Tag Archives: WebPT

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

WebPT founder Heidi Jannenga

WebPT Among Fastest Growing For 2nd Year

WebPT, the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) solution for rehab therapists, today announced it has ranked No. 362 on the Inc. 500 list of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies. Touting a three-year growth rate of 1,316 percent, WebPT boasts two consecutive appearances on this prestigious annual list of elite independent businesses.

“We are honored and excited to be named one of America’s fastest-growing companies, which puts the physical therapy industry in the national spotlight,” said WebPT founder and COO Heidi Jannenga. “The sustained growth is a testament to our customer-centric culture and our focus on producing innovative products to solve real business problems.”

WebPT, which ranked No. 231 on the Inc. 500 list in 2013, recently announced a significant round of growth capital financing from Battery Ventures. The company intends to use the new capital to further accelerate the growth that landed it on Inc. Magazine’s list of the nation’s fastest-growing companies two years in a row.

Since its inception in 2008, WebPT has helped more than 35,000 rehab therapy professionals transition to EMR, leading the rehab industry into the digital age by enabling fast, secure, paperless documentation. In the last four years, the company has added more than 150 jobs and has grown in revenue from $1.2 million in 2010 to a projected $25 million this year. WebPT also ranks among the top ten Arizona companies and the top ten Phoenix Metro Area companies.

“This is a true team award, and I am enormously proud of the hard work, dedication and commitment to excellence displayed by everyone at WebPT,” said WebPT CEO Paul Winandy. “Only a select few companies make the Inc. 500 two years in a row, and we are honored to be part of such an elite group.”

Having created a comprehensive, industry-specific platform, WebPT is changing the way rehab therapists manage the day-to-day operations of their clinics. In addition to offering defensible, compliant and intuitive documentation, the web-based application provides physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech-language pathologists with intelligent business reporting, interactive and organized scheduling, and integrated billing.

heidi_jannenga

Heidi Jannenga – Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Heidi JannengaFounder, WebPT
Jannenga, who has 15 years of experience as a physical therapist and clinic director, is WebPT’s co-founder and chief operating officer. As COO, she leads the product strategy and oversees the WebPT brand vision.

Greatest accomplishment: “Launching a sustainable technology company in Phoenix that now provides more than 200 local jobs.”

Surprising fact: “I once scored 57 points playing basketball against the Chinese National Team.”

Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue, Az Business Magazine celebrates the amazing women who make an impact on Arizona business.

Click here to see all of the 2014 Most Influential Women.

WebPT founder Heidi Jannenga

Significant investment will Fuel WebPT’s Growth

WebPT, the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) solution for rehabilitation therapists, announced it has received a significant investment from Battery Ventures. WebPT intends to use the new capital to accelerate growth.

Founded by Brad and Heidi Jannenga in 2006, WebPT is the leader in the rehab-EMR industry. The company’s innovative technology has been adopted by more than 35,000 therapists and 6,000 clinics in the US and Canada, and WebPT has consistently increased in revenue, while continuing to gain market share. It was recently named to the Inc. 500 list of the nation’s fastest growing companies.

“Battery Ventures has an outstanding track record investing in growth companies and helping them achieve success. We are thrilled to partner with such an experienced investor as we continue to aggressively grow our business,” said WebPT CEO Paul Winandy. “We’re at the cutting edge of healthcare technology and this infusion of capital will allow us to keep innovating in the physical therapy space.”

WebPT is strategically leading the rehab industry into the digital age, enabling fast, secure, paperless documentation. Having created a sophisticated, industry-specific platform, WebPT is fundamentally changing the way rehab therapists manage the day-to-day operations of their clinics. In addition to offering defensible, compliant and intuitive documentation, the web-based application provides physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists with intelligent business reporting, interactive and organized scheduling, and integrated billing.

“WebPT is pioneering a new way for rehab therapists to manage their business operations, while saving them time and money,” said Chelsea Stoner, Battery Ventures General Partner, who specializes in investments in software and healthcare technology and is joining the WebPT board. “As the electronic medical records industry is continuing its explosive growth, WebPT, with its advanced technology and innovative leadership team, has carved out a unique position in the market. We look forward to helping the company continue to achieve success and solidify their position as the leader in this sector.”

WebPT founders Brad and Heidi Jannenga will remain in key leadership positions. Heidi, an experienced physical therapist and multi-clinic site director, joined forces with Brad, a seasoned technologist and award-winning entrepreneur, to start the company after recognizing a need for a robust, industry-specific EMR platform. Today, as President and Chief Technology Officer at WebPT, Brad leads all aspects of company’s technology, while Heidi guides the product strategy and oversees the WebPT brand vision as the company’s Chief Operating Officer.

phoenix

Now is the time to invest in Arizona

It used to be when I traveled to different business meetings across the country, people would ask me about Arizona’s politics. While we still have reputation issues to repair, the questions I’ve been getting recently are more focused on the buzz they’re hearing about our growing technology sector.

There’s good reason Arizona is getting noticed for its growth. Over the last five years, Arizona has developed one of the most robust technology entrepreneurial ecosystems in the country. The state is home to five of Deloitte’s 2013 “Technology Fast 500” firms, specifically First Solar, LifeLock, Telesphere, Inilex and GPS Insight. Other startups that have been home grown in Arizona into industry leaders include Axosoft, GoDaddy, iCrossing, Infusionsoft, Insight Enterprises, LimeLight Networks and WebPT.

We were able to accomplish our strong entrepreneurial spirit in part by drawing the attention of the media and the state’s policy makers to the need to diversify our economy away from construction and climate into a knowledge-based economy with higher paying jobs. Our efforts resulted in a tax credit for qualified research and development that is the best in the nation and a successful angel investment tax credit.

A lot of other resources have been invested. Over a dozen business incubators and accelerators call Arizona home, providing resources to support technology entrepreneurs. In addition to graduating a vibrant workforce to fuel quality jobs, Arizona’s world-renowned universities and community colleges are also heavily engaged.

Arizona State University (ASU) runs the Edson Student Entrepreneur Initiative and the ASU SkySong Innovation Center was recently awarded one of the best organizations of its kind in the country. University of Arizona (UA) is helping create the technology of tomorrow in its Bridges/UA Bio Park and UA Tech Park that includes a Solar Zone. UA also participates in Startup Tucson – an organization dedicated to growing a vibrant ecosystem of entrepreneurship through educational events. Northern Arizona University fosters business growth through it Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology and benefits from its affiliation with NASA. All of that bodes well for Arizona’s innovation economy.

Other efforts are focused solely on exciting people about technology and science. We just celebrated the third annual statewide Arizona SciTech Festival with over 300K people attending more than 500 events this year.

And although we have a long way to go, there’s a growing pool of capital. We’re home to two of the largest and top rated angel investor networks in the U.S. ─ ATIF and Desert Angels. The Arizona Commence Authority has created the Arizona Innovation Challenge that awards the most money in the country to the most promising entrepreneurs meeting technology challenges. Grayhawk Capital just raised $70 million in funds for early and growth stage technology investments. And Tallwave Capital recently announced it has deployed $500,000 in capital in early-stage ventures.

The 2010 census reports Arizona’s population at 6.4 million, with a median age of 35.9 years. The predicted growth rates for Arizona by the federal and state government expect that between 1.5 million and 3 million people will move to Arizona by the year 2020. That type of robust regional population growth combined with an improved U.S. economy translates into high potential for investors.

It’s true we enjoy more than 300 days of sunshine each year. But we offer a lot more than golf and spas. Venture capital sitting on the sidelines should put money into promising Arizona high tech firms and startup ventures.

Now is the time to invest in Arizona.

awards

Industry Leaders of Arizona take spotlight

Az Business magazine is proud to present the Industry Leaders of Arizona (ILoA) Awards, which recognize  the contributions and impact of Arizona‐based companies in five key industries — commercial real estate, education, entertainment, manufacturing and technology. The 30 finalists for this year’s ILoA Awards are profiled on the following pages. Winners will be recognized at the awards dinner that will be held Thursday, February 6 at The Ritz Carlton, Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks
Leadership: Derrick Hall, CEO; Tom Harris, CFO
Address: 401 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: dbacks.com
What they do: The Diamondbacks strive to provide industry-leading entertainment in a family-friendly environment while making a positive impact on its fans and civic partners.
How they lead: The team offers the lowest Fan Cost Index in Major League Baseball. In the community, the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation and the D-backs’ organization have surpassed the $33 million mark in charitable giving since their inception in 1998. The unique corporate culture of the D-backs led Yahoo! to deem the club as “the best workplace in sports.”

Arizona Summit Law School
Leadership: Scott Thompson, president; Shirley Mays, dean
Address: One N. Central Ave., Phoenix
Website: azsummitlaw.edu
What they do: The American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school offers traditional and non-traditional law students the opportunity to succeed through its student-focused curriculum and highly engaged faculty.
How they lead: The practice-ready curriculum equips graduates with the practical skills and ethical instruction, leadership, management and interpersonal skills necessary for career success. The school accommodates students’ diverse needs with options including full-time and part-time day and evening classes; trimester schedule for graduation in two years; and individualized bar-pass instruction through learning diagnostics and mentoring; and experiential learning opportunities via externships, internships and clinics.

Caliente Construction Inc
Leadership: Lorraine Bergman, CEO
Address: 242 S. El Dorado Circle, Mesa
Website: calienteconstruction.com
What they do: Caliente, founded in Arizona in 1991, is a female-owned commercial general contractor that provides construction management services tailored to meet the distinctive needs of its diverse clientele.
How they lead: By embracing the latest technology, Caliente is known as the contractor who can meet the challenge of any type of construction project. This has strengthened its industry position and given Caliente a competitive edge. Caliente has also shown continued growth.  In 2006, revenues were $23,500,000 with 30 employees. Today, revenues exceed $57,000,000 and Caliente employs 81.

Casino Del Sol Resort, Spa and Conference Center
Leadership: Jim Burns, CEO
Address: 5655 W. Valencia Rd., Tucson
Website: casinodelsol.com
What they do: Casino Del Sol Resort encompasses a spa, conference center, five award-winning restaurants, Sewailo Golf Course, Anselmo Valencia Tori Ampitheater, a 5,000-seat open-air concert venue and the Del Sol Marketplace, which includes a gas sttation, car wash, convenience store and smoke shop.
How they lead: In less than two years since opening its $100 million expansion, Casino Del Sol has earned a AAA Four Diamond designation and is the state’s only casino resort to earn the coveted Forbes Four-Star Award for its hotel and spa.

Entrepix, Inc.
Leadership: Tim Tobin, CEO; David Husband, CFO
Address: 4717 E. Hilton Ave., #200, Phoenix
Website: entrepix.com
What they do: Entrepix re-manufactures semiconductor fabrication equipment and develops products and services to significantly extend the lifespan of semiconductor manufacturing technology.
How they lead: Entrepix’ is defining a new class of supplier to the semiconductor industry —  a “technology renewal partner” — and has become the third-party leader in this space.  It launched the first ever foundry process center supporting remanufactured equipment.  The company was spotlighted for this on the cover of the industry’s largest publication, Semiconductor International, whose cover is normally occupied by game-changing innovations from companies such as Intel and Applied Materials.

FlipChip International
Leadership: David Wilkie, CEO; Gordon Parnell, CFO
Address: 3701 E. University Dr., Phoenix
Website: flipchip.com
What they do: FlipChip International is a leading supplier of wafer level packaging technologies to a diverse global customer base in the semiconductor industry.
How they lead: FlipChip was founded in 1996 by industry leaders in automotive technology and semiconductor integrated circuit assembly. Their strategy was primarily developing and licensing the technology. After new owners took over in 2004, manufacturing was expanded and new technologies were introduced. Today, FlipChip’s technologies can be found in a wide range of products in consumer, medical, industrial and automotive applications.

FNF Construction, Inc.
Leadership: Jed S. Billings, CEO; David James, CFO
Address: 115 S. 48th St., Tempe
Website: fnfinc.com
What they do: FNF provides heavy-highway construction and general engineering work, both as a general contractor, subcontractor and manufacturer/producer of aggregate and asphalt rubber binder.
How they lead: FNF’s ability to self-perform much of the work on its contracts allows the company to better manage and support its subcontractors and keep projects on schedule.  FNF supports its personnel with state-of-the-art equipment and in-house technical support which keep its workers safe and guides and educates employees on FNF’s innovative construction methods.

GlobalTranz
Leadership: Andrew Leto, CEO; Greg Roeper, CFO
Address: 5415 E. High St., #460, Phoenix
Website: globaltranz.com
What they do: GlobalTranz is a privately held, Phoenix-based logistics company specializing in freight management services, including less-than-truckload shipping, full truckload, supply chain management and domestic air/expedited shipping.
How they lead: By focusing on innovative technology, GlobalTranz optimizes the flow and storage of merchandise as the goods move within and throughout the customers’ supply chain. GlobalTranz has been recongnized as one of the fastest-growing companies in the country with annual sales of over $200 million. Globaltranz has doubled its revenue every year since its inception in 2003.

Grand Canyon University
Leadership: Brian Mueller, president and CEO; Dan Bachus, CFO
Address: 3300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Website: gcu.edu
What they do: GCU is a private Christian university that has graduated some of the Southwest’s best-prepared teachers, nurses and fine arts professionals.
How they lead: What was once a small, struggling university has come into its own as a world-class liberal arts institution. When escalating tuition made higher education nearly impossible for some students, GCU built a financial model that made earning a degree attainable and affordable. The model does not rely on taxpayer subsidies, yet keeps costs about two-thirds less than most private universities and lower than many public schools.

Great Hearts Academies
Leadership: Daniel Scoggin, CEO; Ward Huseth, CFO
Address: 3102 N. 56th St., #300, Phoenix
Website: greatheartsaz.org
What they do: Great Hearts Academies is a non-profit network of public charter schools dedicated to improving education in the Phoenix metropolitan area by developing a network of excelling preparatory academies.
How they lead: Great Hearts Academies has a 95 percent college placement rate, including many prestigious colleges and universities around the country. Students have an average SAT score of 1836 and ACT score of 27.4, which is 20 percent above the national average and higher than many private schools.

IDentity Theft 911
Leadership: Matt Cullina, CEO; Sean Daly, CFO
Address: 7580 N. Dobson Rd., Scottsdale
Website: idt911.com
What they do: IDentity Theft 911 is a provider of identity management solutions, identity theft recovery services, breach services and data risk management solutions. The company works with insurance carriers to provide identity theft services to individual personal lines policyholders and crisis data-breach services for commercial insurance policyholders.
How they lead: Founded in 2003, IDentity Theft 911 is a premier consultative provider of identity and data risk management, resolution and education services. The company serves 17.5 million households across the country and provides fraud solutions for a range of organizations.

Integrate
Leadership: Hart Cunningham, CEO; David Tomizuka, CFO
Address: 4900 N. Scottsdale Rd., #4000, Scottsdale
Website: integrate.com
What they do: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology platform—combining ad-serving tech and analytics, a paid media marketplace and full suite of marketing services.
How they lead: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology provider to empower marketers and media buyers to plan, launch, analyze and optimize campaigns across performance, programmatic and traditional media. The Integrate AdHQ platform offers an end-to-end solution that supports the entire lifecycle of paid media campaigns in one intuitive dashboard.

Ipro Tech, Inc.
Leadership: Kim Taylor, president and COO; Bret Lawson, CFO
Address: 6811 E. Mayo Blvd., #350, Phoenix
Website: iprotech.com
What they do: Founded in 1989, Ipro is a global leader in the development of advanced software solutions used by legal professionals to streamline the electronic discovery process.
How they lead: Ipro pioneered the development of electronic discovery technology in 1989, when savings and loan scandals led to an abundance of paper documents needing immediate legal review. Ipro developed customized technology that greatly improved the process and speed in which litigation document collections could be produced and helped to establish the litigation technology industry as we know it today.

Jokake Construction Services, Inc.
Leadership: Casey Cartier, CEO; Dave Miller, CFO
Address: 5013 E. Washington St., #100, Phoenix
Website: jokake.com
What they do: Jokake is a full-service real estate solutions provider founded on delivering exceptional construction experiences through ground-up, renovation and tenant improvement construction for public and private clients.
How they lead: In June, Jokake launched its 30th anniversary celebration with a commitment to complete 30 community service projects in 12 months — one project for each year in business. Since the initial announcement, Jokake’s employees have advocated for great causes, most of which are with nonprofits that they have been personally invested in for many years.

Laser Options, LLC
Leadership: Jeffrey Masters, CEO
Address: 3758 E. Grove St., Phoenix
Website: laseroptions.com
What they do: Laser Options sells new and refurbished multi-function printers/copiers, provides managed print services to its clients and is a leading re-manufacturer of laser print cartridges.
How they lead: Since starting in 1993 as a re-manufacturer of laser printer cartridges and HP printer service, Laser Options has transformed itself into a full-service business technology organization. Since inception, Laser Options has put into place sustainability practices. Whether it is its manufacturing and recycling process, the cars it uses or the vendors it partners with, customers know they are “going green.”

MicroAge
Leadership: Jeff McKeever, CEO; Roger Rouse, CFO
Address: 8160 S. Hardy Dr., Tempe
Website: microage.com
What they do: MicroAge is a leading provider of technology products and services. They serve customers from the data center to the desktop with computer products from industry-leading manufacturers.
How they lead: MicroAge’s tech-savvy account executives are experts at assisting clients with selecting information technology solutions that best meet their unique requirements. MicroAge possesses a vast sourcing capability which enables us to deliver on the most challenging of procurement requests.  MicroAge continues to be a well-known name and a respected industry pioneer with a heritage of industry innovation spanning five decades.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
Leadership: Steve Sanghi, CEO; Eric Bjornholt , CFO
Address: 2355 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler
Website: microchip.com
What they do: Microchip Technology Inc. is a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions for thousands of diverse applications worldwide.
How they lead: Microchip is the semiconductor industry’s greatest Cinderella Story, having come a long way since its humble beginnings as a failing spinoff of General Instrument in 1989. Over that time, Microchip has had the most successful IPO of 1993, achieved the No. 1 ranking in 8-bit microcontrollers in 2002 and recorded its 91st consecutive quarter of profitability in June 2013.

Mountainside Fitness
Leadership: Tom Hatten, president; William Malkovich, CEO; Tracy Taylor, CFO
Address: 1230 W. Washington St., #111, Tempe
Website: mountainsidefitness.com
What they do: Mountainside Fitness is the largest locally owned health club in Arizona, striving to help its members incorporate exercise into their lifestyle.
How they lead: With 10 locations, including the newest location inside Chase Field, the fitness center provides more than 950 jobs. The company has experienced a 41 percent growth within the last three years, including employee growth of approximately 400. The expansion placed Mountainside among the recipients of the 2012 Inc. Hire Power Awards as one of the Top 10 private business job creators in the state of Arizona.

Phoenix Children’s Academy
Leadership: Doug MacKay, CEO; Paul Malek, CFO
Address: 8767 E. Via de Ventura, #240, Scottsdale
Website: pcafamilyofschools.com
What they do: Phoenix Children’s Academy operates a national network of 111 private schools, including preschools, elementary schools and middle schools in 15 states serving approximately 16,000 students.
How they lead: PCA is the sixth-largest company in its industry in the U.S. and the largest headquartered in Arizona. By developing centralized support functions to take the majority of the administrative burden away from its schools, PCA teachers and principals have more time to spend with children and parents. This has enabled PCA to tailor its educational services to the individual needs of the child.

Phoenix Suns
Leadership: Jason Rowley, president; Jim Pitman, CFO
Address: 201 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: suns.com
What they do: The Suns provide the finest in Arizona sports, entertainment and community leadership by striving to create sustained success on and off the court.
How they lead: Between offering a first-rate fan experience, giving back to Arizona children and families in need, and staying at the forefront of technology and innovation, the Suns have served as Arizona’s professional sports leader since our 1968 inception. Each year, Suns players and alumni make more than 1,000 community appearances and the Phoenix Suns Charities contributes more than $1 million annually to more than 125 local nonprofit organizations.

Rigid Industries LED Lighting
Leadership: Jason Christiansen, CEO; Seth Anderson, CFO
Address: 779 N. Colorado St., Gilbert
Website: rigidindustries.com
What they do: Rigid Industries’ patented Hybrid and Specter optics and forward projecting LED lighting and quality products are designed, engineered, and assembled in the United States.
How they lead: Rigid Industries recently ranked 150th on Inc. 500 magazines’ Fastest Growing Companies list for 2013. Additionally, Rigid leads the industry as the fastest-growing LED lighting manufacturer and the fifth-fastest-growing in overall manufacturing in the U.S., proving to be one of the most innovative companies of 2013. From 2009-2012, Rigid experienced an exponential growth rate of 2,528 percent.

Scottsdale Golf Group
Leadership: Shelby Futch, CEO
Address: 6210 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa
Website: scottsdalegolfgroup.com
What they do: Scottsdale Golf Group owns and manages four public and three private golf courses. Futch founded the John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies, with 12 locations across the USA and Canadian locations coming soon. John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies is one of the oldest continuous  golf schools in the U.S. with more than 500,000 students instructed.
How they lead: Scottsdale Golf Group’s state-of-the-art teaching facilities utilize the finest computerized swing analysis equipment. Under the guidance of golf industry expert Futch, Scottsdale Golf Group has grown from the undisputed leader in golf instruction to become a master of club operations, management, and consumer marketing services as well.

Speedie & Associates, Inc.
Leadership: Gregg A. Creaser, CEO; Brett P. Creaser, CFO
Address: 3331 E. Wood St., Phoenix
Website: speedie.net
What they do: Speedie & Associates is a consulting engineering firm that specializes in geotechnical, environmental and construction materials testing and special structural inspection services.
How they lead: From its inception 33 years ago, Speedie & Associates has embraced and maintained a philosophy of providing a superior level of customer service to every one of its clients. The firm believes that listening to its clients, hearing the essence of what they’re saying, and fully understanding their expectations are the most important first steps in providing a superior service experience.

STORE Capital
Leadership: Morton H. Fleischer, chairman; Christopher H. Volk, president and CEO; Catherine Long, CFO
Address: 8501 E Princess Dr, Scottsdale
Website: storecapital.com
What they do: STORE Capital (the name stands for Single Tenant Operational Real Estate) is a leading provider of real estate lease capital for real estate intensive middle-market companies.
How they lead: STORE acquires customers’ commercial real estate they use to generate their profits and lease it back to them in a sale/leaseback transaction.  A real estate lease is not just a debt financing substitute for customers, but it’s both a debt and equity substitute, while also offering reduced monthly payments. This makes them less bank-dependent and more entrepreneurial, creating more efficient capitalization.

Sun Orchard™ Juicery
Leadership: Marc Isaacs, CEO; Jeff Anthony, CFO
Address: 1198 W. Fairmont Dr., Tempe
Website: SunOrchard.com
What they do: Sun Orchard™ is a national craft juice company offering an unmatched selection of exceptional juice products to food service businesses of all shapes and sizes.
How they lead: Sun Orchard built its business on freshness, taste, quality, people and being one step ahead. Sun Orchard’s family of experts’ tree-to-table mastery allows it to quickly turn emerging trends into cutting-edge juice products, giving its customers a quick-to-menu advantage and back-of-house efficiencies. Sun Orchard continues to work closely with its customers to help grow their businesses.

Synergis Education, Inc.
Leadership: Norm Allgood, CEO; Scott Wenhold, CFO
Address: 1820 E Ray Rd., Chandler
Website: synergiseducation.com
What they do: Synergis Education is a premium, full-service provider of educational services designed for college and university leaders who are not satisfied with the status quo.
How they lead: Synergis Education assists its partner institutions in gaining regional prominence, enrollment growth, and overall sustainability through continual improvement and best practices. Synergis is unique among education services providers in that it is positioned to work with the entire adult higher education market, remaining agnostic as to the delivery methods (online, face-to-face, blended, etc.).

University of Advancing Technology
Leadership: Jason Pistillo, CEO; Erika Garney, CFO
Address: 2625 W. Baseline Rd., Tempe
Website: uat.edu
What they do: University of Advancing Technology (UAT) is the technophile’s college experience — a community uniquely suited to provide students passionate about technology an ideal place to live and grow.
How they lead: UAT students graduate to become technological mavens, cyber warriors, elite game designers and advanced computer scientists. The university’s commitment extends far beyond its student body. UAT hosts a myriad of on-campus events, including the annual Avnet Tech Games, The Leonardo da Vinci Society for the Study of Thinking and many other various user groups.

WebPT
Leadership: Brad Jannenga, chairman, president and CTO; Paul Winandy, CEO; Jacob Findlay, CFO
Address: 605 E. Grant St., #200, Phoenix
Website: webpt.com
What they do: WebPT is the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) and practice management solution for physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists.
How they lead: By creating an affordable, intuitive, and technologically sound cloud-based electronic EMR solution for rehabilitation therapists — practitioners excluded from the government’s meaningful use incentive under the HITECH Act — WebPT brought all the benefits of EMR to small, private therapy practices that would have otherwise fallen behind. WebPT has helped more than 24,000 therapists adopt EMR since 2008.

Wespac Construction, Inc.
Leadership: John Largay, CEO; Don Mann, CFO
Address: 9440 N. 26th St., #100, Phoenix
Website: wespacaz.com
What they do: Wespac is a commercial general contracting and construction management firm, offering a range of pre-construction and construction services in a variety of market sectors.
How they lead: Wespac has developed a specific system of project management tools to successfully complete the job. This comprehensive process is Wespac’s Systematic Building Approach™ (SBA™). The SBA™ is Wespac’s process to ensure constant communication, dedication, coordination and planning. Utilizing the SBA™, the team is able to ensure timely procurement of materials and equipment, keeping the build-out on track.

Wilson Electric Services Corp.
Leadership: Wes McClure, president; Todd Klimas, COO; Terry Oakes, CFO
Address: 600 E. Gilbert Dr., Tempe
Website: wilsonelectric.net
What they do: Wilson Electric is the Southwest’s leading, single-source provider of total facility solutions, including commercial construction, solar, and operations technology.
How they lead: Wilson Electric invests in each employee-owner’s success through a rigorous, in-depth corporate training program. The program begins with new hire orientation and continues throughout employment, blending in-house resources with industry experts. Topics range from effective project management and safety procedures to manufacturer certifications. Because of this, Wilson’s safety record is one of the best in the state.

boeing-phantom-ray

It takes fuel to win tech race

Many of us can relate to thinking of Arizona’s economy as an automobile race. To win, you need a smooth race course, a fast car, a winning driver and high-powered fuel.
Carrying that analogy into Arizona’s technology sector, it’s clear that a lot of resources have been invested and progress has been made in building a world-class race course.  We’ve made tremendous strides in creating a business climate and technology environment for facilitating both private and public sector support to address the needs of Arizona’s technology businesses.

The Arizona Technology Council has worked collaboratively with many different technology champions to build this course. Technology issues are supported by the Governor’s office, the state’s legislature, the Arizona Commerce Authority, the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and more.

Technology incubators and shared space facilities such as Gangplank in Chandler, Avondale and Tucson; Hackspace and Venture Catalyst at ASU’s SkySong in Scottsdale; BioInspire in Peoria; Innovation Incubator in Chandler; AzCI in Tucson; and AZ Disruptors in Scottsdale are making sure that today’s innovators are being given the right support, tools and environment to create the next big thing.

Collectively, our wins have included the passage of a tax credit for qualified research and development that is the best in the nation, the creation of the first statewide Arizona SciTech Festival and the birth of the Arizona Innovation Institute, to name a few.
Arizona’s technology industry also has great race cars. These are the technologies and intellectual property that create wealth and jobs driven by both Fortune 500 companies and entrepreneurs.  Companies such as Intel, Microchip Technologies, Freescale, ON Semiconductor and Avnet can all be found here.  Nearly all of the largest aerospace and defense prime contractors in the nation are located in Arizona, including Boeing, Honeywell, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and General Dynamics.

The state’s entrepreneurial spirit is reflected in companies such as WebPT, Infusionsoft, Axosoft, iLinc and Go Daddy that were founded in Arizona along with the many innovators that are coming to the table every day with new ideas rich in technology.

These companies large and small are driven by some of the greatest race car drivers the nation has produced.

But when it comes to fuel, Arizona’s economy has always been running close to empty. We lack the vital capital needed to win the race. Having access to angel investors, venture capital and private equity as well as debt instruments is critical to Arizona’s success.
The situation has not been improving on the equity side of the fuel equation. To offer some relief, the Arizona Technology Council is proposing legislation that would create a system of contingent tax credits to incentivize both in-state and out-of-state investors to capitalize Arizona companies.  This program, called the Arizona Fund of Funds, would allow the state to offer $100 million in tax incentives to minimize the risk for those seeking to invest in high-growth companies.  The state government’s role would be to serve as a guarantor through these contingent tax credits in case the investments don’t yield the projected results.  Expect more information on this important piece of legislation as it advances.

On the debt side of the fuel equation, there are encouraging signs that the worst of the credit crunch may be over. Early-stage companies need access to debt instruments, or loans. Capital is needed for equipment and expansion. A line of credit can help early-stage companies through ongoing cash-flow issues. But loan activity is still modest in Arizona for small companies. It remains heavily weighted toward the strongest corporate and consumer borrowers.

Capital goes hand in hand with innovation, high-paying jobs and cutting-edge technology, products and services. Before Arizona’s economy can win the race, we will need to become more self-sufficient at providing the fuel necessary to be a winner.

Steven G. Zylstra is president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council.

WebPT

Paul Winandy, WebPT

Paul Winandy, CEO at WebPT, shares what it is like to be the CEO of WebPT, which provides physical therapists with a Web-based electronic medical records system.

How did you end up as CEO of WebPT?

There is a group in town called the Arizona Technology Investor Forum, which focuses on early-stage technology investing. I was the managing director of that angel group, and I met (WebPT founders) Brad and Heidi Jannenga when they came in to present to the group. I looked over their strategy and vision and was really impressed and really enjoyed what they were bringing to the table.

Video by Cory Bergquist

What qualities do you have that helped WebPT triple in size in 2011?

My background is all in early stage technology startups. I’ve done about five in my career. My experience is taking those companies from the early stages and growing them to $10 million or $12 million in revenue. I’ve been through the wars and I’ve been through the battles, so I know what to do in terms of building the right team, bringing in the right resources and being able to grow the company fast.

What qualities do you think an effective CEO needs?

You have to be able to rely on your team. You have to realize what you bring to the table and you have to realize what you need to build out. In early-stage technology companies like WebPT, you have to have the ability to be able to get in there and get your hands dirty. I like that part of it. I like to be a hands-on CEO. But once you build up the team, you have to have the ability to let go and let that team be successful.

Are there benefits to starting a technology company in Arizona?

We’re a little bit under the radar in terms of the Silicon Valley mentality. In Silicon Valley, the mentality is “let’s get a great idea and get a little proof of the concept and then raise a bunch of money.” You can’t do that here in Arizona. You have to build a product that is out on the market generating sales before you can go out and raise a lot of money.

Are there any obstacles to starting a tech company in Arizona?

As much as being under the radar is beneficial, sometimes it’s nice to be out there in the spotlight so you can get the right talent. Phoenix has some phenomenally talented people, but we’re not as deep in the technology area as some other parts of the country.

Where do you see WebPT growing?

We need to stay focused on the physical therapy industry because that will allow us to be laser focused. There is a great market there. It’s a niche market, but it’s developing and it’s a very open and a very green field ready to embrace and adopt technology. There are about 30,000 physical therapy clinics and we have 2,100 now, so about eight percent of the market. So if we focus on that and become the dominant player, we’re going to have a nice, long track record.

What advice would you give someone looking to start a technology company in Arizona?

Solve a business need with whatever product you’re trying to develop. To be successful, it has to be something that is going to have a market demand. There are a lot of great ideas, but they cannot figure out how to make it solve a business need and get that first customer. So find out what is needed, create a way to solve that business need, and then go to market on that basis.

Vital Stats: Paul Winandy

  • Over the course of his 20-year career, Winandy has been an executive leader in four successful technology businesses, two of which were named to the Inc. 500 list and were later acquired by public firms.
  • For several years prior to WebPT, Winandy was an active business advisor and angel investor in fast-growing technology companies.
  • Before his advisory practice, Winandy was COO of SkillSurvey, a startup web services firm providing online reference assessment tools. Before that, he was director of strategic accounts for Khimetrics, a leading enterprise software firm specializing in revenue.

For more information about WebPT, visit their website at webpt.com

Arizona Business Magazine September/October 2012

WebPT medical billing

WebPT Adds Revenue Cycle Management Service To Deliver End-To-End Solution For Clinics

WebPT, developer of cloud-based software that makes clinics more efficient, now offers a Revenue Cycle Management service in addition to its industry-leading EHR system for physical therapists. Leveraging a team of deeply experienced billing specialists, WebPT is now offering a complete, turnkey solution to make billing and collections more efficient.

Electronic documentation of billable services and demographics will flow directly from the WebPT EHR system to a dedicated billing team, which will handle claims processing, reimbursement management and accounts receivable. This enables physical therapists to focus on patient care instead of back office billing. It also improves front office efficiency and saves time with the elimination of data double entry.

“We’re expanding the WebPT solution to help clinic owners become successful in all areas of their practice,” says Paul Winandy, CEO of WebPT. “Faced with declining reimbursements, it’s critical for therapists to get paid promptly and accurately for every service they provide. Our dedicated team of expert billing specialists makes sure that happens with our new ‘white glove’ billing service.”

WebPT has an impressive 95 percent first-pass claim acceptance record, resulting in an accelerated reimbursement process. Supported by the same premium level of customer service that WebPT members are familiar with, all billing and insurance filing needs are handled domestically with no automated phone systems or overseas staff.

Using WebPT’s integrated billing service is like having a dedicated expert employee on staff. Tasks such as posting and reconciling payments, and investigating, correcting and appealing insurance denials are all performed with WebPT’s all-in-one solution. Also available is real-time, 24/7 access to billing and claim information, which can be accessed from any computer, tablet, or Web-ready device. Customers are given access to a robust dashboard that will provide daily, weekly and monthly reports for their review. The dashboard will give insight into account aging, revenue per visit, payer mix and more, to help provide a deeper understanding into the cash flow of their clinic.

“WebPT’s billing experts are so accessible and knowledgeable of my clinic, that I feel like they are part of my staff, I know exactly who is handling my account, and appreciate never being handed off to a third party or offshore team,” says Zach Sutton, DPT, MS, OCS of McMinnville Physical Therapy. “The prompt service and communication WebPT provides has helped my clinic identify small errors that get claims rejected, and they fight for every dollar we can. As an integral part of my clinic’s success, WebPT handles important tasks which allow me the freedom to spend my time on treating my patients and growing my practice.”

Funding Startup Companies Jumpstart Economy

Funding Startup Companies Can Help Get the Economy Moving Again

Wanted: More Jobs

I don’t have a fancy degree from an Ivy League school, and I’m not formally trained in economics. So you won’t see me on the President’s economic advisory team, or lecturing on the philosophical differences between the Keynesian and Austrian economic theories.

Instead, I grew up watching my father start a manufacturing firm and build it into a successful, multimillion-dollar business. I followed in those footsteps by helping two technology startups grow from infancy to a spot on the Inc. 500 list and eventually sell for more than $100 million.

What I’ve learned through these experiences is that innovative startups are the engine of the American economy. Startups breathe life into slow growth industries (think Starbucks, Crocs and Netflix). Startups create new products and new markets (think salesforce.com, Google and Twitter). And startups solve complex scientific and engineering challenges to create life-changing products (think Intel, Amgen and TiVo).

Naturally, as innovative startups grow they create jobs — and lots of them. An eye-opening study by the Kauffman Foundation brings that into sharp focus. The study showed that startups are responsible for all net job growth in the U.S. since 1977.

Think about that for a minute. In aggregate, older more established firms do not create jobs (at least not in the U.S.). Job growth at one company is matched or exceeded by a decline at another. In essence individual companies are trading market share, but the market itself is growing slowly or not at all. When you add in technological advances to improve employee productivity, outsourcing to offshore locations, or simply eliminating positions to meet a lower level of demand, it is not surprising that established firms do not drive job growth.

Not all startups are equal

Any entrepreneur with the guts to launch a new startup deserves enormous respect, but not all startups are created equal when it comes to job creation. Startups in slow-growth markets such as restaurants, retail and other consumer services suffer from the same challenges as more established firms. Namely, a new growth company takes market share from an established player, so any new jobs created are eventually met with job cuts at other companies.

Similarly, startups in cyclical industries such as transportation, hotels, construction, real estate, etc., will not create sustained job growth. In good economic times, these companies will boom — and just as quickly go bust when the economic winds change.

While there are exceptions to these broad generalizations (note Starbucks and Crocs), sustainable job growth usually comes from scalable, innovative startups. These are the startups that venture capitalists and angel investors target. And these are the startups that will create new markets and lead the U.S. out of this economic slowdown.

Angel and venture capital investing

The startups noted earlier all share one common trait: they were funded by angel and/or venture capital. It is safe to say that without that capital, these companies would not have reached their respective heights.

Venture capital (VC) as a distinct asset class has existed since the ’60s, reaching its high point during the dot-com boom of the late ’90s and early 20000s. With such a long history, venture capital remains a relatively small segment of the capital markets. According to a report by HIS Global Insight, in 2009, new venture investments totaled $18 billion. Since 1970, only $474 billion has been invested in 27,000-plus companies. By comparison:

    The U.S. Treasury Department will issue more than $1.1 trillion in debt this year to cover the budget deficit.

    The junk bond market is greater than $600 billion in size.

    The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan cost more than $170 billion in 2010 alone.

But venture-backed companies have an outsized impact on GDP and employment. VC-backed companies produced more than $2.9 trillion in revenue in 2009, representing more than 21 percent of total U.S. gross domestic product. More importantly, 12.1 million people are employed at venture-backed companies, representing more than 11 percent of total private sector employment.

These numbers clearly show that innovative startups create economic growth and sustainable employment.

An alternative plan

That’s why I get viscerally angry watching the economic ignorance of our federal and state governments. Politicians pay lip service to wanting to create jobs, then spend tax dollars on big corporate giveaways, old industry subsidies, and pet projects that have little impact on actual job growth.

And when our government finally recognizes the need to create jobs and support small businesses, they create programs that will do neither.

A simple (and most likely profitable) plan that will have a fast and tangible impact on jobs is to create a federal “matching fund” for any angel group or venture capital firm to access. The matching fund would automatically invest a matching amount in any innovative startup that receives investment from the VC/angel group. Funds should be made available only for seed and early-stage investments. Extra incentives should be given to promote investment in regions of the country with low levels of VC investment and/or high levels of unemployment.

Under this plan, capital will be invested in companies with the highest potential for job and economic growth, and the fund will most likely turn a profit when all is said and done.

But don’t hold your breath waiting for innovative economic solutions to materialize in Washington. Instead, allocate some of your portfolio to angel/venture investing, then find a local angel group and get involved. You will be rewarded by working with some of the best and brightest entrepreneurs, while helping get the American economy growing again. And with any luck, you will make some money along the way.