Tag Archives: wall street journal

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks Top 30 in the Nation

U.S. News & World Report announces its prestigious annual rankings for “Best Graduate Schools” today. For the sixth year in a row, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University ranks Top 30 among the best graduate business schools in the nation.

“We’re really proud to demonstrate consistent excellence at the W. P. Carey School of Business,” says the school’s dean, Amy Hillman. “This particular ranking is largely determined by our peer business schools and corporate recruiters who offer our students jobs, so they are very aware of the great work happening here. Thank you to the dedicated faculty members, staff and students who do their best every day to keep us on the cutting edge of education.”

The new list for 2014 ranks the W. P. Carey School No. 30 for its full-time MBA program. It’s the best ranking for any Arizona school. The full-time program also ranks among the Top 20 nationwide for career placement at graduation, demonstrating the school’s keen interest in preparing students to succeed in the real world.

“In addition, our full-time MBA is among the two least expensive programs in the Top 30, a clear value,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean of graduate programs at the W. P. Carey School. “It’s also among the two smallest programs in the Top 30, allowing us to keep class sizes at a personal level.”

In January, U.S. News & World Report also pre-announced that the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program ranks No. 2 among online graduate business programs in the country. The online MBA program is known for its flexibility, convenience and offering of the same stellar faculty members who teach in the school’s highly ranked face-to-face programs.

Several other W. P. Carey School programs also appear on new graduate-level “specialties” lists from U.S. News & World Report this week. The evening MBA program ranks No. 22 among part-time MBA programs nationwide, the highest ranking for any Arizona school on that list. The renowned supply chain management program ranks No. 6 for supply chain/logistics, and the information systems program ranks No. 16 in its category. Also, the Ph.D. program in economics ranks No. 36 in its field.

Other recent high rankings for marquee programs at the W. P. Carey School:

* U.S. News & World Report ranks the undergraduate business program No. 24 in the nation.
* The Wall Street Journal ranks the executive MBA program in the Phoenix area No. 13 in the world.
* Britain’s Financial Times ranks the school’s China-based executive MBA program No. 21 in the world.
* The Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranks the school No. 18 in the world for “economics/business.”

consumer behavior

Consumer Behavior Sparks Ideas For New Products, Expanding Markets

Marketing turns something old into something new: Consumer behavior sparks ideas for new products, expanding markets.


Introducing a new product to market can take years of research and expense. Or it can be as simple as taking something already in existence and marketing it for a different purpose. Creating or discovering a whole new use or new market for a product can be all you need to generate increased sales and growth. Observing consumer behavior is often the catalyst for new ideas.

A recent article in The Wall Street Journal outlines Hidden Valley Foods’ plan to expand its market penetration for its premier product, Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing. By repositioning the ever-popular salad dressing as the “new ketchup,” the company believes it can expand its market share and increase revenue. Updating the recipe to make the dressing thicker and creamier in order to stay atop a burger and creating new packaging and labeling, the new version will be called Hidden Valley for Everything. The company will introduce the product to the restaurant industry and grocery sales as soon as they finalize the recipe, so it can safely remain on the table as a nonperishable item, like ketchup and mustard.

The idea for repositioning the top selling salad dressing came about when a company executive observed his daughter pouring it over her salmon dinner. While ranch dressing is said to be “the most often used salad dressing in the U.S.,” the executive saw his daughter’s behavior as an opportunity to expand to a new area. Research shows that 15 percent of ranch dressing consumers use it on something other than salad, which supports the company’s move to make a play for market share in the condiment category.

Similarly, when Google learned that its customers were enjoying Google Translate more for its musical attributes than to translate words and phrases, the company saw a demand for this service with a new purpose. Customers type in a string of consonants as English for the system to translate into German, and then the computer “speaks” the phrase in rhythmic beat. The result is music to the user’s ears.

Then there is Starbucks’ CEO, Howard Schultz, who was recently credited with reviving the business by introducing a variety of new products and services. One of those ideas is a light roast coffee — a first for the coffeehouse chain that built its business on rich, dark roast flavors. When the company’s market research uncovered that “40 percent of U.S. coffee drinkers prefer a lighter, milder roast,” the product development team went to work creating their new Blonde roast.

Business owners and managers at small companies can learn from these industry leaders. Watching and listening to your consumers can often uncover the potential for new sources of revenue. Conduct a review of current products and services and think about how you might promote them to a different target market or how they may be utilized differently. By repositioning or refocusing your marketing, the potential for growth can be accomplished by just looking at the situation from a new perspective.

For more information on observing consumer behavior, or marketingworx and its services, visit www.marketingworxpr.com.

W.P. Carey

ASU Business School Community Mourns The Loss Of W.P. Carey

The Arizona State University and Phoenix business communities are mourning the loss of a great benefactor, philanthropist and businessman. William Polk Carey, one of the nation’s most prominent real estate investors and the major donor behind the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU, has passed away at the age of 81.

“The ASU family mourns the loss of our benefactor and friend Bill Carey,” says ASU President Michael M. Crow. “Bill Carey was not only a great business leader and philanthropist, but also a visionary. He knew that metropolitan Phoenix needed a first-rate business school to advance in the 21st century and saw in ASU the potential to develop that school. Through his generous investment in ASU almost a decade ago, the school that bears his name has become world-class and will continue to educate future business leaders for many generations to come.”

The New York-based banker, founder and chairman of W. P. Carey & Co. LLC donated $50 million from his educational and philanthropic W. P. Carey Foundation to ASU in 2003. In recognition of his extraordinary support, ASU renamed the university’s business school in his honor, and the gift has been instrumental in helping the W. P. Carey School to become one of the world’s top business schools. U.S. News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times all now rank W. P. Carey School programs among the Top 30 nationwide.

At the time, Carey’s generous donation was the second-largest gift ever to a U.S. business school. Carey’s family has deep connections to Arizona State University. His grandfather introduced legislation that created the university in 1886. Carey also had an honorary Doctor of Science degree from ASU.

Carey has said of his gift to the business school, “The key to future economic growth is quality education, and this school will be dedicated to producing our country’s next generation of business leaders.”

The school’s leadership agrees.

“Bill gave us the ability to dramatically advance the quality and status of the school much more rapidly than would have been possible otherwise,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “He was a philanthropist who believed a primary way to advance our country was through education, and he helped a number of schools, including ours. He was also a student of economics and a great admirer of top-tier economists.”

Mittelstaedt also says Carey was a smart businessman who pioneered a way for smaller investors to participate in large real estate projects with consistent top-tier returns. Carey had an incredible 60-plus-year career in the finance industry and will be remembered as a visionary leader with fierce loyalty and abundant generosity.

For more information about the W.P. Carey School of Business, visit wpcarey.asu.edu.