Tag Archives: website

energy policies

Southwest Renewable Resource launches Website

The member electric utility companies of the Southwest Variable Energy Resources Initiative (SVERI) have launched a dedicated website that provides near real-time data for renewable energy resources from across the desert Southwest.

SVERI is partnering with the University of Arizona to collect, display and analyze generator output and electric customer load data from the participating companies. The website is available to the public and can be accessed at http://sveri.uaren.org.

The SVERI participants include Arizona Electric Power Cooperative, Arizona Public Service Co., El Paso Electric Co., Imperial Irrigation District, Public Service Company of New Mexico, Salt River Project, Tucson Electric Power Co. and the Western Area Power Administration’s Desert Southwest Region.

“Challenges being faced in the Pacific Northwest and California in integrating renewable generation drove the creation of this investigatory effort,” said Robert Kondziolka, director of Transmission and Generation Operations at SRP and the current chair of the management committee for SVERI.
“Our objective is to collectively determine if and when the integration of renewable resources into our respective systems may create operational challenges, and to identify the most appropriate tools to address this challenge. Our overall goal is always to ensure continued system reliability and to provide benefits to our customers.”

SVERI was formed in the fall of 2012 to evaluate the likely penetration, locations and operating characteristics of variable energy resources within the Southwest over the next 20 years. The SVERI participants are exploring tools that may facilitate variable energy resource integration and provide benefits to customers.

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AZIMA’s TIM Awards set for March 20

The Arizona Interactive Marketing Association (AZIMA) will host its 2nd Annual TIM Awards from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thurs., March 20 at the Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Ave., in Phoenix. Named after Sir Timothy Berners-Lee, acknowledged father of the World Wide Web, the TIM Awards showcase Arizona talent and work in the interactive realm for calendar year 2013.

Twelve TIM awards will be given for “Best”: Website, Social Media Campaign, Integrated Interactive Campaign, Email Marketing Campaign, Display Ad (single or campaign), Rich Media Execution, Mobile Marketing Campaign, App, Blog, Online Video, Brand of the Year and Interactive Person of the Year.

Roger Hurni, of Off Madison Ave, received AZIMA’s coveted 2013 Interactive Marketing Person of the Year TIM award last year. “It was quite an honor to have won this award. To me, the AZIMA TIM Awards are a demonstration of the amazing, cutting edge work being done in Arizona by companies from all kinds of industries,” said Hurni.

Guests to the TIM awards ceremony will have a chance to network with top digital marketing professionals and view Phoenix Art Museum’s current exhibits before enjoying a delicious sit-down dinner and awards presentation. The official program will kick off with keynote speaker Marcus Sheridan, president and founder of The Sales Lion. Sheridan is best known for skillfully using content and inbound marketing efforts to increase traffic to his website and becoming one of the largest pool installers in the U.S. during the Great Recession. In 2009, he started his sales, marketing and personal development blog, The Sales Lion, to teach others about content and inbound marketing.

AZIMA offers four options for event registration: $75 for a single seat; $50 for a single seat if an AZIMA Corporate/VIP member; $700 for a Table of 10; and $475 for a Table of 10 for Corporate/VIP members.

To learn more, visit www.azimaawards.com or www.joinazima.org.

KrispyKreme

SRS Real Estate Partners Sells Building at The Park in Chandler to Krispy Kreme

SRS Real Estate Partners announced the sale of a 53,492-square-foot shopping center outparcel which includes a 3,504-square-foot former bank building located at the southwest corner of Chandler Boulevard and Alma School Road in Chandler, Ariz.

Alan Houston and Jeff Alba with SRS Real Estate Partners represented the seller, Grossman/Robson Associates in the transaction.  Andy Kroot with Velocity Retail represented the buyer, Hot Glazed Enchantment, Inc.

Kroot announced Krispy Kreme Doughnuts purchased the former Washington Mutual Bank building at the southwest corner of Chandler Boulevard and Alma School Road in Chandler. The transaction closed escrow on August 26, 2013 with Andy Kroot of Velocity Retail Group, LLC representing the buyer – Hot Glazed Enchantment, Inc., a New Mexico corporation and SRS Real Estate Partners representing the seller – Grossman/Robson Associates. The building was +/-3,504 SF on 1.23 acres of land and sold for $837,500.

“We are pleased to be able to help Krispy Kreme expand their presence and product offering in the greater Phoenix area,” said Kroot, “and we are continuing to look for sites (for sale or for lease) in the 1,500 to 3,500 square-feet range on freestanding locations or end caps with drive-thru.”

At the moment, Krispy Kreme has four stores open in the greater Phoenix area; the Mesa factory at Superstition Springs Boulevard/US 60 Freeway, 7055 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale AZ, 1984 W. Main St., Mesa, and 3201 W. Indian School Rd., Phoenix, with other stores in the works. Krispy Kreme was founded in 1937 in Winston-Salem, NC, and is well known for its signature hot Original Glazed® doughnut. There are 649 Krispy Kreme locations in 21 countries around the world.

Housing Development

Realty Executives Phoenix launches new site

Realty Executives Phoenix, one of the largest and most productive real estate brokerages in the nation, announced the launch of a new consumer-focused website at www.RealtyExecutivesPhoenix.com.

The web launch marks a unique presence for the brokerage, unlike any other in the company’s nearly 50 year history. Concurrent to the web launch of the Phoenix-based brokerage, Realty Executives International unveiled a new Realty Executives International Website and intranet system.

Realty Executives International, parent company to Realty Executives Phoenix and one of the fastest growing real estate franchises in the United States, now offers a comprehensive intranet for its Broker/Owners and sales agents in Phoenix and around the globe. The new intranet serves as a dashboard designed to increase productivity and streamline real estate business activities on a daily basis.

Powered by Southern California based data company, CoreLogic, the new web solutions allow agents to leverage technology effectively through an arsenal of powerful, fully integrated back and front-end marketing tools. The consumer-facing sites, www.RealtyExecutivesPhoenix.com and www.RealtyExecutives.com, offer clients property search functionality in the United States and Canada. The new design and features were developed with the needs of consumers first and foremost, while still providing the company’s Broker/Owners and sales agents with a state-of-the-art website that also meets their needs.

A robust intranet system now provides a comprehensive platform for all Realty Executives Broker/Owners and sales agents, allowing them to interact with the system like never before.  This system, called “Executive Access” includes a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tool to manage contacts and leads, listing management and access to each agent’s MLS.  The result is an interactive experience as opposed to a static website that provides data, information, agent-to-agent communications, calendar management and alerts for business among other useful tools.

“I’m so pleased to announce the launch of these incredible tools for our agents and consumers in the Phoenix area and worldwide. I’m looking forward to seeing the fruits of this cutting-edge technology, which will dramatically improve the home search and marketing process for today’s savvy consumer,” said Rich Rector, owner and president of Realty Executives.

Does Your Online Presence Pass the Truth Test?

What’s the fastest-growing marketing trend on the Internet?

I’m sad to say it’s the “fakeosphere.” Yes, fake blogs (called “flogs”), fake web news sites and fake testimonials. They look like the real thing, right down to comments posted by “bloggers” and their supposed readers. Those comments appear to be written by people discussing the pros and cons of a particular product or service, and they even include some naysayers.

“But in the end, the bloggers and their readers always win over the skeptics and persuade them to buy the product from a convenient nearby link,” writes Bob Sullivan in his blog on msnbc.com.

He cites Internet marketing analyst Jay Weintraub, who believes the fakeosphere has become a $500 million-a-year industry.

These fake sites and phony conversations are often more than simply misleading – OK, fraudulent – marketing. For consumers, they can be downright dangerous.

“The end game for most of these sites – no matter what they sell – is to persuade a consumer to sign up for a ‘free’ trial of a product, then make it incredibly difficult to cancel before the trial period ends,” Sullivan writes. “A similar technique … is to offer a free product and charge a web user a token shipping and handling fee, just to get the consumers’ bank account information. Larger charges soon follow.”

Consumers are – and should be – increasingly wary. They’re scrutinizing websites more closely, especially if they’re considering making a purchase there. They’re avoiding social media interactions with anything that smells less than genuine, and they’re more careful about who they share information with online.

What would they say about your online presence? Do you look like the real deal, or a potential cyber threat?

Here are some ways to ensure you pass the reality test — and some missteps that will ensure you don’t.

On social media:

• Real people have real friends and family among their connections. They can’t resist sharing photos of their vacation, the newest baby in the family and their genius dog (not necessarily in that order). They have interests that may have nothing to do with what they’re trying to market, and they comment about them (“I shot a hole in one today!”) or share a photo (“Here I am buying everyone drinks after my hole in one today. That was the most expensive golf shot ever!”) They also respond to all comments, even if it’s just to say, “Thank you.”

• Fake people generate mostly sales copy – “Buy my product! It’s great!” They don’t engage in conversation, they don’t appear to have a personality – or friends or loved ones or hobbies, for that matter.

On your website:

• Real people have text that informs and entertains users while offering them helpful information. The copy is professionally written – no typos or other mistakes – and provides answers to anticipated questions. It’s easy to learn more about you or your business and to find your contact information. Testimonials are from real people whose existence can be verified through a simple Internet search. They write blogs that are updated regularly and/or post articles with helpful information.

• Fake people have websites with lots of pop-up advertising banners and text urging users to “Buy my product!” Testimonials are from untraceable people with vague titles or credentials. The site may be hard to navigate; contact information may be missing or difficult to find; and there’s no link to media about the person or company.

In your newsletter:

• Real people share valuable information in their newsletters (which can be as minimal as a “tip of the week” email). Their newsletter (or tip) includes no overpowering sales pitch or self-promotion – or, at least, includes that only occasionally. It conveys a personality, whether warm and friendly, authoritative, or humorous.

• Fake people blast newsletters and promotional emails that may identify a problem but offer as the only solution hiring them or buying their product. They may seem unprofessionally written (errors, etc.) and lack personality. They offer nothing of value to the reader.

All of these things will help you create an online personality that conveys your authenticity. But the No. 1 thing you can do – what I value above everything else – is to be, actually … genuine.

In my book, “Celebritize Yourself,” I write about identifying the passion that led you to start your business, create your product or write your book. Maybe you became a financial adviser because you found it gratifying to solve people’s money problems. Or you developed a product that you know will benefit others. Or you have expertise that can help people live longer, happier, or more productive lives.

Whatever it is that got you going, that’s what makes you genuine. Identify it and make it a part of your message, and no one will ever call you a fake.

Marsha Friedman is a 22-year veteran of the public relations industry. She is the CEO of EMSI Public Relations (www.emsincorporated.com), a national firm that provides PR strategy and publicity services to corporations, entertainers, authors and professional firms.

Online browsing

Websites That Keep Track Of Some Of Your Information Aren’t All Bad

This weekend my wife and I went shopping for lighting — fixtures and lamps for some redecorating we’re doing. There’s a particular style we like and we found some things in different stores in town, but not a huge selection in that style. So, of course, the next thing I did was go online to see what else is available. I found options at quite a number of online sites and “stores.”

The next day I was online doing research at various sites, many of which are ad-supported. While browsing about I noticed an ad in the banner at the right of the page. It was for a terrific table lamp in just exactly the style we’re looking for. It was even at a good price!

I think most of us are at least vaguely aware of that type of thing. On at least some level we recognize that when we’re browsing online we’re constantly being shown products and services that our past browsing behavior indicates might interest us. And I’m guessing that most of us view that as a real service. After all, if we’re going to be marketed to — and by browsing ad-supported content we’ve “opted in” to being marketed to — it’s a whole lot better if it’s something we might be interested in than if it’s just more commercial noise, isn’t it?

It’s called “behavioral marketing” and I can remember when it was a scary concept. The idea that our browsing behavior might be tracked and the information collected might be somehow used without our knowledge was chilling. It sounded vaguely Big Brother-ish. We had to keep those “cookies” off our computer!

But over time our attitudes changed. Browsers have settings that allow us to control cookies, or even keep them off our computer altogether, but most of us don’t use those settings. Perhaps for some that’s because they don’t even know they can, but I think most people wouldn’t regardless. And I think that’s because we recognize the value we receive in return.

It happens in varying degrees. The example above is pretty innocuous. Consider what happens when you log onto a site? Now the connection becomes even more intimate and the information shown even more targeted. For example, as soon as I log onto Amazon, I see any number of “Recommendations for You.” These recommendations are based on my previous buying and browsing behavior, and how it compares to others with similar tastes and behaviors. Another example is when you see things like “People who bought this also bought …” Or music services that suggest things I might like based upon what I already listen to. All these are examples of things that are only possible because the computer collected some information about myself and millions of others, and then drew inferences.

And do you know what? I think this is great! I find it very valuable. I think it improves my life in subtle but significant ways.

How about you?

Intern Opportunity at AZ Big Media

Internship Opportunity At AZNow.Biz

AZNow.Biz is looking for interns. AZNow.Biz is a web companion to Arizona Business Magazine, Arizona’s largest and most reputable bi-monthly business magazine.

AZ Big Media, AZNow.Biz’s parent company, is expanding rapidly and looking to create several websites in the next few years, which makes it the perfect place to gain priceless experience.

We are looking for interns in several areas:

  • Graphics
  • Editorial
  • Design
  • Website Development

Interns work in a hands-on manner in an open and inviting environment, perfect for fostering learning and creativity. Ideas are not only welcome – they are encouraged.

At AZNow.Biz, we’re creating a top of the line website and are always looking to add more intelligent and diverse content to our website. As an intern you would have many opportunities to be published on AZNow.Biz. We are a lifestyle and business website, which means almost no topic is off limits.

Please submit your resume and portfolio of previous work (if applicable) to AZ Big Media’s assistant Web editor Kristine Cannon at kristine.cannon@azbigmedia.com.

GPEC Launches A New Website To Promote The Greater Phoenix Story

At a time when traditional newspapers are struggling or even vanishing, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council has launched a new Web site designed to provide information that offers a complete picture of what is going on in the Valley.

One of the goals behind the formation of OGP — opportunitygreaterphoenix.com — is to offset some of the negative news coverage that continues to plague Arizona. Barry Broome, GPEC president and CEO, says community leaders agreed on the concept of establishing a communications initiative that focuses on the brand of the Greater Phoenix market.

“We’re more transactional,” Broome says. “A lot of great attributes about our market don’t necessarily get conveyed in a transactional exchange. Our reputation is tied to a lot of things that go well beyond building work force availability and the cost of a transaction.”

Working with the Maricopa Partnership of Art, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, and the Phoenix Convention & Visitors Bureau, GPEC maintains the Web site that enables people in Arizona and elsewhere to read stories about Arizona they might not see anywhere else.

“You can find the kind of in-depth stories not necessarily always available in a typical news environment,” Broome says. “Hopefully, it will become a social media phenomenon. Our goal is to complement blog activity and news activity in the market, and really tell our story. It’s more of a communications initiative than a Web site.”

Events of the past two years spurred the creation of Opportunity Greater Phoenix. There was concern that mainstream media were not defining Greater Phoenix in a fair and equitable way. Those events Broome mentions include the immigration debate, the housing market collapse, the impact on Arizona from the banking crisis and issues related to a state budget bleeding red ink.

GPEC Chairman Michael Bidwill and Vice Chair William Pepicello obtained funds from the private sector to launch the site. A Web publisher and a part-time reporter were brought onboard. Discussions about OGP began Oct. 1. Eight weeks later, the site was up and running.

The OGP site is designed to inform and influence the conversation about all things related to business, employment, and the economy in Greater Phoenix. It provides accurate coverage of news, trends and analysis relevant to the local economy, along with resources such as database searches, lists, links and summaries on work force, quality of life, and overall competitiveness. It will be particularly helpful, Broome says, when GPEC embarks on economic development trips to New York City and Washington, D.C. Interested parties can go to a single site and get a broad base of stories about the Greater Phoenix market, he says.

Commenting on the emergence of blogs, Broome says, “There’s not a lot of peer review to a blog. As communications becomes more organic and viral, we think it’s important that the market has an organic and viral communication device that will allow readers who are intrigued about our market an intense reading and learning experience.”

So where and how will the site get its information?

“We will be reconstituting information from mainstream media, and producing a lot of fresh new stories of our own,” Broome says. “We expect to write at least five new major stories a week. We’ll have features on CEOs, a community news site, profiles on individuals, and there may be an interactive opportunity to interface with an expert on the economy. The content will be fresh and compelling, but it won’t all be originally generated.”

As an example, Broome notes that Nobel Prize winner Lee Hartwell left the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he was executive director, to establish and co-direct the Center for Sustainable Health at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute.

“That’s a big deal,” Broome says. “There’s a lot more to that story. What will be the focus of his research? It’s important to the region’s reputation that the story gets told in a more comprehensive and robust way.”

Another example of a story waiting to be told involves a dynamic young woman who graduated from ASU and launched a wireless company in Chandler.She might not be a candidate for a major news story by a major news outlet, but she’s young, which addresses the notion that Greater Phoenix is a retirement community, and she’s talented, which more accurately describes ASU as a first-class institution and not a party school, Broome says.

“That story won’t be in the New York Times,” he adds. “They write about our housing troubles. And The Washington Post writes about our budget problems.”

Opportunity Greater Phoenix is more than a news source. OGP is a resource, Broome says.

“Businesses looking to relocate or expand into Greater Phoenix will find information about the work force, quality of life, policies and legislation that impact decisions,” he says. “And those looking to visit or live in the Valley will find useful information on employment, neighborhoods and arts and culture.”

opportunitygreaterphoenix.com


Arizona Business Magazine

February 2010