Tag Archives: Valley

Knight Management

Robert F. Knight & Associates rebrands as Knight Management

The longest tenured commercial real estate management firm specializing in third-party owned real estate portfolios in Maricopa County has a new brand identity: Knight Management. Established in 1977 and formerly known as Robert F. Knight & Associates, LLC, the firm’s property management portfolio totals more than 2 million square feet of commercial office space in Greater Phoenix, making it one of the largest in the market.

“This is a new era for Knight Management. With over 14 million square feet of commercial property under our management over a span of 36-plus years, the foundation of our firm is built upon high standards of excellence and an unyielding commitment to customer satisfaction,” said Robert F. Knight, CPM, President of Knight Management. “Through investments in client-focused initiatives including technology-based efficiency enhancements, environmental sustainability initiatives and the expansion of our expert staff of management professionals, we are focused on enhancing our services for our clients for years to come.”

Knight Management will continue to provide comprehensive property management, facility management and value-added real estate services to its portfolio of properties throughout the Valley, including commercial office buildings, retail centers, industrial/warehouses, medical building and real estate land holdings.

childbirth

MomDoc named Patient Centered Specialty Practice

MomDoc, known Valley wide for exemplary care in women’s health, was named one of only sixty early adopters of the prestigious Patient Centered Specialty Practices, a recognition previously available only to  primary care practices. MomDoc is the only practice honored in Arizona.

Patient Centered Specialty Practice is an extension of the Patient Centered Medical Home designation which emphasizes strong connections between primary and specialty practices engaged in a patient centered model. The designation was given only to those specialty practices that have successfully coordinated care with their primary care colleagues and each other and that meet preset goals including timely access to care and continuous quality improvements. The program also addresses reducing duplication of tests, measuring performance and improving patient communication.

MomDoc is recognized in Arizona for its five overarching practices with fifteen offices. Under the MomDoc umbrella are Drs. Goodman and Partridge, OB/GYN a staple in the valley for over thirty years; MomDoc women for Women, a practice encompassing all female doctors; Mi Doctora, a fully Spanish speaking women’s practice; MomDoc Midwives and SHE, Sexual Health Experts, another practice unique to the state featuring an emphasis on women’s sexual health.

MomDoc is in good company with its new distinction, sharing the spotlight with Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, a part of the group which includes both the hospital and the School of Medicine.

“It is indeed am honor to be one of the early adopters and to receive this designation,” says Nick Goodman, CEO of MomDoc. “It is very special to be the only practice in Arizona to be recognized. It makes us even more proud of the work we do at MomDoc and it lets us know that the direction we take with our practices is the right one.”

Patient centered care, originally recognized in the Patient Centered Medical Home designation, is an innovative program for improving care in clear, specified criteria which include coordinating care around patients, working in teams and coordinating and tracking care over time. It is the cornerstone of MomDoc’s philosophy and practices. From early morning, evening and Saturday appointments to emotional health and whole patient care, MomDoc prides itself on service and a patient centered approach.

MomDoc offices and specialty practices are located throughout the Valley and same day appointments are available.

heat relief network - hot sun

Summer Heat Relief Campaign Kicks off May 1

Scorching temperatures are a health hazard to the Valley’s homeless and elderly shut-ins, and one non-profit organization is mobilizing to prevent heat-related deaths and illnesses among this vulnerable, growing population.

Phoenix Rescue Mission is partnering with several municipalities and businesses to launch its new “Code Red: Summer Heat Relief Campaign” on Wed., May 1. While the Mission has conducted annual summer water drives for several years, “Code Red” elevates the urgency of the call to action with a public plea for water, white socks, toiletries, cool snack packs, hats, light-colored T-shirts, sunglasses, sunscreen, chapstick, chilly neck coolers and more. Volunteers are needed to help with distribution efforts and other tasks. Monetary donations are also requested, particularly in May when the Mission qualifies for a matching grant made possible by several friends of the Phoenix Rescue Mission that ends May 31.

“The majority of homeless people on the streets are battling addiction challenges, which means many of them are already severely dehydrated because of their substance abuse. Combine that with extreme heat and it can be fatal,” said Jay Cory, Phoenix Rescue Mission president and CEO.

Arizona ranks as the 4th worst state in the nation for homelessness. A startling 13,248 men, women and children are homeless in Maricopa County, according to the most recent Maricopa Association of Governments street count and point-in-time shelter data. In addition, Phoenix was recently identified in a national HUD survey as one of the few places in the U.S. where the homeless street population has actually grown by 11 percent in 2012 as compared to 2011.

Public drop-off sites for water, socks, sunscreen, hats, toiletries and other heat relief items are located throughout the Valley. For a complete list of items needed and drop-off locations, visit www.phoenixrescuemission.org.

Phoenix Rescue Mission provides Christ-centered, life-transforming solutions to persons facing hunger and homelessness. The non-profit Mission, which has been operating since 1952, is asking the public for support of its many programs designed to save lives, including Hope Coach Street Outreach, Homeless Emergency Services, Men’s Addiction Recovery Program and the new Changing Lives Center for Women and Children. For more information, call (602) 346-3342 or visit www.phoenixrescuemission.org.

massage

Massage Envy Introduces New Sugar Foot Scrub Therapy

Whether it’s your job, the daily grind or an intense workout that causes your feet to feel worn out, the best way to find relief is to give your feet some serious tender, love and care. Beginning today your toes will thank you with the launch of the new Sugar Foot Scrub Therapy, available at any of Valley’s 28 Massage Envy clinics. Ideal for reducing daily stress or the pain and discomfort caused by dry callused skin, a Sugar Foot Scrub treatment can be added to any massage session for only $10 ($15 for guests) as part of Massage Envy Enhanced Therapies menu.

Massage Envy’s partner, Bon Vital, helped formulate the sugar foot scrub exclusively for Massage Envy customers that combine fortified sugar with jojoba, olive and safflower oils, and lavender essential oil. Massage Envy’s specially designed formula contains extra fine sugar granules and less oil than a typical sugar foot scrub, allowing for easier absorption into the skin. The scrub cleans and exfoliates, removes dead skin cells, and soothes the surface of the skin while stimulating lymph flow and increasing circulation. Following the sugar scrub, a whipped Bon Vital Body Butter, which is blended with cocoa butter, Shea butter, beeswax and lavender oil, is also applied to add a hydrating protective layer to the freshly scrubbed skin.

“Our new Sugar Foot Scrub Therapy is perfect to treat tired feet,” said Steve Cook, Massage Envy regional developer for Arizona and Las Vegas. “The winter weather can take a major toll on our feet, but the Sugar Foot Scrub will be sure to smooth away rough spots and drench dry skin to create the ultimate therapeutic massage experience.”

In addition to this new service, all Valley Massage Envy clinics are offering special Valentine’s Day deals for members and guests through Feb. 14. Gift cards for massages and facials make a perfect present for your loved one and Massage Envy is offering specials with the purchase of $50, $75 and $100 gift cards. When you purchase a $50 gift card, you will receive a certificate for a free enhanced therapy, when you purchase a $75 gift card, you will receive a complimentary half-hour upgrade and with the purchase of a $100 gift card, you will receive a free one-hour massage session.

With a membership at Massage Envy, customers can choose from a variety of monthly massage and spa treatments including Swedish, Trigger Point, Deep Tissue, Sports, Prenatal and Geriatric. As part of the revamped Enhanced Therapies menu that includes AromaTherapy, Deep Muscle Therapy and Hot Stone Envy™, the new Sugar Foot Scrub will allow members and guests to further customize and boost their wellness experience. The proven benefits of routine massage include improved circulation, joint flexibility and posture, relief from pain and swelling caused by arthritis, reduced blood pressure, fatigue, migraine pain and stress, as well as improved sleep, concentration and overall sense of well-being.

Additionally, Massage Envy Spa offers facials designed by Dr. Murad, the leader in skincare science. With a monthly membership, customers can choose from four different Murad® Healthy Skin facials including Environmental Shield®Vitamin C, Clarifying Enzyme Acne, Anti-Aging and Sensitive Skin.

Massage Envy clinics are open late, seven days a week. For Massage Envy locations or to schedule an appointment, call 602-992-ENVY (3689) or visit massageenvy.com.

massage

Massage Envy Introduces New Sugar Foot Scrub Therapy

Whether it’s your job, the daily grind or an intense workout that causes your feet to feel worn out, the best way to find relief is to give your feet some serious tender, love and care. Beginning today your toes will thank you with the launch of the new Sugar Foot Scrub Therapy, available at any of Valley’s 28 Massage Envy clinics. Ideal for reducing daily stress or the pain and discomfort caused by dry callused skin, a Sugar Foot Scrub treatment can be added to any massage session for only $10 ($15 for guests) as part of Massage Envy Enhanced Therapies menu.

Massage Envy’s partner, Bon Vital, helped formulate the sugar foot scrub exclusively for Massage Envy customers that combine fortified sugar with jojoba, olive and safflower oils, and lavender essential oil. Massage Envy’s specially designed formula contains extra fine sugar granules and less oil than a typical sugar foot scrub, allowing for easier absorption into the skin. The scrub cleans and exfoliates, removes dead skin cells, and soothes the surface of the skin while stimulating lymph flow and increasing circulation. Following the sugar scrub, a whipped Bon Vital Body Butter, which is blended with cocoa butter, Shea butter, beeswax and lavender oil, is also applied to add a hydrating protective layer to the freshly scrubbed skin.

“Our new Sugar Foot Scrub Therapy is perfect to treat tired feet,” said Steve Cook, Massage Envy regional developer for Arizona and Las Vegas. “The winter weather can take a major toll on our feet, but the Sugar Foot Scrub will be sure to smooth away rough spots and drench dry skin to create the ultimate therapeutic massage experience.”

In addition to this new service, all Valley Massage Envy clinics are offering special Valentine’s Day deals for members and guests through Feb. 14. Gift cards for massages and facials make a perfect present for your loved one and Massage Envy is offering specials with the purchase of $50, $75 and $100 gift cards. When you purchase a $50 gift card, you will receive a certificate for a free enhanced therapy, when you purchase a $75 gift card, you will receive a complimentary half-hour upgrade and with the purchase of a $100 gift card, you will receive a free one-hour massage session.

With a membership at Massage Envy, customers can choose from a variety of monthly massage and spa treatments including Swedish, Trigger Point, Deep Tissue, Sports, Prenatal and Geriatric. As part of the revamped Enhanced Therapies menu that includes AromaTherapy, Deep Muscle Therapy and Hot Stone Envy™, the new Sugar Foot Scrub will allow members and guests to further customize and boost their wellness experience. The proven benefits of routine massage include improved circulation, joint flexibility and posture, relief from pain and swelling caused by arthritis, reduced blood pressure, fatigue, migraine pain and stress, as well as improved sleep, concentration and overall sense of well-being.

Additionally, Massage Envy Spa offers facials designed by Dr. Murad, the leader in skincare science. With a monthly membership, customers can choose from four different Murad® Healthy Skin facials including Environmental Shield®Vitamin C, Clarifying Enzyme Acne, Anti-Aging and Sensitive Skin.

Massage Envy clinics are open late, seven days a week. For Massage Envy locations or to schedule an appointment, call 602-992-ENVY (3689) or visit massageenvy.com.

strawberries

Do Something Different for Valentine’s Day

As Valentine’s Day rolls around again, many couples will find themselves in the same old flowers-and-dinner routine.

There are many places around the Valley that offer something a little different this year, whether for first dates or long-married couples. Here are some to think about:

1. Romance in the Garden: On Feb. 16, the Desert Botanical Garden is hosting a candlelit outdoor concert by Chris Burton Jácome Flamenco Ensemble. Dinner, wine flights and bottles of champagne are available. Can’t celebrate on Thursday? Take Saturday to hear sexy music under the stars with a glass of wine.

Ullman Terrace, 6-9 p.m. Dinner tickets must be purchased ahead. 480-481-8188

2. Chocolate Affaire: From Feb. 8-10, experience downtown Glendale’s festival of chocolate, wine and romance. Watch chocolatiers making their specialties and sample treats like chocolate-covered bacon. Bring the kids for crafts and rock-climbing, and take a ride in a horse-drawn carriage through the historic district.

Starts Friday at 5 p.m. Park in garages at 59th Ave & Glenn Dr.

3. Citrine Natural Beauty Bar: Fragrances definitely play a big part in everyone’s Valentine’s Day. Melissa at Citrine will take time to blend you a customized fragrance from the purest organic essential oils. Ingredients like Somalian Frankincense and Egyptian Jasmine are aphrodisiacs, or try a blend that matches your astrological sign.

At UNION Biltmore. 602-955-2354. Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 12 p.m.-6 p.m.

4. Picasso at the Lapin Agile: Written by Steve Martin, this play is being performed by the Brelby Theatre Company in Glendale. Think Einstein and Picasso at a Paris café in 1904, add Steve Martin’s intelligent humor, a special cameo and great acting, and you have an idea of what to expect.

7:30 p.m. Thurs-Sat through Feb. 23. Tickets $20. Brelby.com. 6839 N. 58th Ave.

5. The Spouse Whisperer: If you’re looking for laughs, head over to Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino to hear Mark Cordes’ tongue-in-cheek, sharp-witted humor about marriage and middle age. This hysterical look at couples’ life is a great change of pace for Valentine’s Day.

Ovations LIVE! Showroom, 7:15 p.m. Tickets $15. 877-840-0457

6. Roka Akor: While prix-fixe menus are a staple of many V-Day dinners, this one stands out. Items like wild boar bacon, lobster tartare and mushroom tempura will be served in three seatings: 5, 7 and 9 p.m. Voted one of the top ten sushi restaurants in the U.S., Roka Akor is an excellent date spot as well as a culinary destination. This menu will be served through the 16th if you can’t make it Thursday.

$98 per person. 7299 N. Scottsdale Rd. 480-306-8800

7. The Bassics of Love: On the 14th, the ASU Kerr Cultural Center is featuring Chunyang Wang, who studied at Julliard and played in the New York Asian Symphony Orchestra. Wang will perform timeless classics from Rachmaninov, Mozart and Piazzolla on double bass and piano.

7:30 p.m. Tickets from $10.50: vip.me/AAMOdCWkHBM. 6110 N. Scottsdale Rd.

 

strawberries

Do Something Different for Valentine’s Day

As Valentine’s Day rolls around again, many couples will find themselves in the same old flowers-and-dinner routine.

There are many places around the Valley that offer something a little different this year, whether for first dates or long-married couples. Here are some to think about:

1. Romance in the Garden: On Feb. 16, the Desert Botanical Garden is hosting a candlelit outdoor concert by Chris Burton Jácome Flamenco Ensemble. Dinner, wine flights and bottles of champagne are available. Can’t celebrate on Thursday? Take Saturday to hear sexy music under the stars with a glass of wine.

Ullman Terrace, 6-9 p.m. Dinner tickets must be purchased ahead. 480-481-8188

2. Chocolate Affaire: From Feb. 8-10, experience downtown Glendale’s festival of chocolate, wine and romance. Watch chocolatiers making their specialties and sample treats like chocolate-covered bacon. Bring the kids for crafts and rock-climbing, and take a ride in a horse-drawn carriage through the historic district.

Starts Friday at 5 p.m. Park in garages at 59th Ave & Glenn Dr.

3. Citrine Natural Beauty Bar: Fragrances definitely play a big part in everyone’s Valentine’s Day. Melissa at Citrine will take time to blend you a customized fragrance from the purest organic essential oils. Ingredients like Somalian Frankincense and Egyptian Jasmine are aphrodisiacs, or try a blend that matches your astrological sign.

At UNION Biltmore. 602-955-2354. Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 12 p.m.-6 p.m.

4. Picasso at the Lapin Agile: Written by Steve Martin, this play is being performed by the Brelby Theatre Company in Glendale. Think Einstein and Picasso at a Paris café in 1904, add Steve Martin’s intelligent humor, a special cameo and great acting, and you have an idea of what to expect.

7:30 p.m. Thurs-Sat through Feb. 23. Tickets $20. Brelby.com. 6839 N. 58th Ave.

5. The Spouse Whisperer: If you’re looking for laughs, head over to Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino to hear Mark Cordes’ tongue-in-cheek, sharp-witted humor about marriage and middle age. This hysterical look at couples’ life is a great change of pace for Valentine’s Day.

Ovations LIVE! Showroom, 7:15 p.m. Tickets $15. 877-840-0457

6. Roka Akor: While prix-fixe menus are a staple of many V-Day dinners, this one stands out. Items like wild boar bacon, lobster tartare and mushroom tempura will be served in three seatings: 5, 7 and 9 p.m. Voted one of the top ten sushi restaurants in the U.S., Roka Akor is an excellent date spot as well as a culinary destination. This menu will be served through the 16th if you can’t make it Thursday.

$98 per person. 7299 N. Scottsdale Rd. 480-306-8800

7. The Bassics of Love: On the 14th, the ASU Kerr Cultural Center is featuring Chunyang Wang, who studied at Julliard and played in the New York Asian Symphony Orchestra. Wang will perform timeless classics from Rachmaninov, Mozart and Piazzolla on double bass and piano.

7:30 p.m. Tickets from $10.50: vip.me/AAMOdCWkHBM. 6110 N. Scottsdale Rd.

8. Vampire’s Wedding: If you’re in the Tucson area and looking for a laugh, head to Tucson Dinner Theatre on the 14th. “Murder at The Vampire’s Wedding” is a 3-act interactive show at Arizona’s oldest dinner theatre. A 3-course meal and champagne toast will be served, and the ladies will receive a ‘Keepstake’ rose.

2744 E. Broadway Blvd. 520-624-0172. Tickets $42. Show starts at 7 p.m.

9. Orange Sky: If you prefer something a little more traditional, Orange Sky at Talking Stick is offering an excellent $70 prix-fixe on the 14th. What makes Orange Sky different is the romantic, award-winning view of the Valley at dusk. The wine room is stunning and a sommelier can help you choose the best bottle.

9800 E. Indian Bend Rd. Reservations: http://www.talkingstickresort.com/orange-sky.aspx

Dress code enforced: see site for details.

A Guide to Applying for a Bank Loan

Are Arizona banks lending?

Are they or aren’t they?

Banks can only stay in business by making loans, not turning away customers who want to borrow money. So why does the public believe that banks aren’t lending?

“The truth of the matter is that when things were really bad a few years ago, banks weren’t lending,” said Robert Sarver, CEO of Western Alliance Bancorporation. “The banking business, not unlike other businesses, tend to react and overreact and sometime we react too much when times are good and we lend too much money on too liberal terms, and when times are tough, we don’t lend enough money and are too conservative.”

Banks are a business — a unique kind of business — that is under significant pressure to make a profit like any other like any other business. A typical bank, in healthy years, should earn a return on assets (ROA) of 1.1 percent to 1.5 percent. That translates into an return on equity (ROE), because of leverage, of anywhere between 8 percent and 18 percent, similar to most other businesses.

A bank makes its money by investing deposits into either securities or loans, both of which earn a return. Typically, loans earn more than securities and both earn more than what banks pay out to depositors. Although loans earn more, they come with a credit loss rate that a securities portfolio generally does not have. In 2009, in the depths of the economic crisis, a typical bank had a loan loss rate of 1.73 percent on its loan portfolio, which ate into the profitability of the bank. So what does a bank to do when it incurs such high loss rates in its loan portfolio? It invests in fewer loans.

But that is changing. Banks have increased their lending for four of the last five quarters, but Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) acting chairman Martin Gruenberg, is still taking a ”wait and see if the trend toward increased lending can be sustained” approach.

“Banks are lending today, and most banks have excess liquidity that they would prefer to put out in loans,” said Keith Maio, president and Chief Executive Officer of National Bank of Arizona. “Those that feel that banks aren’t lending are likely those who have had their credit compromised in recent years. Loan demand is down from consumers and businesses particularly, since the recession. The recession has caused many personal borrowers to be more conservative in their approach to leverage. Businesses tend to increase borrowing when their revenues are increasing and they need to finance that growth.”

Sarver said that banks do want to lend, “but unfortunately there is a lot of regulation in our industry, which to a certain degree has stifled long-term growth because our capital requirements have almost doubled over the last five years, so that’s been another barrier to banks lending money.”

As an outgrowth of those regulatory changes, lending standards have tightened in certain consumer loan categories like mortgages, experts said. But while mortgage rules have changed, lending standards for business haven’t seen dramatic shifts.

“Commercial lending standards for owner-occupied real estate and commercial and industrial loans have not changed much,” said Kevin Sellers, executive vice president with First Fidelity Bank in Arizona. “For investment property loans, banks are requiring owners to maintain more equity capital in the properties and higher net operating income relative to the property debt service.”

According to Adam White, senior vice president of credit administration at Biltmore Bank of Arizona, bankers have always used the “Five C’s of Credit” to determine if a business is credit worthy.  Those included:
1. Cash flow – history of positive cash flows and probability of recurring
2. Collateral – adequate collateral support
3. Capital – adequate capital to support normal business operations
4. Conditions – what’s affecting the business
5. Character – who are the people behind the business

“In today’s environment, banks emphasize ALL five elements,” White said, “whereas in the past too much reliance may have been placed upon appreciating collateral values under unsustainable market conditions.”

Kevin Halloran, Arizona state president of Mutual of Omaha Bank, said that while there have been shifts in the requirements banks are setting for lending, he sees the industry taking steps toward normalcy.

“I believe lending standards have returned to the original norm,” he said. “In the early to mid-2000s, the banking industry required only limited borrower documentation relating to income and other basic information for residential loans. Now, the industry is requesting proper information to make sound decisions.”

On the business lending side of the equation, “lending standards over the past 10 months have loosened in both pricing and structure for both large and small companies,” Halloran said.

And while some banks have pulled back lending activity, it’s definitely not the case at many Arizona banks.

“Loans at our company have grown 8 percent this year and in discussions with my colleagues at other financial institutions in the Valley, they are experiencing similar results,” said Dave Ralston, chairman and CEO of Bank of Arizona. “Loans are the lifeblood of a bank and at Bank of Arizona. loan growth is our number one priority.  We are seeing increasing demand from credit-worthy consumers and businesses in the Valley.”

Halloran echoed Ralston’s observations.

“Over the past three years, we have completed more than $500 million in new loans in Arizona,” Halloran said. “That includes commercial loans and commercial real estate financing across multiple industries, as well as private banking loans and residential mortgages. Our local commercial banking group has provided local businesses with working capital, revolving lines of credit, equipment loans, owner-occupied loans and merger and acquisition loans. Our commercial real estate group has provided loans in industrial, multi-family, senior and student housing, charter schools and multiple other real estate segments. So we have been – and will continue to be – a very active lender.”

A positive result in the changes in lending banks have been forced to examine in the wake of the Recession is that bank have learned lessons that will create a stronger business model for the industry.

“Banks need to consistently monitor their concentrations in all lending sectors and understand they can only provide so much capital to any one industry,” Halloran said. “Arizona’s population grew so much over the past decade that it resulted in a substantial need for real estate lending. The concentration Arizona banks had in real estate negatively affected all Arizona banks.  In the future, I believe all banks will be better at managing their overall balance sheet risk as a percentage of capital.”

Goldwater Institute

Valley attorney launches ‘triage’ service

Valley attorney and well-known venture capitalist, Morris Callaman, Esq., has launched a new type of non-traditional law firm – he describes his work as triage attorney.

As a concierge attorney, Callaman offers personalized problem solving to his clients in almost every area of practice. Rather than specialize in one specific subject matter, like family, corporate or contract law, Callaman assumes the role of general counsel to his clients and advises them on the best resolution to their situation. After understanding the issue and helping the client fully understand the situation, Callaman calls on his network of experts to solve the problem.

The idea was developed after years of using his corporate experience as the youngest Principal at accounting firm Ernst & Young, as well as his degrees in business, engineering, and law to operate a private micro venture capital firm. Callaman realized the unique needs of his clients spanned much greater than securing financing and start-up advising.

“My clients first need an ethical problem-solver, and they trust me, and that’s what I do. Many times, my clients need someone they can trust with highly confidential or personal issues – whether it’s a high-profile divorce or the bankruptcy of a highly visible company. My clients don’t have the time to be searching for the best litigator for their problem or best tax counsel for their project, so they call me and I make a plan, assemble the best team to get the job done, and guide my clients through the process.”

His model of practice is similar to that of the triage team in a hospital emergency room. However, instead of passing the client off to the most qualified expert, he oversees the entire case from start to finish, creating highly personalized solutions.

Callaman believes that the traditional law firm model has become destructive to the profession and often to business in general.

“As a society, we don’t admire lawyers as we used to,” said Callaman. “Still, lawyers tend to get into law because they have a sense of ethics and concern for others. Too often, the traditional processes make it feel as if lawyers have somehow lost their way. I’m interested in changing that with this new model of law practice.”

Callaman has been hired to resolve issues with regulators, navigate corporate turnarounds, guide celebrity divorces, litigate contract cases, and negotiate financings.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/morriscallamanesq or call 480-250-4315.

78481357

Valley High School Students Compete at JA Stock Market Challenge

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and more than 400 high schools students from nearly 20 Arizona schools will come together for Junior Achievement of Arizona’s Sixth Annual Student Stock Market Challenge, in which teams compete to see who can grow their mock-stock portfolio and create the highest net worth. The event will be held at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel on Thursday, Nov. 1.

Mayor Stanton will sound the closing bell at the event and congratulate the winning team.
Students have been preparing for the Challenge the past two months by participating in lessons designed to help them grasp the concepts they’ll need in stock trading, led by Junior Achievement (JA) volunteer instructors and our partner teachers. The JA Student Stock Market Challenge gives students a chance to practice those skills in a fun and dynamic environment. Particularly pertinent is that lessons learned during the Challenge are the focus of reflection exercises that will help today’s youth make smart financial choices as adults.

“Bestowing financial knowledge into high school students is crucial for our economic future,” said Joyce Richards, president of Junior Achievement of Arizona.  “Through the Stock Market Challenge and other JA programs, students are learning lessons on which to build effective personal financial habits for life.”

The Sixth Annual Stock Market Challenge is sponsored by: The Charles Schwab Foundation, Title and TruWest Credit Union, Champion of Hope.
For more information, visit www.jaaz.org.

Spice It Up Food Truck

Valley’s Best Food Trucks All in One Place at Vistancia

Enjoy Vistancia’s Food Truck Experience from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 featuring gourmet food samplings from 11 of the Valley’s best food trucks, tours of 11 model homes throughout the Vistancia community, Blackstone Country Club clubhouse tours and menu tastings.

The West Valley’s first food truck tour begins at the Vistancia Information Center, 12026 W. Lone Mountain Parkway in Peoria, where guests will receive a map of the gourmet food trucks located throughout the community’s builder model homes by K. Hovnanian Homes, Meritage Homes, Rosewood Homes, Shea Homes, Taylor Morrison and T.W. Lewis by David Weekley Homes. Complimentary food samplings will be available from all food trucks to the first 400 guests during this open to the public community event.

Located amongst a stunning backdrop of Sonoran desert mountain beauty, guests can rediscover Vistancia and all it has to offer as they enjoy 11 diverse gourmet food trucks featuring Carte Blanche, Hey Joe!, Filipino Street Food, Island Loco, Luncha Libre, Mojo Bowl, Pizza People, Q UP BBQ, Spice It Up!, Sweet Jonez Cupcakes, Tom’s BBQ Pig Rig and Torched Goodness.

Specialty food offerings will range from Chipotle mushroom and mozzarella  quesadillas, smoked beef brisket sliders, pulled pork on coleslaw, bacon mac and cheese bites and ancho chile braised steak tacos to vanilla, sea salt caramel and chocolate crème brulee; mini cupcakes, strawberry banana, orange and pineapple mango smoothies; with gluten free and vegetarian options.

Blackstone at Vistancia’s private Blackstone Country Club will feature tours of the club and menu tastings from an active Paella station featuring pork loin, chorizo, clams, mussels, shrimp and saffron rice, located in the courtyard of the stunning hacienda-style clubhouse.
In addition, The Village at Vistancia community will be offering tours of the 15,000-square-foot Mountain Vista Club and the Blackstone at Vistancia will feature previews of new custom homesites during the special event.

Vistancia offers the best in family life and neighborhood involvement among miles of open space away from the city and close to what’s especially important in life. The community offers a wide range of living choices and amenities for enjoying truly diverse experiences.

“We’ve created a community that offers a wide range of living choices and amenities for enjoying varied experiences at Vistancia,” said Mark Hammons, vice president/general manager of Vistancia. “From the playful spirit at The Village at Vistancia to a comfortable luxury found in Blackstone at Vistancia and the genuine, overall feeling of being connected by pure, unspoiled nature away from the bustle of the city, we do have the best of everything,” Hammons said.

“Master planned communities like Vistancia are very appealing to today’s homebuyers as they provide exceptional value with a variety of housing choices, architectural integrity, recreational amenities, multiple schools on site and magnificent nature trails such as the 3.5-mile Discovery Trail, all with respect for the natural beauty of the land and plenty of open space,” said Hammons.

A quicker access to metropolitan Phoenix with the opening of Vistancia’s second entrance off of the Loop 303 and Lone Mountain Parkway has accelerated the vibrancy of the Vistancia master plan.

Distant mountain ranges provide a perfect setting for Vistancia featuring dramatic views of White Peak, Twin Buttes and the Bradshaw Mountains in a pristine desert landscape.
Take Loop 303 to the new Lone Mountain Parkway (exit 127) to enter the Vistancia community. The Vistancia Information Center is located at the guard-gated entrance of Blackstone at Vistancia. For more information about Vistancia or the Food Truck Experience event Oct. 27 visit www.vistancia.com or call 623-933-6233.

Dr. Will Kirby

Valley lands Dr. Tattoff clinic

Dr. Tattoff Medical Director and Board-Certified Dermatologist Dr. Will Kirby formally announced that the opening of Dr. Tattoff’s new clinic location in Phoenix, Arizona will be on Tuesday, November 13, 2012.  The newest facility will be located at 740 South Mill Avenue, Suite 130, Tempe, AZ 85281 (www.drtattoff.com/phoenix).  This will be the seventh location nationwide for Dr. Tattoff.

In business since 2004, Dr. Tattoff (www.drtattoff.com) is the country’s first branded laser tattoo removal chain.  To date, the company has performed over 100,000 tattoo removal treatments, over 165,000 laser procedures and has treated over 20,000 patients.

To celebrate the Company’s expansion to the Phoenix area, Dr. Tattoff will offer free tattoo removal to the public on November 13, 2012.   Anyone who shows up between the hours of10:00 AM and 6:00 PM will receive a free tattoo removal treatment.  Patients will be treated on a first come first served basis and can get up to ten (10) square inches treated.  To book an appointment anytime after the grand opening event, prospective patients can call (480) 525-9238 or visit www.drtattoff.com.  Patients should understand that tattoo removal usually involves multiple treatments and should not expect that their tattoo will be gone after this one free treatment.

Consistent with the Dr. Tattoff brand, the Phoenix clinic will be a state-of-the art medical facility, custom designed and built specifically to service the diverse range of consumers wanting tattoo removal.  From soccer moms to tattoo enthusiasts, business professionals to pro athletes, Dr. Tattoff has a wide variety of patients, each with their own story and reason for seeking tattoo removal.  In markets like Phoenix where tattoo removal is mostly performed by people with an unsettlingly low level of training (typically a two-day training course), Dr. Tattoff sets the bar for patient care incredibly high by having all treatments performed by licensed clinicians with a designation of Registered Nurse or greater.  In addition, all Dr. Tattoff clinics are overseen by board certified dermatologists with special expertise in tattoo removal.

According to Dr. Kirby, “Everyone makes mistakes or has a change of heart, but they should not be made to feel bad or pay a fortune for those decisions.   The mission of Dr. Tattoff is, as it always has been, to provide the highest quality affordable laser tattoo removal and laser hair removal in a non-judgmental, friendly environment.”

Dr. Kirby will personally be on-hand along with the Dr. Tattoff staff to meet and treat patients on opening day.

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Lori Singleton ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Lori Singleton, Salt River Project (SRP)

Lori Singleton, SRP

Lori Singleton is the manager of sustainability initiatives and technologies at Salt River Project. She is a 29-year employee of SRP and 40-year resident of Arizona. She is responsible for design and implementation of SRP’s environmental outreach programs with special focus on renewable energy.

Lori’s responsibilities at SRP include development and implementation of renewable energy projects to meet SRP’s sustainable resource goals. Singleton oversees research and development projects to support company-wide initiatives for SRP including gasoline lawn mower recycling, tree planting, clean school bus initiative, travel reduction and other internal environmental programs.

She works on development and implementation of the “green” energy pricing program, solar incentive program for residential and commercial customers and renewable energy education programs for implementation in middle school and high school curricula.

In addition, she does promotion and public relations for all new renewable energy projects and purchases (solar, wind, geothermal, landfill gas, low head hydro, fuel cells) while serving as the environmental issues media spokesperson for SRP and being a constant representative of SRP on numerous environmental committees, boards and commissions.

She was appointed by Governor Janet Napolitano to serve on the Solar Energy Advisory Council and also has several other current affiliations including: Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors; Audubon Society, chair, Board of Directors; Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, chair; Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President & National Board Director; Southwest Center for Education; and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of Directors.

Current Affiliations

Solar Energy Advisory Council, appointment by Governor Janet Napolitano
Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors
Audubon Society, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, Chair
Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President &
National Board Director
Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of
Directors

Affiliations (Past)

Valley Forward Association, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force
City of Phoenix, Environmental Quality Commission
Valley Metro, Clean Air Advisory Committee
Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Environmental Committee
Valley of the Sun United Way Loaned Executive


Topic: How people & organizations can get involved in the green movement from an energy perspective.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 157

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



 

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Mark Roddy ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Mark Roddy, SmithGroup

Mark Roddy, SmithGroup

Mark Roddy, AIA, a design principal and lead designer for the Phoenix office of SmithGroup’s Office Workplace Studio, has over 18 years in the architectural field.

Mark received his bachelor degree from the University of Arizona in 1991 and a Masters in Architecture from UCLA in 1996. He has taught architecture design at the University of Arizona, Montana State University and Arizona State University.

His expertise produces civic/municipal spaces that respond to the surrounding community and its culture, while his office/workplace designs are efficient without sacrificing environmental responsiveness. This is most evident in the recently completed Chandler City Hall that is tracking LEED Gold Certification. This commitment to sustainability is also demonstrated in the “green” addition to his historic home in Central Phoenix that has won numerous awards including a Crescordia from Valley Forward. Mark’s work has been exhibited locally, nationally and internationally.

He believes architecture should be expressive and environmentally responsible, but above all it should seek and find a balance between beauty and function.


Topic: Sustainable Office Design, Two Case Studies in Regional Office Design: Strategies and benefits of sustainable office building design, focusing on three main topics — regional design-buildings, performance strategies and employer & employee benefits.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011


BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Sponsors:

Luxury Home - AZ Business Magazine November 2008

Housing Crash Hurts The Valley’s Luxury Home Market

High-End Distress: The housing crash is now hurting the Valley’s luxury home market


A meticulous five-bedroom, remodeled home sits nestled in one of Paradise Valley’s most beautiful neighborhoods. But the most remarkable thing about this home is not its one-acre lot, new flooring or up-to-date kitchen. It’s the “For Sale” sign that has graced the front yard for two years.

Two years, two different realty companies and several price reductions later, the home finally is generating some energy and a contract is in the works. But, according to information from Coldwell Banker’s luxury home experts with The Walt Danley Group, that never would have happened if the price hadn’t dropped 20 percent in one year and 40 percent from the time it first went on the market.

This scenario is playing out to varying degrees throughout the Valley’s high-end home submarkets, from the Biltmore area to Paradise Valley to North Scottsdale. Real estate professionals say that while wealthy clients clearly are insulated from some of the economic hardships that face production-home buyers, they are not completely immune from them.

Inventory is high, homes are sitting on the market longer and Realtors must convince sellers to lower their expectations on price.

“What’s happening in the marketplace,” says Sandra Wilken of Sandra Wilken Luxury Properties, “is we are trying

to get our sellers to be extremely realistic on their list price. The ridiculous prices of three years ago are not going to happen.”

In 2007, Wilken says buyers in Paradise Valley purchased 133 properties worth $2 million or more. The most expensive ho

me sold for $8.8 million. This year, 62 homes have been sold in that range, with the highest fetching $7.62 million.

Information from the Arizona Regional Multiple Listing Service in two high-end zip codes, Paradise Valley’s 85253 and North Scottsdale’s 85256, shows inventory climbing through 2007 and the first half of 2008 compared to accepted offers. The average price for a property sold in Paradise Valley in September 2006 was $2.328 million. This past August it was $1.606 million.

Break it down
It is important to understand that in the luxury home market, different segments are performing in different ways.

Buyers who can afford a $2 million to $4 million home, or higher, are more insulated from current market conditions.

Tom Fisher calls them “program buyers,” successful and affluent business people who are on track to build homes that some call “family resorts.”

Fisher, owner of Fisher Custom Homes, builds houses that start at $2 million. His clients’ income or cash flow often is tied to the stock market, and while that has bred caution in their spending, in his experience it hasn’t derailed many building plans.

Walt Danley agrees there still is activity in the high-end market, but poor economic conditions fostered by sub-prime lending have, in a sense, trickled up.

Credit crunch
Credit in the form of jumbo loans, or loans for more than $417,000, has dried up as well. Several years ago, buyers could purchase a $1 million home with as little as 5 percent down, says Dean Bloxom, president of iMortgage Services in Phoenix. Some banks asked for 10 percent on $2 million.

Today, loans are available but banks want at least 20 percent down, and clear, documented evidence of someone’s assets and income — a correction that should have happened earlier, Bloxom says.

There are indications the market may pick up some velocity, says Cionne McCarthy, an agent with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty.

The Luxury Home Tour, which showcases homes in Paradise Valley and the Arcadia and Biltmore districts, recently released figures that show homes in August spent less time on the market.

From Aug. 8 to Sept. 6, homes spent an average of 151 days on the market, compared to an average of 223 days between August 2007 and August 2008.

Arizona Business Magazine November 2008

Energy Costs - AZ Business Magazine September 2008

Higher Energy Costs Are Forcing Valley Companies To Look For Alternatives

From the neighborhood car wash to a corporate behemoth such as US Airways, rising energy costs are forcing Valley businesses to search for alternatives to relieve the pressure on their bottom lines.


On a warm weekend morning in the Phoenix area, a bored but concerned car wash attendant asks the only motorist who pulls up for a cleaning: “Where is everybody?” He then answers his own question: “People aren’t driving as much and their cars aren’t getting as dirty.”

From airlines to car washes to supermarket chains, record-high gas prices are taking their toll, causing businesses to implement strategies aimed at trimming expenses and saving energy.

Alternatives, ranging from solar to wind to biodiesel, are becoming more attractive and cost-effective as utility bills and prices at the pump continue to squeeze the bottom line.

While US Airways made major news when it announced a broad range of steps to cut costs and generate revenue, the airline is by no means alone in its actions. Bashas’ Family of Stores is an example of supermarkets that are feeling the pinch of higher diesel fuel prices, and the trucking industry reports some haulers are considering dropping customers who are in outlying areas.

Even car washes, which depend entirely on customers’ driving habits, are seeing a decline in business. Brian O’Connor, owner of Arizona Auto Wash, with operations throughout the Valley and in Sedona, says his customers are coming in less frequently.

“Instead of once a week, maybe we see them every other week,” O’Connor says. “People are so sick of putting money into their cars. They’re changing oil every 10,000 miles instead of 3,000 miles.”

O’Connor and other gas retailers are victims of what he calls a double whammy. Retailers get 8-to-10-cents per gallon, regardless of the price. Back when gas was $1 a gallon, that was a 10 percent profit. At $4 a gallon, that’s only 2.5 percent.

In addition to hiking the air-conditioning a degree or so, O’Connor has employees check equipment regularly for leaky hose bibs and broken sprinkler heads to conserve water.

Conservation, whether of water, fuel or energy, comes in many forms. For example, there’s solar power. Leah Bushman of Dependable Solar Products in Tempe, acknowledges that businesses, in particular home builders, don’t opt for solar units because of the cost.

“They want to know how is it going to affect their pocketbook, what is the return on investment,” she says.

She tells of a California builder who found that equipping homes with solar units added $18,000 to the cost, even after rebates and incentives. But, those solar homes sold much faster than others in the development.

In addition, a “green” architect in the Valley is seeing more interest in solar energy, Bushman says. “Why? Because more people are aware that we have an energy crisis on our hands,” she says. “We don’t have cheap oil anymore, but we do have the solar technology and the sunshine.”

At Southwest Windpower in Flagstaff, Miriam Robbins, marketing director, says any business could benefit from the company’s system, which is installed directly into the electric grid and does not need batteries or additional backup. The cost of most systems, including installation, ranges from $12,000 to $18,000. Rebates are available.

“The amount of power you get depends on wind speed,” she says. “Larger retailers may be interested to not only help offset electric costs, but also to make it more of a green statement. It can be installed on top of a light pole in a parking lot.”

Rick Katt, an owner of AZ BioDiesel in the Valley, says any business with a large fleet of trucks that runs on diesel should consider biofuel.

“No modification to your vehicle is needed,” he says. “It’s 80 percent vegetable oil, your motor runs cooler in hot weather and it’s cheaper than regular diesel by about 50 to 75 cents a gallon. And it’s better for the environment.”

Kristy Nied, director of communications for Bashas’, says the soaring price of diesel fuel has made it even more difficult for the company to operate in a cost-efficient manner.

“We rely on diesel fuel for our fleet of 97, over-the-road, 18-wheelers that deliver groceries to our stores throughout the state,” she says.

Recently, Bashas’ installed a device on its diesel trucks and eight other trucks that reduces fuel consumption and emissions.

“We’re saving enough fuel to run our entire fleet for a week,” Nied says. “We’ve also achieved a 32 percent reduction in particulate emissions.”

Bashas’ is testing a work-at-home program for certain employees, rewarding those who carpool with gifts ranging from duffel bags to vacations, and giving employees who ride public buses for two months a $25 gift card for store items.

“We’ve seen the number of bus riders go up because of gas prices,” Nied says.

A business decision closely related to the price of gas was the discontinuation of Bashas’ “Groceries on the Go” service.

“The cost of fuel made it extremely difficult for us to offer delivery service at a reasonable fee,” Nied says.

During the hot summer months, Bashas’ encouraged stores to set thermostats 2 degrees higher than normal. The grocery chain also placed nightshades on open freezer cases to reduce energy consumption, and installed energy-efficient lighting in more than one-third of the stores. The goal is to retrofit the remaining stores by the end of next year, Nied says.

To cope with rising fuel costs, US Airways has plans to cut as many as 2,000 jobs and started charging passengers more for items such as drinks, choice seats and checked bags. In the second quarter, the carrier lost $567 million, even though revenue rose 3 percent to $3.26 billion. But that revenue was eaten up by fuel costs. A year ago, the company reported a profit of $263 million.

In announcing US Airways’ second quarter earnings, company Chairman and CEO Doug Parker said he expects the new fees to add $500 million to the airline’s coffers. However, that’s less than half of the $1.1 billion the company paid for fuel in the second quarter.

Industry sources estimate fuel costs for airlines have increased 80 percent over a year ago. Valerie Wunder, associate manager of media relations for US Airways, says the airline is estimating its fuel costs to be $2 billion more than last year.

She explains other moves to save fuel. They include replacing all service carts with ones that are 12 pounds lighter and, in the cockpits, replacing paper manuals with electronic flight bags and maintenance logbooks to remove about 100 pounds of weight on each flight.

“Our fuel-hedging program and fuel-conservation measures such as single-engine taxi, which saves an estimated 5.2 million gallons of fuel annually, and fuel-conserving winglets, which reduces drag and saves approximately 1 million gallons of jet fuel, also help us conserve fuel,” Wunder says.

Karen Rasmussen, president and CEO of the Arizona Trucking Association, says fuel prices led to a record number of trucker bankruptcies nationally in the first quarter of the year. The association has 353 members, including UPS, Bashas’ and Safeway.

“Truckers are struggling,” she says. “They’re doing everything in their power to reduce fuel consumption, such as limiting idle time and keeping tires properly inflated. But, when it’s 113 degrees and they’re in their sleeper cab taking a required break, they have to keep the A/C going.”

In many cases, truckers are installing governors to limit speed or have instituted a companywide policy of keeping speeds between 58 and 62 mph.

“Reducing speed reduces fuel use,” Rasmussen says. “Many companies are looking at markets or customers they won’t serve as part of an overall business plan. They’re sticking with their best customers, the ones that pay their bills on time.”

Fuel formerly was the second highest cost of doing business next to labor.

“Now, it’s the highest in many cases,” Rasmussen says.

The outlook?

“There’s not much to indicate we will get an improvement in fuel prices,” Rasmussen says.

“There are too many things on the global horizon indicating we will continue to have shortages of distillate, which is what diesel fuel is made from. There is a huge increase in demand overseas.”

Part of the problem is the weak dollar. U.S. firms are exporting more diesel fuel than ever.

“They can sell it for more overseas,” Rasmussen says. “Wouldn’t you?”

For more information about how Valley companies are combating high energy costs, visit the following websites:

bashas.com
usairways.com

dependablesolarproducts.com

windenergy.com
azbiodiesel.com

arizonatrucking.com

Arizona Business Magazine September 2008