Tag Archives: Wells Fargo Advisors

Theresa Chacopulos - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Theresa E. Chacopulos – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Theresa E. ChacopulosSenior vice president and senior financial advisor, Wells Fargo Advisors

Chacopulos was ranked among Barron’s Top 1,000 Financial Advisors for 2013 and was ranked No. 1 in the state of Arizona. Chacopulos serves high net worth clients, offering a customized approach to portfolio management. A 29-year financial services veteran, she holds the Certified Financial Planner and Certified Investment Management Analyst designations. She is insurance licensed in Arizona and has Series 7 and 66 registrations.

Surprising fact: “I started my career as a drive-in teller with First Interstate Bank.”

Biggest challenge: “In 1999, I transitioned my business, reducing my client base to a manageable number, allowing me to provide better service.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

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Chacopulos among Top 100 Women Financial Advisors

Theresa Chacopulos, Senior Financial Advisor and Senior Vice President – Investments, at Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, in Scottsdale, Arizona, was named to the prestigious 2013 Barron’s “Top 100 Women Financial Advisors” list.  Chacopulos was number 8 on the list.  This is her 6th time making the list.

The list, published annually, provides readers with a comprehensive, objective look at the top women advisors as determined by the volume of assets overseen by the advisors and their teams, revenues generated for their firms and the quality of the advisors’ practices.  Barron’s magazine is one of the industry’s leading publications.

Chacopulos has consistently been recognized for her client service standards at Wells Fargo Advisors where she’s been named a “Premier Advisor.”  The Premier Advisor program honors those advisors who are meeting or exceeding Wells Fargo Advisors’ highest standards of excellence.  Earlier this year, she was also recognized as one of Barron’s 2013 “Top 100 Financial Advisors” in the country, where she was ranked the number one advisor in the state of Arizona.  In 2011, she was inducted into Research Magazine’s “Advisor Hall of Fame.”

Chacopulos has been with Wells Fargo Advisors for 25 years and has 29 years of experience in the industry.  She is very involved in her community, choosing to dedicate her time to the Phoenix Zoo and Autism Speaks.  Her office is located at 8601 N. Scottsdale Rd. Ste. Scottsdale, AZ  85253.

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Wells Fargo advisor ranked No. 1

Theresa E. Chacopulos, senior financial advisor of the Scottsdale branch of Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, was ranked among Barron’s Top 1,000 Financial Advisors for 2013, as announced in the weekly magazine’s February 18th issue.  Chacopulos was ranked No. 1 in the state of Arizona.

“I’m incredibly honored to be recognized alongside other top advisors,” said Chacopulos.  “My focus is now and always has been, to put the needs of my clients first and to work hard to help my clients succeed financially.  I’m proud to be recognized as a top advisor and I look forward to continuing to build even stronger client relationships.”

Winner’s Circle, a Barron’s research organization, produced the rankings based on data provided by over 4,000 of the nation’s most productive advisors.  Among the factors considered for the rankings are assets under management, revenue produced for the firm, regulatory record, quality of practice, and philanthropic work. Institutional assets are given less weight in the scoring. Investment performance is not an explicit component because not all advisors have audited results and because performance figures often are influenced more by clients’ risk tolerance than by an advisor’s investment –picking abilities.

Chacopulos has 27 years experience in the brokerage industry. She is a member of Central Arizona Estate Planning Council, the Investment Management Consultant Association and the Phoenix Zoo Planned Giving Advisory Committee.  She holds Certified Financial Planner (CFP) and Certified Investment Management Analyst (CIMA) designations.  Chacopulos lives in Scottsdale with her husband and has one son.

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Financial Awareness Gap Still High for LGBT Investors

LGBT investors indicate high levels of post-election optimism about the political and economic direction of the country, as well as confidence about their own financial future, according to a recent Wells Fargo nationwide survey.  LGBT investors also show a great deal of optimism around the future of same-sex marriage and civil unions.  The picture is not entirely rosy, however.  Despite steps toward retirement preparation, LGBT investors remain concerned about saving enough for retirement, and there continues to be underlying confusion about transfer rights and benefits for same-sex couples.

Two-thirds (66%) of LGBT investors are optimistic about the political direction of the country, compared with 43% of the overall population.  Three in four expect a stronger U.S. economy over the next two years, much higher than the general population of 47%.  And two-thirds (65%) anticipate stronger local economies over the next two years, compared to 45% overall.

LGBT investors are more positive regarding their current financial situation than the general public.  Three in five (59%) report they feel financially comfortable, compared to 51% of all U.S. adults.  Two-thirds (66%) are confident in their financial future versus 52% of U.S. adults.  LGBT adults are also more likely to report being better off financially then they were three years ago (65%), compared to 51% of all adults.  And two thirds (66%) feel secure in their current job situation, higher than U.S. adults (55%).

“While optimism and confidence among LGBT investors remain high, there is clearly an awareness gap related to the very complex financial issues facing same-sex couples,” said Kyle Young, Financial Advisor and Vice-President, Investment Officer for Wells Fargo Advisors.  “Lack of Federal recognition of same-sex couples adds many layers of challenges to retirement and estate planning for all LGBT couples.  Proper analysis and planning that comes with a financial advisor who understands the landscape of today’s differing state-by-state approaches is essential.”

LGBT adults appear to be taking more steps to better save and prepare for retirement. On average, non-retired and retired LGBT adults report higher median net savings than the overall population. Over half of LGBT non-retirees (55%) report having a detailed retirement savings plan in place, compared to 42% of all adults.  These LGBT respondents are more likely to have developed plans with a paid financial advisor (42%) while an additional 22% used web-based tools and calculators to assist in the process.

Nevertheless, concerns remain.  Many LGBT respondents are concerned about saving enough for retirement (53%), and only 55% are confident they will be able to afford their current lifestyles in retirement.  In a list of financial concerns, “saving for retirement” was the top concern for pre-retired LGBT respondents at 38%, followed by healthcare costs (18%) and paying monthly bills (16%).

LGBT adults with children consistently report more financial challenges, including preparing for retirement, than LGBT adults without children.  LGBT with children feel less financially comfortable than those without (42% vs. 61%), and reported less confident in their financial future (40% with children vs. 68% without).  LGBT with children are also twice as likely to report that high living expenses are limiting their ability to save for the future (51% with children vs. 26% without).

Almost all LGBT adults (92%) believe that within their lifetime, federal laws on survivor rights and benefits will become the same for same-sex couples as they are for heterosexual couples.  Nearly half (43%) believe this will happen within the next three years, while 22% believe it will happen in the next four or five years.

Despite heightened attention to same-sex marriage and civil unions, tremendous confusion remains around transfer rights and benefits for same-sex couples.  Nearly half (44%) of LGBT respondents did not know that Social Security income and benefits are not transferable to the spouse or partner in a same sex couple.  Similarly, fewer than half (41-47%) of LGBT respondents correctly answered that other assets and benefits like real estate (47%), life insurance (44%) and retirement savings (41%) may be transferable depending on the state in which the same-sex couple resides.  Only 36% of LGBT adults know that Federal taxes on survivor assets or benefits are different for the spouse/partner in a same-sex marriage than in a heterosexual marriage.