Tag Archives: Valley Forward

rsz_tempe-marketplace-01

Vestar celebrates 25th anniversary

Vestar, the largest privately held retail developer in the western US, is celebrating 25 years of creating and managing shopping and entertainment destinations. Today, Vestar owns and operates more than 23MSF of retail property located across several western states.

The company’s most noteworthy projects include Desert Ridge Marketplace, the award winning 1.2 million square foot entertainment and lifestyle center; Tempe Marketplace, the 1.2 million square foot power center; and the District at Tustin Legacy, a 1 million square foot regional center.

Vestar was founded in 1989 by the executive team of Richard J. Kuhle, Chairman and CEO, David J. Larcher, President, J. Paul Rhodes, Executive Vice President and the late Lee T. Hanley, past chairman. The company first established itself through successful development and management of large open-air retail destinations in Arizona and California.

Building on its philosophy of developing environmentally sensitive and culturally significant properties, Vestar has worked closely with neighborhood groups, communities and municipalities to ensure their projects integrate with and enrich their communities. This holistic approach led to expanded opportunity throughout the western United States.

In 2008, Vestar expanded its focus to include the increased acquisition and redevelopment of existing retail centers in order enhance their value and relevance to shoppers and their communities. In recent years, acquisitions have exceeded $1.5 billion, ushering in a new era of growth for the company.

“We’re proud of where we’ve been,” says David Larcher, President of Vestar. “But we’re just as excited about where we’re going. As a financially sound and well-capitalized company with a reputation for quality, the future is bright for Vestar, which makes our 25th anniversary a true celebration.”

Today the company remains based in Phoenix, and now has eleven regional offices including Los Angeles, the Bay Area and Dallas. Vestar’s portfolio includes properties in Texas, Colorado and Nevada, along with Arizona and California. The company’s valued partners and clients include UBS, La Salle, Heitman, AEW, Rockwood Capital, KIMCO, and the Carlyle Group among others.

In addition to its focus on community connection and involvement, Vestar has expanded its commitment to sustainability. The company’s proprietary GreenSTAR initiative aligns Vestar building techniques to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certification for the company’s new development projects. As a result, Vestar has received Silver LEED certification, and been recognized with the Valley Forward Environmental Excellence Award.

srp installs solar energy systems

Energy Consortium’s Roadmap puts state of path to build industry

Imagine Arizona as the energy hub of the Southwest — where major regional transmission lines tie into infrastructure in the state and serve a growing regional demand for energy. Arizona would be a place where an increasing percentage of jobs are related to the energy industry, whether in manufacturing, generation, transmission, energy efficiency, service or technology innovation. Many of these jobs would be higher-wage jobs requiring a skilled labor force fed by Arizona’s schools and universities. Arizona could be a hub of energy-sector jobs, with factories making equipment for the industry and power plants shipping electricity to neighboring states via new power lines, all contributing to a better economy.

That is the essence of the Arizona Energy Consortium’s Energy Roadmap, which the group hopes with be a catalyst for the state’s energy industry in the same way Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap helped the state increase bioscience jobs by 41 percent and helped increase the number of bioscience establishments by 27 percent during its 10-year plan.

“It was important to create this document to give the energy industry a unified voice and direction,” said said Michelle De Blasi, co-chair of the AEC and a shareholder at Greenberg Traurig. “The energy industry is going to be here forever. We are always going to need energy. So the Roadmap was designed to make the industry better for everyone — consumers, developers, legislators. So it was critical that we get it right.”

This is the vision the Roadmap hopes to realize over the next decade: Arizona is the energy hub of the Southwest, with a diverse energy mix supporting reliable transmission, a strong base of manufacturing facilities, increased numbers of higher wage jobs, and world-class research institutions, resulting in increased economic development for the state and region.

Once that vision is realized, De Blasi said the state can expect to reap these benefits:
• Enhanced job creation and higher-wage jobs within Arizona
• Increased state economic revenue
• Enhanced energy export potential
• Heightened energy self-sufficiency and national and state security
• Increased transmission reliability
• Continued low cost energy

“This Roadmap is going to help Arizona be looked at differently from outside its borders,” said Chris Davey, co-chair with De Blasi of the AEC and president of EnviroMission, which is developing a solar tower in Western Arizona. “The Roadmap will create a sense of certainty, which appeals to the finance community. So when they are looking to invest, that certainty creates a more attractive environment for developers and investors.”

Davey and De Blasi said they will be rolling out the Roadmap this year, presenting it to groups throughout the state. For more information on the Roadmap, visit aztechcouncil.org.

ROADMAP CONTRIBUTORS

Arizona Commerce Authority
Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy
Arizona Public Service
Bridge Strategy Group
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
City of Mesa, the Office of the Mayor
Cleantech Open
Dircks
DIRTT
DMB Associates
Energy Services Coalition
EnviroMission
Faithful+Gould
Greater Phoenix Economic Council
Greenberg Traurig
The Green Chamber – Greater Phoenix
Golder Associates
Hensel Phelps
Ikoloji
Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals
J.D. Porter & Associates
Kolbe Connect
Matthew McDonnell
Ormond Group, LLC
RG Schmelzer, Inc.
Salt River Project
Stream Energy
Tucson Electric Power
Valley Forward
Valley Partnership

federal transportation bill

Arizona Forward hopes to guide Arizona’s transportation systems

As Valley Forward transitions to Arizona Forward to encompass a statewide focus, it’s only fitting that the association with a 43-year history of success tackling environmental issues — including land use, water management, air quality and energy — turns its attention to an issue that impacts every resident and every business in Arizona.
Transportation.

“Valley Forward has always valued transportation as one of the organization’s key areas of interest,” says John Godec, president of Godec, Randall & Associates Inc., which helps governments and businesses solve public and stakeholder challenges. “The Phoenix and Tucson metros have seen radical transportation changes and improvements in the past decade, so we’re asking, ‘What’s next? Are we good to go now?’”

Just as it did last year with parks and open spaces, Valley Forward hopes to answer those questions as it unveils its stance on transportation, covering topics such as transportation planning, how it impacts the quality of life in the Sun Corridor and how transportation affects Arizona’s economy.

One issue that Valley Forward wanted to address in its Transportation Primer is one on the minds of every Arizona: traffic congestion and how to better connect cities with each other. According to a policy report written by Byron Schlomach for The Goldwater Institute, the average Phoenix commuter spends an average of 38 hours a year in traffic, while a commuter in Tucson spends roughly 42 hours in traffic.

In an attempt to remedy traffic congestion in Phoenix, voters adopted Proposition 400 in November of 2004, which allowed for the renovating and extending of current freeways and the addition of more public transportation, such as the Valley Metro Light Rail, all of which connect small communities with larger cities. In Tucson, Pima County voters approved the $2.1 billion Regional Transportation Plan, which saw the construction of a modern streetcar project throughout the city, giving more people a chance to get around, while getting cars off the highways.

However, the question that has been asked by Valley Forward is, is it enough, especially since Arizona only seems to be growing in size?

“At least half the transportation systems that the state will need in 2050 have yet to be built,” says Sally Stewart, deputy communications director at the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) and Valley Forward member. “Despite the recent economic downturn, Arizona’s growth is not over. It is not a question of whether the Sun Corridor — one of the emerging megapolitan regions in the country — will be a reality; it is simply a matter of when.”

According to a study published in March 2010 by ADOT, it is expected that Arizona’s population will more than double, from 6.4 million to about 16 million people in the next 30 years. Maricopa County’s population is expected to increase by 90 percent, from 4 million people to about 7.6 million. The study suggests that because of this population explosion, travel times for various destinations in the Sun Corridor could increase by about 100 percent by 2050. This could mean that a trip between Phoenix and Tucson, which currently is about a 95-minute drive, could take up to 5.5 hours in 2050 (assuming that the Interstate-10 freeway is widened to about 10 lanes).

Valley Forward experts say that Arizona must plan ahead to improve this possible transportation dilemma, especially if the state wants to see more business activity and economic improvement.

“Transportation is key for economic development,” says said Eric Anderson, transportation director at the Maricopa Association of Governments. “The ability of a company’s workforce to commute on a predictable basis is critical. The movement of freight in and out of the region is also important. Companies looking to locate in the region always look at the adequacy of the transportation system in providing mobility and travel options.”

According to the American Public Transportation Association, every $1 billion invested in public transportation supports and creates 36,000 jobs. Despite the fact that policies, such as Proposition 400, have created and funded transportation projects, Valley Forward says that there is still not enough money allocated for Arizona’s travel needs.

“Arizona’s future economic development will be tied closely to the state’s willingness to commit funding and resources to improving and expanding its statewide transportation system,” says Craig Hughes, CEO and founder of Total Transit, the parent company of Discount Cab in Phoenix and Tucson. “Without a firm commitment to building and maintaining an efficient, integrated transportation network, the future could be one of congested freeways, inadequate rural highways, gridlocked city streets and under-funded and under-utilized mass transit.”

Valley Forward hopes that its stance and data findings will help create a dialogue not only among Phoenix and Tucson residents, but also policymakers.

“Arizona’s business community is a vital participant in guiding policymakers regarding the infrastructure challenges facing the state,” Stewart says. “If Arizonans want to enjoy a better quality of life based on a vibrant economy, then the business community must work closely with policymakers to make the difficult, but necessary decisions regarding transportation infrastructure.”

Adds Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, “We want to bring together the public and private sectors. Valley Forward’s goal is to try and drive the conversation to the middle and take the politics out. We want to drive up solutions so that Arizona, as a whole, can advance and can sustain itself.”

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group

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Valley Forward presents environmental awards

The Maricopa County Master Watershed Stewards Program has earned the coveted President’s Award (Best of Show) in Valley Forward’s 32nd annual Environmental Excellence Awards, held in partnership with SRP for 11 consecutive years.

This impactful initiative was submitted by University of Arizona Cooperative Extension in Maricopa County and mentors future stewards of the environment through education and action focusing on the Valley’s most precious natural resource – water. It teaches how the health of watersheds is tied directly to quality of life, not just for humans but also for nature and wildlife.

More than 120 entries were received in Arizona’s oldest and most prestigious awards competition focusing exclusively on sustainability initiatives. Winners were announced Sept. 29, at Valley Forward’s awards gala attended by more than 600 community leaders at The Westin Kierland Resort in Scottsdale.

Valley Forward and SRP presented 17 first-place Crescordia winners and 29 Awards of Merit. The awards set standards for achieving a balance between the built and natural environment in the region’s physical, technical, social and aesthetic development.

The Master Watershed Stewards Program was recognized for training volunteers to protect, restore, monitor and conserve local water and watersheds. The 10-week course combines classroom education and field training, introducing participants to local riparian ecosystems and facilitating an understanding of how to effectively manage natural resources.

In addition to the University of Arizona, project team members include: Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department, Audubon Arizona, Central Arizona Project and EPCOR Water. The submittal also won a first-place Crescordia Award in the Environmental Stewardship (SRP Award) category. Crescordia is a Greek term meaning, “to grow in harmony,” and the President’s Award is selected from among all Crescordia recipients.

“There was a recurrent theme of collaboration and regional cooperation among this year’s project winners,” said Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward. “Sustainability is clearly at the forefront in our community, and it’s inspiring to preview such innovative programs directed at preserving natural resources – air, water, open space and our unique desert environment.”

South Mountain Community Library in Phoenix was the only project to receive multiple Crescordia awards this year. The building itself was recognized in the Buildings and Structures – Institutional and Civic categories, and a collaborative multi-faceted public art piece on the community college campus in which the library is located, received first-place honors in the Art in Public Places category.

The innovative 51,600-square-foot facility not only integrates with the natural desert environment in which it is situated, but fully blends elements of the two entities it serves. The public and academic sides converge into a holistic, sustainable landmark building. A signature element, Passage, created by artists Mags Harries and Lajos Heder, combines talking chairs, plaza enhancements, poetry trellises and a new pedestrian crossing of the Western Canal.

The awards competition has become especially competitive among Valley municipalities and government agencies. This year, the city of Phoenix faired especially well, earning six Crescordia awards and four Awards of Merit. Other Valley cities to earn awards include Tempe, Scottsdale, Mesa and the town of Gila Bend, as well as the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community.

Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO of the Arizona Science Center, served as lead judge for the program. Other jurists included: Chris Brown, vice president, SmithGroupJJR; Bert Castro, president and CEO, Phoenix Zoo; Greg Esser, associate director desert initiative, Arizona State University Art Museum; Greg Flanagan, principal, G.K. Flanagan Associates, Inc.; Joe Herzog, director of architecture, Shepley Bulfinch; Park Howell, president, Park & Co; Kyle Hultquist, vice president of marketing and communications, StandardAero; and Steven Lichtenberger, principal, AECOM.

Valley Forward is a non-profit public interest organization that brings business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. The organization operates with the belief that businesses must take a leadership role in solving the complex and sometimes controversial problems that confront growing population centers.

 

In addition to the Maricopa County Watershed Stewards Program, South Mountain Community Library and Passage, Crescordia winners include:

 

WOLFF RESIDENCE (LEA – Architects, LLC)

The existing structural frame of this 1960s home in Paradise Valley was preserved along with the interior materials significant to the mid-twentieth century during the complete overhaul, floor plan modifications and new addition. Careful, informed decisions were made to protect the original design intent, while enhancing the home’s connection to the natural environment.

 

WINDSOR AND CHURN (Shepley Bulfinch)

Creating a community hub and sense of identity for two prominent historic neighborhoods in north central Phoenix, this adaptive reuse project transformed a 1940s structure into a lively restaurant and adjoining artisan ice cream shop. The intent was to keep as much of the original brick structure and stacked sandstone veneered walls as possible and work with the existing footprint of a building that had seen many uses throughout its history.

 

DPR Construction Phoenix Regional Office (SmithGroupJJR)

DPR Construction purchased an underutilized 1970s building and redeveloped it into a LEED Platinum certified office space for its Phoenix team using cost saving sustainable strategies.
TEMPE LAKE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE (City of Tempe, T.Y. Lin and Otak)

Tempe Town Lake Pedestrian Bridge provides a beautiful crossing at the western-most end of the lake and is part of the city’s overall efforts to reduce vehicular traffic, improve air quality, connect people to culture, conserve water and create shade.

 

COWLEY COMPANIES OFFICE (Office of Desert Architecture)
Renovating a 1930s produce warehouse in downtown Phoenix, Cowley Companies not only restored the character of an historic building, but created a unique and energy-efficient workspace for its employees.

Central Station (City of Phoenix Public Transit Department)

This refurbishment gave a facelift to the 14-year-old transit facility located near Civic Space Park and Arizona State University’s downtown campus in Phoenix. Updates included improved passenger amenities and a plethora of environmentally friendly features.

 

CENTRAL MAIN PLAN (City of Mesa Development and Sustainability Department)

Mesa developed a Central Main Plan for its Main Street corridor by following three principles of sustainability. The plan aims to create a prosperous, people-friendly setting while reducing vehicle traffic, celebrating cultural diversity and fostering a distinct, environmentally conscious community.

 

TRES RIOS ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROJECT (Kiewit Western Co)

Phase Three of the Tres Rios program updated and reconfigured drainage systems and removed salt cedar in a 2.5-mile long, 650-acre stretch of open water and wetland marshes at the confluence of the Gila, Salt and Agua Fria rivers. The project has created 44 acres of new open water reaches along with 10 acres of marsh habitat and 46 acres of riparian habitat.

 

GEORGE “DOC” CAVALLIERE PARK (SmithGroupJJR)

Nearly 25 years in the making, George “Doc” Cavalliere Park in Scottsdale established a new benchmark for sustainable practices, demonstrating how to appropriately design and construct an active community park in a sensitive desert context. Open spaces were preserved and site disturbance minimized while maintaining functional uses.

 

PALOMA SOLAR POWER PLANT (Arizona Public Service)

A collaboration between APS, First Solar and the town of Gila Bend, Paloma is a 17-megawatt solar power plant with 275,000 panels situated on a retired alfalfa farm. This zero water-use facility was built in record time and conserves more than 13.3 million gallons of water annually over traditional solar plants.

 

FIX A LEAK WEEK PROMOTION AND ONE FOR WATER 4-MILER & FESTIVAL (Arizona Municipal Water Users Association)

This public awareness campaign empowers residents to eliminate water waste in their homes and was sponsored by the Arizona Municipal Water Users Association with support from more than 40 partner municipalities, businesses and organizations. The program included extensive educational outreach efforts and culminated in a four-mile, professionally timed race.

 

U-HAUL CONTRIBUTIONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION

(U-Haul International)

Through its comprehensive educational outreach program, U-Haul promotes environmental awareness and touts the importance of sustainability to its stakeholders, as well as millions who drive along roads and highways every day.

STARDUST NONPROFIT BUILDING SUPPLIES DECONSTRUCTION SERVICES (Stardust Nonprofit Building Supplies)
Stardust Nonprofit Building Supplies Deconstruction Services removes usable building materials from homes and businesses at no cost to the owner for donation of the items, saving more than 1,500 tons of supplies from local area landfills each year. 

2012 ENVIRONMENTAL EXCELLENCE AWARDS
COMPLETE LIST OF WINNERS

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Residential

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Wolff Residence

Submitted by: LEA-Architects, LLC

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Legacy Build

Submitted by: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona

 

Name of Entry: Whispering Ridge

Submitted by: Knoell & Quidort Architects

 

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Civic

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: South Mountain Community Library

Submitted by: richärd+bauer, llc.

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: FBI Phoenix Office

Submitted by: AECOM

 

Name of Entry: Ocotillo Library + Workforce Literacy Center

Submitted by: durkin + durkin architects llc

 

 

 

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Historic Preservation

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Windsor and Churn

Submitted by: Shepley Bulfinch, Phoenix

 

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Cutler*Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center

Submitted by: Motley Design Group, LLC

 

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Commercial & Mixed Use

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: DPR Construction Phoenix Regional Office

Submitted by: SmithGroupJJR / DPR Construction

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Okland Construction

Submitted by: Weddle Gilmore black rock studio

Name of Entry: Windsor and Churn at Central & Oregon

Submitted by: Venue/Upward Projects

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Institutional

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: South Mountain Community Library

Submitted by: richärd+bauer, llc.

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Integrated Education Building at GateWay Community College

Submitted by: SmithGroupJJR

 

Name of Entry: Nursing & Exercise Science Building at Mesa Community College

Submitted by: SmithGroupJJR

 

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Industrial & Public Works

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Tempe Lake Pedestrian Bridge

Submitted by: City of Tempe, T.Y. Lin and Otak

 

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: The Greenest Factory on the Planet

Submitted by: DIRTT Environmental Solutions

 

LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Sustainable Communities

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Devine Legacy on Central

Submitted by: Adolfson & Peterson Construction

 

 

 

LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Adaptive Reuse

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Cowley Companies Office

Submitted by: Office of Desert Architecture

 

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: IN FLUX Initiative

Submitted by: Scottsdale Public Art & City of Tempe Public Art

 

LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Multimodal Transportation & Connectivity

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Central Station

Submitted by: City of Phoenix Public Transit Department

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Virtual Dial-A-Ride

Submitted by: Total Transit

 

Name of Entry: 27th Avenue/Baseline Road Park-and-Ride

Submitted by: City of Phoenix Public Transit Department

 

LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Public Policy/Plans

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Central Main Plan

Submitted by: City of Mesa Development and Sustainability Department

 

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Vulture Mountains Cooperative Recreation Management Area Master Plan

Submitted by: Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Department

 

SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Residential

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: The Smith Residence

Submitted by: Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc.

 

SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Public Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Tres Rios Environmental Restoration Project

Submitted by: Kiewit Western Co.

 

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick

Submitted by: HKS, Inc.

 

SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Trails

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Crosscut Canal Multiuse Path Project

Submitted by: City of Tempe

 

SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Parks

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: George “Doc” Cavalliere Park

Submitted by: SmithGroupJJR

 

ART IN PUBLIC PLACES

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Passage, South Mountain Library and Western Canal Public Art Project

Submitted by: Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: “Contours and Crossings” Crosscut Canal

Submitted by: City of Tempe

 

Name of Entry: IN FLUX Initiative

Submitted by: Scottsdale Public Art & City of Tempe Public Art

 

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES: Public Sector

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Flood Control District of Maricopa County Tall Pot Tree Program

Submitted by: Flood Control District of Maricopa County

 

Name of Entry: Phoenix Renewable Energy Program

Submitted by: City of Phoenix

 

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES: Private Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Paloma Solar Power Plant

Submitted by: Arizona Public Service

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: PanAridus

Submitted by: Fifty Plus One

 

Name of Entry: Power Parasol at Lot 59

Submitted by: debartolo architects

 

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION/COMMUNICATION: Public Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Fix a Leak Week Promotion and One for Water 4-Miler & Festival

Submitted by: Arizona Municipal Water Users Association

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools

Submitted by: Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools & ASU Global Institute of Sustainability

 

Name of Entry: Phoenix Recycling Program

Submitted by: Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION/COMMUNICATION: Private Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: U-Haul Contributions to Environmental Education and Communication

Submitted by: U-Haul International

 

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Green Living Magazine

Submitted by: Green Living Magazine

 

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION/COMMUNICATION: Educators, Students & Nonprofits

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Stardust Nonprofit Building Supplies Deconstruction Services

Submitted by: Stardust Nonprofit Building Supplies

 

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Plant Something Campaign

Submitted by: Arizona Nursery Association

 

Name of Entry: Urban Hummingbird Project

Submitted by: Audubon Arizona

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP – The SRP Award

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Maricopa County Master Watershed Stewards Program

Submitted by: University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County

 

PRESIDENT’S AWARD (Best of Show)

Name of Entry: Maricopa County Master Watershed Stewards Program

Submitted by: University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Maricopa County

environmental excellence

Valley Forward Showcases Environmental Excellence

It may not be easy being green but in today’s world, it might be the only way for companies to survive. Consumers are increasingly attracted to “greener” options, forcing organizations of all sizes and industry sectors to reevaluate how they operate.

Those that figure out how to do it right see a wide range of benefits from saving money to creating a healthier workplace. It further results in a more productive and satisfied workforce and ultimately a more sustainable future.

Valley Forward has been showcasing environmental excellence in the region for more than 30 years, recognizing contributions to quality of life and raising the bar for future development.

The organization’s Environmental Excellence Awards has become known as the “Academy Awards” of the local environmental community, setting standards for the exceptional physical, technical and social development of our metropolitan area. The awards are highly sought by companies both large and small, government agencies, cities and towns, design professionals, educators, media representatives, artists, technicians and others.

Environmental excellence takes many forms, from green buildings, magnificent desert vistas and livable communities to innovative public art, sustainable technologies and environmental education.

Sustainable development is more prevalent today than ever. The past few years has seen a record number of entries in the competition, and this program has become a powerful vehicle in advocating for the preservation of natural resources – air, water, open space and our unique desert environment.

If you have or know of green initiatives that should be recognized at the 32nd annual Environmental Excellence Awards program at the Westin Kierland on Sat., Sept. 29, get your entry in ASAP! The deadline is fast approaching.

In an effort to make the awards program as environmentally friendly as the projects submitted, Valley Forward is now requiring all entries be submitted electronically through an FTP site and will not accept any printed, hard copy materials!

Nominations will be accepted through 4 p.m., Thursday, July 19, 2012, in the following categories: Buildings and Structures; Livable Communities; Site Development and Landscape; Art in Public Places; Environmental Technologies; Environmental Education/Communication; and Environmental Stewardship (SRP Award).

Environmental Excellence Awards nomination forms are available at valleyforward.org or calling (602) 240-2408.

valley forward receives grant

Valley Forward Receives $80K Grant

A coalition to foster a statewide sustainability agenda for Arizona has been propelled by a major grant, two new high-level prominent Charter members, its first public sector recruit and two more utilities joining the diverse business-based group.

Valley Forward Association recently received an $80,000 grant from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust with the opportunity to renew funding for an additional two years to grow its Arizona Forward initiative, launched last year to promote a healthy environment while encouraging economic vitality. As part of its annual grant program, the Trust awarded more than $1.8 million to 22 Arizona nonprofit organizations.

The University of Arizona and Cox Communications are the newest Charter members, joining nine other high-level entities represented on the Arizona Forward Advisory Board. Other new recruits include Pima County, Unisource Energy Corporation and Southwest Gas Corp., bringing the total roster to 41.

“This generous financial support from the Trust will allow us to continue our education, outreach and advocacy aimed at enhancing the livability and sustainability of communities throughout Arizona,” said Diane Brossart, acting director for Arizona Forward. “Our ultimate goal is to encourage more coordinated regional efforts through an exchange of ideas and information statewide that bolster our overall economic growth and environmental quality.”

Arizona Forward is leveraging the resources of the 43-year-old Valley Forward to bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide sustainability issues. The group’s basic agenda focuses on land use and open space planning, protecting public lands, parks and monuments, as well as transportation, air quality, water and energy.

“We have experienced impressive growth of public and private sector members in a relatively short time, coupled with an initial grant from a private foundation in 2011 and the one we just received from the Trust,” said Kurt Wadlington, Tucson building group leader for Sundt Construction and chairman of Arizona Forward. “It demonstrates the need for what we are providing and encourages corporate stewardship.

ABOUT NINA MASON PULLIAM CHARITABLE TRUST ORGANIZATION

Since the Trust began its grant making in 1998, it has awarded more than $99.2 million to 422 Arizona nonprofit organizations. The Trust also makes grants in Indiana and as of March 31, 2012, had assets of approximately $350 million. Visit ninapulliamtrust.org for more information about the Trust and its programs.

ABOUT ARIZONA FORWARD

Arizona Forward is an initiative that brings business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue and advocacy on statewide sustainability issues. Charter Members include: Arizona Community Foundation, Cox Communications, First Solar, Freeport McMoran Copper and Gold, National Bank of Arizona, Solon Corporation, Sundt Construction, The Nature Conservancy, Total Transit, University of Arizona and Wells Fargo.

For more information on Valley Forward and the Arizona Forward initiative, visit arizonaforward.org or call (602) 240-2408.

Air Quality

A Better Environment: Improving Air Quality And Our Health

Did you know 13 million deaths could be prevented every year by making our environment healthier? The fact is, public health is intricately connected to our environment regardless of where we live. This link between health and the environment has increasingly become a focal point for the medical community, policymakers and the general public. Some of the foremost factors are air pollution and exposure to pests and chemicals, which can have a significant impact on not only our health but also our quality of life.

The EPA considers indoor air quality one of the top five environmental risks to public health. It is a serious health issue for people who work inside, and furthermore, Americans spend 90 percent of their lives indoors.

Air quality is closely linked to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the leading cause of hospitalization in adults, and it can also contribute to asthma and cardiovascular diseases.

Did you know the main reason for school absenteeism is asthma? It accounts for more than 12.8 million missed school days in a single academic year, and every day, nearly 40,000 people miss school or work due to this chronic disease.

The annual cost of asthma is estimated at nearly $18 billion in direct and indirect costs, such as hospitalizations and lost earnings, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation. Household pests also contribute to health problems with German cockroaches and dust mites a key risk factor for asthma development and exacerbation of asthma symptoms.

Green building emphasizes ventilation and non-toxic, low-emitting materials that create healthier and more comfortable living and working environments. The built environment has also recently been recognized as an important potential contributor to reduced levels of physical activity. An important element of sustainable design is the preservation of natural environments that afford a variety of recreation and exercise opportunities. Green buildings also seek to facilitate alternatives to driving, such as bicycling and public transport, which eases local traffic while encouraging personal health and fitness.

An interactive panel of local healthcare experts discuss the impact of the environment on our health at Valley Forward’s Quarterly Luncheon on Tuesday, April 3 at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix.

Dawn Gouge, Ph.D., entomologist specialist at University of Arizona, will talk about how public health is affected by pests and pesticides, including the rising bed bug crisis our nation is facing. In addition, Fred Karnas, Ph.D., president and CEO of St. Luke’s Health Initiatives, will spotlight health impacts in relation to the built environment and what constitutes livable, walkable communities. The program will be moderated by Bob England, M.D., director of the Maricopa County Department of Public Health.

Join us for this enlightening perspective on how our health is impacted by where we live, work and play — and how we can improve our environment, including improving air quality and reducing exposure to pests and chemicals. Visit valleyforward.org for more information.

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Future of Technology In Arizona: Where Do We Go From Here?

The future of technology: Science and engineering turned Arizona’s first 100 years upside down, so where do we go from here?


Think about the achievements in technology that came during Arizona’s first 100 years.

  • The first transcontinental telephone service between New York and San Francisco (1915).
  • The world’s first radio broadcasting station goes on the air  (1920).
  • Television has its first successful demonstration in the United States (1927).
  • James Watson and Francis Crick at Cambridge University describe the structure of the DNA molecule (1953).
  • The microchip is invented (1959).
  • The first test-tube baby is born (1978).
  • IBM introduces its first personal computer (1981).
  • Cellular telephones are introduced to consumers (1982).
  • Development of the World Wide Web begins (1989).
  • Dolly the sheep becomes the first mammal cloned from an adult cell (1996).
  • Apple introduces the iPod (2001).
  • Facebook is launched (2004).
  • Scientists discover how to use human skin cells to create embryonic stem cells (2007).

They are all innovations that have changes the way we lives our lives and do business.

Where will technology take us as Arizona enters its second century? How will it affect our lives? Here are technologies and scenarios that some of Arizona’s best and brightest minds see playing out in the state’s next 100 years.


The Future of Technology In Arizona


Future of TechnologyMark Bonsall
General manager and CEO
SRP

If I had to pick one technology with the potential to truly revolutionize the industry it would be finding affordable ways to store energy on a very large scale.  This would increase the value of intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar and could transform electricity into a more common commodity.  It isn’t clear that this is possible, but with the growing focus on electric vehicles and other storage technologies, it is certain there will be significant gains over the next century.


Future of TechnologyMark Edwards
Vice president of corporate development and marketing
Algae Biosciences, Inc.

Algae-based food, fiber, feed, fertilizer, fuels, and advanced medicines will transform those industries, as we know them today. The current serious problems of waste and pollution will be solved with sustainable algae-based production that recycles and reuses nutrients, water, and energy while regenerating air, water and soils. Our children’s children will have sufficient natural resources to produce the food, energy and transportation they will need.

Algae Biosciences is Scottsdale-based and focused on discovering and unlocking the powers of algae to resolve critical human issues – nutrition, health, energy and environment.


Future of TechnologySteve Sanghi
President and CEO
Microchip Technology Inc.

If I had to pick one (technology that will have biggest impact on Arizona’s next 100 years) it would be the renewable-energy complex of technologies. For Arizona, the primary renewable-energy opportunities can be broken into three categories—measurement, conservation and harvesting.  The world’s oil supply will eventually run out, and Arizona has more days of sun than most areas.  We must continue working to tap into this ever-present energy source.  At the same time, we must focus on developing the technologies that will enable individuals and companies to both measure and conserve their energy usage.  For example, Arizona has the potential to play a key role in developing the technologies that will be employed at the home, industrial and utility levels to make the burgeoning “smart grid” work.


Future of TechnologyJohn Lefebvre
President
Suntech America

The amount of energy generated through renewable sources like solar power has the potential to surpass that derived from fossil fuels in the next 50 years. We’ve already seen remarkable technological innovations in the solar field to increase efficiency, develop solutions for energy storage, and further reduce costs, with further improvements on the horizon. With over 300 days of sunshine, Arizona is naturally poised to take advantage of these advancements and its abundant resource by generating clean electricity without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.


Future of TechnologyDiane Brossart
President
Valley Forward Association

The biggest issues facing Arizona over the next 100 years are managing a finite water supply and transitioning to a clean energy economy. Green technology and innovation will create economic and environmentally sound solutions, making Arizona the leading destination for living wisely and sustainably in a desert.

Valley Forward Association promotes cooperative efforts to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities.


Future of TechnologyKelly Mott Lacroix
Graduate research associate
Water Resources Research Center in Tucson

We do not have a silver bullet to solve our water supply and demand challenges The state and its water issues are too diverse.  Rather, there are many smaller pieces from the simple and small scale, such as rainwater harvesting, to the large and complex, such as increased reclaimed water use, that when taken together will constitute a solution.


Future of TechnologyBill Hubert
President and founder
Cology, Inc.

Universal, personal-application based technology in general, and highly-sophisticated, profile-driven applications that help consumers (students and parents in our industry) not only gain access to a broader spectrum of programs and services available – but an interactive relationship with providers that will help both sides of the “economic equation” benefit from the transaction.

Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc. is a leading provider of end-to-end private student loan origination and repayment servicing solutions for lenders.


Future of TechnologyCR Herro
Vice president of environmental affairs
Meritage Homes

In the next century, climate will take the lead role in transforming Arizona and its buildings into energy-producing solar collectors. Arizona has the ability to become the largest producer of renewable, clean energy nationwide. In residential construction, that has already started.  The first cost-effective solar communities debuted in Arizona. Meritage Homes introduced the nation’s first net-zero homes in Arizona, saving owners both energy and money. And Arizona utilities lead the country in sponsoring energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.  Arizona is shaping up to be a state powered by the sun in every way imaginable.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Niemiec
President
Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

Technology will be used to not only focus on the tiny gene, but to see the bigger picture of the bio-energetic field of the body. Not unlike what you would see in a Star Trek movie, technology would be used to assess and heal both the body and mind, taking into account the bio-electric system. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine has been focused on individualized medicine for thousands of years, with each treatment and formula specifically adapted to an individual, changing as the person changes and moves toward health. Thus, this dynamic medicine is the forefather of modern “individualized medicine” and can work well to make modern biotechnology more effective.


Future of TechnologyDanny Murphy
Airport director
Sky Harbor International Airport

With the explosion of mobile devices, coupled with high speed wireless networks, there is a new generation that will live their lives on mobile technology, using smartphones, touchpads and other mobile devices.
In the past we used to print so many information pieces about the airport. And while we still provide printed materials to an extent, our focus is on providing information via the web and for mobile units.


Future of TechnologyDr. Grace Caputo
Director
Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

Moving to a system where we utilize electronic medical records will really give us the ability to shape and improve health care across the board. Pediatric healthcare will be heavily impacted as we have just started to unravel genetic bases diseases. In the future, we hope to understand the genetic process of diseases so we can treat them and ultimately prevent diseases with wellness and lifestyle changes.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Anaya
Anchor
CBS 5 News

I think the internet technology we currently use to help in our news gathering will become a bigger factor in how we do things. Smart phones  (or whatever replaces them in the next 100 years) will replace cameras and studios creating more intimacy and accessibility. That accessibility will make it much easier to hold those in power more accountable for their actions which I hope will have a positive impact on how the state’s laws are created, shaped and enforced.


Future of TechnologyMahesh Seetharam, M.D.
Medical oncologist and hematologist
Arizona Oncology

Personalized medicine through whole genome sequencing (genomics), proteomics and noninvasive imaging will pave the way for the future.  Current research to evaluate for circulating cancer cells, and evaluation for cancer in urine samples are already being studied, and holds promise for the future.


Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D.
Radiation oncologist
Arizona Oncology

Immensely precise and conformal radiation treatments in the form of stereotactic radiation, high dose-rate radiation and molecularly targeted radiation will allow radiation oncologists surgical precision in assisting the people of Arizona to improve cancer cure and control. Just as the technological advances in the past have allowed women diagnosed with breast cancer to pursue breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and have allowed men to preserve erectile function with prostate cancer, future advances will allow more Arizonans diagnosed with cancer to enjoy a better quality of life along with improved cure rates.


Michael Crow
President
Arizona State University

The biggest single technology to impact the future of Arizona will be individualized learning technologies that allow individuals to master subjects in ways customized to their particular types of intelligence and learning modalities.  This technology will allow people to learn more quickly and more deeply and more broadly. Those places, hopefully like Arizona, that enable and empower this kind of learning will see tremendous positive impacts from this technological development.


Where to invest in technology

Patricia Ternes, a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Scottsdale says these are the four technology sectors to invest in going into Arizona’s next century:

1. Water 
Growing imbalances in global water supply and demand are well documented. Within that heading, the companies involved with water fall into four categories: (1) activities and technologies that increase supply; (2) the building of the necessary water structure; (3) processes that help reduce demand; and (4) water management.

2. Agriculture
When you look at the growth of the world’s population companies that are involved in agriculture and food production will continue to be attractive and important.

3. Health
Another important sector will be health care services and life sciences tools and services that provide better quality of life for the aging population.

4. The unknown
The fourth sector doesn’t exist yet.  Advances are happening so fast that something new will be created that will change our lives.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Civil Discourse

Civil Discourse: What, How And Why Now?

It seems to be the topic of many conversations these days. But what is civil discourse, and how can we achieve it? More importantly, why has the call become increasingly louder for a concerted effort to find a different way of electing our leaders, solving our problems and interfacing with each other?

What is Civil Discourse

Civil discourse is our ability to have conversation on topics about which we disagree and to listen to each other’s perspectives. Civil discourse requires respect of the other participants and an appreciation for others’ experiences.

To advance society and improve the quality of life in Arizona, we must be prepared to discuss important, yet potentially contentious issues, such as growth, transportation, healthcare and education. Our democracy is dependent upon responsible residents that can, and will, wrestle with these tough issues, without partisanship, while maintaining respect for the need to hear, understand and take into account different viewpoints.

Join the Discussion

An interactive panel of local experts will be discussing civil discourse, what it is and why it’s important at Valley Forward’s luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 25 at the Tempe Mission Palms Hotel.

Panelists include Paul Johnson, former Mayor of the city of Phoenix and manager of Southwest Next Capital Management; Chuck Coughlin, president of HighGround Public Affairs; and Steve Rizley, senior vice president and general manager of Cox Communications. Tarah Jackson, president of Arizona Town Hall will serve as moderator.

These speakers will be engaging attendees in a conversation on civil discourse, the shifting of politics in Arizona, consensus building and regional thinking. It’s especially important in this presidential election year, which also marks Arizona’s centennial celebration and the 50th anniversary of Arizona Town Hall. Come hear for yourself why listening to others’ opinions is so integral in our society.

For more information about Valley Forward, visit valleyforward.org.

Valley Forward

Valley Forward: Reflecting On Two Decades Of Service

I never really thought when I took the job that I’d see my 20th year anniversary as president of Valley Forward. That’s not to say I expected to leave my post sooner. For the past two decades, it’s been pretty automatic – I got out of bed every morning and found my way to the office without much thought about doing anything differently.

And for that I have no regrets. Serving this 42-year-old environmental public interest organization is an honor and a privilege but even more, a passion that has enriched my life in many ways. For that I thank all of the Valley Forward members  – the lifeblood of our impressive and diverse association, as well as our friends in the community who have supported our efforts over more than four decades.

This has been a year of significant change and transition as we’ve taken our mission statewide through a new initiative, Arizona Forward. I’ve become a regular on the I-10 corridor to Tucson and north to Prescott and Flagstaff via 1-17. The prospect of commuter rail  in the Sun Corridor one day brings great promise for enhancing our connectivity and bridging economic development opportunities.

We’ve come a long way during my tenure, which spans almost half of Valley Forward’s existence. From creating and presenting the state’s first official Earth Day celebration to co-hosting Arizona’s largest volunteer clean up along the Salt River, we have engaged countless individuals in our environmental programs.

Our advocacy of desert preservation and open space, multi-modal transportation options, water conservation and renewable energy alternatives has helped to shape public policy in our region that impacts both our livability and sustainability. We’ve graded Valley cities on how they respond to growth issues and made them stronger in the process. Our publications on smart growth strategies have helped educate public and private sectors.

That’s a lot! It’s also what drives my enthusiasm for Valley Forward – it’s ever changing, never static, always moving and anything but boring. I encourage everyone to get involved in something – find a way to give back to the community you’ve made your home. It will reward you in many ways.

I thank those who picked Valley Forward for their involvement. We couldn’t have made such strides without significant support from the community at large. 2012 brings with it ample opportunities to continue our collective journey to balance Arizona’s environmental quality and economic growth towards a more vibrant future.

For more information about Valley Forward, visit valleyforward.org.

Environmental Legal Issues - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Faces Environmental Legal Issues To Grow ‘Green’ Movement

Though Arizona may be working to reach a higher standard of sustainability, a myriad of environmental legal issues will be seen as these changes are implemented. Arizona Business Magazine spoke with the state’s top law firms and industry experts to find out the most important environmental legal issues the state can expect to face in the next decade.

Particulate Matter-10

Attorney Megan Lennox of Bryan Cave LLP says, “The single biggest environmental legal issue Arizona will be facing for the foreseeable future is the regulation, implementation and enforcement of regulations concerning Particulate Matter-10, also referred to as PM-10, which is essentially “dust.”’

According to an Aug. 25, 2011, press release by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality stressing a high pollution advisory: “State and county agencies measure PM-10 and PM-2.5 which are extremely small solid particles and liquid droplets found circulating in the air. PM, or particulate matter, comes from either combustion (cars, industry, woodburning) or dust stirred up into the air. High levels of PM are typically created when the air is especially stagnant or especially windy. PM-10 stands for particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less. PM-2.5 stands for particulate matter measuring 2.5 microns or less. To put this in perspective, one strand of human hair is 70-100 microns in size.”

“Over the summer, we saw a number of High Pollution Advisory (HPA) warnings issued by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) relating to PM-10, particularly in connection with the haboobs (dust storms) we’ve been having in the Valley this summer,” Lennox says. “But what is not as commonly known is that, even without a haboob, Arizonans face real health threats caused by common everyday dust generating activities.

“Indeed, the EPA has not been satisfied with what the Arizona has done in the way of dust control thus far, and because Arizona continues to exceed federal air quality standards for PM-10, we are now facing a very real possibility that the EPA will push the Arizona regulators aside and step in with their own plan to reduce PM-10.

“The real issue of concern is that, if the EPA is required to step in, Arizona will stand to lose over a billion dollars in federal highway funds,” Lennox says. “This translates to further loss of jobs, no new transportation projects, and likely intense regulation and economic impact to the construction industry — all of which will be decidedly detrimental to Arizona’s economy overall.”

Lennox says that Arizonans must prepare and prevent this from happening by doing their part, which includes refraining from leaf blowers, no fires in the fireplace, driving down dusty roads and joining forces with regulators “toward the common goal of reduction of PM-10 and maintenance of federal funding – both of which, everyone should be able to agree, are critical for the long-term health and prosperity of the Valley.”

Michelle De Blasi, partner at Quarles & Brady agrees: “Serious nonattainment areas must demonstrate PM-10 emission reductions of five percent per year until the standard is attained.  The state and local governments have instituted many measures to make these reductions.  To reach attainment, three years of clean data are needed at all PM-10 monitors… The state and local governments have instituted many proactive control measures to try to limit excesses at the monitors caused by dust.”

Utility Deregulation

As the state continues to develop renewable energy, several legal issues can arise. Court Rich, an attorney at Rose Law Group states that: “As renewable energy prices come down its implementation will grow quicker.  At some point the technology involved in distributed roof top solar energy is going to allow people not only to produce energy during the day but to store energy for power at night.”

If people are able to produce the energy they need, should they pay a utility company for its electricity service? These are the types of questions Arizona may face as renewable energy production grows.

“The State has previously looked into forms of utility deregulation…(and) could review forms of deregulation that may set up a better environment for future competition among energy providers ultimately providing lower cost electricity to all Arizonans and providing greater choices to the consumer,” Rich adds.

Balancing environmental protections with economic impacts

“Implementing more protective environmental regulations must be balanced with their economic impacts,” says Matt Bingham, attorney at Lewis and Roca.

Sometimes, small improvements that can be made come at a significant cost and may not be worthwhile for the state to pursue.

“(Government) agencies have accomplished A LOT since environmental laws were first enacted,” says Bingham, “but at some point, the costs of making further improvement are going to outweigh the benefits.  Agencies need to adequately consider industry’s concerns when developing stricter environmental standards to ensure that the benefits outweigh the costs.  Failing to do so will prolong Arizona’s economic recovery.”

Growth of renewable energy

“In Arizona, regulated utilities are expected to get 15 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2025 (in 2011, the goal is 3 percent),” says Bingham, attorney at Lewis and Roca. “This will require a massive expansion of our renewable energy capabilities over the next 10-15 years.”

As Arizona tries to catch up on renewable energy growth compared with some of its sustainability-driven neighboring states, many environmental impacts will need to be addressed. These include land use, water use, and effects on wildlife, endangered species and several others.

“The growth of renewable energy in the state also involves policy choices by the legislature and the Arizona Corporation Commission,” says Bingham.

Some examples:
➢    Requiring utilities to procure renewable energy.
➢    Increasing demand for solar by providing incentives.
➢    Providing tax incentives for companies who locate manufacturing and other facilities in the state and create jobs.

Arizona has essentially decided that it wants to be a hub of the growing solar industry and has made some good moves in that direction but it needs to continue pursuing an effective, comprehensively designed strategy while assuring companies that this support will not fade,” Bingham adds.

Enforcement of regulatory policies:

Since 61 percent of land in Arizona is either managed or controlled by federal agencies, many policies involving land use have a disproportionate impact upon our state, says Jeff Littell, principal geologist at Brown & Caldwell.

“By far, the greatest environmental issues facing Arizona will arise from federal agencies and their imbalanced enforcement of existing regulatory policies or the increased promulgation of new rules and regulations,” Littell says.

The state should apply balanced and measured responses to difficult environmental issues while empowering state agencies and the Legislature to defend Arizona against misapplied federal actions, Littell adds. “The results of their interaction with county and state agencies will have a profound impact on the long term success of Arizona, the diversity of our economy, and our ability to emerge from the current economic situation.”

For more information about environmental legal issues and other environmental issues, visit www.valleyforward.org.

 

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

Sustainability Discussions at the GoGreen Conference

GoGreen Conference ’11 Sustainability Panel Discussions (Part II)

In the first part of the GoGreen Conference ’11 coverage, we reported that sustainability education and patience were the buzzwords of many of the panel discussions. Here’s why:

The panel discussion titled “Green Your Workplace: High Impact Change at Your Business,” moderated by Ed Fox, chief sustainability officer for APS, focused on how to turn the idea of going green and sustainability into governance. This challenge small and large businesses face was the topic of discussion among the panel, which included:

  • Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of Adolfson & Peterson Construction;
  • Jonce Walker, sustainability manager of Maricopa County;
  • Anthony Floyd, LEED AP, green building program manager of the City of Scottsdale;
  • and Leslie Lindo, president and co-founder of IKOLOJI.

Fox began the discussion asking the panelists how one would convince the leaders of companies to pursue incorporating green elements into the workplace.

Floyd suggested offering incentives and marketing materials and free literature to spur interest. Lindo agreed providing incentives to employees will help encourage them to make the changes second nature. She also suggested owners become educated themselves and have a strong advocate in the office.

Walker took a different approach and said reducing consumption to afford sustainability is one step a business can consider taking. The company must be efficient and through this efficiency, it will convince others that the extra cost will be worth it.

Walker continued to say that it helps to know all the benefits of turning your particular business green — environmental, economical, etc. — and know your audience.

“Ninety percent of clients are bottom-line driven,” Dunn said. They want to save energy and save money, he added. Two ways companies can do this is by making their own operations more efficient (switching your lighting to LED, for example) while also anticipating changes in the marketplace.

Dunn also said behavioral modifications must take place. You can switch to LED, but the appropriate actions must be taken by the staff, i.e. remembering to turn off the lights.

But what was stressed was the acceptance of risk. While making your business more environmentally friendly and sustainable will help you save money in the long run, it will take some time to get there with few obvious returns. Or, as Fox put it, the few “low hanging fruit.”

In the following discussion, “Applying Sustainabilty Best Practices to Impact Community Equity and Diversity,” moderated by Dr. George Brooks, owner of Southwest Green and NxT Horizon Group and including Greg Peterson, founder of Urban Farm; Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward; and Rosanne Albright, Brownfields Project Manager of the City of Phoenix, regenerative sustainability was the hot topic as well as education.

“Nature regenerates itself, not just sustains itself,” Peterson said. “Education is the key piece to sustainability.

Urban farming (or growing and sharing food), recycling land via the Brownfields Land Recycling Project, and the importance of parks and open space in the state were all covered in this discussion.

“Energy, food, health, poverty — they are all connected,” Brooks said. “Local sourcing and urban farms can help offset the costs of energy.”

Peterson’s final thoughts?

“It’s really a grassroots movement,” he said. “For those of you in the government, get out of our way.”

Visit the GoGreen Conference website at gogreenconference.net.

 

Arizona Forward - AB Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Forward Hopes To Preserve Parks, Open Land

As one of the earliest pioneers of sustainability in the Valley, Valley Forward has had an Arizona presence for 42 years. The organization’s focus on land use and open space, air quality, water, energy and transportation has grown immensely since its inception. It is no surprise that this progressive group has once again embarked on the next sustainable step with the creation of Arizona Forward — a public interest coalition aimed at bringing together business, community and civic leaders to convene public dialogue and advocacy on sustainability in the state.

“By promoting cooperative efforts between Arizona cities and towns, the state’s livability, sustainability and economic vitality will be enhanced for both current and future generations,” says Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner at Sundt Construction, Tucson Building Group Leader and Arizona Forward advisory board chair.

Arizona Forward is initially expected to focus on the Sun Corridor, the region encompassing Tucson to Phoenix, hoping to encourage collaborative efforts between members and strike a balance between economic growth and environmental quality.

“We believe there is a strong connection between the health of our environment and the health of our economy,” says Pat Graham, state director of the Nature Conservancy in Arizona. “Arizona Forward provides an opportunity for like-minded businesses and organizations from across the state to come together and come up with solutions.”

First on the agenda for the coalition is spreading the message about the importance of parks and open spaces and their economic impact on the state.

According to the Outdoor Industry Foundation, nearly 5.5 million Arizonans participate in outdoor recreation. This leads to approximately $350 million in annual state tax revenue and supports 82,000 jobs in Arizona.  Arizona Forward leaders say the economic impact of parks and open spaces is just one reason why the business community should take notice and take a stand.

“One of the challenges today is the complexity of the problems we face,” Graham says. “It requires working together in new ways and with new partners to find solutions that improve the health of both the economy and our environment to maintain a good quality of life in Arizona.”

A study compiled by WestGroup Research on behalf of Valley Forward found that 93 percent of Arizonans categorize parks and open space as “essential” to Arizona’s tourism industry. The study also found that 23 percent of Arizonans visit parks or recreation areas at least once a week.

Just how much open space are we talking about? State and federal entities, along with Native American tribes in Arizona manage more than 70 million acres of land (excluding county and municipal parks). Not surprisingly, negative effects on our parks and open space have a big impact on the state’s bottom line.

“Economic development and new jobs rely on lifestyle considerations,” Wadlington says. “Parks, forests, refuges and other open spaces support the quality-of-life factors that can make a difference for communities seeking to attract employers and a strong workforce. Access to open space boosts property values and provides healthy outdoor recreational opportunities for residents and tourists alike. If we don’t prioritize our parks and open space, we will lose our most treasured resources.”

Prioritizing these aspects has a major economic impact on Arizona. A 2009 National Parks Second Century Commission projected that every $1 in taxpayer money spent on national parks returned a $4 economic benefit through tourism and private sector spending. A June 2011 press release from the Department of the Interiors’ Economic Contributions Report further emphasized this information, with data showing that Arizona’s public lands supported 21,364 jobs and contributed nearly $2 billion to Arizona’s economy.

It is figures like these that Arizona Forward hopes will get the public and policy makers involved with protecting parks and open spaces. State legislators must stop encroaching on the parks-system budget and instead focus on securing funding for their protection, Valley forward leaders say.

“A depressed economy has impacted parks negatively at every jurisdictional level,” Wadlington says. He noted that an already-weakened parks system could be further depleted if lawmakers don’t get the message from their voters about protecting these open spaces.

“As the economy recovers and state revenues return, legislators will be faced with many choices on how to best allocate these funds,” Wadlington says. “As a community, we have to step forward collectively and make a strong case for the parks system and open space preservation.”

Like the mission Valley Forward embarked on 42 years ago, Arizona Forward hopes to serve as the catalyst for change during these trying times.  A diverse membership group with a common goal of environmental stewardship hopes to protect the state’s important parks and open spaces and other environmental issues facing Arizona.

“Future Arizona vision: A place where people want to live and work, where growth occurs responsibly and does not diminish quality-of-life,”  Wadlington says. “A place where business thrives, creating public revenue that can be reinvested in perpetuating sustainability of our state’s natural resources and quality-of-life amenities.”

For more information about Valley Forward and Arizona Forward, visit www.valleyforward.org.

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

Valley Forward's Crescordia Awards Winners

Crescordia Awards Spotlight Those Making A Difference In Our Communities

Crescordia Awards spotlight those making a difference in our communities

The U.S. 60 Gonzales Pass widening project has earned the coveted President’s Award (Best of Show) in Valley Forward’s 31st annual Environmental Excellence Awards program, held in partnership with SRP for the tenth consecutive year. Designated the Pinal-Gila Scenic Road, the 10-mile scenic stretch of highway is the Valley’s eastern gateway to the Superstition Wilderness and the Tonto National Forest, which plays host to 5.8 million visitors each year.

While freeways are inherently considered detrimental to environmental quality, this significant project was recognized for exemplifying sensitivity and responsiveness to site conditions, balancing human-made elements with the natural desert landscape to conserve and protect precious resources. The project team made environmental sensitivity a key priority in efforts to improve safety and capacity of the narrow, two-lane roadway by widening it to a four-lane facility.

More than 130 entries were received in Arizona’s oldest and most prestigious awards competition focusing exclusively on environmental initiatives. Winners were announced Sept. 17, at Valley Forward’s awards gala attended by more than 600 community leaders at The Westin Kierland Resort in Scottsdale.

Valley Forward and SRP presented 19 first-place Crescordia winners and 30 Awards of Merit. The awards set standards for achieving a balance between the built and natural environment in the region’s physical, technical, social and aesthetic development.

In presenting the top award, Valley Forward recognized three civil engineering companies and two landscape architectural firms that teamed with the USDA Forest Service and Arizona Department of Transportation. The project was lauded for reducing environmental impacts, conserving and protecting natural resources and integrating engineering and aesthetic considerations into each phase of the development process.

In addition to the President’s Award, the U.S. Gonzales Pass won a first-place Crescordia Award in the Site Development and Landscape (Public Sector) category. Crescordia is a Greek term meaning, “to grow in harmony,” and the President’s Award is selected from among all Crescordia recipients.

This year Valley Forward unveiled a newly designed Crescordia award created by Vernon Swaback and Nicholas Markwardt of Two Worlds Community Foundation. The prestigious award’s glass, copper and wood design exemplifies a balance between the natural and built environment, incorporating natural materials and local resources.

The breadth and depth of entries in this year’s program spotlights the high priority sustainability has in our growing metropolex,” said Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward. “These awards have become powerful vehicles in advocating for the preservation of natural resources – air, water, open space and our unique desert environment.”

Two projects received two Crescordia awards each this year – Soleri Bridge and Plaza in Scottsdale and the Intel Ocotillo Campus. The Soleri Bridge and Plaza by renowned artist and architect Paolo Soleri was awarded first-place honors in the Site Development and Landscape (Trails) and Art in Public Places categories. A pedestrian passage, solar calendar and gathering space along the Scottsdale Waterfront, the striking bridge provides a scenic viewpoint over the 60-foot-wide water conveyance channel and includes a 22,000-square-foot plaza, providing a pleasing natural environment within the high-energy atmosphere of downtown Scottsdale.

Intel Corporation’s Ocotillo Semiconductor Manufacturing Campus in Chandler received the Crescordia for Buildings and Structures (Industrial & Public Works) along with the Environmental Stewardship – SRP Award. The four-million-square-foot campus is the first of its kind in the world to receive Silver Certification under the LEED Existing Building: Operations & Maintenance green building rating system. The impressive facility minimizes energy and water use, conserving natural resources and reducing its environmental impact.

“It’s inspiring to see the corporate sector leading the way in environmental stewardship,” said Richard Hayslip, associate general manager of Environmental Management, Policy and Compliance at SRP. “Working with the City of Chandler to achieve aggressive water reuse results, Intel Corporation has significantly reduced its environmental impact in the manufacturing process, demonstrating the potential of public/private partnerships.”

Christine Ten Eyck, founder and principal of Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, served as lead judge for the program. Other jurists include: Kristin Bloomquist, general manager, Cramer-Krasselt; Robert Booker, executive director, Arizona Commission on the Arts; Tamara Caraway, principal project development, Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; Eddie Jones, principal, Jones Studio Inc., Jerry Meek, president, Desert Star Construction; Marty Sedler, director of Global Utilities and Infrastructure, Intel; Victor Vidales, board member, National and Arizona Audubon; and Dave Wilson, senior landscape architect, EPG.

Valley Forward is a non-profit public interest organization that brings business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. The organization operates with the belief that business must take a leadership role in solving the complex and sometimes controversial problems that confront growing population centers.

In addition to the U.S. Gonzales Pass, Soleri Bridge and Plaza and Intel’s Ocotillo Campus, Crescordia winners include:

Meritage Homes Launches Net-Zero Revolution (Meritage Homes)

Arizona-based Meritage Homes not only builds homes that cut energy usage by up to 80 percent but introduced the first “net-zero” production home in the state – one that could ultimately produce as much energy as it consumes.

Chandler City Hall (SmithGroup)

This modern, environmentally efficient building seeking LEED Gold Certification is located in the city’s historic downtown and encompasses 137,700 square feet of office space, a public TV studio, art gallery and 330-space parking structure, as well as Council Chambers. Open space and shaded walkways welcome visitors to the complex, which features an array of sustainable design elements.

Santa Fe Freight Depot (Arrington Watkins Architects)

Originally opened in 1929, this historic Phoenix building sat vacant for more than 50 years before being revived in a sensitive and thoughtful preservation project that now serves as headquarters for the Maricopa County Assessor’s Office and is currently seeking LEED Gold Certification.

U-Haul Contributions to Phoenix Metro Area Built Environment (U-Haul International)

Demonstrating a longstanding and strong commitment to sustainability, U-Haul routinely implements building and site improvements that benefit the environment from energy-efficient practices and water-saving techniques to permeable ground cover initiatives and adaptive reuse building conversions.

Paradise Valley Community College – Life Sciences Building (Marlene Imirzian & Associates LLC, Architects)

The innovative Paradise Valley Community College Life Sciences Building uses a diverse pallet of sustainable materials, including concrete floors and masonry, high recycle-content carpet and tack boards, bamboo doors and millwork, providing an environmentally friendly home for its growing anatomy, physiology and biology programs.

Sustainable Landscape Management: Standards for Landscape Care In the Desert Southwest (Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association)

The Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association has taken important steps to promote higher industry standards by adopting best recommended practices published in “Sustainable Landscape Management: Standards for Landscape Care in the Desert Southwest.”

Downtown Chandler Redevelopment (City of Chandler)

City officials and private partners joined forces to redevelop downtown Chandler, which had fallen into disrepair with boarded up buildings and high crime rates, into a walkable, lively core utilizing principles of environmental and economic sustainability.

Arcadia Residence (colwell:shelor Landscape Architecture)

This one-acre site in Arcadia features a home and landscape renovation that honors the historic essence of the unique neighborhood, creating a seamless transition between interior and exterior living spaces that take advantage of existing lush citrus groves and maximizes views to the mountains.

W.L. Gore & Associates Phoenix Campus (LVA Urban Design Studio)

Situated in the commercial core of the Sonoran Foothills Master Planned Community in North Phoenix, W.L. Gore & Associates’ 40-acre campus is a model of responsible development, featuring only low-water use plants including many native species. Salvaging efforts saved 82 mature trees and 158 specimen cacti, all of which were replanted on site.

White Tank Branch Library and Nature Center (Maricopa County Library District)

Surrounded entirely by desert, the 29,000-square-foot library and nature center is located at the entrance to White Tank Mountain Regional Park and is only the third library in the U.S. to earn LEED Platinum Certification. Energy efficiency, water conservation, passive solar design and returning the site to its native appearance were cornerstone to the project.

Ikea Tempe Solar Energy Project (IKEA Tempe)

IKEA has installed a 75,000-square-foot solar array at its store in Tempe consisting of two 300-kilowatt systems, each built with approximately 1,300 panels. The solar program will produce approximately one million kWh of electricity annually, the equivalent of reducing at least 760 tons of carbon dioxide (equal to the emissions of 133 cars or powering 84 homes yearly).

Conservation and Sustainable Living Programs (City of Glendale)

The newly created office of Conservation and Sustainable Living for the City of Glendale is educating residents, businesses and neighborhoods on sound environmental practices, giving away energy saving devices, providing teaching materials to schools and promoting sustainable landscaping.

Sonoran Sustainable Building Advisor Program (Sonoran SBAP, Inc.)

Designed to advance education and expertise in sustainable solutions for the built environment in Arizona, this nine-month program for professionals teaches best practices in sustainability sciences. It does not require the commitment of an advanced degree but provides more depth than short courses or online programs.

Valley Permaculture Alliance’s Education Program (Valley Permaculture Alliance)

The Valley Permaculture Alliance inspires sustainable urban living through education, community involvement and creative cooperation. Its programs include weekly sustainable living classes, monthly tours of local sustainable homes, ongoing hands-on training opportunities and special events.

[stextbox id=”grey”]For a complete list of 2011 Environmental Excellence Award Winners and categories, visit 2011 Environmental Excellence Awards Winners.[/stextbox]

 

2011 Environmental Excellence Awards Winners

2011 Environmental Excellence Awards Winners

Valley Forward’s 31st annual Environmental Excellence Awards program, held in partnership with SRP for the tenth consecutive year, announced its winners at The Westin Kierland Resort in Scottsdale.

More than 130 entries were received in Arizona’s oldest and most prestigious awards competition focusing exclusively on environmental initiatives. Winners were announced Sept. 17, at Valley Forward’s awards gala attended by more than 600 community leaders at The Westin Kierland Resort in Scottsdale.

2011 Environmental Excellence Awards Winners

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Residential

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Meritage Homes Launches Net-Zero Revolution
Submitted by: Meritage Homes

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Cedar Street Residence 2010
Submitted by: colab studio, llc


BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Civic

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Chandler City Hall
Submitted by: SmithGroup

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Appaloosa Branch Library
Submitted by: Douglas Sydnor Architect and Associates, Inc.

Name of Entry: Harmon Public Library
Submitted by: richard+bauer, llc


BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Historic Preservation

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Santa Fe Freight Depot
Submitted by: Arrington Watkins Architects

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Shade Platform
Submitted by: SmithGroup


BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Commercial & Mixed Use

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: U-Haul Contributions to Phoenix Metro Area Built Environment
Submitted by: U-Haul International

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Macy’s
Submitted by: Arizona Public Service


BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Institutional

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Paradise Valley Community College – Life Sciences Building
Submitted by:    Marlene Imirzian & Associates LLC, Architects

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Chandler-Gilbert Community College’s Ironwood Hall
Submitted by: Architekton

Name of Entry: Arizona State University College of Nursing & Health Innovation Phase 2
Submitted by: SmithGroup


BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES: Industrial & Public Works

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Intel Ocotillo Campus LEED Existing Building: Operations & Maintenance
Submitted by: ARCADIS

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Glendale Regional Public Safety Training
Submitted by: LEA-Architects, LLC

2011 Environmental Excellence Awards, Intel Ocotillo Campus


LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Sustainable Communities

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Sustainable Landscape Management: Standards for Landscape Care in the Desert Southwest
Submitted by: Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Maricopa County Community Wildfire Protection Plan
Submitted by: Logan Simpson Design Inc.

Name of Entry: Saguaro Transplant Study
Submitted by: Logan Simpson Design Inc.


LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Adaptive Reuse

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Tempe Marketplace
Submitted by: Vestar Development Co.


LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Multimodal Transportation & Connectivity

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: 96th Street Improvement Project: Shea Boulevard to Thunderbird Road
Submitted by: City of Scottsdale


LIVABLE COMMUNITIES: Public Policy/Plans

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Downtown Chandler Redevelopment
Submitted by: City of Chandler

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Southern Scottsdale Character Area Plan
Submitted by: City of Scottsdale


SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Residential

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Arcadia Residence
Submitted by: colwell:shelor Landscape Architecture


SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Public Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: U.S. 60 Gonzales Pass
Submitted by: Logan Simpson Design Inc.

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: White Tank Branch Library and Nature Center
Submitted by: Maricopa County Library District

Name of Entry: South Arizona Avenue Improvement Project
Submitted by: City of Chandler


SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Private Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: W.L. Gore & Associates Phoenix Campus
Submitted by: LVA Urban Design Studio

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: The Dot Garden
Submitted by: colwell:shelor Landscape Architecture

Name of Entry: Solar Pavilion at Chase Field
Submitted by: Arizona Public Service


SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Trails

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry:  Soleri Bridge
Submitted by: Howard S. Wright

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge Loop 101 Crossing at 63rd Avenue
Submitted by: City of Glendale

 2011 Environmental Excellence Awards, Soleri

SITE DEVELOPMENT AND LANDSCAPE: Parks

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Harmon Park
Submitted by: Phoenix Office of Arts & Culture Public Art Program


ART IN PUBLIC PLACES

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Soleri Bridge and Plaza
Submitted by: Scottsdale Public Art

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Extraordinarily Common
Submitted by: colab studio, llc

Name of Entry: Maple Ash Irrigation Standpipes Project
Submitted by: City of Tempe


ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES: Public Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: White Tank Branch Library and Nature Center
Submitted by: Maricopa County Library District


ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES: Private Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: IKEA Tempe Solar Energy Project
Submitted by: IKEA Tempe

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Edwin and Nancy Van Brunt Central Energy Plant
Submitted by: Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Name of Entry: Water Conservation in Medical Device Industry
Submitted by: Medtronic, Inc.


ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION/COMMUNICATION: Public Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Conservation and Sustainable Living Programs
Submitted by: City of Glendale

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Regional Tree & Shade Summit
Submitted by: Sustainable Cities Network/ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability

Name of Entry: White Tank Branch Library and Nature Center
Submitted by: Maricopa County Library District


ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION/COMMUNICATION: Private Sector

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Sonoran Sustainable Building Advisor Program
Submitted by: Sonoran SBAP, Inc.

AWARD OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Sustainable Landscape Management: Standards for Landscape Care in the
Desert Southwest
Submitted by: Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association


ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION/COMMUNICATION: Educators, Students & Nonprofit Organizations

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Valley Permaculture Alliance’s Education Program
Submitted by: Valley Permaculture Alliance

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Keep Phoenix Beautiful Education Outreach Program
Submitted by: Keep Phoenix Beautiful

Name of Entry: The Arizona Challenge
Submitted by: Two Worlds Community Foundation


ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP – The SRP Award

CRESCORDIA

Name of Entry: Intel Ocotillo Campus LEED Existing Building: Operations & Maintenance
Submitted by: ARCADIS

AWARDS OF MERIT

Name of Entry: Frito Lay Net Zero Program
Submitted by: Arizona Public Service

Name of Entry: Phoenix Public Art Program
Submitted by: Phoenix Office of Arts & Culture Public Art Program


2011 Environmental Excellence Awards, U.S. 60 Gonzales PassPRESIDENT’S AWARD

Name of Entry: U.S. 60 Gonzales Pass
Submitted by: Logan Simpson Design Inc.

 

 

[stextbox id=”grey”] For more information about the Crescordia winners, visit Crescordia Awards Spotlight Those Making A Difference In Our Communities.[/stextbox]

 

AZ Business Magazine - Digital Issue

AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011:

The Finance Issue

In this issue of AZ Business Magazine, find out who the CFO of the Year Awards 2011 finalists are. Also, read about how innovators and inventors have shaped history in our Centennial Series, and how the economic downturn has changed the way businesses are giving back to the community. Plus, flip through to find out who the Spirit of Enterprise Awards finalists are, read about how Valley Forward is helping to improve the environment, and much more.

 

Read the articles online on AZNow.Biz.

Take it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.

Arizona Forward, State Park Issues

Arizona Forward Enhances Awareness of Arizona’s Park Issues

Arizona Forward Enhances Awareness of Arizona’s Park Issues

Arizonans value their parks and open space, consistently ranking them as key quality of life indicators. A recent survey conducted of residents statewide shows that 87 percent visit a park or recreation area at least once a year, with 23 percent doing so on a weekly basis. In addition, parks and open spaces create thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in revenue.

Multiple land ownerships and funding mechanisms have produced parks and open space issues that are complex, confusing and sometimes controversial. In fact, the telephone survey conducted by WestGroup Research further revealed that most residents (80 percent) rate their knowledge of how state and local parks are funded as very low or in the middle range. Meanwhile, a depressed economy and recession has impacted parks negatively at every jurisdictional level from federal and state to county and municipal governments.

Recognizing the need for public education on the subject of parks and open space issues, Arizona Forward, a new statewide environmental/business coalition launched by Valley Forward earlier this year, developed a comprehensive report to provide unbiased facts, background information and answers to frequently asked questions about state and federal lands as well as county and municipal parks.

Designed to enhance awareness of and interest in solving Arizona’s parks issues, the primer is among Arizona Forward’s first projects towards its mission to promote cooperative efforts to improve the livability, sustainability and economic vitality of cities and towns across Arizona. Readers can sort out how much open space is available in the state, who is responsible for it and the challenges facing various jurisdictions of government. The user-friendly reference guide is described as ‘parks and open