do not have the business background to turn concepts into profitable ventures. Business education can help entrepreneurs fill knowledge gaps and strengthen business acumen.”

If you were the boss

More than three quarters (76 percent) of all working adults identify things that they would do differently if they were in charge of their workplaces. For example, 37 percent would provide more training and education opportunities for employees, 35 percent would hire better-qualified employees and 32 percent would create more flexible work environments, such as offering flex hours or the option to work from home. Twenty-seven percent say they would rely more on teamwork and collaboration. The majority of working adults say they would be or are great bosses, with 85 percent of self-employed adults and 76 percent of workers who are not self-employed indicating this.

Career stagnancy and being entrepreneurial in your own career

Nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of all working adults say they currently have limited opportunities within their companies. That said, many workers also admit that they may need to be more proactive in managing their own careers. More than half (53 percent) of working adults say they should be more entrepreneurial in their careers. Notably, even those well into their careers express an interest in being more entrepreneurial, specifically 47 percent of those in their 40s, 46 percent of those in their 50s and 43 percent who are 60 or older. Two in five (40 percent) working adults have not set career goals for themselves.

“Being entrepreneurial does not just mean starting your own company; it is also about approaching your existing career with purpose,” added Bevis. “Do not rely on your employer to manage your career. Setting career goals, developing a strong personal brand and constantly looking for ways to grow and tie your responsibilities to the company’s bottom line can help you succeed and feel more engaged in your career.”

Bevis offers the following recommendations for individuals who want to start businesses or be more entrepreneurial in their careers:

Tips for owning your own business

* Start with a business idea that not only fulfills specific customer needs, but has enough market demand. Support your idea through market research, competitive intelligence and target audience assessment.
* Identify your target audiences, understand what motivates them to act and learn how to grow long-term relationships with your customers.
* Create a business plan and use it to set priorities, address gaps and lay out your growth strategy.
* Financial planning can be one of the most challenging aspects for business owners who are not trained in this area. Consider additional education or plan for resources to address financial planning and management.
* Develop an organization and management structure so your company is poised for growth.
* Do not operate in a vacuum – network and learn from other successful entrepreneurs.

The Small Business Administration website offers a variety of business plan templates at www.sba.gov.

Tips for being more entrepreneurial in your career

* Be knowledgeable about your organization, industry and career growth opportunities.
* Think like a marketer. Develop a strategic business plan to grow and improve your personal brand within your organization. Start with a mission statement. Other areas to consider include: audience assessment; Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis; points of differentiation; promotion strategy; and ongoing personal development.
* Keep your personal brand current and sustainable by knowing how your skills and experience fit into the big picture of your organization.
* Network and engage with individuals who have diverse experiences.
* Identify and engage with a mentor. This individual does not necessarily have to be in your own company. Find someone who you admire professionally and whose success mirrors your goals.
* Identify and engage with a sponsor in your own company. This person can champion your success and advocate for your growth within the company.

University of Phoenix School of Business offers associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree programs with specializations across a wide range of business disciplines, including entrepreneurship, marketing, human resources and finance. For more information about University of Phoenix School of Business degree programs, visit www.phoenix.edu.

phoenix

University of Phoenix names new president

University of Phoenix announced that the institution’s board of trustees has named Timothy P. Slottow as the new president of the University.

Slottow’s distinguished career spans 30 years at public and private organizations throughout the U.S. He currently serves as executive vice president and chief financial officer at the University of Michigan, where he is responsible for operations and finance. Since 1998, Slottow’s work at the University of Michigan—one of the nation’s largest public universities—has helped the institution fulfill its academic mission and strategy on behalf of 61,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. He will assume office at University of Phoenix on June 20, 2014.

“Tim Slottow’s leadership at the University of Michigan amplifies what he has done throughout his accomplished career: delivering measurable results to public and private organizations as they embrace the principle of continuous advancement and transition to reach ambitious goals,” said Merrilee Lewis Engel, Ph.D., Chair of the University of Phoenix board of trustees.

“After a comprehensive national search, we are honored to have Tim Slottow join us from one of the world’s most respected higher education institutions,” said Gregory W. Cappelli, member of the University of Phoenix board of trustees, and CEO of Apollo Education Group, Inc. “Tim shares our commitment to the mission of University of Phoenix, and to delivering a quality education that helps students achieve academic and personal success to meet their individual and professional goals. I am confident that his focus on connecting students’ talents, skills, and educational achievement to employers’ ever-increasing human capital needs will help differentiate University of Phoenix and deliver genuine value to its students.”

“For decades, University of Phoenix has pioneered change throughout U.S. higher education, and I am honored to lead this groundbreaking and innovative university through its latest and most significant transformation,” said Slottow. “I am committed to furthering the University’s important work to deliver high quality, career-relevant educational programs that help all students achieve—and exceed—their professional goals.”

In his current position at the University of Michigan, Slottow supervises and is responsible for the university’s $6.3 billion annual operating revenues and more than $16 billion in financial and physical assets.

“Tim Slottow has played an integral role in the University’s growth and financial stability throughout the recession, ensuring the University of Michigan’s academic excellence as he worked in partnership with our academic and university leaders,” said University of Michigan president Mary Sue Coleman.

Prior to his work at the University of Michigan, Slottow oversaw strategic business planning and finance at Amtrak in Washington, D.C.; served as director of policy and planning for the City of Seattle; and was a manager at Accenture (formerly Andersen Consulting). He earned a master’s degree in business administration from University of Washington and a bachelor’s degree from University of California, Berkeley.

As the seventh University of Phoenix president, Slottow succeeds Bill Pepicello, Ph.D., who began his tenure at the University in 1995 and announced his intention to retire in September 2013.

cybercrime

U. of Phoenix offers Cybersecurity Scholarships

University of Phoenix, a subsidiary of Apollo Education Group, Inc., and the (ISC)2® Foundation, today announced they are offering nine full-tuition scholarships. (ISC)2 Foundation is the non-profit charitable trust for (ISC)² that aims to empower students, teachers and the general public to secure their online lives with community cyber security education and awareness. The scholarships will provide education opportunities for individuals interested in entering or furthering their information security careers.

Each scholarship recipient will have the opportunity to complete an undergraduate or master’s degree program at University of Phoenix and will receive a voucher from (ISC)² to take either the SSCP® or CISSP® certification exam within one year of graduation.

(ISC)² and University of Phoenix are both working to advance the skills of information technology and security professionals to address the growing skills gaps in these fields. The collaboration will also be reflected in curriculum that meets the needs of today’s information security economy.

The (ISC)² sixth annual Global Information Security Workforce Study (GISWS) revealed that the lack of skilled and qualified information security professionals is negatively affecting both companies and consumers and causing a global economic ripple effect. In fact, more than half (56 percent) of survey respondents indicated that the staffing shortage is significantly impacting their organizations. Security concerns indicated by respondents included brand damage, breaches of laws and regulations, service downtime, customer privacy violations, and customer identity and corporate intellectual property theft.

“Educating cybersecurity professionals should be one of the top global priorities,” said Julie Peeler, director, (ISC)2 Foundation. “The profound staffing and skills shortages in this industry put organizations’ reputations and customer data at risk. We are proud to collaborate with University of Phoenix to offer these scholarships and provide learning and career opportunities to the next generation of information security professionals.”

“University of Phoenix is committed to providing degree programs and curriculum that reflect real industry needs,” said Dr. Tim Welsh, senior vice president for Industry Strategy at Apollo Education Group. “There is a clear demand for information security professionals and the University is pleased to collaborate with (ISC)², a globally renowned leader in the information security field, to directly align our education programs with industry staffing needs.”

Applications for the University of Phoenix/(ISC)² Cybersecurity Scholarships are currently being accepted. The deadline to apply is June 3, 2014. Each scholarship recipient will have the opportunity to complete an undergraduate or master’s degree program at University of Phoenix and can choose to attend a local University of Phoenix campus or online. (ISC)² will also provide recipients with a voucher to take either the SSCP or CISSP certification exam within one year of graduation. The exam voucher will be provided to the awarded recipients upon proof of graduation in an area of study with an emphasis on cybersecurity and/or information assurance. For scholarship terms and conditions or to learn more about the scholarship, visit www.phoenix.edu/isc2scholar.

To learn more about University of Phoenix efforts to better equip the workforce through innovative corporate alliances, learning tools and educational programs, visit phoenix.edu/industry.

118315706

GPEC announces Board of Directors for FY 2014

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) today announced the appointment of its Board of Directors for the 2014 fiscal year, as approved by the Executive Committee.

Alliance Bank of Arizona CEO James Lundy will continue to lead the Board of Directors as chairman.

“As the economy continues to improve, GPEC’s team of results-driven board directors will work to ensure the region not only maintains its trajectory but also pushes toward a more diversified and sustainable economy that is less dependent on growth industries like real estate and construction,” Lundy said. “I’m honored to work with this talented group of professionals and look forward to a productive year.”

Rounding out the Board’s leadership is SCF Arizona President and CEO Don Smith and Empire Southwest Executive Vice President Chris Zaharis as vice chairs, APS Vice President and Chief Customer Officer Tammy McLeod as secretary and Bryan Cave, LLP Partner R. Neil Irwin as treasurer.

New Board Directors include: Steve Banta, CEO of Valley Metro; the Honorable Denny Barney, District 1 Supervisor for the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors; Scott Bradley, Area Vice President for Waste Management; Mark Clatt, Area President for Republic Services; the Honorable Vincent Francia, Mayor of the Town of Cave Creek; Dr. Ann Weaver Hart, President of the University of Arizona; Bill Jabjiniak, Economic Development Director for the City of Mesa; the Honorable Michael LeVault, Mayor of the Town of Youngtown; Rich Marchant, Executive Vice President, Global Operations for Crescent Crown Distributing; Ryan Nouis, Co-Founder and President of Job Brokers; and Eric Orsborn, Councilmember for the Town of Buckeye.

“GPEC’s success is largely driven by its strong Board of Directors, all of whom reflect the region and state’s most accomplished professionals,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “Every single one of them truly cares about our market’s success and serves as a community thought leader when it comes to competitiveness.”

Mayors from GPEC’s member communities and the organization’s Nominating Committee are responsible for nominating and appointing Board Directors. The one-year terms are approved during GPEC’s Annual Board meeting.

GPEC FY 2014 Board of Directors:

James Lundy – Chairman
CEO
Alliance Bank of Arizona

Don Smith – Vice Chair
President and CEO
SCF Arizona

Chris Zaharis – Vice Chair
Executive Vice President
Empire Southwest

Tammy McLeod – Secretary
Vice President and Chief Customer Officer
Arizona Public Service Company

R. Neil Irwin – Treasurer
Partner
Bryan Cave, LLP

William Pepicello, Ph.D. – Immediate Past Chair
President
University of Phoenix

Barry Broome
President and CEO
Greater Phoenix Economic Council

Richard C. Adkerson
President and CEO
Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold

Jason Bagley
Government Affairs Manager
Intel

Ron Butler
Managing Partner
Ernst & Young LLP

Brian Campbell
Attorney
Campbell & Mahoney, Chartered

Michael Crow, Ph.D.
President
Arizona State University

Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Midwestern University

Derrick Hall
President and CEO
Arizona Diamondbacks

Sharon Harper
President and CEO
The Plaza Companies

Ann Weaver Hart, Ph.D.
President
University of Arizona

Don Kile
President, Master Planned Communities
The Ellman Companies

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation

Rich Marchant
Executive Vice President, Global Operations
Crescent Crown Distributing

David Rousseau
President
Salt River Project

Joseph Stewart
Chairman and CEO
JPMorgan Chase Arizona

Hyman Sukiennik
Vice President
Cox Business

Karrin Kunasek Taylor
Executive Vice President and
Chief Entitlements Officer
DMB Associates, Inc.

Gerrit van Huisstede
Regional President Desert Mountain Region
Wells Fargo

Andy Warren
President
Maracay Homes

Richard B. West, III
President
Carefree Partners

John Zidich
Publisher & President
The Arizona Republic

Chuck Allen
Managing Director, Gov’t & Community Relations
US Airways

Steve Banta
CEO
Valley Metro

Denny Barney
County Supervisor-District 1
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

Jason Barney
Principal and Partner
Landmark Investments

The Honorable Robert Barrett
Mayor
City of Peoria

Timothy Bidwill
Vice President
Vermilion IDG

Scott Bradley
Area Vice President, Four Corners Area
Waste Management

Norman Butler
Market Executive
Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Mark Clatt
Area President
Republic Services

Jeff Crockett
Shareholder
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

Wyatt Decker, M.D.
CEO
Mayo Clinic Arizona

George Forristall
Director of Project Development
Mortenson Construction

The Honorable Vincent Francia
Mayor
Town of Cave Creek

Rufus Glasper, Ph.D.
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges

Barry Halpern
Partner
Snell and Wilmer

G. Todd Hardy
Vice President of Assets
ASU Foundation

Lynne Herndon
Phoenix City President
BBVA Compass

Linda Hunt
Senior VP of Operations and President/CEO
Dignity Health Arizona

William Jabiiniak
Economic Development Director
City of Mesa

The Honorable Robert Jackson
Mayor
City of Casa Grande

The Honorable Linda Kavanagh
Mayor
Town of Fountain Hills

The Honorable Andy Kunasek
County Supervisor, District 3
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

The Honorable Michael LeVault
Mayor
Town of Youngtown

The Honorable John Lewis
Mayor
Town of Gilbert

The Honorable Marie Lopez Rogers
Mayor
City of Avondale

The Honorable Georgia Lord
Mayor
City of Goodyear

Jeff Lowe
President
MidFirst Bank

Paul Magallanez
Economic Development Director
City of Tolleson

Kate Maracas
Vice President
Abengoa

The Honorable Mark Mitchell
Mayor
City of Tempe

Ryan Nouis
Co-Founder & President
Job Brokers

Ed Novak
Managing Partner
Polsinelli Shughart

Eric Osborn
Councilmember
Town of Buckeye

Rui Pereira
General Manager
Rancho de Los Caballeros

The Honorable Christian Price
Mayor
City of Maricopa

Craig Robb
Managing Director
Zions Energy Link

The Honorable Jeff Serdy
Councilmember
City of Apache Junction

Steven M. Shope, Ph.D.
President
Sandia Research Corporation

James T. Swanson
President and CEO
Kitchell Corporation

Richard J. Thompson
President and CEO
Power-One

Jay Tibshraeny
Mayor
City of Chandler

John Welch
Managing Partner
Squire Sanders

Dan Withers
President
D.L. Withers Construction

The Honorable Sharon Wolcott
Mayor
City of Surprise

GENERAL COUNSEL
Bryant Barber
Attorney at Law
Lewis and Roca

education.business

Educators say executives can increase workplace value

Despite signs of what most people view as a recovering economy, more than half of Arizona’s workforce stresses over job security.

A recent University of Phoenix survey revealed that 61 percent of working adults worry about losing their jobs in the current economic climate and 20 percent anguish over it at least once a week.

“In a challenging economic environment, workers should be doing more to position themselves as leaders in their organizations, but the survey finds that many are holding back at work, and this can have a negative effect on performance and productivity,” said Dr. Sam Sanders, college chair for University of Phoenix School of Business and a former human resources executive with more than 20 years of hiring and employee relations experience. “Those who understand the big picture and how their own skill sets help their companies achieve goals should have more confidence and can have an advantage in the workplace.”

To separate themselves from others and to create more job security, many executives are strengthening their skill sets through education.

“The trends in executive education is for shorter duration programs than those that preceded the recession, with emphases on acquiring skills that lead to promotions or career advancement and new market opportunities,” said Dr. Kevin McClean, interim dean, Ken Blanchard College of Business at Grand Canyon University. “Another key ingredient is the opportunity to network. These objectives are not really different from those that motivated people to pursue executive education in the past.”

Executive trends

Some of the shifts that educators are incorporating into graduate business programs include more emphasis on leading in turbulent times, developing organizational talent, innovation and creativity, and flexible, participative strategic planning.

“Executives are being asked to take on more responsibility and act more holistic in understanding the interdependencies of people and functions in organizations,” said Dr. Kirk Wessel, dean of Angell Snyder School of Business at Ottawa University. “This is being reflected in curricula.”

Educators are also being asked to help prepare executives and business students to deal with increasingly more complex business issues.

“For example, rather than teaching executives innovation or risk, we are talking about ‘risk-bound innovation,’” said Dennis Baltzley, Ph.D., senior vice president of executive education at Thunderbird School of Global Management. “Leaders want to know how to create an environment of innovation, while creating a ‘boundary’ of risk management. We must innovate, but more than ever, a bad decision can be fatal.”

Baltzley said Thunderbird is also seeing a dramatic interest in global global leadership.
Our customers want to know how to lead effectively across borders, cultures, different business models and philosophies,” Baltzley said. “Since 2008, growth has been slow in the U.S. and other mature markets. This led many businesses to leap into emerging markets with the promise of double digit growth whether they were ready or not, and most were not as ready as they would have liked.”

Paul Melendez, assistant dean of executive education at the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona, said he is seeing four specific trends:
* Customization: Executive education is becoming much more tailored to specific organizations, with programs, content, and learning customized to the unique needs of the organization. While many business schools still offer one- or two-week open-enrollment programs, organizations are finding it more beneficial to develop a program that is tailored to their executives.
* Consulting: The natural extension of customized programs is a consulting model where education and problem-solving are combined into a program. “We have helped organizations develop their culture, strategically plan, and develop a wide variety of business improvement plans through programs that also provide education for leaders,” Melendez said.
* Strategic partnerships: Eller Executive Education has developed strategic partnerships with Miraval and Canyon Ranch to offer programs that join cutting-edge leadership and management principles and with world-class health and wellness programs which they have dubbed “integrative leadership.”
* Privatization: A year ago the university spun Eller Executive Education out of the UA to allow greater operating flexibility. “As a result, we are now providing many more custom program for private, governmental, and non-profit organizations,” Melendez  said. “We have seen a number of other state business schools also privatizing their executive education organizations.”

Increasing your stock

Michael Bevis, director of academic affairs at University of Phoenix, said more executives have started to approach their careers in the same way they approach business management by focusing on building their personal brands.

“When you think about a company brand, it isn’t just about what you are communicating, but how that brand addresses the needs of the intended audience,” Bevis said. “One of the things I work on with executives and other business students at University of Phoenix, is developing a personal business plan that starts with the personal mission statement. You wouldn’t run a business without a plan and the same should be true about your career. If you are not setting goals, measuring progress and making sure your knowledge stays current and relevant, your personal brand — like that of a company’s — can become stagnant.”

So what programs are out there for executives to utilize to strengthen their brand?

* University of Phoenix: Within the MBA programs, concentrations allow executives to grow specific skills. It is common for executives or business owners to have specific knowledge about an industry or certain aspects of business management, but skills or knowledge gaps in other areas. Concentrations can help professionals hone certain skills, such as people management, finance or marketing.

* Thunderbird School of Global Management: Thunderbird offers a range of options from its short programs — less than a week — to its more in-depth MBA offerings. “We have a Global MBA Online that allows you to learn global business from anywhere in the world and an Executive MBA that’s on-campus, but provides a schedule suited to the working professional. “ Baltzley  said. “We also offer online certificate programs which are designed specifically for working professionals looking to improve their marketability and gain a leading edge over their competition.

* W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University: “Our executive-education programs, such as our leadership development workshops and our certificate programs in real estate, supply chain management, and service excellence, can give executives deeper skills and expose them to new ideas,” said Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “However, if they want to move into leadership roles beyond their current functional areas, then the MBA is the best option, though short non-degree courses that develop leadership skills are also helpful.”

* Eller College of Management: Eller Executive Education offers a variety of week-long programs and year-long programs for leaders of different types of organizations. “We are also launching a program in early 2014 that is specifically oriented toward CEOs of mid-sized to large companies,” Melendez said.

* DeVry University: Keller Graduate School of Management offers seven specialized master’s degree programs and 13 graduate certificate programs.

* Ken Blanchard College of Business: GCU offers very practical programs that include a master’s in leadership, a masters in accounting, and a masters in public administration.

* Angell Snyder School of Business: Case teaching methodologies teach executives to think critically about all internal and external factors that come into play in developing effective organizational strategies, irrespective of the industry.

Moving forward

The most important message that educators have for executives who may be worried about maintaining their position in the current economic climate is to stay current on trends in your industry, keep your brand current by understanding how your skills and experience fit into the big picture of an organization.

“This past year, we were asked repeatedly how to be effective in managing a diverse, multicultural, and geographically dispersed workforce, and how to stay relevant in a Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous (VUCA) world,” Baltzley said. “Without question the term ‘VUCA’ has come of age and has several implications for executives who want to remain relevant today.”

To stay in the game, Baltzley has three pieces of advice for executives:
1. Get your head into what it means to think globally. If you think your company is domestic and American, and it will never go global, you are wrong, global is coming to you. In fact, global is probably already there, in the form of complex supply chain issues or direct competitors, so you better get prepared.
2. A term coined in the late 1970’s is important here – “Permanent Whitewater” – That is, if you think the whitewater is going to slow down, or that a calm patch is just around the corner, you are mistaken. You have to prepare yourself for leading in constant change in scale and speed.
3. Check your personal leadership style. Are you able to influence people very different than yourself? Do you enjoy variety, the unknown, surprises? Is your self-confidence and personal energy level pretty high? Do you like to test yourself, take some risks? If you can’t answer “yes” to most of these, you have some work to do to become a more adaptive leader.

baseball

D-backs’ Goldschmidt Graduates From University of Phoenix

Arizona Diamondbacks All-Star first baseman and N.L. MVP candidate Paul Goldschmidt has officially graduated from the University of Phoenix with a bachelor’s of science degree in management. The National League leader in home runs and RBI had been taking classes throughout his first two full seasons in the Major Leagues.

“This was always something I wanted to get done,” said Goldschmidt. “There may be other online universities, but University of Phoenix is the way to go, especially for a ballplayer during the baseball season. It’s tough to do it any other way.”

Goldschmidt, 25, was drafted by the D-backs in the 8th Round of the First-Year Player Draft in 2009 after playing for three seasons at Texas State University.

“We are extremely proud to count Paul among our distinguished graduates today both because of what he’s accomplished on the field and in the classroom,” said University of Phoenix President Dr. Bill Pepicello. “I have had the good fortune of getting to know him through our partnership with the D-backs and to watch what he’s accomplished this season, while completing his degree, certainly shows what a special person he is.”

Dubbed “America’s first baseman” by his teammates, Goldschmidt has established himself as one of the leading candidates for the N.L. Most Valuable Player Award.

“I’d like to do something with my degree eventually,” he told D-backs Insider for a recent cover story. “I don’t just want a piece of paper. A lot of jobs that require a college degree go in line with what I’ve now learned in school. I don’t really know what I want to do, but I’d like to talk to people in the business world and see what opportunities may be there and interest me.”

D-backs Assistant Hitting Coach Turner Ward, who served as Goldschmidt’s manager at Double-A Mobile in 2011, is also enrolled in the online program at University of Phoenix.

baseball

D-backs' Goldschmidt Graduates From University of Phoenix

Arizona Diamondbacks All-Star first baseman and N.L. MVP candidate Paul Goldschmidt has officially graduated from the University of Phoenix with a bachelor’s of science degree in management. The National League leader in home runs and RBI had been taking classes throughout his first two full seasons in the Major Leagues.

“This was always something I wanted to get done,” said Goldschmidt. “There may be other online universities, but University of Phoenix is the way to go, especially for a ballplayer during the baseball season. It’s tough to do it any other way.”

Goldschmidt, 25, was drafted by the D-backs in the 8th Round of the First-Year Player Draft in 2009 after playing for three seasons at Texas State University.

“We are extremely proud to count Paul among our distinguished graduates today both because of what he’s accomplished on the field and in the classroom,” said University of Phoenix President Dr. Bill Pepicello. “I have had the good fortune of getting to know him through our partnership with the D-backs and to watch what he’s accomplished this season, while completing his degree, certainly shows what a special person he is.”

Dubbed “America’s first baseman” by his teammates, Goldschmidt has established himself as one of the leading candidates for the N.L. Most Valuable Player Award.

“I’d like to do something with my degree eventually,” he told D-backs Insider for a recent cover story. “I don’t just want a piece of paper. A lot of jobs that require a college degree go in line with what I’ve now learned in school. I don’t really know what I want to do, but I’d like to talk to people in the business world and see what opportunities may be there and interest me.”

D-backs Assistant Hitting Coach Turner Ward, who served as Goldschmidt’s manager at Double-A Mobile in 2011, is also enrolled in the online program at University of Phoenix.

Arizona School Choice Trust

D-backs Accepting Submissions For $150K School Challenge

The Arizona Diamondbacks announced today that they are now accepting applications for the $150,000 School Challenge, presented by University of Phoenix, to benefit schools across the state of Arizona. The program is open to all Arizona public, private, and nonprofit charter schools, Grades K-12, and teachers and administrators are encouraged to “make their best pitch” on why they deserve to receive this important funding by submitting an application online at www.dbacks.com/schoolchallenge by Sept. 30.

“Last season we were astounded by the volume and quality of applications received and we know that schools across the state truly need help,” said D-backs’ President and CEO Derrick Hall. “That’s where the D-backs and University of Phoenix step in and we are excited to be able to bring back this valuable program. We are dedicated to ensuring that the schools in our state receive the resources that will make the biggest impact on our students and the community at large.”

The D-backs kicked off the program last spring with the $100,000 School Challenge and received an overwhelming response that inspired the team to also host a $150,000 Back-To-School Challenge last fall. With more than 1,300 applications last year, the D-backs were able to grant $5,000 to 50 schools for a grand total of $250,000 in 2012. The Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation provided $150,000 for the program and the University of Phoenix provided $100,000.  The $5,000 grants helped schools from across the state with needs such as educational supplies, books, updated computer programs, mobile computer labs and school improvements.

“Our community, schools, and students thrive when supported by local businesses and organizations,” said University of Phoenix President Dr. Bill Pepicello. “University of Phoenix is committed to providing support in the communities in which we reside and we are so proud to be part of this School Challenge program in partnership with the D-backs helping to ensure the education of our youth.”

The School Challenge is part of the D-backs’ overall charitable efforts and last season, the team and its charitable arm, the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation, surpassed $30 million in combined donations since their inception in 1998, including more than $4 million in 2012.

Scott Pearson

Clear Title Agency of Arizona Hires Pearson

Clear Title Agency of Arizona, has added another strategic hire to its roster: Scott Pearson.  Pearson joins Clear Title as the chief title officer for the commercial escrow division. The company, which recently celebrated its five-year anniversary, has experienced 200-percent compounded annual growth for the past several years.  It is the fastest-growing title and escrow company in Arizona.

Pearson will focus on new growth for Clear Title’s commercial division. Previously, Pearson was state manager at RedVision Systems in Arizona. Prior to that, he was senior commercial escrow officer, assistant vice president, manager of trustee sales/forfeiture/national default title services for Arizona and Nevada and title examiner for First American Title Insurance Co. during 18 years of service.

Pearson received his dual B.S. degree in business management and marketing from University of Phoenix. He is a resident of San Tan Valley. Pearson is a chartered organizational representative for Boy Scouts of America. He has six children (four boys, two girls) and his two oldest sons received their Eagle Scout Award at age 13.

For more information, visit http://cleartitleaz.com.

education.business

Apollo quarterly profit beats predictions

For-profit education company Apollo Group Inc. said Monday its fiscal second-quarter net income tumbled 79 percent, hurt by a drop in enrollment, but the results beat Wall Street predictions and Apollo shares jumped 7 percent in premarket trading.

For the quarter ended Feb. 28, the University of Phoenix parent company earned $13.5 million, or 12 cents per share, down from $63.9 million, or 51 cents per share, in the same quarter last year. Excluding restructuring charges and other one-time items, the company said its adjusted profit was 34 cents per share.

Revenue dropped 13 percent to $838.4 million, from $962.7 million in the year-ago period.

Analysts, on average, expected a profit of 19 cents per share, on $824.9 million in revenue, according to FactSet.

Apollo attributed the drop in profit to lower enrollment and higher marketing costs, which were partially offset by lower restructuring and bad-debt costs. Enrollment at the University of Phoenix fell more than 15 percent to 300,800, while new degreed enrollment dropped 20 percent to 38,900.

Apollo projected fiscal 2013 revenue of $3.65 billion to $3.75 billion, while analysts expect $3.73 billion.

The for-profit education industry enjoyed a big boom when the recession first hit, but student demand has faded. In addition, increased criticism of the schools, new federal regulations and the still-struggling economy have weighed on enrollments.

The drop in enrollment has dented Apollo’s profits, and the company said in October that it was closing 115 of its smaller locations to cope with lower enrollment and plunging profits.

Apollo shares rose $1.22, or 7.2 percent, to $18.26 in premarket trading.

PHOENIX CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 20TH ANNUAL BEACH BALL TO BENEFIT CHILDREN'S HEART CENTER

Coinciding with the hospital’s 30th anniversary, this year’s Beach Ball gala will be held on Saturday, March 2, 2013. The Barcelona–themed event will bring together members of the community and beyond to celebrate the world-class care that the Phoenix Children’s Hospital has continued to provide to the Valley for three decades.

Beach Ball GalaThe event will be held at The Phoenician luxury resort in Scottsdale, and Apollo Group/University of Phoenix will be the proud presenting sponsor.

“Each year, Beach Ball brings together members of this community who are giving of their time and generosity to benefit one of the largest and most respected children’s hospitals in the country. We are so fortunate to be a part of a community that fosters development with such a strong spirit of generosity,”
Steve Schnall, Senior Vice President and Chief Development Officer of Phoenix Children’s Hospital said.

The Children’s Heart Center at Phoenix Children’s Hospital is the premier regional referral center in the Southwest for children with heart disease, and is the fifth-largest program of its kind in the United States. It proudly offers the most comprehensive inpatient and outpatient pediatric cardiac care to infants, children and teens with congenital heart defects, rhythm disturbances, heart failure and other cardiac-related problems. The Center’s surgeons perform nearly one heart transplant each month.

Proceeds raised from the 2012 Beach Ball reached nearly $1 million – a goal that this year’s event chairs hope to exceed for the Children’s Heart Center.

Those interested in getting involved with the 2013 Beach Ball or future events are encouraged to do so and should contact, Dusty Whitney, Volunteer Coordinator at the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation by email at dwhitney@phoenixchildrens.com.

Event and donation information may be found at www.pchbeachball.com, on the event’s Facebook page or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/PCHBeachBall.

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group

minorities

University of Phoenix honored for support of women, minorities

University of Phoenix has been recognized by the Arizona Million Dollar Circle of Excellence for its exceptional efforts to support Arizona minority-owned and woman-owned suppliers. The University has been inducted as an inaugural member of the Arizona Million Dollar Circle of Excellence by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC).

“As an Arizona-based business, we view supporting minority- and women-owned businesses as an essential part of our business structure,” said Dominique K. Brown, University of Phoenix corporate diversity officer. “We are thrilled to be recognized by the Arizona Million Dollar Circle of Excellence and we look forward to continuing to work with a diverse group of suppliers and businesses across the state of Arizona.”

The creation of the AZHCC’s Arizona Million Dollar Circle of Excellence was inspired by the state’s increasingly diverse consumer base and the fast-growing diversity at every level of its business community. The Circle of Excellence initiative recognizes major corporations and governmental entities that directly spend at least $1 million in purchasing goods or services from minority-owned and women-owned businesses in Arizona.

University of Phoenix was honored alongside 14 other notable Arizona businesses and organizations with an induction ceremony at the recent 2012 Minority Business Enterprise Summit, which was organized by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Phoenix MBDA Business Center, a U.S. Department of Commerce-financed organization aimed at securing large public and private contracts and financing transactions for eligible minority-owned businesses.

“The induction of University of Phoenix and other inaugural members of the Arizona Million Dollar Circle of Excellence is a historic step that reflects how our state’s economy is growing due to the influence of minority- and women-owned businesses,” said Gonzalo A. de la Melena Jr., President and CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, which organizes and runs the Arizona Million Dollar Circle of Excellence. “This is our way of recognizing companies that are leading the way in supplier diversity.”

This latest acknowledgement of University of Phoenix’s commitment to diverse communities in Arizona comes at the heels of a recent report by the magazine Diverse: Issues in Higher Education that University of Phoenix graduates more minority students than any other university in the United States.

To learn more about University of Phoenix visit Phoenix.edu.

veterans

Advancing Arizona’s Heroes

This week, our nation took time to celebrate the enormous contributions and sacrifices of those who have served in our Armed Forces. Just in time for Veterans Day, the Arizona Chamber Foundation released its latest policy brief, Economic Opportunity for Arizona Veterans. This new report highlights the importance of veteran employment and outlines specific policy recommendations for Arizona.

Arizona is home to an estimated 76,000 Second Gulf War veterans. According to national unemployment numbers for August 2012, these veterans face an unemployment rate of 10.9 percent, compared to the national rate of 8.1 percent. These veterans serve as an untapped resource for Arizona employers – one that has the ability to significantly grow and help diversify Arizona’s economy.

Military service prepares veterans with work ethic, teamwork and leadership skills. There are clear economic opportunities and synergies between the talents veterans bring to the workforce and the needs of private industry. Yet many veterans continue to face obstacles when transitioning to civilian employment. As the report recognizes, it’s incumbent on business and elected leaders to harness this talent by:

1) Adopting best practices for hiring and retaining veterans

2) Implementing policies to  facilitate the transition from military to civilian life

3) Streamlining and clarifying the wealth of public, private and non-profit resources that are available

To that end, the Arizona Chamber has established the Veterans and Military Affairs Committee with a vision of making Arizona one of the most attractive states for veterans to live and work. The committee serves as a resource and connector for employers that are interested in helping veterans transition from military service to civilian employment. The committee also works to support public policies that aid in this transition.

The committee has created a resource toolkit to help veterans and employers navigate the wide array of resources available. Additional next steps in addressing this issue include:

1) Finalizing a specific policy proposal to allow relevant military experience to count toward the certification requirements for occupations requiring a professional license.

2) Developing a strategy for disseminating company best practices for hiring and retaining veterans, reservists and National Guardsmen.

3) Partnering with like-minded organizations and interested elected officials to provide meaningful connections between employers and veterans.

Media response to these efforts has been overwhelmingly positive. Yesterday’s edition of Arizona Illustrated featured Suzanne Kinney, executive director of the Foundation and Captain Craig Doyle, chairman of the Veterans and Military Affairs Committee, in a discussion on the report’s findings and the importance of this topic. The issue is gaining traction and the efforts of Arizona businesses are being recognized.

It’s important to acknowledge the cross-section of Arizona Chamber member companies that were interviewed for the Foundation’s report: Amazon, Intel, Magellan Health Services, Northern Arizona University, Raytheon, Swift Transportation, University of Phoenix, USAA, and Wells Fargo. These companies along with the Arizona Department of Veterans Services provided valuable insight regarding best practices for recruiting and retaining vets. Many other chamber member companies, such as US Airways with their nationally-recognized Honor Flight Network, are taking action to support veterans as well. A key goal of the Veterans and Military Affairs Committee is to help other interested employers adopt proven strategies that will lead to more veterans successfully transitioning to civilian employment.

The Chamber also owes many thanks to Captain Craig Doyle for his leadership and continued service.
An Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran, Captain Doyle recently returned from the Asian Pacific Theater, his third activation since September 11, 2001. While there, he was the first Naval Reserve Officer to serve as Commanding Officer of the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Yokosuka.  His mission included all operational, planning and logistical support for the Far East region. With both business and military leadership experience, Captain Doyle brings indispensable personal experience to this important endeavor.

We look forward to further advancing the mission of the Veterans and Military Affairs Committee during the 2012 legislative session and continuing the recognition of this issue throughout the state. We will be working diligently to help more Arizona businesses implement proven programs to recruit, promote and retain veterans and to advance public policies that support veteran employment and entrepreneurship.

Glenn Hamer is the president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is committed to advancing Arizona’s competitive position in the global economy by advocating free-market policies that stimulate economic growth and prosperity for all Arizonans. http://www.azchamber.com/

Evening on the Diamond Presented by University of Phoenix

Call him Dr. Derrick Hall

Arizona Diamondbacks President & CEO Derrick Hall has been awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters from University of Phoenix. Hall was presented the doctorate on Saturday, November 10 during the graduation ceremony at University of Phoenix in which Hall was the commencement speaker. A photo of the ceremony is attached with Hall alongside University of Phoenix President Dr. Bill Pepicello and Phoenix Campus Vice President David Fitzgerald.

“University of Phoenix is a great partner of the D-backs and a leader in the Arizona community,” said Hall. “I am honored to receive this degree of high distinction. I’m so proud of the collaborative efforts to make a strong impact in the community with our joint initiatives.”

The doctorate is in recognition of Hall’s leadership role in the community. The honor came one day after Hall was presented with the first-ever Goldwater Community Service Award for his philanthropic efforts in the Arizona community. He currently serves on 27 boards, including Chairman of the Board for Valley of the Sun United Way leading the Hunger-Free Communities Plan Steering Committee, and is an active member of the Thunderbirds and Young President’s Organization.

The D-backs and University of Phoenix worked together to create the $100,000 School Challenge last February that received more than 700 applicants. The success of the first round of the program led to the $150,000 Back-To-School Challenge launched in September in which 31 schools received $5,000 each to improve their school in one of four categories: educational programs, innovation and technology, nutrition and fitness and school/campus improvements. In addition, the D-backs and University of Phoenix team up each year to provide more than 500 children with a fun holiday experience, including interacting with D-backs players and coaches, an arts and crafts station, T-ball game, and a gift bag with new shoes at the annual Winter Classic Holiday Party held at Chase Field in December.

Untitled

AWEE presents 2012 Faces of Success

A formerly homeless veteran who lost his hearing from an explosion in Vietnam, an ex-offender who chose drugs over her children and today counsels individuals in similar circumstances, and a Baltimore transplant who had to rely on the financial support of family when she couldn’t find a fulltime job despite a steady work history will tell their turnaround stories and be honored at the 18th annual Faces of Success Luncheon on Thursday, Nov. 15 at The Arizona Biltmore Resort and Spa.

The annual fund-raising luncheon supports Arizona Women’s Education & Employment (AWEE), a workforce development organization using a diverse range of evidence-based training and support services to advance Arizona’s workforce and change the lives of women, men, young adults and special populations through the dignity of work.

Also at the luncheon, Michelle King Robson, who overcame life-threatening health issues to start the widely praised social health website EmpowHER.com for women will receive the Jeanne Lind Herberger Award.

More than 700 people are expected at the luncheon, which is presented by Bank of America.  Registration and reception begin at 11 a.m.   The highly entertaining, rapid-fire program of giveaways, raffles and remarkably moving stories of success will be co-hosted by television personality Tara Hitchcock and Alfredo J. Molina of Molina Fine Jewelers.  Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton will make brief congratulatory remarks.

Molina also has donated a stunning pair of 18-karat white gold earrings with .39 carats of brilliant diamonds surrounding black onyx for a raffle.  The earrings are valued at $4,990.  Raffle tickets are $25 each or 6 for $100 and can be purchased at the event or online at www.awee.org.

Individual tickets for the Faces of Success Luncheon are $100 each and also can be purchased online or the day of the event.  Sponsorships are still available.

The highlight of the annual luncheon comes midway through the program when the three Faces of Success take the audience through their personal journeys from rock bottom to steady employment and self sufficiency thanks to AWEE programs, services and support.

The 2012 Faces of Success are:

• Craig Leighton, a U.S. Marine Corp photographer whose life fell apart after returning from Vietnam in 1974 deaf and angry.  Leighton eventually found himself battling alcohol and drug addiction, homeless and in jail.  “I needed help,” he said.  “Coming out of prison, you have a choice:  Go back to your old behavior or start over.  AWEE is what saved my life.”

• Vicki Rainey, the mother of two children who grew up in Phoenix living a “wonderful childhood” until the family moved to a new neighborhood.  That’s when she started making a series of bad choices with alcohol, drugs and criminal behavior and wound up homeless and in and out of prison.  Prison let her come out of the meth-induced fog she had lived in for months when she chose the drug over her kids.  She learned about AWEE in prison workshops and classes, rebuilt her self-esteem and her life and is now the marketing manager at Recovery Opportunity Center.  “The simple fact is, I wouldn’t be where I am today without AWEE.”

• Tanya Smith moved to Phoenix from Baltimore after her mother died.  Smith wanted warmth and sunshine.  Unfortunately, she couldn’t find permanent work and ran out of money between assignments through a temporary agency, needing help from family members.  Surgery complicated matters.   After getting on AHCCCS, she was referred to AWEE where resume writing and interview training keyed her turnaround.  Today, she’s working fulltime in the Home Modification Division of the Arizona Department of Economic Security.

Jeanne Lind Herberger honoree Robson combines a successful track record as a businesswoman and entrepreneur with nearly two decades of civic and community leadership to lead one of the fastest-growing social health companies on the Web.  She started EmpowHER following her own personal struggle with a debilitating health issue and the challenges she experienced in finding the health resources she needed.  “I thought ‘If this happened to me, what is happening to women all over the world?’  At that moment, I decided I would dedicate my life to making sure no other woman would suffer as I had by creating the resources I wish I had when I was sick.”

Kathey Wagner, CEO, B-On The Obvious and Nicole Spracale, Senior Vice President, Jobing, are co-chairs of the 2012 Faces of Success Luncheon.  Bank of America is the Presenting Sponsor with additional support from: The Herberger Foundation, Bruce T. Halle Familiy Foundation, APS, B-On The Obvious, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Discover Financial Services, Jobing, EmpowHER.com, First Solar, Molina Fine Jewelers, SRP, State Farm, Lewis & Roca, MidFirst Bank, Wells Fargo, Avnet, Comerica Bank and University of Phoenix.

For sponsorship information, contact Chief Development Officer Jamie Craig Dove at jamiecraigdove@awee.org or by calling (602) 223-4333.  For ticket information, visit www.awee.org.

78464706

University of Phoenix closing 115 locations

For-profit education company Apollo Group Inc. says its net income fell 60 percent in its fiscal fourth quarter, hurt by a sharp drop in enrollment at the University of Phoenix and higher costs.

The company also announced Tuesday that it is closing 115 locations due to shrinking enrollment and higher interest by students in taking courses online.

Apollo reported net income of $75.4 million, or 66 cents per share, for the three months ended Aug. 31. That compares with net income of $188.6 million, or $1.37 per share, a year earlier.

Excluding special items, Apollo’s earnings amounted to 52 cents per share.

Revenue fell 11 percent to $996.5 million from $1.12 billion.

Analysts polled by FactSet expected adjusted earnings of 50 cents per share on $1.01 billion in revenue.

University of Phoenix - Sperling Center

New University Of Phoenix Campus Opens, Offers Technologically Advanced Classrooms

The University of Phoenix unveiled its new, one-of-a-kind campus — the John Sperling Center for Educational Innovation.

This award-winning facility provides students with technologically advanced, yet practical learning environments, or “classrooms without boundaries.”

The campus, at 1625 Fountainhead Parkway, Fountainhead Corporate Center, in Tempe, celebrated its grand opening yesterday. Fountainhead won the 2012 RED Award for Best Office Project. Its designer, DAVIS, was named Architect of the Year.

“The innovation at this new campus embodies the foundation of what University of Phoenix prides itself in delivering to its students – an education without boundaries,” said Bill Pepicello, president of the University of Phoenix.

Technologically advanced classrooms called “Classrooms Without Boundaries” were designed with practicality at top-of-mind for students. The walls are writable surfaces, as well as the desktops, which flip to vertical positions allowing for easy presentations. Through use of eBeam® technology, instructors and students can work directly from projected computer screen images on the walls where they can open files, click on tabs or images, drag and drop files, etc., with the use of a special “pen.” The use of telepresence in these classrooms can extend programs/instruction into smaller, remote campuses and communities, such as in Yuma,  where testing is already underway.

“The ‘Classrooms Without Boundaries’ are real working classrooms but also labs for experimenting, developing and adopting new teaching technologies and techniques. Ideas that prove successful here are rolled out to programs and other campuses,” said David Fitzgerald, Phoenix campus director. “Even though these are physical classrooms at a physical campus, they’re all about having an education without barriers – our students are going to class on campuses or on their iPhone®, iPad® and laptops from their kitchen, workplace and local coffee shops.”

The campus not only offers highly advanced classrooms to students, but also gives visitors innovative experiences that showcase what the university is all about. From the lobby, through hallways to a large briefing/media room, the first floor of this 10-story building, (through a mixed use of technology, graphics and artistic design) tells the story of the university through “experiences” such as touch and learn panels, life-size progressive videos, and interactive maps. “These experiences were designed to offer fun, yet informative narratives of the university telling who we are, who we serve, how we do it, where we are going and what it means to potential students,” Fitzgerald said.

The John Sperling Center for Educational Innovation now serves as the main campus for  Metro Phoenix with numerous other campus locations throughout the Valley. The campus also houses traditional classrooms, a state-of-the-art nursing lab, a counseling center that lets students serve real families and individuals, a student advisement center, The Rev Café, a student resource center with computer workstations and group study rooms, video booth labs that let students work on and improve presentations and the usability lab where University staff facilitate end-user observations and real-time product design.

The Apollo Group Real Estate and Facilities team enlisted architecture and construction firms for this project. Besides DAVIS, construction was a joint effort between Sundt Construction (shell and tenant improvement) and Southwest Architectural Builders.

For more information about University of Phoenix, visit their website at www.phoenix.edu.

Diamondbacks Foundation - Evening on the Diamond

Evening On The Diamond Raises $1.7 Million For Diamondbacks Foundation

The Arizona Diamondbacks announced today that its sold-out Evening on the Diamond fundraising event at Chase Field raised a record $1.7 million to benefit the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation. Overall, the event has raised $8.2 million to be given back to Arizona charities and non-profit organizations since 2007 and has been ranked as one of the largest fundraising events in the Valley.

“Last night was a truly unforgettable evening for everyone in attendance and the community will feel the impact of our attendees’ generosity for years to come,” said D-backs’ Managing General Partner Ken Kendrick. “We are humbled by the efforts of so many who made last night such a success and we are grateful that so many people, including our entire team and coaching staff, took the time to be a part of it.”

The theme of the gala was Teaming up for Education, as the University of Phoenix served as the presenting sponsor and the school’s president, Dr. Bill Pepicello, co-chaired the event with his wife, Kris. A portion of the program geared specifically towards education raised $100,000 from the attendees, with the University of Phoenix matching an additional $50,000 for $150,000 total in critical funds. Lee Hanley, chairman and CEO of Vestar, received the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation Community Leadership Award for his philanthropic endeavors to assist Arizona charities and the community throughout the Valley.

The event’s live auction raised more than $680,000 and featured a South African Hunting/Photographic Safari, a James Bond Experience in London, a vacation in the Bahamas aboard a luxurious 145-foot yacht, a Hawaiian vacation at Kapalua, a five-day hunting expedition with Kirk Gibson, an Eddie Matney prepared personal dinner with D-backs legends and more than a dozen current players, as well as VIP trips to Napa Valley, the Oregon Coast and New York, where the winning bidder will get to dine with members of the Trump family and take in the live finale of “The Apprentice.”

More than 700 people were in attendance and enjoyed dinner on the infield of Chase Field followed by a live performance by Grammy-Award winner Natalie Cole, who performed an hour-long set that included the famous video duet on dbTV with her late father, Nat King Cole.

Last night, D-backs’ President and CEO Derrick Hall announced the official passing of the $30 million mark in combined charitable giving between the D-backs and the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation. Those organizations gave back more than $4 million in 2011 and later this week, will dedicate the 32nd field in the community, Justin Upton Field at University Park.

For more information on the Diamondbacks Foundation, visit their website at arizona.diamondbacks.mlb.com/ari/community/foundation.jsp.

Junior Achievement JA You’re Hired! Challenge 2011

Junior Achievement JA You’re Hired! Challenge Teaches Students Workforce Skills

Hundreds of Valley high school students learn workforce skills, compete for internships at the Junior Achievement of Arizona (JAAZ) JA You’re Hired! Challenge at the Tempe Center for the Arts


According to a 21st Century Skills study, 42 percent of employers rate the overall preparation of high school graduates for entry-level jobs as deficient. On March 29, more than 350 Valley high school students will defy this statistic at the Junior Achievement of Arizona (JAAZ) JA You’re Hired! Challenge at the Tempe Center for the Arts.

The JA You’re Hired! Challenge is a part of a three component, award-winning program created by JAAZ in partnership with the University of Phoenix to develop high school students’ work-readiness skills, many of which are not addressed in a normal high school curriculum.

“We realize that even some of the best schools lack the ‘real world’ lessons that are needed to transition from student to employee,” says Joyce Richards, president of JAAZ. “JA You’re Hired! teaches students those skills and does so in a realistic, competitive environment to help them make smart academic and economic choices.”

The first component is a rigorous curriculum led in class by Junior Achievement volunteers to prepare them for the JA You’re Hired! Challenge. Over the course of a few weeks, students learn proper interview techniques; work to improve their writing, language, math and critical thinking skills; and how to apply what they learn in the classroom to real life situations.

These skills are then put to the test by nearly 50 Phoenix area hiring managers who will be on-site the day of the JA You’re Hired! Challenge. They will be testing the students on their abilities through mock interviews, marketing pitches and public speaking exercises.

Some of the hiring managers will be offering summer internships. Students selected will continue to the third component of the program, which is comprised of successfully completing a paid internship with regular correspondence between the employer and Junior Achievement advisors.

“What is truly unique about this program is that it goes beyond lessons and workshops,” Richards says. “Students actually go through the hiring process and apply everything this program has taught them. And like the real world, not everyone gets the job, but at least now they are prepared for whatever challenges they may face in the job market.”

This year’s JA You’re Hired! Challenge program is made possible thanks to the generous support of University of Phoenix and community partners, such as Phoenix Suns Charities, Triton Technologies, Crexando, FedEx, Allstate, bluemedia, Charles Schwab, Manpower, SHRM and others.

For more information on Junior Achievement or ways to get involved, please call 480-377-8500 or visit jaaz.org.

About Junior Achievement of Arizona
Junior Achievement is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization which believes that every child deserves an education in economics and finances in order to inspire and prepare them for success in a global economy. Serving Arizona’s youth since 1957, JA prepares young people for the real world by showing them how to become self-sufficient, how to create jobs which make their communities robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. Junior Achievement of Arizona reached nearly 83,000 students during the 2010-2011 school year.
Educational Partnership - Maricopa Community Colleges & University of Phoenix

University of Phoenix Forms Educational Partnership With Maricopa Community Colleges

Alliance creates career pathways to address workforce skills gaps

University of Phoenix, the nation’s largest private university and leader in educating today’s working learner, today announced an educational partnership with Maricopa Community Colleges that will provide new educational opportunities in manufacturing, healthcare, business, and hospitality. The new partnership was announced at a special signing ceremony at Rio Salado College.

“This new partnership will provide a transition from associate’s to bachelor’s degree in areas like manufacturing, hospitality and business, where we know we need skilled workers and need them now.”

Through the new partnership, University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges will work with area business, academic and diversity leaders to identify workforce needs and develop focused curriculum and specific career pathways to meet those area workforce skills gaps. Students will have the opportunity to earn an associate’s degree at any Maricopa Community College and then seamlessly transition to a bachelor’ degree program at University of Phoenix.

“We agree with President Obama—community colleges are critical in developing our next generation of skilled workers—and that’s why we continue to invest in these types of partnerships,” said Dr. Bill Pepicello, President, University of Phoenix. “When two education providers like University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges come together to present education solutions, the benefit to students, employers and the local economy is that much greater.”

As part of the partnership, Maricopa Community College students will have the opportunity to potentially convert prior training and work experience into college credit through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) at University of Phoenix. Through a new University of Phoenix transfer policy, credits earned through an associate’s of arts degree at Maricopa Community Colleges will transfer to University of Phoenix and satisfy general education course requirements so students can immediately begin working towards their bachelor’s degree in their field of study. University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges will also explore transfer trends to ensure the partnership is meeting local employer demands.

“The Maricopa Community Colleges are committed to helping our students reach their educational goals, and part of that commitment is ensuring that they have as many ways as possible to achieve success,” said Dr. Rufus Glasper, Chancellor of the Maricopa Community Colleges. “This new partnership will provide a transition from associate’s to bachelor’s degree in areas like manufacturing, hospitality and business, where we know we need skilled workers and need them now.”

[stextbox id="alert" bwidth="1" bcolor="000000" bgcolor="e0e0e0" image="null"]For more information on this educational partnership go to Maricopa Community Colleges  or University of Phoenix.[/stextbox]

Arizona State Credit Union Awards Scholarships

Arizona State Credit Union Awards $34,000 To College Students, Graduates

Arizona State Credit Union awarded $34,000 in scholarships to 18 individuals – a combination of both college students and recent college graduates of Arizona schools.

The scholarships were awarded through Arizona State Credit Union’s Community Leaders Scholarship and Loan Reduction program.

The Community Leaders Scholarship provides help for students to pay for tuition, books and other academic expenses, whereas the Load Reduction Grant helps graduates pay for student loans. The graduates were awarded for their academic achievements and commitment to the community.

Recipients of the scholarships are from various Arizona schools, including Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, University of Arizona, University of Phoenix, Gila Community College, Mesa Community College and Paradise Valley Community College.

“I commend each of these students for the commitment they have made to their education,” said David E. Doss, President/CEO of Arizona State Credit Union.

These scholarships are only one part of the scholarships and grants that Arizona State Credit Union supports. The Credit Union is a supporter of sustainability and providing assistance to the Arizonans and local communities that it serves.

Arizona State Credit Union is a non-profit, statewide financial cooperative. The company has 21 branches across Arizona that provides financial products and services.

The 18 award recipients are Casey Lee Green, Brigitte Steinken, Eric Lehnhardt, Mathew Wadsworth, Maria Pina, Sawsan Hamad and Kevin Denhardt, all of Arizona State University.

Camille Adkins-Rieck, Daniel Cheek, Noam Dorr and Alegra Savage are the recipients from the University of Arizona.

Timothy O’Donnel and Chelsea Wilson are of Mesa Community College, James Burgos and Angela Towner are of the University of Phoenix, Jacquelina Blanch of Gila Community College and Joseph Cook of Paradise Valley Community College are also recipients.

“It is a privilege to be associated with some of the state’s brightest and most deserving individuals,” Doss said. “I am certain their dedication will enhance not only their futures but the future of Arizona as well.”

For more information about Arizona State Credit Union or its Community Leaders Scholarship and Loan Reduction program, please visit www.azstcu.org.