Tag Archives: usgbc

rsz_fbi_phoenix_division

Ryan Companies US, Inc. Earns LEED Gold Certification For FBI Phoenix Office

 

The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) and Ryan Companies US, Inc. announced that the GSA FBI Phoenix Division Office Building has been awarded LEED Gold certification for new construction by the USGBC.

Completed in February 2012, the 225,000 SF facility sits on 12.2 acres at 21711 N. 7th St. in Phoenix. The FBI Phoenix Division building won the 2013 RED Award for Best Office Project.

“We are extremely proud to be involved in a project where, in addition to security, energy efficiency and sustainability were key design goals,” said John Strittmatter, President of Ryan’s Southwest region. “To be a part of the team that achieved this prestigious designation is an honor.”

In working toward LEED Gold certification, the design and construction team incorporated a variety of sustainable and energy-saving elements into the building. Some of these features include the use of energy efficient mechanical systems which provide a 30% reduction in energy usage over the current City of Phoenix building code requirements, and the use of low-water plumbing fixtures which achieve a 40% reduction in building water usage. In addition to energy- and water-efficient systems and fixtures, Ryan used Energy Savings Performance utility agreements to achieve, maintain, and/or exceed the ENERGY STAR benchmark.

Additional sustainable features include desert themed landscaping which was utilized across the entire site and will reduce landscape water usage by 50%. The use of desert cobble in lieu of 100% decomposed granite (DG) produced a more natural native desert appearance and reduced transportation costs by reducing the amount of material imported to the site.

Ryan developed and constructed the new, build-to-suit Class A office building for the GSA with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) serving as the anchor tenant. The FBI consolidated four of its Phoenix locations into the new building and, in doing so, increased cost savings and organizational efficiencies. The building was also named a “Design Excellence” project by the GSA, which recognizes excellence in public architecture, engineering and construction.

 

A Guide to Applying for a Bank Loan

Wells Fargo opens LEED-Silver store in Tempe

Wells Fargo announced the opening of its newest Arizona Community Banking store, at 20 E. University St. in Tempe, on June 3.  The 2,249-square-foot location – the 261st Wells Fargo banking store in the state – is designed and built to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver standards set by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).  Wells Fargo has five LEED certified stores in Arizona.

“Wells Fargo understands the importance of promoting environmental stewardship in the communities we serve,” said Misha Patel Terrazas, Metro East area president for Wells Fargo in Arizona.  “In addition to our commitment to have 35 percent of our leased and owned buildings LEED certified by 2020, we also have introduced new envelope-free ATMs throughout Arizona and continue to provide support through grants and volunteerism by our team members to local nonprofit organizations that share our environmental commitment.”

Environmental features in the new store include:
· Water saving plumbing fixtures and control devices help us cut water usage by up to 40% compared with conventional buildings of the same type
· Energy efficient light fixtures and HVAC system help to reduce energy use by up to 21% compared with conventional buildings of the same type
· Light harvesting system helps cut energy use by automatically adjusting indoor lighting for maximum use of available daylight
· Bike racks help reduce pollution impacts from automobile usage
· Increased use of recycled content, like porcelain tiles that contain 40% recycled content and insulation  made from recycled cotton – including scraps of denim
· Fully recyclable materials such as counter surfaces comprised of recycled bottles and cement, carpet, and window shades divert these materials from the landfill at their end of life
· Sustainably grown, harvested and manufactured wood materials
· Low toxic paints and other materials and strict air quality management practices during construction contribute to a healthier environment
· Waste diversion during construction keeps much of our construction waste from ever seeing the landfill
*Compared to conventional buildings of the same type.
“Our vision as a company is to help our customers succeed financially, and this new store will make it even easier for our customers to connect with the full financial services that Wells Fargo has to offer,” said Store Manager Chris McCarthy.  “We’re excited to be serving our customers in this new energy efficient store.”

McCarthy joined Wells Fargo as a teller in 2001 and also has held positions as a personal banker and training consultant.  His store team will consist of 11 Retail Banking team members, including Service Manager Samantha Brock, four personal bankers and five tellers.  Representatives from Wells Fargo Home Mortgage and Wells Fargo Investments also will serve customers at the store.

The new store includes two ATMs with 24-hour access, a merchant night drop and an online terminal where customers can access their Wells Fargo accounts online. Hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday.

Natural light floods the five-story atrium space

ASU's ISTB 4 Achieves LEED Gold Certification

 

Arizona State University’s recently opened Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 4 (ISTB 4) research facility was recognized as LEED Gold certified from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

To earn the LEED Gold, the $110M, 7-story ISTB 4 achieved 46 total LEED points under the LEED for New Construction Version 2.2 Rating System. One of the major project goals for the 298,000 SF building was to reduce energy as much as possible — when fully occupied ISTB 4’s energy use will be nearly one-half of a typical laboratory building.

HDR, as executive architect, collaborated with the design architect, Ehrlich Architects,  for the uniquely sustainable research and laboratory building. Sundt Construction was the general contractor.

As sustainable designer, Mathew Cunha-Rigby, LEED AP BD+C, point outs, “ASU and HDR were committed to making ISTB 4 a high performance, sustainable building from the beginning of the project. The university set a minimum goal of LEED Silver, with a stretch goal of LEED Gold.

“ASU also outlined sustainability targets that needed to be met for all new projects on campus, which helped influence many of the design strategies that were implemented in the building.”

Some of the sustainable strategies implemented in the building include:

>> Optimal building orientation based on local climate conditions and a high performance façade with vertical sunshades to reduce heat gain and incorporate passive cooling strategies.

>> Efficient active systems to minimize lighting, mechanical and process loads including energy recovery, reduced heating and cooling requirements for ventilated air, variable-air-volume settings for offices, labs and fume hoods, as well as, energy-efficient lighting, with occupancy sensor controls.

>> On-site renewable energy. ASU allocated energy produced by a photovoltaic array on the adjacent parking structure to ISTB 4 to supply more than 16% of its energy use.

>> Building performance monitoring to ensure the building will continue to meet its energy use reduction goals over the life of the building.

>>  Minimized resource use. Local building materials, extracted and manufactured within 500 miles of the site, totaled more than 44 percent of the entire material cost.

>> Daylighting. The building envelope and the interior space are designed to admit natural light into as many spaces as possible, and a central atrium brings daylight deep into the building interior.

>> Users are encouraged to use alternative transportation. ISTB 4 is within one fourth of a mile from a light rail stop and bus stops, serving five different bus routes. Bicycle racks are provided on site and the number of parking spaces has been reduced by 55% from that of a typical university building, with 10% of the parking spaces dedicated to carpool and fuel-efficient vehicles.

With the ISTB 4 certification, HDR now has a total of 14 LEED Gold projects.

 

Afton Trail

CBRE Asset Services Earns Recognition for LEED Certified Buildings

CBRE Asset Services was selected a recipient of the inaugural Heavy Metals Awards from the Arizona chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

The award acknowledges all certified LEED building owners in the state on their accomplishments, and gives special recognition to others who achieve the highest number of certifications per category.

CBRE was recognized for its efforts in obtaining the highest number of Silver-level LEED-Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance (LEED-EB O&M®), which includes the following properties:

>> Collier Center: A 24-story, 567,163 SF Class A multi-tenant high-rise at 201 E. Washington St. in Downtown Phoenix.

>> Phoenix Plaza: The property, on the NEC of Central Avenue and Thomas Road, consists of two 20-story, Class A office towers totaling 836,059 SF.

“CBRE delivers industry-leading energy and sustainability services to property owners in metropolitan Phoenix and around the globe,” said Afton Trail, managing director of CBRE’s Asset Services Division in Phoenix. “We are not only committed to minimizing our impact on the environment, but also in assisting our clients in doing the same at their properties.”

The USGBC, recognized the award recipients at a luncheon held Oct. 24 at the Phoenix Convention Center.

rsz_doxa_2

DOXA Redevelopment Project Receives LEED Gold Certification

 

With 17.8% of the total building materials content, by value, manufactured using recycled products, DOXA was pleased to accept the LEED Gold level certification this month for its newest Phoenix adaptive reuse development project.

Located at Buckeye Rd. and 16th St. and once home to the original Smitty’s Grocery store, the 60,000 SF refurbished building now houses the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ primary regional office.

An internationally recognized mark of excellence, LEED certification was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and is verified and awarded by third party, Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI).

The designation provides independent, third-party verification that a building was designed and built using strategies aimed at achieving high performance in five key areas of human and environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality.

Through the course of construction, DOXA diverted 96.64% of waste from landfills, using 11.97 percent of salvaged, refurbished or reused materials from the original building. The new building also utilized regional materials, totaling 33.1% of the total building materials, lowering the financial and environmental cost of delivery and stimulating the local economy.

In addition to sustainable construction methods, LEED certification emphasizes sensitivity to a building’s occupants. As such, DOXA has taken a number of measures to increase the health, safety and comfort level in the building, including the use of paint and interior materials low in Volatile Organic Compounds; heating and cooling systems free of dangerous chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based refrigerants; and a redesigned building envelope which doubled the existing insulation.

The redevelopment also reduced potable water use by 54.6% through the installation of high efficiency water closets and urinals and low flow lavatory faucets.

“As landlord, our obligation was to obtain a LEED Silver Certification for the building,” said Dan Wilhelm, DOXA principle. “Achieving LEED Gold demonstrates our commitment to increasing measureable energy efficiency for this and all other DOXA buildings where the government is the tenant.”

 

Managing Downstream and Upstream Risks

Managing Downstream And Upstream Risks

Examine your company’s cash flow needs and managing downstream and upstream risks

Even the strongest, most sophisticated contractor has probably taken a lump or two over the past year as a result of one of the worst stretches the construction industry has seen in decades. Because of these challenges, there are many ways that you should be examining your own company, your cash flow needs, profit estimate and balance sheet projections.

Managing both your upstream risks and downstream risks will be critical to your success in the coming years. Ask the following questions:

  • How much bad debt can my company absorb before having a critical impact on my balance sheet and cash flows?
  • How long should I perform work without being paid? What does my contract allow for in terms of work stoppages for non-payment?
  • Who bears the risk of non-payment by the ultimate project owner? Do I have any “Pay If Paid” contracts?
  • How is this private project being financed? Has anyone seen a bank commitment letter?
  • What would happen if my receivables were stretched another 30-45 days on average?
  • How would this job be impacted if one of my subcontractors could no longer perform their work (due to bankruptcy or otherwise)? How much would it cost me to replace them?
  • What is my added exposure when I bond a job?
  • How do I address onerous contract terms with my owner/GC/client?
  • How do I know if my subcontractors are still financially viable?

There are landmines at every turn so be sure to not discount the value of doing your homework before signing a contract. What are some specific areas of risk to pay close attention to?

Upstream Risks

We all understand the inherent risks with subcontracting a portion of “your work” to another contractor for whom you will be responsible. How many of us though give a lot of thought to upstream risk? Are you a sub to a general contractor? Sub to another sub? Vendor, supplier? Or a general contractor doing work for a private company? All of these scenarios carry several risks.

The most obvious upstream risk is no pay/slow pay from your client. As a general contractor doing work for a private owner, you will typically have the ability prior to starting the work to inquire about project financing. Do not dismiss this right and take full advantage of this opportunity as you will likely have difficulty getting anything else from the owner once the project has begun. Useful tools here include a “set aside” letter from their bank, loan commitment letter for project specific funding or a bank reference letter stating that the owner has sufficient cash on hand to pay for the project.

Even if you are not prime to an owner, all of these risk factors affect you. Unfortunately, you will not likely have access to your upstream contractor’s financials and will be somewhat dependent on their due diligence with the owner. Even so, don’t be afraid to ask your prime contractor (or upstream contractor) if they have done their homework. Also, check with your peers or any subs/suppliers who are working for your general contractor to see how timely they are currently making payments.

Downstream Risk

If you are a general contractor, part of your normal operating procedure is to monitor subcontractor bids and hopefully that includes a formal prequalification process for the majority of your subs. The amount of data you request is up to you, but the following is a key list of things you should know about your potential subcontractors:

  • What is their reputation? Do they have reference letters? How many jobs of similar size and scope have they performed in the past?
  • What is their safety history? Do they have a dedicated safety director?
  • What is their financial status? Have they ever failed to complete a job? Will they share financials?
  • Do they have a bond company and/or a bond line? If so, what are their single and aggregate limits? Can you obtain a letter from their surety stating these limits and current capacity?
  • Do they have all the required insurance currently in place? How do you monitor and track expiring certificates throughout the year?
  • Do you know how many subs or suppliers they will engage to fulfill the contract? If you are providing a bond as a prime contractor, these parties will all be covered by your Payment Bond and add to your potential exposure for non-payment claims.

This economy has certainly taken its toll on a large number of contractors. Often the smaller, trade contractors are hit the hardest as they did not carry large backlogs of work or large balance sheets into this downturn. They could be dependent on their next job for their very survival so it is critical that all parties are aware of potential risk factors with key subs and suppliers and employ as many additional tools as possible to mitigate those risks and prevent another contractor’s problem from being your problem.

[stextbox id=”grey”]For more information about downstream and upstream risks, visit www.mjinsurance.com.[/stextbox]

 

Feature Big Green 2011

Speaker: Melisa Camp ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Melisa Camp, Go Green Investments

Melisa Camp, Go Green Investments

Melisa Camp, “The Green Queen,” is CEO of Go Green Investments, Realtor with the GREEN designation, and Consultant on sustainable living. Camp is a LEED Green Associate working toward obtaining the LEED AP-Homes accreditation. She has served as USGBC AZ’s Residential Green Building Advocate since 2009 and educates and raises awareness with other Realtors, builders, homeowners, government officials, green professionals, and lenders & appraisers.

Camp has an Interdisciplinary Studies Degree in Business and Communication from ASU and a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Phoenix, and she has started her Green MBA as well.

Some of her accomplishments include co-hosting LEED for Homes overviews, ReGreen workshops, a Green Home Tour, publishing two local residential LEED for Homes case studies, and speaking at the AZ Biz Green Forum. Camp is a member and volunteer for the Green Phoenix Chamber of Commerce and Habitat for Humanity volunteer. As a former teacher and journalist, Camp authors a well-followed blog, “Bring the Green” and is drafting a series of children’s books and seeking publication.

Camp is also working on the development of a green home class for Realtors. She is passionate about going green and teaching anyone who will listen. She has attended GreenBuild in Phoenix and Chicago as well as the Sonoran Green Expo in Tucson. In her spare time Camp plays competitive sand volleyball and is a stay at home Mother. Her energy is contagious to those around her and her motto is “What good is what I know if I do not share it with the world?”


Topic: Green Home Rating System in Multiple Listing Service (MLS): Systems that are searchable within the MLS and specific to the Phoenix area like LEED, NAHB, SRP PowerWise Homes, EnergyStar and Scottsdale Green Building Programs.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Room 158

BIG Green Conference 2011



BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.



Mark Wilhelm Lifetime Achievement Az Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Lifetime Achievement

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: Mark Wilhelm, LEED AP
Co-founder, Green Ideas Sustainability Consultants

Mark Wilhelm has a long-standing commitment to the green movement, and over the years he has given countless hours toward improving the earth.

Wilhelm realized in 1973 that he wanted to create ways to make the U.S. a sustainable place to live. He focused on solar energy technology, building energy simulation, and designing energy-efficient buildings. After earning his master’s in environmental planning from Arizona State University, Wilhelm worked for APS for 13 years, where he headed the development of the APS Environmental Showcase Home (ESH). The home is designed to use 60 percent less water and 85 percent less energy than a regular home and displayed new sustainable technologies, materials and procedures.

In 1994, Wilhelm created the firm Green Ideas Sustainability Consultants with his colleague, Charlie Popeck, to promote green building. He also volunteers to teach sustainability to ASU students and community organizations throughout the Valley.

Wilhelm is a founding member of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Arizona Chapter, and served as chapter chairman in 2006. In 2007, Wilhelm successfully lobbied to have the Arizona chapter host the 2009 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo. He also helped to choose the LEED Silver certified Phoenix Convention Center as the site of the conference. To recognize Wilhelm for his hard work and passion, he was named chairman of the Greenbuild Host Committee. The 2009 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo truly engaged the greater Phoenix community and attracted more than 27,000 attendees from around the world.

www.egreenideas.com


Finalist: Edwards Design Group
www.edwardsdesigngroup.com

The Edwards Design Group is the pioneer of building environmentally sound, energy efficient homes in Scottsdale, Ariz. Brothers Kevin Edwards and Doug Edwards have been creating environmentally friendly homes for customers for thirty years. The company’s green approach protects the earth, conserves energy and saves homeowners money.

The Edwards Design Group was the first construction group to create and build a house using straw bale and autoclave aerated concrete, an insulated building block that doesn’t need to be as replaced as often as regular concrete. The Edwards Design Group also set up recycling processes on site during construction, saving one owner over $25,000.

The Edwards Design Group helped the City of Scottsdale increase its awareness on environmentally friendly and safe building techniques and materials. The company works closely with the City of Scottsdale’s Green Building Program, and has participated in the annual “Green Building Expo.” Kevin and Doug both host a TV show called “Sustainable Scottsdale.”


Finalist: Richard Franz-Under, RA, LEED AP
Pima County Development Services
www.pimaxpress.com

Richard Franz-Under made history in Arizona when he received the first LEED certification for a building in the state. The Desert Vista Campus Plaza Building at Pima Community College was also the 31st building in the world to achieve LEED certification. In 1997, while working at Pima Community College, he developed the first green building program and is the state’s leading expert in designing buildings to meet LEED certification.

His dedication to sustainability doesn’t end there. Franz-Under commutes 20 miles round trip to work on a bicycle and provides community outreach for sustainable construction practices and affordable housing. He also manages a LEED for Homes Provider program — the only one in the nation — and is currently supervising the certification process of one remodel, 94 multifamily units and 62 new homes.

Franz-Under has served as a consultant for several different LEED projects in Arizona and speaks to the community throughout the year, educating people about the importance of green building practices.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

Green Innovation SRP Earthwise - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Green Innovation

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: SRP EarthWise

SRP has a wide variety of sustainable solutions that allow customers to reduce their carbon footprint and do their part to help save the environment. The SRP EarthWise programs are the first step in this process.

One program, EarthWise Energy, produces electricity from renewable resources like the sun, wind and water. Once the electricity is produced, it is sent to the SRP electric system for all customers to use. By using renewable power, there is less need to use fossil fuels. This program is offered to customers for an extra $3 per month. So far, EarthWise Energy has about 5,300 people participating.

Another SRP EarthWise program, EarthWise Solar Energy, allows customers to install solar electric or solar water systems in their homes or businesses for a reduced price. Businesses also can offset electricity usage with natural sources by joining the EarthWise Renewable Energy Credits program. SRP customers also are given the option to support reforestation through Trees for Change.

SRP EarthWise has several other programs that help the community take an active part in the movement to save energy. These programs include: EarthWise Solar for Schools; EarthWise Renewable Energy Credits; EarthWise Trees for Change; EarthWise Mowing Down Pollution; and EarthWise Powering Our Future.

www.srpnet.com


Finalist: Burgis Envirolutions
www.burgisenviro.com

Burgis Envirolutions is redefining the traditional composting process, and allowing food operators to effectively manage food waste with innovative green technology.

The Organic Refuse Conversion Alternative is a technology that converts food into a water waste that can be discharged or treated and reused in irrigation. The ORCA uses natural microorganisms and biochips to process and break down food on site.

The ORCA allows businesses to save time and money, while reducing their carbon footprint. Businesses will not have to pay for hauling fees or labor costs that come from disposing their food waste at compost locations. By making less trips hauling food, carbon emissions will be lowered.

The ORCA is offered in six sizes. It requires very little power and uses only a small amount of water, from 40 to 200 gallons depending on the machine size.

Burgis Envirolutions was awarded the 2009 Valley Forward/SRP Crescordia Award in Green Technology.


Finalist: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
www.phoenixchildrens.com

Phoenix Children’s Hospital is changing the way hospitals approach their responsibilities to the environment and their patients.



The Hospital recently spent $588 million to build an additional 11-story tower for patients. During construction the hospital was conscious of the design, construction and operations practices it used, and as a result the new building will use 20 percent less energy.

Phoenix Children’s most recognizable sustainability effort is the Central Energy Plant (CEP) that powers the hospital’s 34 acres. The CEP uses an 800-ton water-to-water heat pump chiller that saves 5.6 million gallons of water each year, and over the next 15 years the CEP is expected to save the hospital $11 million in energy and operating costs.

The hospital maintains a paperless policy, and sends materials to subcontractors through online distribution. Recycling is heavily emphasized and throughout the construction process more than 70 percent of the construction waste was recycled.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

Bonnie Richardson - Green Advocate - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Green Advocate

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: Bonnie Richardson, LEED AP, Architect & Principal Planner· City of Tempe

A passion for sustainable design and an enthusiasm for sharing her knowledge with others are not the only attributes Bonnie Richardson brings to the table.

After graduating from Arizona State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design in 1983, Richardson established her own architectural firm and became a visiting professor of architecture at her alma mater. Since then, Richardson has continued to share her knowledge of design, not only with the ASU community, but also with the Phoenix-metro area.

As an architect and principal planner for Tempe’s transportation department, Richardson has put her mark on many of the city’s green building endeavors, including Phoenix’s METRO light rail system and the Tempe Transportation Center.

Richardson is a Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) professional, and an advocate for environmentally friendly development. She is committed to creating facilities and buildings that area residents will find aesthetically pleasing, and prove to be a valuable investment of their tax dollars.

She is a member of the American Institute of Architects, Valley Forward and the Arizona Technology Council, and has served with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Arizona Chapter.

Her commitment to the future of Tempe and Arizona is manifested in her desire to encourage and promote sustainable designing and building in her community.

www.tempe.gov


Finalist: Lori Singleton, Manager, Sustainability Initiatives & Technologies
SRP
www.srpnet.com

Although Lori Singleton is Salt River Project’s manager of sustainability initiatives and technology, she also uses her knowledge of environmentally friendly and sustainable practices to help others in her private life.  Singleton’s passion for sustainability has been demonstrated through her association with the Arizona chapter of the Audubon Society and Valley Forward.

Both Singleton’s personal and professional lives are dedicated to improving the quality of life in Arizona, advocating for sustainable practices and bringing attention to new, more efficient conservation techniques.  Her personal and professional philosophy — “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” — exemplifies her enthusiasm for sustainability.

Singleton had a regular column in The Arizona Republic, which she used to educate readers on daily ways to help preserve the environment.  She also aided the Audubon Society in its early stages by leading Audubon Arizona’s Business Advisory Committee.  Her involvement with Audubon gave the society the resources to spread its Healthy Planet/Healthy Home message to its 10,000 statewide members.


Finalist: Mara DeFilippis, Founder & CEO
Phoenix Green Chamber of Commerce
www.arizonagreenchamber.org

Striving to fill Phoenix’s need for green information and resources, Mara DeFilippis established the Phoenix Green Chamber of Commerce in 2008.

DeFilippis once asked, “If we were to have a lifespan of 500 years, how would we be living differently?”  This sentiment reflects DeFilippis’ passion for environmentally responsible practices.  It also demonstrates the Green Chamber’s mission to promote businesses committed to environmental and social responsibility.

The Green Chamber serves more than 140 businesses, holds monthly educational forums and distributes a monthly newsletter, which reaches more than 5,500 Phoenix businesses, agencies and people.  It is also compiling an “Eco-Standards” handbook, estimated for a mid-2010 release, which features a tiered system to rate members’ sustainable business practices.  These ratings will be visible online through the Green Chamber’s directory.

DeFilippis and the Green Chamber strive to provide clear education on which green ideas and businesses are most effective for the environment and the bottom line.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

Amy Stephens Volunteer Of The Year - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Volunteer Of The Year

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: Amy Stephens, Co-Founder · Stephens ID & Associates

Amy Stephens volunteers her time, creativity and energy to the advancement of the sustainability movement across the state. She also has played an integral role in the growth of the Arizona Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council.

Stephens joined the Arizona chapter in 2006, when she also became a member of the national USGBC. She has dedicated countless hours and effort to the local chapter. She has been a member of the education committee since 2006, and has been the co-chair of that committee since 2008. In 2009, she sat on the host committee and the greening committee for the national USGBC’s Greenbuild International Conference and Expo when it was held in Phoenix.

Stephens shows the same passion she has for the USGBC in her own design company, Stephens ID & Associates. Stephens graduated from William Woods University in Fulton, Mo., in 1997 with a BFA in interior design, and has been designing balanced environments for people to live in ever since.

Her company focuses on interior design, interior repurposing, feng shui and green design. She assists her clients in going green by repurposing existing furniture with a goal toward creating healthier living spaces.
Stephens also teaches green building education classes, and is the vice president and a founding board member of the Green Meeting Industry Council Arizona chapter.

Among her future goals is to work with local elementary schools to teach students how to plant and grow food, so they will understand the importance of the Earth and where their food comes from. These plans are just several of many as Stephens forges ahead with her various sustainability endeavors.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

www.stephensid.com

First annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Alternative Mobility

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: ECOtality

For more than 20 years, ECOtality has been designing revolutionary, fast-charge products that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and pollution, making alternative transportation easier and more accessible to the public.

Since 1989, ECOtality has had the opportunity to become involved in important North American electric vehicle (EV) initiatives, thanks to its subsidiary eTec (Electric Engineering Transportation Engineering Corporation). ECOtality also has been leading the way in the EV industry.

ECOtality was named lead grantee in August 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy, and was awarded a $99.8 million grant for the EV Project, which will create and produce several thousand electric cars.

ECOtality’s EV Project will reach 11 major cities in Arizona, Oregon, Washington, California and Tennessee. There will be approximately 4,700 of Nissan’s electric cars, LEAFS, in the five states. There also will be 11,000 charge stations across the country to allow drivers to recharge their zero-emission battery electric cars.

Each LEAF is expected to save approximately 436 gallons of gasoline per year. Combined, that’s a savings of more than 2 million gallons of gasoline for all LEAFS. The EV Project is projected to generate more than 750 new jobs by 2012; and by 2017, ECOtality expects to have more than 5,500 new positions across the country.

ECOtality also has created the Minit-Charger, a battery-charge system that works as quickly and efficiently as possible by using proprietary algorithms to charge a battery. This system eliminates the potential for batteries to overcharge or overheat, and prolongs battery life.
www.ecotality.com


Clean Air Cab
www.CleanAirCab.com

Clean Air Cab is Arizona’s first completely green taxicab service that gives people the opportunity to go green just by riding with them.  The company offers green cabs at an affordable rate.

Clean Air Cab is composed of 26 Toyota Priuses, which are currently the most fuel-efficient cars available. The Toyota Prius saves 33 miles per gallon of gas, which saves about 1,000 miles per gallon among all of the company’s cars combined.

Aside from driving green cars, the company supports global reforestation by planting 10 rainforest trees each month for each cab that is in service. In the first quarter of operations, Clean Air Cab planted 780 trees.

“We believe that going green isn’t something you do- it is something you are,” said Steve Lopez, founder of Clean Air Cab. “Our intention is to take the trendy out of ‘going green’ and deliver a product that allows consumers to be green just by participating.”


Valley Metro RPTA
www.valleymetro.org

The Valley Metro Regional Public Transportation Authority is already helping thousands commute in a sustainable way. With the introduction of a new program called “ShareTheRide” Valley Metro RPTA is furthering their efforts by helping commuters choose the best transit options based on their time and route. The program’s goal is to educate the public about alternative methods of transportation, while reducing cost and pollution.

ShareTheRide is a free service accessible through Valley Metro’s website. When commuters enter alternative transportation information into the Commute Tracker they can earn points for incentives around the Valley. To support businesses, the program also includes customizable sub sites, where employers could promote the program and offer special incentives to their employees when they login to sub sites with a company e-mail address.

From data collected between April 22, 2009 and January 13, 2010, ShareTheRide resulted in 3,485,069 pounds of greenhouse gas savings and 34,706 pounds of carbon monoxide savings from a grand total of 178,842 round-trip commutes. The RPTA successfully created a service that Valley commuters needed to make traveling to work easier on the commuter and the environment.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

General Dynamics Green Processes - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Green Processes

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: General Dynamics C4 Systems

Scottsdale-based General Dynamics C4 Systems is cutting costs and its environmental impact at the same time. The company has applied various sustainable practices to its Scottsdale facility and achieved almost $750,000 in cost savings annually.

General Dynamics C4 Systems develops and integrates secure communication and information systems and technology for businesses and governments. Although the company does not directly focus on green products, it is committed to becoming environmentally friendly. The company’s Environment, Health and Safety Policy states that it strives to reduce its impact on the environment and continues to pursue improvement.

General Dynamics C4 Systems certainly found a way to shrink its environmental impact at its research-focused, 1.5 million square foot Scottsdale campus, which houses more than 5,000 employees, visitors and contractors.
The site utilized sustainable ideas and practices on the road to becoming a Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) certified facility. Through the certification process, General Dynamics C4 Systems replaced or reconditioned the existing structures to lessen the site’s environmental impact. Also, the Scottsdale campus has saved more than 1.4 megawatts of power simply by turning off thousands of devices when they are not in use.

General Dynamics C4 Systems also integrated green cleaning and maintenance practices into its operations. The company utilizes reusable cleaning materials and cleaning chemicals that are non-obtrusive. It also extensively re-uses construction materials, equipment and components. Plus, the campus has upgraded the lighting system at its LEED-certified site and converted completely to locally manufactured recycled paper products.

The company also integrated its Computerized Aided Facilities Management system into its construction and maintenance processes. This system tracks sustainable data such as materials, infrastructure capacity, energy impacts and indoor air quality at its Scottsdale campus.

Additionally, General Dynamics C4 Systems produces the maximum energy savings and extends the life of equipment by integrating building operations procedures with systems commissioning.

Not only is General Dynamics C4 Systems’ own site lessening its impact on the environment, the company strives to meet environmental and safety requirements as it designs and manufactures products and services for its customers.

www.gdc4s.com

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

Greenroads: A sustainable highway

Greenroads: A Sustainable Performance Metric For Roadways

Windows rolled down. Wind whipping through your hair. Music blaring from the speakers.

Does this scene sound familiar? Chances are many (if not all) of you have experienced driving down the highway and can relate to this imagery. Indeed, driving on the millions of miles of American highways is as embedded in our culture as hot dogs.

The United States highway network consists of 4 million miles of roads and streets. But did you know that building and maintaining a single mile of freeway takes as much energy as 200 homes in the U.S. use in one year? Or that it generates more waste than 1,200 homes produce annually? I certainly didn’t.

Luckily, researchers from the University of Washington’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the engineering firm CH2M Hill have launched the world’s first rating system for sustainable road construction.

Just as the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) introduced the LEED Rating System — a third-party certification program encouraging sustainable green building through tool and performance criteria — the researchers and engineering firm have introduced Greenroads.

According to the website, Greenroads is “a sustainability performance metric for roadway design and construction. It is applicable to new and reconstructed/rehabiliated roadways. It awards points for approved sustainable choices/practices and can be used to assess roadway project sustainability.”

In order for a roadway to be considered a Greenroad, it must meet 11 “Project Requirements”. Much like the LEED system, there are also several levels of certification including: certified, silver, gold and evergreen.

Sustainable practices continue to be implemented into all facets of living and Greenroads is a great example of the progress that’s being made. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again — our future is green and that’s a good thing.

What do you think? Will Greenroads be a success?

www.greenroads.us
www.usgbc.org
www.ce.washington.edu
www.ch2m.com

LEED Certification - AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

LEED Certification – Making Existing Buildings More Eco-Friendly

Eco Buddies

This summer, two Phoenix office buildings entered new territory for existing private-sector buildings in Arizona. Collier Center and Phoenix Plaza became Arizona’s first privately owned multi-tenant existing buildings to receive the U.S. Green Building Council’s consideration for LEED certification, thanks to the efforts of their owners and their two building managers. Both buildings are seeking LEED-Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance (LEED-EB O&M) Silver-level certification.

Of course, LEED certification isn’t just about saving the world. It’s also about being best-in-class, separating a company’s building from its competition and improving operating efficiency. LEED-certified buildings promote an eco-friendly workplace and, in most cases, offer lower overall operating expenses — two factors tenants are specifically looking for these days.

LEED in the Private Sector

Yet, to date, the USGBC lists only three LEED-certified existing buildings in Arizona, two single-tenant quasi-government buildings and a single-tenant manufacturing facility. Arizona’s other LEED-certified buildings are new construction, and almost all are owned by the government.

So why aren’t more private-sector owners of existing buildings interested in LEED certification? Most either don’t know enough about the program or assume it’s too expensive. However, research entities like CB Richard Ellis are proving that LEED certification costs far less than believed, and can result in significant savings that will continue for the life of the asset.

For example, Collier Center reduced its electricity consumption by 30%, or 2.7 million kWh, between January 2009 and July 2009. Compared to the same time period in 2008, that’s a savings of $216,000, or 67 cents, PSF annualized — Phoenix Plaza’s results are equally as dramatic.

Also, Collier Center and Camelback Esplanade III are transitioning janitorial services to daytime cleaning, and anticipate reductions in annual lighting costs of 10 cents to 15 cents PSF.

The Cost of Green

Minimum costs to pursue LEED certification include a small registration fee of about $500 and a certification fee, which depends on a building’s size. As property manager for both Collier Center and Phoenix Plaza, CBRE reports these costs at $12,500 for each building. Additional costs to satisfy prerequisites and credits vary from building to building. Of the 30 applications CBRE’s Sustainability Programs group has completed so far, the costs to certify averaged 24 cents PSF, and ranged from 10 cents to 67 cents PSF.

For CBRE, the certification projects took approximately 6 months to complete, including determining each building’s existing status and satisfying certification requirements in 6 categories under LEED-EB O&M:

  • sustainable sites
  • water efficiency
  • energy and atmosphere
  • materials and resources
  • indoor environmental quality
  • innovation in operation
  • and upgrades

Overwhelmingly, the process has been favorably received by existing tenants — and many have even begun seeking ways to improve on their own green efforts.

A broad implementation of sustainability practices, such as LEED, in the nation’s private-sector existing buildings can significantly advance progress toward energy independence and precious resource conservation, while also promoting eco-friendly workplace environments and cutting operating costs.

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www.usgbc.org

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2009