Tag Archives: yuma

Taco Bell, Marcus Millichap, WEB

Marcus & Millichap Sells Yuma Taco Bell Location

Marcus & Millichap Real Estate Investment Services, the nation’s largest real estate investment services firm, has announced the sale of Taco Bell, a 1,344 SF retail property located in Yuma, Ariz., according to Don Morrow, regional manager of the firm’s Phoenix office. The asset sold for $410,000.

Chris Doty, an investment specialist in Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office, had the exclusive listing to market the property on behalf of the seller, an individual/personal trust.  The buyer, a limited liability company, was secured and represented by Chris Doty. Taco Bell is located at 1676 South 4th Avenue in Yuma.

Armstrong, Keri 2014

Wells Fargo Names Armstrong Business Banking Manager

Wells Fargo today announced that Keri Armstrong has been named Business Banking manager overseeing Wells Fargo Business Banking in the Mesa and Yuma and Arizona Agricultural Banking. Todd Gerber, Area Business Banking manager for Arizona announced the appointment.

“As the nation’s leading business lender, Wells Fargo is committed to satisfying all of the financial services needs of business customers and helping them succeed financially,” Gerber said. “During her career, Keri has excelled at providing outstanding service to our customers. Her strong skills, years of experience, and commitment to helping our business customers reach their goals, make him tremendous asset for our Business Banking team.”

Armstrong joined Wells Fargo in 1996 and most recently served as a Credit Management Group loan adjustment manager in Mesa where she was responsible for managing an assigned portfolio of assets for the Arizona and California markets. She has also held positions of senior business relationship manager, credit analyst, business sales associate, customer service representative and teller. Armstrong earned her bachelor’s degree in Accounting and Masters in Business Administration from the University of Phoenix.

Wells Fargo Business Banking delivers customized solutions and tailored business packages to help our business customers grow and prosper. These include loans and lines of credit, treasury management, payroll, merchant card services, foreign exchange, employee benefit plans, real estate lending, online banking and bill payment, business and personal insurance, investments, trusts, wealth management, business valuation and retirement planning.

legal

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon Expands to Yuma

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon, PLC (Jennings Strouss), a leading Phoenix-based law firm, announced the opening of its Yuma office to serve the growing legal needs of Yuma and Imperial counties. The firm’s Yuma location will provide clients with the full range of personal and business legal services, including agribusiness law, business and finance law, estate planning, health care law, labor and employment law, and real estate law.

Shanna Bowman Orlich and Wayne A. Smith will be the primary attorneys at the Jennings Strouss Yuma office. Shanna has deep roots in Yuma and a strong background in agriculture. Orlich has been involved in the business and legal aspects of both of her father’s agribusinesses, BSN Farms and Coronation Peak Ranches, Inc.

“I’m very excited to serve my hometown,” stated Orlich. “This is a tremendous opportunity to give back to my community and offer legal services that are directly beneficial to and customized to meet the unique and diverse needs of business owners and families in Yuma and Imperial Counties. Our Yuma office will have the firm’s full support and resources, which includes a network of 65 attorneys.”

Orlich focuses her practice in the areas of agricultural law, commercial and financial transactions, business operations, planning and formation, and real estate. She also has experience in commercial and probate litigation. Orlich attended Columbia University, where she earned her juris doctorate degree and master’s degree in business administration. She earned a bachelor of science in industrial engineering from Arizona State University.

Wayne Smith also has a strong background in agriculture and continues to run his family’s cattle ranch today. Smith focuses on issues related to agribusiness and agricultural compliance with federal and state programs, water law, real estate (including 1031 exchange and reverse exchange), federal and state income and estate taxation, business and estate planning, and partnership, corporation and limited liability company formation and compliance. Smith earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University, a juris doctorate degree from the University of New Mexico School of Law, and a master’s of law degree in taxation from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law.

Jennings Strouss is committed to supporting the numerous business, civic and industry organizations that are dedicated to the growth of Yuma and Imperial Counties. The firm is a member of the Greater Yuma Economic Development Corporation and the Yuma County Chamber of Commerce.

The opening of the Yuma office marks the fourth location for Jennings Strouss, with offices also located in Phoenix and Peoria, Ariz., and Washington, D.C.

The Yuma office is located in historic downtown Yuma, Ariz at 256 S. 2nd Ave., Suite C.

legal

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon Expands to Yuma

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon, PLC (Jennings Strouss), a leading Phoenix-based law firm, announced the opening of its Yuma office to serve the growing legal needs of Yuma and Imperial counties. The firm’s Yuma location will provide clients with the full range of personal and business legal services, including agribusiness law, business and finance law, estate planning, health care law, labor and employment law, and real estate law.

Shanna Bowman Orlich and Wayne A. Smith will be the primary attorneys at the Jennings Strouss Yuma office. Shanna has deep roots in Yuma and a strong background in agriculture. Orlich has been involved in the business and legal aspects of both of her father’s agribusinesses, BSN Farms and Coronation Peak Ranches, Inc.

“I’m very excited to serve my hometown,” stated Orlich. “This is a tremendous opportunity to give back to my community and offer legal services that are directly beneficial to and customized to meet the unique and diverse needs of business owners and families in Yuma and Imperial Counties. Our Yuma office will have the firm’s full support and resources, which includes a network of 65 attorneys.”

Orlich focuses her practice in the areas of agricultural law, commercial and financial transactions, business operations, planning and formation, and real estate. She also has experience in commercial and probate litigation. Orlich attended Columbia University, where she earned her juris doctorate degree and master’s degree in business administration. She earned a bachelor of science in industrial engineering from Arizona State University.

Wayne Smith also has a strong background in agriculture and continues to run his family’s cattle ranch today. Smith focuses on issues related to agribusiness and agricultural compliance with federal and state programs, water law, real estate (including 1031 exchange and reverse exchange), federal and state income and estate taxation, business and estate planning, and partnership, corporation and limited liability company formation and compliance. Smith earned a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University, a juris doctorate degree from the University of New Mexico School of Law, and a master’s of law degree in taxation from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law.

Jennings Strouss is committed to supporting the numerous business, civic and industry organizations that are dedicated to the growth of Yuma and Imperial Counties. The firm is a member of the Greater Yuma Economic Development Corporation and the Yuma County Chamber of Commerce.

The opening of the Yuma office marks the fourth location for Jennings Strouss, with offices also located in Phoenix and Peoria, Ariz., and Washington, D.C.

The Yuma office is located in historic downtown Yuma, Ariz at 256 S. 2nd Ave., Suite C.

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Microchip Announces FIRST Robotics results

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today announced the results of the 2013 FIRST® Robotics Competition (FRC) Arizona Regional, held March 22-23, 2013 in Chandler.

Phoenix’s Carl Hayden High School; Tempe Preparatory Academy, Tempe; and Buena High School, Sierra Vista qualified to compete in the 2013 FIRST Robotics Competition Championship, April 25-27, 2013 in St. Louis, MO. Kingman High School/Kingman Academy of Learning, Kingman; Yuma High School, Yuma; and Rockwell-Collins & Escondido Charter High School, Escondido, Calif. were Regional Finalists.  Students had six weeks to build a robot capable of competing in this year’s competition, the game called Ultimate AscentSM, where teams joined forces to fling saucer-like discs through various slots during several two-minute and fifteen-second matches.  Extra points were scored for robots that could hang from a 10 foot tower in the final seconds of the match.  Any student participating on a FIRSTteam is eligible to apply for more than $16 million in scholarships.

“The engineering challenge presented by FIRST to build a functioning robot that must accomplish specific tasks inspires students to find creative solutions using math, science and engineering, while adhering to strict deadlines.  Working with industry mentors, students learn marketable skills such as working on a team, critical thinking, marketing and problem solving, while having fun at the same time,” said Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip Technology, co-chair of the FIRST Arizona Regional Planning Committee, FIRST sponsor and member of the FIRST Board of Directors.

Chandler, Ariz.-based Microchip Technology is the organizing sponsor of the FRC Arizona Regional.  Fifty high-school robotics teams competed in the 2013 FRC AZ Regional, including 44 teams from Arizona, three from New Mexico, two from California and one from Mexico.  AZFirst, a non-profit organization, awarded the Steve Sanghi Scholarship to Bianca Rodriquez, a senior at Carl Hayden High School, Phoenix, AZ.  Funded by Steve and Maria Sanghi, this scholarship totals $16,000 over four years, and is awarded to an outstanding FIRST participant who intends to pursue a college degree in science, technology, engineering or math.  Coconino High School won the Regional Chairman’s Award, which recognizes the team that best represents a model for other teams to emulate, and embodies the purpose and goals of FIRST.  Christine Sapio, teacher at Coconino High School, Flagstaff, a FTC (FIRST Technical Competition) Affiliate Partner, received the “Outstanding Volunteer of the Year” award for her success in growing the FTC robotics program for middle-school and high-school students.

Additionally, Dave Thompson, FIRST coach at Coconino High School, received the Woodie Flowers Finalist Award, which recognizes a teacher or engineer who demonstrates excellence in teaching science, math and creative design.  Chris Brandt from Saguaro High School in Scottsdale was awarded the “Arizona Teacher of the Year,” based upon an essay written by his students.

Generous supporters of the 2013 FRC Arizona Regional included Organizing Sponsor Microchip Technology; Leader in Technology Sponsor Microchip Technology Employees; and Captain of Innovation Sponsors Army ROTC, Avnet, Craig and Barbara Barrett, Medtronic Foundation, Microchip Technology and Wells Fargo.  Friends of the Future Sponsors included Best Buy Children’s Foundation, Go Daddy, ON Semiconductor, and Steve and Maria Sanghi.  Regional Fan Sponsors included Chase Giving Foundation and Wishes in Stitches/Alan and Margaret Jannuzzi.

Due to the growth of local FIRST programs First Lego League, FTC and FRC), two separate FRC Arizona regional events are expected to be held in 2015.  Recruitment of FRC teams is currently occurring, with a goal of doubling the number of teams in the next two years.  For more information and to get involved, contact FIRST Regional Director Carol Popovich at carol.popovich@microchip.com or (480) 792-7938.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor’s Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor's Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

November Art Walk Events in Arizona

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011


Phoenix, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-10 p.m.
(602) 256-7539
facebook.com/FirstFridayArtwalk

The weather will be cooling down … just perfect for visiting our various arts districts with
great spaces and amazing art. Park at the Phoenix Art Museum, and ride our free shuttles (or ride light rail, take your bike, pedicab, taxi or walk).


Flagstaff, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-9 p.m.
kathrynwillisart.com

Enjoy a beautiful fall evening on the streets of downtown Flagstaff, with music, art, refreshments and lively community vibes!


Jerome, AZ ~ Jerome Art Walk

Saturday, November 5th, 5-8 p.m.
(928) 649-2277
www.jeromeartwalk.com

Twenty-six studios and galleries will host openings and happenings throughout the artist colony. From the Old Jerome High School studios to The New State Motor Company with the Patrick Lincoln Gallery, art, music and lively conversation.
Download the walk map.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art Walk at Water Tower Park

Saturday, November 5th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Bisbee after 5

Saturday, November 12th, until 8 p.m.
(520) 432-3554
www.discoverbisbee.com

Experience the town-wide Art Walk with more than 30 shops and galleries, special sales and promotions, live entertainment and refreshments and artist receptions.


Tucson, AZ ~ 5th La Encantada Fine Art Festival

Friday & Saturday, November 11th & 12th, 10-5 p.m.
www.laencantadafestival.org

45 of the region’s finest artists are slated to present and sell their work at the La Encantada Fine Art Festival. The show will also be featuring free children’s art activities and live entertainment all day long!


Sahuarita, AZ ~ 3rd Annual Pecan Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-6 p.m.
(520) 820-3299
www.sahuaritapecanfestival.com

Sahuarita Pecan Festival has been approved as an Official Centennial Event!


Kingman, AZ ~ Kingman Cancer Care Arts & Crafts Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-5 p.m. & Nov 13th, 10-4 p.m.
(928) 753-1186
www.kingmantourism.org

You’ll be sure to find that perfect item for that person that has everything. This show features many vendors, original arts, crafts, food and more.


Scottsdale, AZ ~ Thursday Art Walk

Thursday, November 17th, 7-9 p.m.
(480) 990-3939
www.scottsdalegalleries.com

This is America’s original Art Walk. Wander into galleries that capture your fancy, stroll around a delightful area punctuated by dramatic statues, bubbling fountains, tree-covered courtyards and more.


Tucson, AZ ~ 30th Annual Holiday Craft Market

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 18th-20th
(520) 624-2333
www.tucsonmuseumofart.org

This event has more than 120 booths of juried work, including jewelry, metalwork, painting, pottery, ceramics, watercolors and food; join this great event.


Yuma, AZ ~ North End Art Walk

Friday, November 18th, 5-9 p.m.
(928) 373-5202
yumamom.com

Dozens and dozens of artists will showcase their work in ceramics, jewelry, prints and canvases, calligraphy, photography, glass and mixed media.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Holiday Art Walk

Saturday, November 26th, late into the evening
(520) 432-2071
www.discoverbisbee.com

Local merchants and artists offer art work, antiques and collectibles, jewelry and wares.  Decorated shops remain open, offer beverages and snacks to make your shopping pleasure a festivity. Located in Historic Bisbee.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art in the Open

Friday, November 26th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Grand Canyon, AZ ~ 4th Annual Grand Canyon Celebration of Art

Through November 27th
(928) 863-3877
www.grandcanyon.org

Proceeds from this event will be dedicated to funding an art venue on the South Rim that will preserve and showcase the spectacular collection of historic and contemporary paintings owned by Grand Canyon National Park and the Grand Canyon Association.

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scroll to the bottom of the page and contact us.[/stextbox]

 

Solar Energy Arizona Western College,

Solar Energy Builds on Arizona Western College Campus

The current economic situation has spurred a lot of talk, advertisements and encouragement to buy local and use local to sustain our economy. The Guinness Book of World Records named Yuma, AZ the sunniest city on earth, so where better to utilize innovative solar energy technology on Yuma’s Arizona Western College campus?

The Project

The Arizona Western College in Yuma is in the process of installing solar panels to cover close to 100 percent of its daytime electricity needs and cut its costs, all of which are planned to happen by October 2011. However, this project is doing more than just generating solar energy; it is utilizing five new types of photovoltaic technology from six different companies.

Arizona Western College plans to use the solar panels to teach classes on solar technology, installation and environmental engineering. This three-year solar project, from vision to completion, was partially funded by APS and will be managed by Main Street Power for 30 years and after the contract expires, the equipment will become part of the college and continue producing energy, says Lori Stofft, the director of public relations and marketing at Arizona Western College.

It is unique to apply five different technologies to a single institution, but that is one of the projects innovative angles.

The five photovoltaic technologies and the companies behind them include:

(c)2011 Arizona Western College by Ernest Yates

1. CPV (concentrator photovoltaic) from SolFocus, including their dual-axis trackers and GreenVolts fully integrated system including two-axis trackers and inverter
2. Thin Film panels from Sharp Solar
3. Monocrystalline panels from Solar World
4. Poly Crystalline panels from Suntech
5. Single-axis trackers from O Solar

Another unique aspect of this project is that the building process is streamed live over the internet to allow the community and the solar technology companies to check in on the progress.

“A lot of our partners are in Northern California, Germany, Spain… we wanted those people to feel like they were connected to our campus and that they could check in seven days a week and find out what was going on,” Stofft says. “It’s a way to include our partners in the building process.

The ground breaking was in May 2011 and the “Flip the Switch” completion ceremony is slated for October 2011. Only six months were allotted to cover 23 acres of land with solar arrays. The tight deadline was set in order to meet APS’s guidelines for the funding.

The Educational Advantage

It would make more sense to use one solar technology instead of five if it was just about energy generation, but it’s not, Stofft says. It’s about allowing the companies to measure their technologies against one another in one of the harshest climates on earth. Another educational aspect of the project will be the incubation area and the demonstration garden.

“The demonstration garden will have nine different technologies that students and the public will have access to,” Stofft  says. “They can see how [the technologies] measure against each other and what measures against the five major arrays.”

The incubation area is based on rental, and for a fee, technology companies can rent a private and secure area for a small array where they can test their equipment against the solar arrays already in place. The estimated savings for Arizona Western College with the solar array in place will be $3.5 million in the first 10 years, $15.4 million in 20 years and a projected $40 million over 30 years, including incubation rental fees.

“It’s more than just saving our tax payers money; it can be a road map for other colleges around the country who want to educate their own students,” Stofft  says. “There are all sorts of certificate and training programs and we could be educating people who work in solar industry at all levels.”

Arizona Western College graduated their first solar installer class of 19 in spring 2011 and are in the process of embedding solar technology into new and existing programs, developing 2-year degrees that can be transferred to four-year institutions.

(c)2011 Arizona Western College by Ernest Yates

It seems as though everyone wins.

Arizona Western College saves money; the solar companies get to test and monitor their technology in a large scale setting; the students reap the benefits, and the community creates jobs. The only thing left is getting a White House representative, or the president himself to the “Flip the Switch” ceremony.

A Presidential Approval

“The goal is to attract national attention to the array,” Stofft  says. ”I really feel this is about energy independence for our country.”

Arizona Western College sent a formal invitation to the White house, but there has been no response yet. They are keeping their fingers crossed, and if the White House plans to respond, it still has time.

“The students, faculty and community are so proud that this solar array is being installed,” Stofft  says. “And if we can get the White House to visit, that will just be the cherry on top.”

For more information about Arizona Western College’s solar panels and its progress, visit www.azwestern.edu.

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Videos

Watch: AWC Solar Array Presidential Invite

Watch: AWC Solar Array Groundbreaking May 2011

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Mission San Xavier del Bac is also known as the "White Dove of the Desert."

Southern Arizona Day Trips

Want to get away, but don’t have the time to plan a vacation? Then a short, fun day trip is the perfect option. Check out this list of southern Arizona attractions to plan a great day trip.

  • Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum
    2021 N. Kinney Rd., Tucson
    520-883-1380
    The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is a world-renowned zoo, natural history museum and botanical garden, all in one place.

  • Bisbee
    1 Main St., Bisbee
    520-432-5421
    In the 1880s, this was once an important mining center. Today, it flourishes as a tourist town.

  • Chiricahua National Monument
    13063 E. Bonita Canyon Rd., Willcox
    520-824-3560 ext. 302
    The monument is a mecca for hikers and birders. Chiricahua plants and animals represent one of the premier areas for biological diversity in the Northern Hemisphere.

  • Colossal Cave Mountain Park
    16721 E. Old Spanish Tr., Vail
    520-647-7275
    Colossal Cave, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, had been used for centuries by prehistoric peoples when it was discovered in 1879.

  • Fort Bowie National Historic Site
    3203 S. Old Fort Bowie Rd., Bowie
    520-847-25004
    The site of the Bascom Affair, a wagon train massacre, and the battle of Apache Pass, where a large force of Chiricahua Apaches under Mangus Colorados and Cochise fought the California Volunteers. It stands as a lasting monument to the bravery and endurance of U.S. soldiers in paving the way for westward settlement and the taming of the Western frontier.

  • Ironwood Forest National Monument
    BLM Tucson Field Office: 12661 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson
    520-258-7200
    The 129,000-acre monument contains significant cultural and historical sites covering a 5,000-year period. Possessing one of the richest stands of Ironwood trees in the Sonoran Desert, the area encompasses several desert mountain ranges including the Silver Bell, Waterman and Sawtooth, with desert valleys in between. Elevation ranges from 1,800 to 4,261 feet.

  • Kartchner Caverns State Park
    2980 S. Hwy. 90, Benson
    520-586-CAVE (2283)
    Discovered in 1974, these caverns just recently opened to the public and feature stunning stalactite and stalagmite formations.

  • Kitt Peak National Observatory
    Off of SR 86 on the Tohono O’odham Nation, Tucson
    520-318-8726
    Kitt Peak is the world’s largest working astronomical observatory. Open daily.

  • Las Cienegas National Conservation Area
    BLM Tucson Field Office: 12661 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson
    520-258-7200
    Designated by Congress in 2000, this 42,000-acre area consists of vast desert grassland and rolling, oak-studded hills with a diverse plant and animal life, including several threatened or endangered species. Las Cienegas contains cultural resources within its borders, such as Empire Ranch House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, mines and mining towns, and historic travel routes. Visitor activities include birdwatching, camping, hiking, horseback riding, hunting, mountain biking and scenic drives.

  • Mission San Xavier Del Bac
    1950 W. San Xavier Rd., Tucson
    520-294-2624
    Framed in the warm browns of the surrounding hills and the violet shadows of distant mountains, it rises, brilliantly white from the desert floor of dusty green mesquite and sage.

  • Old Tucson Studios
    201 S. Kinney Rd., Tucson
    520-883-0100
    Arizona’s Hollywood in the Desert since 1939. This world-famous working film location offers fun for the whole family — guided historical set tours, live stunt shows, gunfights, and saloon musicals, plus rides for the kids! While you’re here, enjoy a scenic trail ride in the unique and beautiful Arizona Sonora Desert.

  • Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument
    10 Organ Pipe Dr., Ajo
    520-387-6849 ext. 0
    This scenic 516-square-mile preserve is filled with Organ Pipe Cactus, rare in the United States, scattered among mountains and plains.

  • Picacho Peak State Park
    Picacho
    520-466-3183
    Hiking, camping and picnicking 60 miles southeast of Phoenix, just off I-10.

  • Reid Park Zoo
    1100 S. Randolph Way, Tucson
    520-791-4022
    Come visit Tucson’s Reid Park Zoo and have a wild time. Meet more than 400 animals — rhinos, elephants, anteaters, polar bears, lions and many more. Venture into the African, Asian and South American regions. Explore the Flight Connection — the full-flight, walkthrough aviary.

  • Saguaro National Park
    2700 N. Kinney Rd., Tucson
    520-733-5158
    This national park protects more than 3,500 acres of native plants and animals.

  • San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area
    BLM Tucson Field Office: 12661 E. Broadway Blvd., Tucson
    520-258-7200
    This 57,000-acre area contains 40 miles of the San Pedro River, which is home to more than 100 species of birds and more than 400 species of migrating and wintering bird species.

  • Tombstone
    Tombstone
    520-457-3929
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Flagstaff lost the highest percentage of construction jobs

Flagstaff Tops The Nation In Percentage of Construction Jobs Lost

Flagstaff lost the highest percentage of construction jobs between July 2009 and July of this year, as 276 of 337 metro areas nationally saw declines, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

Flagstaff lost 700 construction jobs, a 32 percent dip from last year. The Chicago-Joliet-Naperville area lost the most construction jobs — 32,900, or 23 percent.

Statewide, Arizona lost 13,900 construction jobs (down 114,000 from 128,000), an 11 percent decrease. It was a decrease of 54 percent from the state’s peak in 2006, according to the AGCA.

The Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale area lost 8,600 construction jobs (down 86,600 from 95,200), a 9 percent loss; and Tucson lost 2,300 construction jobs (down 14,200 from 16,500), for a 14 percent dip. Yuma fared the best, experiencing just a 7 percent loss.

The employment figures, based on an analysis of federal employment data, demonstrate the widespread decline in demand for construction services that continues to outpace stimulus-funded work, association officials say.

“There is no doubt that we have seen an increase in stimulus activity this summer,” says Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Unfortunately, that increase in stimulus activity is largely being overshadowed by continuing declines in overall demand for construction that are likely to persist well into next year.”

Other areas experiencing large declines in construction employment are: Las Vegas (14,800 jobs, 24 percent); Houston (14,700 jobs, 8 percent); Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale (10,700 jobs, 9 percent); and Seattle-Bellevue-Everett (10,400 jobs, 14 percent).

Simonson says that 31 metro areas actually added construction jobs over the past 12 months, while another 30 areas experienced no change in construction employment.

The construction economist said the impacts of the stimulus can be seen in the fact that many of the construction employment declines metro areas are experiencing are less severe than just a month ago. The year-over-year construction employment declines in cities such as Las Vegas, Houston and Seattle are less severe than the figures recorded in June, Simonson adds. However, he says that too few cities were adding construction jobs to have any widespread impact on construction employment.

“As much as we would hate to see how much worse the construction employment figures would be without the stimulus, the fact is our industry is continuing to suffer even as some areas of the economy have begun to expand,” says Stephen Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “And with regular, long-term infrastructure bills stalled in Congress, it looks like construction workers will have little opportunity to continue rebuilding our economy.”