Tag Archives: video

Top 5 Google Doodle Logos 2002

Top Google Logos 2002


Year-End Google Zeitgeist – Search patterns, trends, and surprises

Track the course of the past 12 months on the timeline and graphs plotting the most popular search terms as they occurred throughout 2002. Check out the year’s top gaining and declining search terms as well as the most popular brands, music, movies and women on the web as seen by Google users.

My Top five Doodles from 2002:


Happy New Year


Google Doodle    Happy New Year

January 1st 2002

Wikipedia: New Year’s Day


La Fête de la Musique


La Fête de la Musique a 2002 Google Doodle

June 21st 2002

Wikipedia: Fête de la Musique


Happy 4th Birthday Google


Google Doodle Happy Birthday Google

September 27th 2002

Google: 4th Birthday images


Happy Birthday Picasso


Google Doodles Happy Birthday Picasso

October 25th 2002

finding Dulcinea: Happy Birthday, Pablo Picasso, Painter


Happy Halloween



Google 2002 Doodle Happy Halloween

October 31st 2002

Wikipedia: Halloween


Google, The Movie

ZepHopper said “I made this little movie trying to incorporate as many Google-logos as possible for SchnappMedia.”

by ZepHopper

Check back Next week for the 2003 Google Doodle’s

Search patterns, trends, and surprises

About Google’s Logo Doodler Dennis Hwang

Top Google Logos 2001



About Google’s Logo Doodler Dennis Hwang.

Google doodles, the drawings that are designed on, around and through the Google logo on the Google home page, have long been part of Google’s history. As a Google intern in 2000, Google Webmaster Dennis Hwang began celebrating and marking worldwide events and holidays with doodles. Since then, the work of the doodle team has been seen by millions and reached cult status, with fans waiting with bated breath to see the next creation on the Google homepage.

Google: doodle4google doodler

My Top five Doodles from 2001:


Chinese New Year


Chinese New Year - Google Doodles

January 24th 2001

History.com: The Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival as it’s been called since the 20th century


St.Patrick’s Day



St.Patrick's Day - Google Doodles

March 17th 2001

Wilstar.com: St.Patrick’s Day


Independence Day


GUnited States Fourth of July Independence Day

July 4th 2001

History.com: Independence Day, commonly known as July 4th or the Fourth of July


Claude Monet’s Birthday


Claude Monet's Birthday from Google Doodles

November 14th 2001

Wikipedia: Claude Monet


Holiday Series 2001 (4th of 4)


Holiday Series 2001 Google Doodle

December 25th 2001

Holiday of Lights: Holiday Traditions Around the World



Doodle 4 Google: Time lapse video of Google Doodle creation

A time lapse video that shows Chief Google Doodler Dennis Hwang draw a Google Doodle from start to finish. He creates a doodle that commemorates the Lunar New Year and invites students to join the Doodle 4 Google art competition.

by Google

 

 

Check back Next week for the 2002 Google Doodle’s

Arizona Business Magazine's Editor-in-Chief Janet Perez

The Buzz on AZNow.Biz – October 25, 2010

There’s a lot of information headed your way, starting with our Buzz story. There’s a new health-care model that combines a doctor’s regular practice with  special one-on-one care for wealthy patients. It’s called hybrid-concierge care. Our health columnist, Dr. Michael Covalciuc, says we have to create our own health screening strategies. Our work force columnist, Marcia Rhodes, looks at  how cost cutting-employers are keeping paid time off programs.


Google Logo

Top Google Logos 1998 – 2000


About Google’s Logo Doodle collection from 1997 – 2000.

Google has had several logos since its renaming from BackRub. The longest running official Google logo was designed by Ruth Kedar, and is a wordmark based on the Catull typeface.  “There were a lot of different color iterations,” Kedar says. “We ended up with the primary colors, but instead of having the pattern go in order, we put a secondary color on the L, which brought back the idea that Google doesn’t follow the rules.”

In 1998 Sergey Brin created a computerized version of the Google letters using the free graphics program GIMP. These special logos, some designed by Dennis Hwang, have become known as Google Doodles. As of 27 September 2010, Google’s own gallery features 913 logos.

wikipedia: History of the Google Logo

My Top five Doodles from 1998 -2000:


Happy Thanksgiving!


Google Happy Thanksgiving!

November 26th 1998

History.com: Thanksgiving by Kathleen Curtin


Season’s Greetings with a Google Doodle


Season's Greetings with a Google Doodle

December 25th 1999

Life123: The Story of Frosty the Snowman by Jenney Cheever


Happy New Year!


Happy New Year! from Google Doodles

January 1st 2000

YouTub: New Years Eve Ball Drop 2000


On Easter weekend, Google displayed this logo with an applet by Ken Perlin



Happy Easter: On Easter weekend, Google displayed this logo with an applet created by Ken Perlin

May 1st 2000

The PhotoArgus: 20 Easter Egg Photos to Inspire you this Holiday


2000 Summer Games in Sydney – Cycling


2000 Summer Games in Sydney - Cycling

September 21st 2000

SR – Olympic Sports: Cycling at the 2000 Sydney Summer Games

 


Doodle 4 Google – Google Doodles Animation

A fun animation of sample Google Doodles to highlight the Doodle 4 Google art competition. Read more

by Google’s official YouTube channel

 

 

Check back  Next week for the 2001 Google Doodle’s

 


Arizona Business Magazine's Editor-in-Chief Janet Perez

The Buzz on AZNow.Biz – October 18, 2010

This week on AZNow.Biz: Avnet chairman and CEO Roy Vallee talks about leading one of the largest distributors of electronic parts in the world. Green columnist Dustin Jones asks whether sustainable housing is in Arizona’s future, and political columnist Tom Milton looks at the political scene as we close in on next month’s mid-term elections.


Arizona Business Magazine's Editor-in-Chief Janet Perez

The Buzz on AZNow.Biz – October 12, 2010

This week on AZNow.Biz, the University of Arizona’s McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship is making it easy for entrepreneurs and small business owners to expand their knowledge with three unique online certificate courses. Our personal finance columnist, Jacob Gold, writes about Americans putting more money into savings and how that benefits the economy. Plus, see some majestic views of the Grand Canyon in our Snap Shot feature.

Arizona Business Magazine's Editor-in-Chief Janet Perez

The Buzz on AZNow.Biz – October 4, 2010

This week on AZNow.Biz, listen to a podcast from our partners at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University about what it takes to become a great leader. Our tech columnist looks at how Microsoft needs to shake itself out of its doldrums, and our political columnist writes about the upcoming mid-term elections.

Richard L. Boals President and CEO Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

CEO Series: Richard L. Boals

Richard L. Boals
President and CEO
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

What are some of the major trends in the health insurance industry?
In health, I think there is a shift toward an increased responsibility toward the individual. We’re asking people to take accountability for themselves. We’re giving them information that they can use to monitor their health status, but we also would hope that they would lose weight, they would quit smoking, they would wear their seatbelt and do the things that are sort of common sense, but can make their life much more enjoyable and in the net, save a lot of money.

In the business world in terms of health insurance, how is that industry looking right now in Arizona?
It’s actually, I think, very healthy. We, like every other industry, are starting to feel the pain of companies who are laying-off employees. So, we’re seeing a little bit of shrinkage within the general size of our group, but we’re growing at about 7 to 8 percent a year, so we feel very good about where we’ll be when we come out the other side of this economic downslide.

How has the recession affected the health care industry in general and health insurers in particular?
There are a couple of things that are happening. In the hospitals, they are starting to see fewer elective surgeries and to some extent that is the bread and butter of a hospital, and if people are holding off getting things done, that pulls down on their revenues. They are also seeing more cost-shifting from the government — or we’re seeing the cost-shifting from the government — and as Medicare and Medicaid pay less and less, I think it’s difficult for hospitals to make a bottom line.

What role is Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona taking in the debate over health care reform?
We’re trying to take a very active role both locally and in Washington. We believe that everybody ought to be covered. We’re a little perplexed that of the 40 million or so uninsured that about a quarter of them already qualify for some state or federal program and simply have not been enrolled. So as we talk about expanding the government’s role, I think we need to expand their accountability for getting people enrolled. But we believe that everybody should have access to good coverage. We believe that the government should not form a competing model, to not promote us but to try to bring us down. Beyond that, I think we’ll see what comes of it. I really believe that the government has an extraordinary opportunity here to inject energy into the health care system. My fear is that as they try to ratchet costs down and save money, they’re going to discourage innovations, and a few years from now we are going to be very disappointed that the supply of physicians and nurses and new technologies is going to be less than it is today.

BCBS of Arizona is working with the Arizona Healthcare and Hospital Association and the Arizona Chamber Foundation on what has been called “the hidden health care tax” in the state. How and why did Blue Cross Blue Shield become involved in this issue?
We’ve been interested in this issue for a long, long time. We were happy to see that others were beginning to recognize that this is a serious problem. About 15 percent of our premium is a result of a government program not paying their fair share. As the hospitals and doctors figure out that they can only push so much to the insurance companies or to the private individuals, they have to speak up and say it’s time for the government to start paying a more realistic amount for the care they are providing to their accountabilities, the elderly and the indigent.

What advice do you have for a C-level job candidate on how they can show either that board of directors or that panel they’re interviewing with that they are somebody who can successfully lead a change in a business?
I think it gets down to two things. One, it’s about the customer — you always have to have them in mind. And it’s about the people you hire to support you. Being in a C suite assumes that you are not doing the physical work, that you’ve hired a team of talented and dedicated people who are going to make you look good, and over the years I have been very fortunate; people have made me look good.

    Vital Stats




  • Joined BCBSAZ in 1971
  • Appointed CEO in April 2003
  • Board member for BCBSAZ, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association and TriWest Healthcare Alliance
  • Board member for Greater Phoenix Leadership, the Translational Genomics Research Institute and the ASU W.P. Carey School of Business Center for Services Leadership
  • Won the ASU Alumni Leadership Award and the American Jewish Committee’s National Human Relations and Centennial Leadership Awards
  • Bachelor’s degree in accounting from Arizona State University; completed executive development courses at Duke University, the University of California, Harvard University and the University of Michigan
Bob Matia Managing Partner Squire, Sanders and Dempsey

CEO Series: Bob Matia

Bob Matia
Managing Partner
Squire, Sanders and Dempsey

What impact has the current recession had on the legal profession?
With the credit markets being down as much as they were this time around, the flow of corporate legal business was definitely affected more than in past recessions. A lot of people view law firms as recession proof, and to some extent some of the practice areas within a law firm are recession proof. Litigation, for example, seems to go on and on whether there is a recession or not, and that is in fact happening now in our firm. But this time around, the corporate group was affected much more than in the past and that has caused different challenges.

Do you foresee any long-term changes in how law firms conduct the business side of their operations as a result of the economic crisis?
It’s been a wake-up call for the law profession … I think there was a complacency that had developed among law firms about how carefully they had to watch developing trends. But I think this has been a good wake-up call, so I think you’ll find law firms staying more conscious of staffing and not trying to get too far ahead in staffing; maybe slightly curtailing the kinds of lead hiring we used to do. We hire every year out of law school. We’re having in Phoenix six new lawyers joining us out of the class of 2009.

They were originally scheduled to arrive in October. We’ve deferred that arrival to January of 2010. I think you’ve probably seen in the paper a number of other moves by other law firms, some taking different forms of action. … I think you’ll see tinkering here and there. I don’t think you’ll see vast changes in the way we do things, but we’re looking at it. We’re looking at it on a monthly basis, checking the numbers, trying to see if we see a trend in one practice area or another.

You have represented the city of Phoenix in its dealings with developers of its downtown mixed-use complex. How would you describe the evolution of Downtown Phoenix from a governmental and legislative aspect?
The change in 30 years has just been remarkable. It’s great. … During the course of 30 years, we got a bill passed that established economic development as a major public purpose in Arizona, which has significant implications in that we feel it probably was the turning point in permitting condemnation for economic development purposes, a subject which is not popular in all sectors of the economy. But certainly there were instances where a single property owner could hold up an entire, major, new downtown development, and the governmental units simply had to have a way of dealing with that. Condemnation was one of them and we’re pleased about that. But there’s a new challenge, actually, to the subsidies that cities have made available to developers, both downtown and in other kinds of zones that are created for economic development. The (state) court of appeals has just thrown out part of the subsidy the city of Phoenix gave to CityNorth. Whether that goes to the Arizona Supreme Court depends on the Supreme Court.

For years, we were operating under another court of appeals case, known as the Wistuber case, and I always thought it struck a very good balance between hard consideration and soft consideration on what cities were getting for their subsidies. The problem is that the Arizona constitution has a gift clause in it, which says public bodies can’t give away their money to private interests without getting value back for that money. TheWistuber case made it clear that you could look at things like increased tax revenues and improving job availability, but you also had to have some hard considerations for what you were spending your money on. I always thought  that was a great balance. We’ll see how this comes out.

Given the current economic climate, what changes have you made to future workforce planning?
I think law firms will stay closer to the break-even point on need, on staff. We had the luxury of delaying responses to ups and downs in the economy in the past. Law firms are being much more conscious today of the cost of legal services to clients. Even the largest corporations are getting our attention in terms of trying to give them the very best service we can for the lowest cost. So we’re going to pay a lot more attention, probably, to having balanced legal teams in terms of experience level. For example, on a typical corporate transaction or litigation matter, we will probably pay a lot more attention to what the blended hourly rate would be if you looked at all the people who are working on the account.

    Vital Stats




  • Started with Squire, Sanders and Dempsey in 1966
  • Opened Phoenix office in 1979
  • Listed in the 2009 edition of “The Best Lawyers in America”
  • Selected for inclusion in the 2007 inaugural edition of “Southwest Super Lawyers”
  • Designated a Center of Influence by Arizona Business Magazine in 2008
  • Received law degree from Case Western Reserve University
  • Works with the Arizona Business Coalition, the Arizona Justice Foundation and the Phoenix Community Alliance
  • www.ssd.com
Keith Maio President and CEO National Bank of Arizona

CEO Series: Keith Maio President and CEO National Bank of Arizona

Keith Maio
President and CEO
National Bank of Arizona

Assess the current state of the banking industry in Arizona.
It looks pretty tough. The economic environment is difficult. What we deal with in Arizona is that we have a real estate-dominant economy, so many of the local banks are heavy in real estate lending. And — as we all know and see and live in our homes every day — assessed values and real estate valuations have declined dramatically, and that puts pressure on banks. That’s starting to trickle through to the consumer segment and small business segment. Everybody is feeling impacted. That being said, I would tell you that the banks in Arizona, the vast majority, are highly capitalized. So they’ve got the capital base to weather the storm.

In terms of the storm, are you seeing any light at the end of the tunnel?
I haven’t seen the light yet. I know it’s there, but I haven’t seen it yet.

How has the turmoil at the nation’s largest banks affected Arizona-chartered banks?
I think it’s a little bit anecdotal in nature. Some of the problems that the big banks feel are not felt directly by the more local, Arizona banks. Local banks tend to be a little higher capitalized, which is a good thing, and their exposures are more direct-lending exposures versus securities investments and off-balance sheet vehicles.

At the end of the day it’s all about credit contraction, so it impacts people different ways. But the local banks are more direct lenders, so it’s what happens directly in their market.

Do you think that’s a positive thing?
I think it’s a positive thing, other than the fact that we have been impacted so badly in Arizona relative to the rest of the country. So that makes it tougher. But at least when you have direct exposures, you are able to assess on an individual basis what that exposure is.

We are hearing more about the role off-bank balance sheet structures have had in the sharp decline in capitalization among the larger national banks. What type of exposure to such off-bank balance sheet structures do local banks have?
Local banks don’t have much exposure there, and what it allows those banks to do is to assess their risk on a transaction-by-transaction basis, rather than market valuations on pools of securities. So it’s a little easier to assess their risk. Local banks have a little bit more capital to weather the storm, but their exposures on the lending side tend to be a little bit greater than the large national banks.

What challenges and opportunities does the current financial crisis hold for local banks in general, and National Bank of Arizona in particular?
Having been through this before, I think there is an opportunity — and as a CEO you’ve got to always look at the long run, not just the short run. You need to manage what we’re all in the middle of today, but you need to keep an eye on the long run. In getting through this, these tough times actually make people and good organizations better. You’ll learn, ‘What could I have done better before,’ and people who want to improve will improve.

Organizations that can improve end up much better off in the long run. And generally, anytime you have a market disruption — which this is — there’s turmoil in the market and there’s disruption. However, over the long run it presents market-share opportunities to banks. I think that’s an opportunity a lot of us have in the long run — to resettle what the market shares look like at the end of this. For the survivors, it’s a very good thing.

At the end of the day it’s all about credit contraction, so it impacts people different ways. But the local banks are more direct lenders, so it’s what happens directly in their market.

Do you think that’s a positive thing?
I think it’s a positive thing, other than the fact that we have been impacted so badly in Arizona relative to the rest of the country. So that makes it tougher. But at least when you have direct exposures, you are able to assess on an individual basis what that exposure is.


We are hearing more about the role off-bank balance sheet structures have had in the sharp decline in capitalization among the larger national banks. What type of exposure to such off-bank balance sheet structures do local banks have?

Local banks don’t have much exposure there, and what it allows those banks to do is to assess their risk on a transaction-by-transaction basis, rather than market valuations on pools of securities. So it’s a little easier to assess their risk. Local banks have a little bit more capital to weather the storm, but their exposures on the lending side tend to be a little bit greater than the large national banks.

What challenges and opportunities does the current financial crisis hold for local banks in general, andNational Bank of Arizona in particular?
Having been through this before, I think there is an opportunity — and as a CEO you’ve got to always look at the long run, not just the short run. You need to manage what we’re all in the middle of today, but you need to keep an eye on the long run. In getting through this, these tough times actually make people and good organizations better. You’ll learn, ‘What could I have done better before,’ and people who want to improve will improve.

Organizations that can improve end up much better off in the long run. And generally, anytime you have a market disruption — which this is — there’s turmoil in the market and there’s disruption. However, over the long run it presents market-share opportunities to banks. I think that’s an opportunity a lot of us have in the long run — to resettle what the market shares look like at the end of this. For the survivors, it’s a very good thing.

    Vital Stats





  • Executive vice president, Zions Bancorporation, parent company of National Bank of Arizona
  • Joined National Bank of Arizona in 1992
  • Has served as president since 2001; appointed CEO in 2005
  • Current chairman, Arizona Bankers Association board of directors
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of New Mexico; graduate, Pacific Coast School of Banking