Tag Archives: workplace

minorities

Language issues become workplace legal issues

Two Whole Foods grocery store employees in Albuquerque were recently suspended after getting in a dispute with their manager over speaking Spanish in the workplace.

That incident raises an employment law question that leaves many Arizona employers scratching their heads: Can employers require their employees to only speak English in the workplace?

The answer to that question, like the gray area that surrounds many legal questions, is “it depends.”

“While there is no specific law that requires a specific language in the workplace, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and the Arizona Civil Rights Act prohibit discrimination based upon national origin and language is closely tied to national origin,” said Stephanie Quincy, a partner with Steptoe & Johnson LLP in Phoenix. “The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that enforces Title VII and the Arizona Civil Rights Division of the Arizona Attorney General’s Office enforces the Arizona Civil Rights Act.  Both agencies are very concerned that employers will enact language requirements not because of business necessity, but as a way of excluding certain nationalities from the workplace. The Phoenix office of the EEOC sued a restaurant located on the Navajo Nation for enacting an English-only policy, resulting in years of protracted litigation for the employer.”

That restaurant is not alone. The EEOC recently released figures on what kinds of employment discrimination cases are being brought to the agency and complaints of discrimination based on national origin, including those involving perceived problems with language ability or accent, have increased  77 percent since 1997. The EEOC has suggested that it might be the increasing diversity of the American workforce, but civil rights advocates think it’s more likely due to a climate of fear, particularly in states like Arizona that have been enacting laws hostile to immigrants, both legal and undocumented.

“Generally speaking, English-only rules are not in and of themselves unlawful,” said John Balitis, a director at Fennemore Craig who practices in the labor and employment area. “They are permissible when needed to promote the safe and efficient operation of the employer’s business.”

According to Joseph T. Clees, shareholder, and Alexandra J. Gill, associate, of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, there are some circumstances where an English-only rule may be necessary to further a safety, efficiency or other legitimate business concern. The EEOC has provided examples of such circumstances including, communication with customers, employees or supervisors who only speak English; emergency situations; cooperative work assignments where the English-only rule is necessary for efficiency purposes; and to assist supervisors with monitoring of performance.

“This is an extremely high standard and very difficult to meet,” Quincy said. “Furthermore, some of these categories would only permit an English-only rule where the business necessity is present and would not support a rule completely prohibiting non-English languages completely.”
This is where that gray area comes into play when it comes to language in the workplace, experts said.

“If the employer cannot demonstrate that (speaking English) is a ‘business necessity,’ it cannot justify such a rule and could be subject to legal action by any employee who is affected by the policy,” Quincy said. “A policy does not have to be a formal written policy. A rogue supervisor can create a policy by simply telling employees speaking Spanish to quit doing so. Such a policy can almost never be supported when enforced on employee breaks or when employees are having non-work related discussions.”

Because the EEOC has taken the position that English-only policies can violate Title VII, Clees and Gill said employers adopting these policies can face a range of penalties under Title VII if the policy is found to be discriminatory.

“An individual alleging a violation of Title VII may seek to recover damages including back pay, front pay, compensatory damages, punitive damages, and attorneys’ fees,” they said. “Individuals may also request injunctive relief.”

Because of the potential backplash, Clees said employers should carefully analyze their reasoning for instituting an English-only policy prior to doing so.

“Employers should consider whether the policy has important safety justifications and/or business justifications, and whether instituting the policy would be effective in advancing the desired business purpose,” he said. “Employers should also consider whether there are any alternatives to an English-only policy that would accomplish the same goals. If an employer decides to an English-only policy is necessary, it should ensure that employees are clearly informed of the policy, including when and where it applies.”

While there is no precise test for weighing or evaluating the business reasons for a language policy in the workplace, Quincy said the EEOC suggests considering:
· Evidence of safety justifications for the rule.
· Evidence of other business justifications for the rule, such as supervision or effective communication with customers.
· Likely effectiveness of the rule in carrying out obectives.
· English proficiency of workers affected by the rule.

“Employers should only (implemented policies that either completely or partially prohibit the use of any language other than English) if they can articulate a business necessity for such policies,” said Charitie L. Hartsig, an associate at Ryley Carlock & Applewhite. “They should also clearly inform employees of the circumstances under which they will be required to speak only English and the consequences of violating the policy. Limited English-only policies have been allowed under Title VII where the policies are in place to ensure clear communications regarding the performance of dangerous and safety-sensitive tasks. The EEOC presumes that an employer that completely prohibits employees from speaking their native language disadvantages the employee’s employment opportunities on the basis of national origin under Title VII. However, the Ninth Circuit rejected the EEOC’s per se rule. Nevertheless, Arizona employers should be cautious about implementing English-only policies and do so only when there is a business necessity for doing so.”

Despite an employer’s best business intentions, experts said instituting a language policy in the workplace is most likely a powderkeg ready to explode.
“The EEOC presumes that English-only rules applied at all times are discriminatory,” Balitis said. “Because the EEOC looks with disfavor on English-only rules, an employer may be forced to litigate even the most carefully crafted rule.”

Flexible Workplaces

Arizona Employers Learn Workplace Violence Prevention

The Phoenix business community has already experienced several tragedies, with the first workplace shooting of the year in January, and the most recent incident involving a personal relationship issue erupting into another workplace shooting. Though the circumstances leading to these violent outbreaks differ, business owners and human resources professionals can learn from them and be prepared to prevent similar situations.

On Wednesday, June 5, expert speakers Dr. James Turner and Mountain States Employers Council (MSEC) staff attorney Dave Dixon will share a series of interactive vignettes designed to help employers to respond promptly, effectively and appropriately to inappropriate workplace behaviors that create disruption in the workplace, while also minimizing risks related to unlawful discrimination under the ADA, even as disability claims continue to rise. The workplace violence discussions and other significant employment and labor law trends and changes are part of this year’s Employment Law Update at the Sheraton Crescent Hotel, 2620 W. Dunlap Ave., in Phoenix.

While violent behavior can manifest for many different reasons, mental illness is often a root cause. Employers must discern between abnormal but harmless behavior and the signs of a violent progression. MSEC, a leader in human resource and employment law services, helps employers understand the legal and psychological aspects of mental illness; identify warning signs of aggression; and ward off or respond to escalated incidents.

“Whether in the workplace, or society-at-large, failure to effectively manage conduct that may or may not be related to mental illness may bring consequences from simple organizational inefficiencies to the more tragic and violent consequences we have all too frequently seen,” said Dixon.

For more information about MSEC’s services or the Employment Law Update, visit www.msec.org.

For 70 years, MSEC has hosted educational events such as the Employment Law Update for employers throughout the Western United States to maintain productive employer/employee relationships and to build effective, successful businesses.

bullying

How to Detect and Protect Against Workplace Bullying

Stories of workplace bullying are commonplace throughout the United States.

Some real-life examples:

Mavis: “When I started there, I was told that someone had been acting in the position and had expected to get the job. This person continually undermined me and turned other staff against me. I endured 12 months of hell, and felt as if I was sinking in quicksand.”

A male employee at a different company: “The misery took over my whole life. I turned nasty and bitter and treated my wife and kids like whipping posts. After many visits to a psychologist, I was able to think of all the positive things in my life. Now I look back and think I wouldn’t want to go through that experience again.”

In general, there are no legal repercussions for non-physical bullying except in specific cases, such as sexual harassment. In fact, bullying is a character trait that tends to be condoned in American society. Consider our national obsession — football. The object of this celebrated game is to get the ball to the other player’s goal, no matter what it takes: trampling, hitting, pushing, screaming. If football is a metaphor for American society, then the winner is the person who pushes others out of the way and wins no matter the cost.

Bullies win by controlling situations and people around them. They crave power and the attention that comes from getting what they want.

Adults have a difficult time performing their jobs effectively when subjected to bullying by a co-worker. It takes a toll physically because of our physiological responses to emotional stress. Typically, victims endure feelings of depression, guilt and shame, and they suffer sleep loss and fatigue.  In some cases, victims begin to believe the bully’s behavior is warranted, and they develop feelings of worthlessness. They cannot complete tasks at the same level as others in their units.

Victims of bullying may suffer from panic disorders, post traumatic stress syndrome, agoraphobia and stress-induced high blood pressure. If they leave the job or are docked because of resulting lowered performance, they face economic issues. Some take their own lives.

The abuse takes a toll on victims in every way imaginable.

Are you a bully?

Being accused of being the bully can be difficult to accept. You may believe your actions were unintentional, or a justified emotional response to provocation. Perhaps, you see yourself as the only one in the office qualified to do anything right.  However, whatever you have said or done, whether purposefully or not, you have created a culture of negativity for at least one person and you need to honestly assess the situation and your role in it.

Symptoms that you may be the bully include:

• Insulting a coworker (remember, one person’s “joke” may be another’s insult).

• Undermining another employee’s work by creating a hostile environment or perhaps by consistently calling their attention to “flaws”. (Bullies focus on a person, while constructive criticism focuses on a task.)

• As an employer, ignoring your employees’ suggestions.

• Humiliating your employee in front of others.

If any of these sound like something that you may be doing, it is important to address this immediately with your victim. You may want to speak with your doctor about getting help, such as counseling, sensitivity training, anger management and other seminars.

It is important to understand the signs and symptoms of a bully in order to help the victim and the victimizer deal with and exterminate the behavior.

If you are a victim, diligently record workplace bullying events. If you choose to make a formal complaint, you will be responsible for providing information should there be charges brought against the bully.

Rakesh Malhotra, founder of Five Global Values, is a world-traveled, values-driven business leader who specializes in organization behavior. Rakesh’s fascination with the connection between human behavior and core values was sparked many years ago. As a result of working, living, and traveling around the world to nearly  40 countries, Rakesh realized that the Five Global Values determine overall  human behavior  across all cultures. He is also the author of Adventures of Tornado Kid: Whirling Back Home Towards Timeless Values.

Pressure In The Workplace

Pressure In The Workplace

It presents itself in a host of manifestations: sleepless nights, gut-wrenching fear, grinding teeth, an angry kick to a trash can.

Workplace stress has changed the environment for those who have been fortunate enough to maintain employment through the recession, but shoulder guilt and face a heavier workload because they survived the cutbacks.

“We have seen an increasing number of hospital and clinic visits with the primary complaint being that stress in the workplace has led to increased levels of depression and anxiety,” says Brian Espinoza, a psychiatrist at St. Luke’s Behavioral Health Center in Phoenix.

A still-struggling economy has cranked up the pressure on those workers left to carry the load. A poll by Right Management shows that 79 percent of employees say their workload has increased because of layoffs. And a recent study commissioned by the American Psychological Association shows that 20 percent of workers say their daily level of stress exceeds 8 on a 10-point scale.

“The economy has caused many companies to ‘downsize,’ effectively increasing the workload of the remaining staff,” says Dr. Kevin Klassen, a cardiologist with Scottsdale Healthcare. “With the increased demands of
the workplace being coupled with fear of loss of job and health benefits, negative stress increases markedly.”

Here are some signs of workplace stress, according to Chip Coffey, director of outpatient services for St. Luke’s Behavioral Health:

  • Increase in workers’ compensation claims
  • Increase in employee complaints and grievances
  • Customer complaints describing your employees as “irritable” or “stressed”
  • Verbal or physical conflict among any of your employees
  • Increase in sick days or call-offs
  • Frequent staff turnover or requests to transfer out

Experts warn that workplace stress doesn’t just impact the employee in a negative manner, it can adversely impact the business’ bottom line.

“When employees experience stress and anxiety for whatever reason, they tend to follow poor eating habits and forego their daily exercise regimen,” says Cheyenne Autumn, director of health and wellness strategies for UnitedHealthcare of Arizona. “High stress levels can prompt absenteeism and decrease (productivity) among employees. Also, stress can cause high blood pressure and impair the immune system response, making people more vulnerable to colds, flu and other infectious conditions.”

To prevent stress from further depleting the workplace, Klassen says employers need to assume that their employees have personal and job-related stressors and remember that everyone has their breaking point.

“Employers need to say please and thank you,” he says. “They need to praise good performances openly and address mistakes privately in a way where the intent is to instruct, rather than to belittle. The same workload can be perceived as crushing or as manageable, depending upon the environment in which the work is done.”

Experts suggest that employees take a proactive approach to managing his or her stress level. Autumn says stressed-out employees should recognize that exercise is the best antidote. Simple steps, such as walking around the building a couple of times each day or taking the stairs instead of the elevator can reduce stress, she says. These activities stimulate adrenalin and the movement of the body will energize the employee for the remainder of the day.

“Employees should also be open and honest with their supervisor or manager,” recommends Dr. Anne-Marie Reed, a board certified family physician at Camelback Health Care. “Communication is the best course of action. Discuss what is causing the workplace stress. That may start with understanding the symptoms of stress itself.”

Espinoza says that it is important for employees to self-monitor for signs of depression and anxiety, such as insomnia, lack of interest in activities which were previously enjoyed, poor self-confidence, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, lack of appetite, lethargy, or sluggishness, and most importantly, thoughts of suicide or homicide. If any of these symptoms are troublesome and interfere with work and home responsibilities, seek medical attention immediately.

Coffey also says it’s important to remind yourself that while you may feel stressed, things aren’t always as bad as they seem.

“Practice being content,” he says. “Most of us know how to be discontent, but we do not practice letting ourselves be content. Take time each day to recognize that things may not be great, they may not be horrible. They just are. This is being content.”

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

Christine French - Creates a Nonprofit & successful entrepreneurial venture. - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Christine French Of The Nonprofit Diversity Leadership Alliance & Global Diversity Consulting

Christine French Took Her Expertise In Diversity To Create A Nonprofit And A Successful Entrepreneurial Venture.

Even as a young child growing up in Vietnam, Christine French always knew her main purpose in life was to help people from different backgrounds and experiences come together and form a whole.

“When I was eight, the first lesson in social studies was talking about ambassadors. Right then and there I stood up and announced to my teacher and my class, to their surprise and mine, ‘I am going to be one of those,’” French says. “The ambassador, as I learned that day in the lesson, is the person who helps people understand each other so they no longer have a need to fight, to have war. That has followed me since I was eight.”

In 2002, in the wake of Sept. 11, French hosted a roundtable in Phoenix that brought together business leaders and various associations to discuss the importance of diversity to business success.

Since the Diversity Leadership Alliance was officially formed in 2003, it has grown rapidly, and now hosts a wide range of events, including monthly workshops with average attendance rates of more than 100 people, quarterly executive and legal forums, an annual diversity conference, and a youth council.

French says she started the nonprofit Diversity Leadership Alliance and her business, Global Diversity Consulting, to dispel the many myths surrounding diversity efforts.

Diversity’s progress has been slowed, French says, because the creation of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and affirmative action programs have led many employers to view diversity as a numbers game.

This misconception created resistance to embracing diversity, as many people and companies thought hiring minorities meant not hiring the most qualified candidate, she says.

But French, who is founder and co-chair of the Diversity Leadership Alliance, argues that diversity is really about embracing the gifts and talents of every individual, and putting those strengths to work for a company.

“EEOC and affirmative action are counting people; diversity and inclusion (are) making people count,” French says.

The only way to combat misunderstandings about diversity, French says, is to create dialogue, which is the goal of the Diversity Leadership Alliance and the forums it hosts. French says she wants this dialogue to lead to major changes in the way people think about diversity.

While promoting the benefits of diversity, French says she is often asked, “Why do I have to change? I’ve been successful so far.”

Her response?

“We all need to change, myself included,” she says. “We all need to change because what brought us here today, all the skill and talent and good work we’ve done yesterday to bring us here today, will not be enough to take us where we need to be tomorrow.”

French’s commitment to diversity extends to her own livelihood. In 2007, she left her job as senior global diversity leader at American Express to spend more time with her four grandsons. However, she continues to champion diversity through Global Diversity Consulting.

French has written and self-published two books, “The Lotus Path” and “How to Get Along With Other People Without Hiring a Hit Man.”

“The Lotus Path,” which will be available in March, details French’s life, her success and how she learned transformational leadership during her world travels.

French co-wrote “How to Get Along With Other People Without Hiring a Hit Man” with Rico Burton. The book, which was published in October, features 10 stories about workplace challenges, and includes activities to help readers find solutions to each situation.

With her books, her life and her work, French is trying to clear away the fallacies about diversity, and one day hopes, to quote Martin Luther King Jr., that her “grandsons (will) be judged by the content of their character, and not by the color of their skin.”

Until then, French will continue pushing for more and more dialogue about diversity.

“Diversity … is about people. It’s about you. It’s about me,” French says. “Let’s clear it once and for all, because as long as we have a misconception, a misunderstanding, the work will never be done.”

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Three business people standing together with arms around each other

Are You A Kind Boss?

Look in the mirror and ask yourself: What kind of boss are you? Do you resemble Cruella De Vil from “101 Dalmatians” – a heartless, puppy-snatcher who orders her hapless henchmen to carry out her cruel demands? Or are you more like Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars” — a dedicated, knowledgeable, soft-spoken Jedi Master with a wry sense of humor?

What are the characteristics of a good boss? While there are far too many traits to mention, here are the top three traits necessary to motivate workers:

A kind boss is someone who solves problems and manages conflict

Studies show that full-time employees spend nearly three hours per week dealing with conflict. Poorly managed conflict can bring serious problems to the workplace, including personal insults and attacks, sickness or absence, and can even lead to someone leaving the company. Instead of avoiding conflict, a good manager uses it as a means to produce a better solution to a workplace problem. Numerous books discuss how to deal with conflict. One that specifically deals with five primary styles of handling conflict is “Introduction to Conflict Management: Improving Performance Using the TKI” by Kenneth Thomas.

A kind boss is someone who practices direct, open communications

In this jobless recovery, employees spend nearly three hours a day worrying about job security. A survey by Lynn Taylor Consulting found that management may be unwittingly fueling this fear by staying behind closed doors: 76 percent of employees said that a closed door triggers thoughts of being laid off. Employees want more communication — whether good news or bad — because it makes them feel like they matter.

A kind boss is someone who invests in employees

A soft economy is the perfect time for managers to think of ways other than money to motivate employees. In a recent survey by SkillSoft, eight out of 10 employees stated they would have higher job satisfaction if they received more on-the-job training. Helping employees acquire new skills and assume greater responsibility to advance professionally is one of the most effective ways managers can promote loyalty, improve performance and build future leaders.

woman holding her head - looking stressed

Five Ways To Reduce Stress In The Workplace

  1. man on phone
    Communicate:If co-workers are causing you stress, ask yourself — why? Perhaps the two of you just aren’t communicating. Put yourself in their shoes — listen to their needs and see if you can accommodate them. If you can, a source of conflict is removed and so is the stress associated with it. If you can better communicate your needs, others are more likely to agree with you.
  2. sun shining thru clouds
    Bright Side:
    When things turn negative, you may follow with a negative pattern of thinking. It’s easy to say that you hate your job, but are you doing anything to improve the situation? If you try to have a positive attitude, it’ll be easier to overcome problems at work. It’s quite possible that everything at work is not as bad as it feels when you are angry. If you try to focus on the things that are going right, you will be less stressed and will increase your job satisfaction.
  3. woman doing yoga in field
    Take Care:
    When the work load is unbearable and you find yourself working through lunch or overtime, stop and take breaks. Enjoy something that isn’t work related. Try not to take work home. Exercise and eat right. A healthy body translates to a healthy mind.
  4. people working together
    Everyone’s Human:
    Everyone makes mistakes. Your team can still produce quality work even if you make a few mistakes. Remember, the work place will still function even if you aren’t there. Remain flexible.
  5. child in adults work shoes
    Other’s Shoes:
    If you put yourself in other people’s shoes you will be able to better understand where they are coming from. If you understand their expectations you can better manage a project and your stress.
hr_director_mega_biz

2009 Mega Business HR Director Of The Year Finalists

Brian BoylanName: Brian Boylan
Title: Senior Vice President of Human Resources
Company: JDA Software

Years with company: 4
Years in current position: 2.5
Company established: 1985
No. of employees in AZ: 360
No. of employees in HR department: 12
www.jda.com

Someone must be doing the right thing when a company’s own employees are its most effective tool for recruiting new talent. At JDA Software, that someone is Brian Boylan, senior vice president of human resources.

Boylan is praised for helping establish a culture at the Scottsdale-based technology company that allows employees to succeed professionally and earn recognition for their accomplishments through extensive award programs. Although JDA uses recruitment and assessment tools, ultimately job candidates who interview are impressed by JDA’s culture and the collaboration among its staff members. Employees feed the candidate pipeline by offering referrals for openings.
JDA’s culture is in part created by a performance-management program strongly supported by Boylan. The program emphasizes continuous learning plans, 20 hours of professional development annually and 360-degree reviews centered on leadership skills. Boylan also developed an emerging-leaders program that brings potential company leaders together for development and pairs them with senior-executive mentors.

Boylan and his staff understand that well-rounded employees need balance in their lives. Employees may work from home to take care of personal matters. The human resources department also offers FranklinCovey’s Seven Habits of Highly Effective People seminar to give employees the tools they need to find a balance between work and home. Onsite, JDA provides a wellness program, yoga and a Nintendo Wii game room.

Diversity is another hallmark of JDA’s culture. As a global company, JDA has a presence in many countries with varied cultures, all of which are reflected in the company’s workplace.


Tina HuffName: Tina Huff
Title: Executive Director of Human Resources and Organizational Development
Company: Pro’s Ranch Markets

Years with company: 3
Years in current position: 3
Company established: 1992
No. of employees in AZ: 1,945
No. of employees in HR department: 24
www.prosranch.com

As a growing upscale Hispanic grocery-store chain, Pro’s Ranch Markets takes extra steps to create diversity within its employee ranks and Tina Huff is deeply involved.

As executive director of human resources and organizational development for the Ontario, Calif.-based company, Huff works out of the regional office in Phoenix. Her department coordinates with several nonprofit agencies to provide work opportunities for refugees the organizations resettle in the United States. Huff’s department also offers jobs to Central and South American college students who work summers in the U.S. on visas. Onsite English-as-a-second-language classes are offered through Scottsdale Community College.

With more than 20 years of human resources management experience in several industries, Huff has a variety of responsibilities with Pro’s Ranch. This year, she directed development of the Ranchie Steps Program, which provides job-training modules and establishes compensation structures for each department companywide. This program shows how employees can grow professionally within Pro’s Ranch. In Arizona this year, Huff rolled out a retail management certificate program, tuition assistance, an apprenticeship training program for bakers and the ESL classes.

Pro’s Markets has been growing the past few years, opening two new stores in Arizona and expanding into Texas and New Mexico. Huff worked with the company’s operations and advertising departments to craft a plan for bringing in new staff. An internal talent assessment offers new employment opportunities for existing employees. Job candidates are recruited from local nonprofit and employment associations and through job fairs that attract as many as 5,000 people.

healthcare onsite for large employers

Healthcare Solutions Center Provides Onsite Health Care To Large Employers

Time and money are two things few people can afford to waste, especially these days. In an effort to save both, people often put their own health concerns on the backburner. After all, who wants to take time away from work or family to go to the doctor, wait around to actually see the doctor, and then get a diagnosis and a prescription that has to be filled for a hefty fee (not to mention the cost of the visit)?

But Frances Ducar is changing the way health care is handled in the workplace and making it much more convenient for people to confront their health concerns. As founder and director of Healthcare Solutions Center, she strives to save Arizona employers and their employees money. And she’s saving lives along the way.

Ducar spent more than 20 years in the health care industry in various positions, including first assistant to some of the country’s top surgeons and as a family nurse practitioner.

“I’ve worked with some really amazing specialists, and a little piece of each of them is what makes me who I am today,” she says of her mentors.

In her experiences over the years, she saw how companies were being “eaten alive” by insurance companies. She knew she wanted to find a way to help employers offer their employees quality health care and help employees afford the health care they deserve. With that, Healthcare Solutions Center was born in 2003.

Healthcare Solutions Center offers large companies (with 500 employees or more) an onsite health care clinic staffed by a family nurse practitioner. With HCS onsite clinics, employers save money on their overall health care costs. Employees save money because HCS eliminates co-pays and deductibles and reduces prescription costs to as little as $4. Employees also receive confidential and top-notch care from a nurse practitioner. In addition, HCS has a relationship with a network of some of the state’s finest specialists. If a patient needs further examination beyond what the nurse practitioner can provide, HCS can arrange a timely appointment with a specialist — sometimes even the same day.

“A company is only as healthy as its employees,” says Ducar, adding that people are much more likely to visit an onsite clinic because it eliminates the need to take time off work to travel offsite to a doctor’s office.

Employees don’t just see the nurse practitioner if they are sick. HCS onsite clinics also offer wellness programs to help patients quit smoking and lose weight.

“Knowing you are helping everyone you see in one way or another, seeing a person change their lifestyle, and seeing companies save money and put it back into their wellness plans — these are just a few of the immense rewards of this business,” Ducar says.

She feels good knowing that employers are saving millions on their health care costs and that HCS is helping employees appropriately utilize every avenue and benefit of the company’s wellness plan, including counseling and beyond.

But there are challenges as well. Ducar personally selects her family nurse practitioners, and she admits that placing the right nurse practitioner with the right company is one of the hardest and most important, parts of her business.

“My nurse practitioners are a reflection of me,” she says. “They become the advocate for their patients who just don’t know where to go.”

Ducar must have a knack for placing her nurse practitioners because she says she’s never had a dissatisfied patient.

“The patients trust (the nurse practitioners), and they are all happy to have us there,” she says.

The entrepreneur predicts huge growth for the future of her company, but she says her business will remain in the state for the long haul.

“Love of medicine and the desire to help Arizona companies afford their health care is what drove me to start this company,” Ducar explains.

Motivate Employees

Keeping Employees Motivated In A Troubled Economy Is Critical

The Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) figures that it can cost up to one-third of an employee’s annual salary to recruit and replace that employee. For the most part, it is to the employer’s advantage to retain and maintain their skilled work force in a tumultuous marketplace.

Uncertain times, family issues and unstable financial situations all compete with the workplace for balance. Couple that with the constant barrage of dismal employment news of company cutbacks, bailouts and failures, and understandably there’s not much motivation left for the workplace. Many people are wondering how secure their job really is and if they need to be on the lookout for the next opportunity.

How do you get your employees to step “up” and stay optimistic when it seems like so many things are falling apart around them? Here are a few quick steps to keep your employees engaged and positive.

Be honest and open
Communication is one of those things that you just can never get enough of — but it does take work. The worst thing you can do for morale is to paint a rosy picture one week, only to have the bottom drop out of their world the following week. No one likes workplace surprises, especially your employees. Regular and transparent communication is essential to maintaining your employees’ trust. Also, remember to let your team members know how much you appreciate them and their personal contributions to the company.

Partner with your workers
Let them be part of the solution. Good old-fashioned brainstorming and suggestion boxes are excellent ways for employers to engage and encourage their employees to use their expertise to help the company reduce costs and increase revenue. Remember to recognize those contributors whose ideas are implemented with either public praise and/or non-monetary perks, such as a certificate or a preferred parking space.

Build up your team
Creating a sense of community does wonders to build team morale. By encouraging positive working relationships through bonding, walls come down and individuals work together toward solutions. Staff development, lunchtime personal growth workshops, community service projects, or even a staff potluck lunch or get-together, are ways to promote team cohesiveness.

Reward creatively
Although a pay raise or some other cash award would be nice, it just may not be feasible for the company right now. But, that shouldn’t stop you from recognizing and rewarding hard work. A covered parking space in the dead of summer in Arizona or in the snowy winter in Ohio certainly is a major perk. A dress-down day when certain business goals are achieved would be welcomed. Even a handshake and “job well done” during a staff meeting can show appreciation without breaking the bank.

Help your employees create work-life balance
Work-life balance seems to be everyone’s hot button these days. Flexible schedules are one way of helping your employees realize it. Depending upon business needs and the employee’s position, flexible schedules can allow your employees to have the work-life balance they need. Telecommuting, job sharing, compact work weeks and flexible start times can be just the motivator the employee needed.

In moving forward, keeping employees motivated is truly a necessity in these uncertain times. Not only will your employees’ motivation be on target, but you’ll see positive results in your ROI as well.

visual workspace

Office Designs Can Spark Employee Creativity

We have all seen, or at least heard about, “off-the-charts” office design that is not only cool, but also inspires its work force. Companies such as Google, Pixar, Herman Miller, Red Bull, and even one blogger in her vintage trailer, have been recognized for their creativity in the workplace. These companies have shown us that designing an office that is “cool” is about embracing your company culture and projecting a contagious attitude.

Your corporate culture says a lot about the way your office should look and function. What do you want to project? What are your core values? What kind of clients do you want to attract? Cool office design is more than a flat panel TV and retro furniture in your lobby. It’s your company’s essence — its physical presence. And we all know what they say about first impressions.

Creating spaces that keep employees engaged and that support the way they live, work and play will stimulate productivity and result in a much happier staff. This will naturally lead to higher client satisfaction and greater return on your investment. So, how do you get started?

Keep in mind a few simple starting points:
Involve everyone in the office in a brainstorming session. What are employees looking for from their workspace? How do they want it to feel and function? Is privacy important? What do your employees wish for in their environment? Choose a point of contact to champion these ideas with your interior designer.

Be flexible, because it is the key to planning a successful work environment. Allowing people to have choices and variety in the way they work and collaborate enhances the experience of the workplace.

Provide opportunities for impromptu meeting and spaces that allow workers to get away from the monotony of sitting at their desks all day.

A connection to nature is an important factor in productivity. People need to be able to see the blue sky, get fresh air and soak up the sun. Oftentimes, we see offices that block the view by installing opaque high panels and storage above eye level, creating depressing “cubicle farms.”

Don’t forget about public and common areas. There are endless opportunities to bring out your company’s brand, culture and differentiation. These spaces also offer a place to relieve stress and to get away from the daily grind.

Creating a cool office in hot Arizona is not as difficult (or as expensive) as it may seem. It all revolves around defining who you are and having fun with it. You’ll know that you’ve achieved “office nirvana” when your clients start asking to have their meetings in your office.

Phoenix_skyline_Arizona_USA

A Voyage Of Discovery In Phoenix

Facing a down economy, shrinking budgets and significant pressures to outperform the year’s commitments, how do you find time for sustainability? Let’s face it, if there is no payback within the current year, it’s unlikely you can get capital or modify your operating budget to make any kind of significant difference toward a green program, right? Wrong!

In a recessionary environment there’s more than one way to cut costs and leverage those savings to support other initiatives. In addition to pure cost savings, a little bit of planning and adjustment of current policies can yield results with little or no additional expense.

Our approach at the Greater Phoenix Chapter of IFMA, beginning in August 2008, was to establish a Facility Managers’ Green Peer Group (FMGPG) to foster open information exchange and provide a forum for sharing best practices.

What FMGPG has done is to create the environment for the peer group to be successful. A facilitator who is familiar with the subject matter is the primary pivot point; we manage and develop the agenda, secure the location and communicate through the FMGPG to the group members. The facilitator then leads the meeting and keeps the group focused on the agenda and future goals.

The initial goal of the peer group was to educate the members on the five major categories of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) as they related to the Existing Building Operations and Maintenance structure, or EBOM.

The LEED-EB system focuses on building maintenance and operations. Unlike the other LEED standards, points are awarded for established programs and policies with measured results over time. Metrics are taken during a performance period lasting from three to 12 months.

As with the LEED for new construction products, points are awarded in six categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor air quality, and innovation in operations

There are 92 available points, with a minimum of 34 required for the lowest level of certification. Most organizations nationwide appear to be striving for Silver or Gold certification based on the initial condition of the building.

We established a yearlong program that was based on the following formula:
General Discussion and Checklist Review + Facility Examples and Benchmarking + Site Visit = A Solid Foundation of Understanding.

So, what’s the bottom line on the benefits of the peer group:

  • Approaching sustainability concepts with minimal or no impact to your FM resources and budget.
  • Marketing your FM organization through sustainability involvement.
  • Taking advantage of LEED benefits without certifying your site.
  • Decoding the myths and fears of LEED.
  • Strengthening your FM position by demonstrating sustainability initiatives.
  • Demonstrating the hidden value of your FM organization by introducing and achieving sustainable initiatives.
  • Educating your staff, customers and stakeholders, as well as yourself, on sustainability and the workplace.
  • One LEED case study, managed by an IFMA CFM (Certified Facility Manager), has shown the following validated results:

    • Effectively reduced electricity use by 35 percent.
    • Effectively reduced natural gas use by 41 percent.
    • Reduced domestic water use by 22 percent.
    • Reduced landscape water use by 76 percent.
    • Diverted up to 85 percent of its solid waste.
    • Reduced total pollution by 26 percent.
    • Reduced CO2 emissions by 17 percent.

    A new study by CoStar Group, the commercial equivalent of MLS, has found that sustainable “green” buildings outperform their peer, non-green assets in key areas such as occupancy, sale price and rental rates, sometimes by wide margins.

    The results indicate a broader demand by property investors and tenants for buildings that have earned either LEED certification or the Energy Star label, and strengthen the “business case” for green buildings, which proponents have increasingly cast as financially sound investments.

    According to the study, LEED buildings command rent premiums of $11.24 per square foot over their non-LEED peers, and have 3.8 percent higher occupancy. Rental rates in Energy Star buildings represent a $2.38 per square foot premium over comparable non-Energy Star buildings, and have 3.6 percent higher occupancy. And, in a trend that could signal greater attention from institutional investors and the C-level, Energy Star buildings are selling for an average of $61 per square foot more than their peers, while LEED buildings command a remarkable $171 more per square foot.

    At the end of the day — even in a down economy — you can make a difference, even with little or no budget.

    Pick the Right Employee

    Hiring The Right People Is More Important Than Ever, But Are You Asking The Right Questions?

    When the economy slows, companies tend to slow their hiring and expect more from their existing employees. It quickly becomes critical that employees perform up to these new, heightened expectations. For those positions that companies do hire for, selecting the right candidate becomes more important than ever. However, many hiring managers tend to ask the wrong questions, focusing the interview on traits that are very trainable versus those traits that a company cannot train.

    Hiring managers tend to focus questions on experience for the position, systems knowledge, actual time spent doing the job with previous employers, etc. In fact, these are actually poor predictors of a candidate’s success in the workplace. Generally, only employees applying for professionally educated positions (e.g. engineers, chemists, attorneys, etc.,) are exempt from this best practice. So what should you focus your interview on?

    Focus of questions
    Center your questions on traits that take more effort to develop. Interview questions should dwell on attention to detail, the candidate’s passion for the job, their initiative, and their self-confidence, to name a few.

    There are many hiring managers that value a relative lack of experience (and many human resource managers that agree). Candidates without experience tend to lack the bad habits typical of those with experience. It is often easier to train a green candidate from ground zero (sometimes called growing a candidate organically) versus “untraining” an experienced candidate’s bad habits and then inserting the desired habits. A candidate who has worked for several companies doing similar roles and is now in your office looking for a job may have a significant number of bad habits and has a track record of leaving previous employers for “employment competitors.”

    Experience is one of the easier items to give a new hire. However, try giving a new employee stronger customer-service skills, greater self-confidence to deal with those problem vendors, or a hunger for doing a great job. Those are not easily trainable, so those traits are what an interview should focus on.

    Types of questions
    Spend your time asking the candidate behavior-oriented questions. Typically, these questions start with phrases like, “Tell me about a time when you …” or “Give me a specific example of a time when you …” When asking these behaviorally focused questions, it is critical that the candidate gives you one specific example. Further, ensure he isolates his role in his example; don’t allow him to use words such as “we” or “our.” If he does, ask him what his specific role. This helps ensure his answer provides you with the information you need.

    The days of asking, “If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be and why” are over. The current trend is asking negative questions — questions that force a candidate to talk about her weaknesses. This helps you see her willingness to admit mistakes, how she has handled mistakes in the past, and — most importantly — what she has learned from those mistakes.

    Sample questions
    Putting these guidelines together is the key to a solid interview. Some general, behaviorally focused questions include:

    Tell me about the last time you had a disagreement with a co-worker and what you did about it? — Listen to what the issue was over, how productive and mature the approach was, and what he specifically did to solve the problem. Candidates who have a passion for their work will work to resolve issues with co-workers and will keep the boss informed of personality clashes, typically without asking for intervention.

    Tell me about the biggest mistake you made in the last 12 months and what you learned from it. — This negative question forces the candidate to take ownership for a relatively large mistake and should end with her telling you what steps she took to ensure a similar mistake (e.g. a time-management snafu, a relationship-building blunder, etc.) would not happen again. All employees make mistakes. Admitting them and taking corrective steps is the absolute most an employer can ask from their employees.

    Give me your top three strengths and your biggest developmental need (weakness). — It is very telling to hear what a candidate believes are his behavioral strengths, as well as his biggest need. Listen for strengths that are traits you cannot teach a candidate (e.g. passion for the job, ability to work with others, etc.). Do not let candidates get away with telling you that their biggest need is that they work too hard or plan too much. Tell your candidate to dig deeper.

    Interviews can be very useful at pulling out the different strengths and weaknesses of a candidate, as long as the interviewer is focused on the right personality traits and asks the right questions. Pull their experience from their resume, but pull their personality from their interview.

    Keep Workers Working

    Ways To Keep Workers Working In A Troubled Economy

    Our current job market is struggling through one of the worst periods of unemployment in memory. The unemployment rate continues to creep toward the unspeakable double digits, a number not reached in Arizona for more than 25 years. Whatever name is attached — downsizing, rightsizing, re-sizing, layoff, offboarding, reduction-in-force, restructuring — the result is the same: lost jobs in the name of economic turmoil that has no conscience.

    Whether you are amazed at the statistics or whether you are one, there is no doubt you have watched the economy take a frightening toll on your workplace. Those who are fortunate enough to still earn a paycheck have had to watch their co-workers walked out in myriad reduction-in-force actions that have dominated news media from California to Florida. Few companies have been spared in their attempts to balance their books by slashing one of the most expensive items on their check register — payroll costs. It’s an ugly story that plays out in all corners, and there is little confidence that the worst of the cutbacks is behind us.

    Local public job assistance resources have been overwhelmed. According to Patrick Burkhart, assistant director at Maricopa Workforce Connections, the no-charge centers have approached capacity in their attempts to provide local job seekers with a head start on hunting for new positions. The MWC has experienced a 100 percent increase in year-over-year traffic in its centers, which currently assist up to 500 job seekers per day in each of the two “one stop” centers. While laid-off workers range from the highly skilled to laborers, preparing them for their next opportunity is often an exercise in futility. With so few available positions, and no job growth predicted for 2009, it becomes a cruel parody of “all dressed up and no place to go.”

    Corporate executives cannot be blamed for adding to this unemployment quagmire. Their directive is to ensure financial survival through any legitimate means available. For most, that means a consideration of reducing work force costs, which may include not only wages, but also significant associated costs of health and welfare benefits, matching 401(k) contributions, profit sharing, tuition reimbursement, training or other company-provided benefits or perks. There is also an indirect impact on the company; a deterioration of employee loyalty, decreased customer confidence, and perhaps most importantly, a sense of apprehension among employees in fearing a loss of their own jobs. The result may have an effect on employee productivity and in retaining and attracting the best and brightest talent for the future.

    It is no wonder then that reducing headcount is considered a last resort among decision makers. But what should companies do to prevent having to announce the dreaded “L” word, as 60 percent of surveyed U.S. companies plan to do in 2009, and thereby disrupt internal work operations for perhaps the long term? Executives first need to create a realistic vision of the direction of their business, attempt to recognize the timing of the “bottom” for their industry, and then set a plan in place to preserve a profit margin that will sustain the business. This analysis has become the key leadership initiative that guides decision making, and may ultimately affect the survival of the company.

    It is said that desperate times call for desperate measures. If so, companies are often cornered into making tough sacrifices in the name of survival. Human resources can play an integral role in the strategic analysis of the business plan, and while cost reductions must be considered to save jobs, there may also be time for process improvement opportunities.

    Among budget initiatives to be considered:
    Freeze unnecessary discretionary spending — Travel for other than customer visits, employee “business” lunches, social events, overtime, temporary help, consultants, new software, advertising, and conferences or training that are not critical can be curtailed.

    Wage considerations — In addition to a bonus and wage freeze, consider a salary reduction, perhaps only for those earning above a targeted salary. Depending on work requirements, consider a reduced workweek in exchange for the wage reduction, or have a temporary company shutdown. Suspend any policy that allows employees to cash-in vacation or paid time off (PTO) accruals, and instead mandate they use the time.

    Company contributions to employee programs — For companies that need to make a more serious dent in expenditures, cutbacks may be made in the health care plan design, tuition reimbursement, 401(k) match, or company paid life insurance or disability plans.

    Don’t expect employees to express appreciation for these types of actions, but every wage earner in today’s work force understands the reality of a balance sheet and its affect on his or her job. While employees usually bear the brunt of company cutbacks, there are actions HR can propose that might soften the impact.

    Cross training and skill enhancement — A business slowdown is an excellent time to prepare employees to assume additional job skills for the future through on-the-job cross training.

    Solicit employee input — Using employees to provide savings suggestions will enhance their buy-in and may even improve morale. Above all else, they want to keep their jobs and when viewed as a partnership with the company, will help foster mutual respect.

    Job transfer — Either as an assignment of temporary resources or a long-term solution to unbalanced workloads, employees may be interested in moving to a new function with a different career path.

    Communicate — Employees may be more understanding of the company’s plight if they are able to share the news along the way with no surprises.

    Today, we still find ourselves in the middle of a sluggish economy that has turned into a marathon, but the finish line must be somewhere down the road. Leaders who can see that far will make the right strategic decisions in the best interest of their organization and its employees. Those who consistently communicate that vision, and take action to save jobs wherever possible, will find a loyal work force ready and willing to enjoy better times ahead.

    organized desk

    Creating More Efficient Workspaces Can Increase Productivity And Reduce Costs

    Bracing for austere times ahead, office leaders have two obvious places to cut back: payroll and real estate. No one would suggest that cutting staff is an easy or enjoyable thing to do, but it can be an opportunity. Space freed by reductions in payroll can be reorganized to improve workplaces, bolster worker morale and raise productivity.

    Even before the recent financial crisis took hold, Gensler’s research found that 36 percent of U.S. office space is considered by the workers using it to be ineffective. This is in large measure because the nature of work is changing. Formerly the domain of so-called creative industries, collaborative meetings and group work scenarios have assumed priority over individual focus time.

    Reducing office space as a cost-cutting strategy can actually create inefficiencies if you simply shrink space and continue with the same workplace model. Gensler’s recent workplace survey found that firms that provide appropriate workplaces for the type of business conducted have higher levels of employee engagement, brand equity and profit, with profit growth up to 14 percentage points greater than those with less effective work environments.

    If layoffs have left you with too much space for too few people, look into whether you can unload space through subletting or simply returning it to the landlord. There can be a real negative psychological impact among employees who always are aware that there’s an empty desk next to them. At the same time, a little more breathing room can boost spirits and productivity.

    Before making any plans, take a look around the office and really understand how space is being used. Observe how people are working in the office, how areas are really utilized. What’s empty? What’s overcrowded? Where have people been doing workarounds to make space effective? Look for wear patterns, improvised equipment and furnishings, over-flowing desks, unused conference rooms, etc.

    When you’re ready to take action, consider these possibilities:
    Make sure you’re getting the most out of your space by converting as many spaces as possible from single-use spaces into multipurpose spaces. A reception area can double as a client area, employee café, community space and optional work area. This approach will require furniture that supports multiple uses.

    Wireless capability makes your office one big workspace. Anyone can go to any corner of the workplace to huddle in groups or get away from everyone for some solitary focus time.

    By strategically locating amenities, you can increase the opportunities for incidental, as well as intentional, collaboration among staff members.

    Branding the workplace nurtures corporate culture and improves a sense of teamwork and pride in the work produced. Color, art, graphic images and printed messages used in strategic locations can be powerful.

    Improve visual connectivity among colleagues to promote collaboration and social interaction. This can be achieved in several ways: employ an open office plan, install low-panel workstations and reduce the number of closed offices.

    Create space by increasing density and clustering meeting rooms. Create collaborative social zones in the space outside of those areas. This energizes public areas while reducing space taken up by circulation paths.

    Place workstations and open collaborative spaces along window areas, and put offices inboard to bring light deeper into the space. Natural light in workspaces raises productivity and reduces energy costs.

    Accommodate telecommuting when appropriate. You can save on real estate, energy costs and demonstrate an interest in your employees’ work-life balance. With mobile workers, be sure you have space in the office that gives them easy access to the tools they require and the people they need to connect with.

    Perhaps before going all in, make small changes and monitor the results. It is important to assess your workplace layout before making any changes and to evaluate the results after implementation. Observation and surveys are effective ways to validate what’s working. Once your workplace environment changes are complete and have been occupied for a few months, verify that your design is advancing workplace goals. Consider evaluating your space every two to three years to help keep your workplace effective.

    Ask where you’ve captured real estate efficiencies. Have you been able to get double and even triple use out of some spaces? Is every part of your office space being deployed in the service of supporting work activities? Are your employees more connected, informed, collaborative and productive? Ultimately, your new design should deliver improved business performance.

    Creating a more efficient, collaborative and accommodating workplace is something that pays dividends even in financially distressed times. A proud organization with employees who enjoy going to work and who feel the company cares about them will work harder and more effectively no matter the state of the economy.

    Generation Y

    The Me Gen: How The Bad Economy Could Affect Gen Y In The Workplace

    Like it or not, the future is in the hands of Generation Y, and in this turbulent economy, an increasing number of companies are trying to find productive ways to work with a generation that has been raised on technology, the Internet, and ushered through their younger years on a velvet pillow.

    Chris Elliott, senior manager of recruiting for the Phoenix office of The Capital Group, a worldwide firm that manages corporate and individual investments through mutual funds, says Gen Y poses some intriguing issues that companies must meet head-on. Like its investments, companies take the long-term view on employees, and this can be perplexing to the instant-gratification mentality of Gen Y.

    “The recent change in market conditions seems to be best understood by people who consume a lot of news — whether through the newspaper, online or on television,” Elliott says. “Those people have heard about many companies that are reducing staff or decreasing benefits and they recognize that this has an impact on job offers in our market. However, some of Gen Y does not tend to follow the news closely and, not having experienced an economic downturn in their adult lives, they do not recognize the impact it could have on the overall job market.”

    Mike Seiden, president and CEO of Western International University, believes Gen Y, even in this economy, is much more savvy than some might believe.

    “Don’t be fooled into thinking that the Yer is less concerned about money than previous generations,” he says. “They want to earn as much as they can and are more than willing to play prospective employers against each other. We’ve all seen employees who accepted a job offer and were scheduled to start on Monday, but didn’t show up because they got a better offer over the weekend. It’s really too early to tell how the current economic situation will pan out, but I don’t expect that too many new employees will lower their salary expectations because the economy is having problems.”

    The changing economic winds have educators evaluating their methodology, as well.

    “We need to recognize and integrate the needs of business with the innate skills of this generation,” says Ajay Vinze, the Davis Distinguished Professor of Business and director of the Executive MBA Program at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. “With Gen Y, technology is part-and-parcel with their existence. They see their cell phones and the Internet, and see the world and how they can make an impact.”

    The education experience remains key to ensuring Gen Yers — no matter the economy — are ready to hit the ground running when they enter the work force. Gen Y is adept at working in a team environment and likes clear expectations and goals outlined for them.

    “Our task is to keep track of the characteristics and skill sets of what employers are looking for and translate that into our teaching,” says Barbara Keats, an associate professor of management at W.P. Carey. Keats adds that the school continues to see Gen Y students struggling with some fundamental communications skills.

    “They have the knowledge, they just need to be shown some strategies to communicate,” she says.

    Still, what remains are some underlining factors employers should think about with Gen Y.

    “I believe there is absolutely more of a sense of entitlement in this generation than in older generations,” Seiden says. “They expect they will be treated with respect, rewarded whenever they do a good job, have opportunities to advance as rapidly as they think they deserve to and will have the flexibility to live as they choose with little or no interference from the company in their lifestyles.”

    While some, like Seiden, say Gen Y has a strong sense of entitlement, Vinze isn’t so sure that’s really the case. In fact, he says, the eagerness and hyper-urge to get things done can make Millennials productive workers from day one. They like to create new titles as a sense of empowerment, such as chief knowledge officer or chief innovator. This shouldn’t be taken as entitlement, Vinze says.

    What could be a big plus in this economic slowdown is Gen Y’s ability to multitask and seek creative solutions to everyday problems, adds Julie Smith David, an associate professor at W.P. Carey.

    Gen Y is also interested in working with older employees who can serve as mentors and foster the capabilities of this future generation of leaders.

    “My take-away is both older workers and Gen Y have a lot to learn from each other,” Smith David says. Seiden addsthat companies should remain flexible with this “new gen” and realize the old thinking of yesterday does not necessarily apply today.

    “This may include such things as flexible work hours and telecommuting,” he says. “Gen Yers want to be challenged. They want assignments that will allow them to ‘show their stuff’ and gain recognition, so providing job opportunities that allow them to do so are important. They want assignments that are challenging, but they want to be trained and provided the tools with which to complete those assignments. Company image is important to them. There appears to be more of an emphasis on working for a good, socially responsible corporate citizen.”

    wpcarey.asu.edu
    www.wiu.edu