Tag Archives: W. P. Carey School

Top Ten Sports Bars, Photo: Clintus McGintus, Flickr

ASU unveils innovative sports law programs

If you want to work with professional sports teams, big sporting events or promising student athletes, then you may be interested in the innovative new sports law and business program officially being launched this week by Arizona State University. The highly ranked Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU are collaborating on two new sports law graduate degrees you can earn in just one year. Classes begin this fall.

“I’ve worked in the sports law field for three decades, and can see we need professionals who have training in both law and business to help work on regulatory and revenue issues in the sports industry,” says professor Rodney K. Smith of the College of Law, director of the new programs. “I don’t know of any other program in the country that offers a master’s degree like this with just a single, intensive year of study.”

The two new one-year degrees are a master of legal studies (MLS), for those without a law background, and a master of laws (LLM), for those who already graduated from law school. In each program, students will work on 18 to 21 credits from the law school, and six to nine credits from the W. P. Carey School. This includes an externship, which might be for a professional sports team, a sports law firm or even a big event like a college bowl game. The programs are going to be small and personalized, accepting fewer than 30 people each in their first year. They will also focus on team-based learning and look at real-world issues, such as stadium problems, player unionization and contract negotiations.

Ray Anderson, ASU vice president of university athletics and a former executive vice president of football operations for the National Football League, will be a professor of practice in the programs. He wanted to be part of a high-quality sports offering, and this one is located in a metropolitan area with three professional sports teams, major golf events, college football bowl games and even next year’s Super Bowl.

“I am proud to be a part of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Sports Law and Business Program because it is the only one of its kind to offer a sports-focused graduate program that combines the strengths of a top law school with a top business school as its foundation,” Anderson says. “One of the reasons I came to Arizona State University from the National Football League is because of the vibrant Phoenix sports market, with its combination of sporting events representative of all major sports leagues and organizations. This fact, combined with a premier research university, will produce top-quality learning experiences for students in the curriculum.”

Courses in the new program will encompass both law and business areas, including “Sports Business Strategy and Industry Dynamics,” “Negotiations and Drafting in the Sports Industry,” and “Problems in Professional Sports Law and Business.” Big-name speakers from the world of sports are expected to participate, as well.

“The sports industry is complex and expanding,” says marketing professor Michael Mokwa of the W. P. Carey School. “The new program will provide skills and savvy for individuals seeking to make a real difference in the field.”

For more information about the new one-year degrees, visit law.asu.edu/sportslaw. A three-year juris doctorate program will also be added this fall for those who want to pursue their law degree with an emphasis in sports law and business.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 in the Nation

U.S. News & World Report announces its prestigious annual rankings for “Best Graduate Schools” today. For the sixth year in a row, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University ranks Top 30 among the best graduate business schools in the nation.

“We’re really proud to demonstrate consistent excellence at the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says the school’s dean, Amy Hillman. “This particular ranking is largely determined by our peer business schools and corporate recruiters who offer our students jobs, so they are very aware of the great work happening here. Thank you to the dedicated faculty members, staff and students who do their best every day to keep us on the cutting edge of education.”

The new list for 2014 ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 30 for its full-time MBA program. It’s the best ranking for any Arizona school. The full-time program also ranks among the Top 20 nationwide for career placement at graduation, demonstrating the school’s keen interest in preparing students to succeed in the real world.

“In addition, our full-time MBA is among the two least expensive programs in the Top 30, a clear value,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean of graduate programs at the W. P. Carey School. “It’s also among the two smallest programs in the Top 30, allowing us to keep class sizes at a personal level.”

In January, U.S. News & World Report also pre-announced that the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program ranks No. 2 among online graduate business programs in the country. The online MBA program is known for its flexibility, convenience and offering of the same stellar faculty members who teach in the school’s highly ranked face-to-face programs.

Several other W. P. Carey School programs also appear on new graduate-level “specialties” lists from U.S. News & World Report this week. The evening MBA program ranks No. 22 among part-time MBA programs nationwide, the highest ranking for any Arizona school on that list. The renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 6 for supply chain/logistics, and the information systems program ranks No. 16 in its category. Also, the Ph.D. program in economics ranks No. 36 in its field.

Other recent high rankings for marquee programs at the W. P. Carey School:

* U.S. News & World Report ranks the undergraduate business program No. 24 in the nation.
* The Wall Street Journal ranks the executive MBA program in the Phoenix area No. 13 in the world.
* Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 21 in the world.
* The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the school No. 18 in the world for “economics/business.”

Amy-Hillman

New Carey School Dean Takes Over

One of the top business schools in the nation will have a new dean at the helm, starting tomorrow. Current Executive Dean Amy Hillman — a world-renowned management expert, popular teacher and noted researcher — will take over as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, effective March 1.

Hillman is the first-ever female dean of the school, which has undergraduate, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA programs all ranked Top 30 in the country by U.S. News & World Report. She is outlining a clear vision for the future.

“We’re going to keep advancing what we do to help our students achieve career and life successes,” says Hillman, who has played a key role in the growth of the school in her four years as second-in-command/executive dean. “Our world-class faculty is full of researchers who teach cutting-edge skills. We want to use this knowledge and our excellent position in a major metropolitan area (the Phoenix area) to help support the business world. We plan to broaden and deepen our business partnerships to become a ‘go-to’ place for firms to come to advance their work force and get help with real-life projects. We’re also going to focus on providing even more value and connections throughout the world for our vast 80,000-plus alumni network.”

Hillman never had dreams of academia when she was younger. She actually got her MBA on evenings and weekends, while striving to improve as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business. However, several of her professors had such a profound influence on her that she realized she’d rather teach others about business than stay in her current job.

“As both an undergraduate and graduate student, I had individual faculty members who had a huge influence on my life,” says Hillman, who has been recognized with outstanding teaching awards every place she has worked. “I felt a sense that if I could make a difference for one student, like these faculty members did for me, then I would personally feel more accomplished than I did in the corporate world.”

Hillman has already made a clear mark on the W. P. Carey School in her decade-plus on the faculty as a management professor. She has championed entrepreneurship projects through the Spirit of Enterprise Center and helped to expand the school’s degree offerings to allow access to more students. (The school’s current total is more than 10,000 students). Recently, she was instrumental in the school introducing several new specialized master’s degrees to help undergraduates from other fields combine their passions with a solid business foundation. These include nine-month master’s programs in management and business analytics.

“I love ASU, and this opportunity to be a leader here, at a place that I love, is a real privilege,” says Hillman. “This is especially significant, since this year is the 10th anniversary of the gift from businessman/philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey that gave the school its name. We’ve come so far, thanks to this transformative gift, and we plan to go even further over the next 10 years.”

Hillman will preside over the opening of the new 129,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art McCord Hall this summer. The building will complement the two existing business-school structures, providing more classrooms for graduate and undergraduate honors students, technologically advanced team study rooms, a new career center, world-class conference facilities and outdoor assembly areas.

“This is a chance for us to really advance the science and culture of learning business,” says Hillman. “The way the building is set up, it will actually help our students to develop teamwork, communication and critical thinking skills.”

Hillman is also a strong supporter of the school’s research efforts. She is a renowned researcher in management, focusing on boards of directors, corporate political strategies, and how links between firms and their external contingencies improve financial performance. Her work has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report, among other venues. The journal Technovation recently ranked the W. P. Carey School No. 1 among all business schools worldwide for authoring research in the Top 45 academic business journals with the most global impact.

“What makes this school special, though, is the people,” says Hillman. “The faculty, staff and students are so amazing, supportive and encouraging of each other. At some older, established schools, there is a sense of complacency. The W. P. Carey School is like a nimble entrepreneur, seeking to constantly improve. That feeling permeates our culture, helping us to transform and advance lives, the school and the business world.”

Hillman takes over for current dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who is semi-retiring after 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the prestigious Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an experienced business co-founder, a board member of three public companies and author of two business books. He will continue to serve at ASU as an adviser to the president and provost, as well as work on a project focused on the business and technical issues facing electric utilities in the future.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business and its programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

Entrepreneurs

W. P. Carey School Launches New Major in Entrepreneurship

If you’ve ever thought about starting your own business — about turning your passion into a moneymaking company – then entrepreneurship may be for you. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University announces a new major in business entrepreneurship that can offer you access to incredible resources and the knowledge to help you succeed.

“The W. P. Carey School has been delivering entrepreneurship coursework for almost 30 years, and ASU has a wide variety of resources for budding entrepreneurs,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “However, until now, we’ve only formally offered a concentration and certificates in entrepreneurship. Starting this fall, we want to give our entrepreneurs a full major, so their degrees and resumes reflect the intense training and preparation they’ve received. This can help when presenting themselves to potential backers, partners or even employers at existing companies looking for true innovators.”

The recent uncertainty in the economy has produced a keen interest in entrepreneurship, as many people try to create their own jobs and business opportunities. As a result, the number of entrepreneurship programs at universities across the country is booming.

“Entrepreneurship students can look forward to potentially connecting with mentors, peers, possible investors and top faculty members who understand how to start and maintain a business,” says Sidnee Peck, director of entrepreneurial initiatives at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “They also get great feedback from industry experts, and they have the ability to try and fail in a safe environment, instead of risking real money in the real world.”

The W. P. Carey School already has a tremendous record of producing great student entrepreneurs. Over just the past few years, the school has had a Forbes magazine “All Star Student Entrepreneur” and two finalists for Entrepreneur magazine’s annual “College Entrepreneur” award. The school has also had many winners of ASU’s Edson Student Entrepreneurship Initiative, which provides funding, mentorship and office space to teams of students and helps them develop their ideas into viable businesses. In the last academic year alone (2011-12), W. P. Carey School students won more than $130,000 in new-venture competitions.

In 2011, Peck was invited to speak at a White House event about the benefits of teaching entrepreneurship to college students. Her entrepreneurship classes at the W. P. Carey School include some groundbreaking new coursework in Lean LaunchPad, an experience-oriented concept introduced in Silicon Valley. Several of her students have successfully launched businesses.

“Our major in entrepreneurship helps you acquire the educational foundation, experiences and network to negotiate obstacles and be successful,” says Professor Gerry Keim, chair of the W. P. Carey School’s Management Department, where the new major is housed. “This country has always encouraged the risk-taking needed to be an entrepreneur. In our program, students can learn whether something is feasible, whether an idea is a good fit for the marketplace, how to get capital, and other key skills, so they only spend time developing business concepts that create value.”

ASU also boasts many other opportunities to help students get their firms off the ground, including:

·         Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS), a sequence of classes at the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering that joins students of various majors to help solve real-world problems.
·         Student Teams for Entrepreneurship Projects (STEP), a program from the W. P. Carey School of Business Spirit of Enterprise Center that matches teams of business students with Valley companies to solve existing problems.
·         CTI Maker Week through the College of Technology and Innovation, where students can pitch ideas, make devices and launch them.
·         InnovationSpace — a joint program between the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering and the W. P. Carey School of Business – that teaches students how to develop products that create market value, while serving social needs and minimizing impacts on the environment.
·         ASU’s SkySong, which offers the Edson Student Entrepreneurship Initiative and other funding competitions, among many other services for entrepreneurs.

The new entrepreneurship degree will officially be available starting in fall 2013, but applications are already being accepted. Two other new bachelor’s degrees will also be offered at the W. P. Carey School this fall: Bachelor of Arts in Business with concentrations in human resources or sports & media studies. A new concentration is also being introduced in digital and integrated marketing communication.

Visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu for more information on the school’s stellar undergraduate program, ranked Top 25 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

economy

Arizona Could Hit Full Economic Recovery in 3 Years

We’re finally on the path to full economic recovery, and Arizona may get there in about three years. That’s the main message from experts who spoke today at the 49th Annual Economic Forecast Luncheon co-sponsored by Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business and JPMorgan Chase.

About 1,000 people attended the event at the Phoenix Convention Center, where economists painted a generally brighter picture for 2013.

“As of September, Arizona ranked fifth among states for job growth, and the Phoenix area was fourth among large metropolitan areas,” said Research Professor Lee McPheters, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Arizona is expected to add 60,000 jobs in 2013, led by professional and business services, retail, hospitality and health care. We should finally dip below 8-percent unemployment in 2013 — down to 7.6 percent.”

McPheters added, as long as the national economy doesn’t drag us down, Arizona may see 2.5-percent growth in its employment rate next year. The state had 2-percent growth this year. Despite the jump, Arizona has gained back less than a third of the jobs it lost during the recession. McPheters believes it will take another three years to return to pre-recession employment levels.

In 2013, McPheters expects improved 5-percent growth in personal income, up from just 4 percent this year. He projects retail sales will go up 6 percent, from 5 percent this year. He expects Arizona’s population to rise 1.5 percent, and he believes single-family housing permits will shoot up a whopping 50 percent, with the local housing market now on the mend.

Both McPheters and Beth Ann Bovino, deputy chief economist at Standard & Poor’s, hinged their forecasts on whether the national economy can really pull forward; otherwise, Arizona will go down, too. The biggest question out there is whether Congress can avoid the “fiscal cliff” – where automatic spending cuts would kick in, just as various tax cuts expire. Bovino says that could plunge the United States back into recession and push national unemployment back above 9 percent by the end of the year.

“If we can avoid the fiscal cliff, then it looks like the economy could finally be in a self-sustaining recovery,” said Bovino. “We expect this year’s gross domestic product (GDP) to hit 2.1 percent, stronger than previously projected. For 2013, we’re looking at about 2.3 percent. Reports also show a stronger jobs market and signs that households are willing to buy big items, such as cars and homes.”

Bovino adds the U.S. unemployment rate was at 7.9 percent in October, and she sees signs more people are joining the workforce and getting jobs. However, she says the labor participation rate is still near a 30-year low, meaning more people will still be coming back to the workforce to look for jobs, keeping the unemployment rate low for a quite a while. Despite this, Bovino expects the national unemployment rate to drop to 7.6 percent next year.

She also has a good outlook for the national housing market, with housing starts already up 45 percent this September over last September. Bovino referenced a report that 1.3 million homes rose above water – with the value going higher than what was owed – in the first half of this year alone. She expects residential construction to go up almost 19 percent in 2013.

In the financial sector, Anthony Chan, chief economist for private wealth management at JPMorgan Chase & Co., says corporations remain flush with cash. They’re waiting for some clarity on where the market will go as a result of the fiscal-cliff situation and other factors.

“U.S. corporations are reluctant to go through global mergers and acquisitions or make big investments until they have a clearer picture,” said Chan. “Corporations are keeping high cash balances, in order to deal with the uncertainty. They’re making near-record profits in some cases, and many values on the stock market look good. However, everyone’s waiting to see what will happen.”

He said high-yield investments, such as bonds, and gold remain relatively attractive. The U.S. dollar keeps falling against currencies from emerging markets, as monetary agencies work through different strategies of dealing with the rough economy.

In the local housing market, Elliott D. Pollack, chief executive officer of Scottsdale-based economic and real estate consulting firm Elliott D. Pollack and Company, also drew some conclusions.

“Even though about 40 percent of Arizona homeowners are underwater on their mortgages, we’re starting to see a recovery,” said Pollack. “The single-family-home and apartment markets look great. Industrial real estate has improved quite a bit. Only office and retail have quite a way to go.”

Pollack adds new residential foreclosure notices are down almost 70 percent from the peak in 2008. Phoenix-area home prices are up more than 35 percent over last year. New-home sales are also doing well, with 67 percent of the local subdivisions active today projected to be sold out in less than a year. Builders are going to have to work to meet the demand, with less land and labor available.

Pollack sees a strong rental presence, with about 22 percent of local single-family homes being used as rentals right now. That’s up from less than 12 percent just a decade ago. Landlords appear to be buying up many single-family homes, and more people are moving to the area.

“In the absence of a fiscal cliff, things should continue to improve over the next several years,” said Pollack. “By 2015, things should be normalized. As I like to say, we’re only one decent population-flow year away from the issue being resolved.”

More details and analysis from the event, including the presentation slides, are available from knowWPCarey, the business school’s online resource and newsletter, at http://knowwpcarey.com.

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U.S. News & World Reports ranks W. P. Carey School in Top 25

Today, U.S. News & World Report reveals its highly regarded annual rankings for the best undergraduate business schools in the nation. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University comes in an impressive No. 24. It’s the ninth time in 10 years the W. P. Carey School ranks Top 30 on this prestigious list.

“We want to thank our stellar faculty and students for helping us to achieve consistent excellence,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “These particular rankings are determined by deans and senior faculty members at our peer schools across the nation, who really understand the criteria for a top business school. The new rankings are a testament to the hard work, world-class research and achievements of our faculty, students and graduates.”

In addition to the No. 24 ranking overall for undergraduate business programs – up four places from last year — the school also ranks among the top five in the West. The school’s renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 3 in the nation on the specialty list for its field.

Other recent Top 30 rankings for the W. P. Carey School and its programs include:

> The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the school No. 18 in the world for “economics/business.”
> U.S. News & World Report ranks the full-time MBA program Top 30 in the nation for the fifth year in a row.
> U.S. News & World Report ranks the part-time (evening) MBA program No. 21 in the nation.
> U.S. News & World Report ranks the school’s online MBA program among just 14 on its first-ever “Honor Roll” for online graduate business programs.
> The Wall Street Journal ranks the school’s Arizona-based executive MBA program No. 13 in the world.
> Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 20 in the world.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

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The Ultimate Degree Program for Honors Students?

As state leaders across the country wonder how to improve their economies by creating and filling more high-income, desirable jobs, Arizona State University is introducing a special degree program aimed at attracting and keeping some of the region’s best-and-brightest future job candidates. The new program allows top students to get two degrees — one from the W. P. Carey School of Business and one from the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering — at the same time.

“The Business and Engineering Scholars Program, which just started this fall, utilizes two of the highest-ranked schools at ASU to produce extremely qualified graduates in both business and engineering in just four years,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “This is the dream program for many honors students, who want to be prepared for a high-impact career.”

“Students want to make a difference; they want to create and bring their ideas to the marketplace,” says Paul Johnson, dean of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering. “This innovative program gives outstanding students the opportunity to experience the best of both worlds.”

The concurrent-degree program features the opportunity to earn dual degrees in areas like economics, industrial engineering, engineering management and even supply chain management, a field in which the W. P. Carey School consistently ranks Top 10 in the nation. The program is offered at ASU’s Tempe campus and is one of four new undergraduate offerings from the W. P. Carey School this fall.

The other three new options are part of the W. P. Carey School’s popular Bachelor of Arts in Business program that combines traditional, high-caliber business degrees with concentrations from other ASU schools. The new concentrations are in technology, statistics and global leadership.

“For example, the business-and-technology degree can please both parents who want their kids to get a high-quality business degree and students who want to develop video games or be involved in digital media or social entrepreneurship,” says Tim Desch, assistant dean for undergraduate admissions at the W. P. Carey School.

The technology concentration is offered at ASU’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa, in conjunction with the College of Technology and Innovation. The other two new concentrations are being offered at ASU’s West campus in northwest Phoenix, in coordination with the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences.

“The field of statistics offers relatively high salaries and a growing number of jobs right now,” says Kay Faris, associate dean of undergraduate programs for the W. P. Carey School of Business. “If you want to be a financial analyst, an actuary or a market researcher, among other occupations, this degree should really help. Those who take the global leadership concentration will get a great background in international politics and cultures, including a Spanish course specifically for business use.”

The four new degree programs bring the total number of undergraduate offerings from the W. P. Carey School of Business to a staggering 21 choices. Students can focus on everything from traditional areas like marketing, finance or management, to combination business degrees with concentrations in areas like sustainability or legal studies. The idea is to give students variety and a broad set of skills, just like they will find and need in the real business world.

Also, the school will soon begin taking applications for fall 2013, when two more innovative offerings will be introduced, pending university approval. They will be business bachelor’s degrees with concentrations in either human resources or sports & media studies. The latter degree will be offered in conjunction with ASU’s prestigious Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

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W.P. Carey offers online program to adapt to real estate market

From the foreclosure crisis to roller-coaster home prices and a trove of new investors, we’re watching the world of real estate dramatically change. This evolution has some real estate professionals looking to blur the lines between what they do now – and what they can do.

For example, general contractors may see opportunities to complete their own real estate projects, and some realtors are looking into buying homes for renovation and investment. A new online program from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University will help address this.

“We’ve been talking with real-estate industry groups, and they see a need for a flexible, convenient program to provide an overview of the development process for current real estate professionals who want to expand their horizons,” says Mark Stapp, the Fred E. Taylor Professor in Real Estate at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “We designed the new online Real Estate Development Certificate program for this purpose. It teaches real estate fundamentals, law, investments and land development, all in an easy-to-use format from a top business school.”

The new online program is essentially a real-estate development education sampler, which lasts nine months. The first classes will begin on Oct. 1. Industry groups, including the Urban Land Institute (ULI), the Valley Forward Association and the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), have already taken an interest, and members will be eligible for a discounted tuition rate.

“In addition to the basics, we’re going to focus on responsible community development and themes like sustainability and creating real value for customers,” explains Stapp, an instructor in the new program and a developer himself. “There’s a new era of real estate construction emphasizing fewer cookie-cutter homes and more focus on buyers’ needs. We want to help real estate professionals deliver an even higher level of service to their clients, make better business decisions, and better position their products and their companies for revenue growth.”

Until now, Stapp only taught in the school’s Master of Real Estate Development (MRED) program, an in-person, one-year program for mid-level real estate professionals. He’s executive director of that program, which is in its sixth year and enrolls students from eight countries, who learn about design, law, construction and business. Many of the same seasoned faculty members will teach in the new online program.

Applications are already being taken for the new certificate program, and more information can be found at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/REDcert. Additional information about the in-person MRED program is available at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/mred. The school will also soon launching a new online publication about its real estate research and programs called knowRE, which will be available to the public at www.knowwpcarey.com/realestate.

The W. P. Carey School of Business’ other graduate programs include full-time and evening MBA programs ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, as well as an online MBA program on the publication’s “Honor Roll” of 14 online graduate business programs. The school’s Arizona-based executive MBA program is ranked No. 13 in the world by The Wall Street Journal.

WPCarey-School-Sign

Top 20 worldwide ranking for W. P. Carey School

The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University celebrates another new accolade this week. One of the most prominent sets of global university rankings puts ASU at No. 18 worldwide for Economics/Business. This is the fourth year in a row the W. P. Carey School has been Top 25 on the prestigious list from the Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

“This particular ranking is extremely significant on a worldwide scale and confirms our international reputation,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “The list is widely recognized globally, and we continue to climb up, thanks largely to our stellar faculty and its global impact on business education.”

The W. P. Carey School went up three places on the list this year. It’s the 10th edition of the rankings, also known as the “Academic Rankings of World Universities.” In 2005, an article in The Economist called the list “the most widely used annual ranking of the world’s research universities.” A piece in The Chronicle of Higher Education called it “the most influential international ranking.”

More than 1,000 universities are ranked in the study each year, but only 500 are actually published. The rankings look at six factors, including the number of highly cited researchers, the number of staff and alumni with Nobel Prizes and Field Medals, and other objective indicators and third-party data.

The W. P. Carey School is especially well-regarded in China because it has a top executive MBA program in Shanghai. Senior-level executives and government officials who have graduated from the program include three vice governors of China’s major provinces, six vice mayors of Shanghai, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange (the fifth-largest stock exchange in the world), several bank chairmen, the chairman of Shanghai Airlines, the chief executive officer of Baosteel and the deputy commissioner of the China Securities Regulatory Commission. Britain’s Financial Times ranks the Shanghai program among the Top 20 executive MBA programs in the world.

Other recent high rankings for the W. P. Carey School of Business include Top 30 rankings from U.S. News & World Report for the undergraduate business, full-time MBA and evening MBA programs. The publication also places the school’s online MBA program on its “Honor Roll” of just 14 online graduate business programs. The Wall Street Journal ranks the school’s executive MBA program in Arizona No. 13 in the world.