Tag Archives: yuma regional medical center

Kirk McClure

McCarthy Building Companies Hires Kirk McClure As Director Of Business Development

 

McCarthy Building Companies recently hired Kirk McClure as Director of Business Development for the Southwest division. His primary focus will be on municipal, higher education and commercial construction projects.

In this position, McClure will play a key role, providing more than a decade of industry expertise with a diverse, well-rounded background in project management, commercial development and planning, and strategic planning.

He has been engaged in a broad range of business development and project management positions throughout his career, most recently as Vice President of Business Expansion for the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA), the state’s leading economic development organization.

McClure, a LEED accredited professional, has a critical understanding of the commercial real estate industry. Prior to his position at the ACA, he worked in land planning,project management and business development for Langdon Wilson, Atwell-Hicks, Graef and The Brooks Companies.

“Kirk has a passion for the commercial real estate industry and is extremely active within business circles here in Arizona,” said Bo Calbert, president of McCarthy Southwest. “The relationships he’s built through his previous positions and his volunteer activities will serve him well in his new role at McCarthy.”

McClure serves on the board of directors for the Arizona Association of Economic Development (AAED), and is the chair for their annual golf tournament. He is also a member of National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), SouthwestChapter of American Association of Airport Executives (SWAAAE) and has been an active member of CoreNet Global, Valley Partnership, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the American Planning Association (APA), and the Urban Land Institute (ULI).

He is also the founder and organizer of the monthly A/E/C Golf Invitational at Grayhawk Golf Club,which includes a league of professionals that work and support the development industry. He is also a USA Hockey-Certified youth hockey coach and has been coaching for more than 13 years, most recently with Desert Youth Hockey Association (DYHA).

He earned his MBA from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University (ASU) and also holds a bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Design, also from ASU.

 

Hospital Construction - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Please Do Not Disturb: Hospital Construction Zone

During hospital construction, constant planning and communication are top priorities for healthcare builders

The foremost focus in upgrading or expanding a hospital is keeping the work concealed from the patients. So says Steve Whitworth, Kitchell’s Healthcare Division manager, about hospital construction.

It’s not like adding or enlarging a store in a retail center, which might force shoppers to step around a construction barrier for a few days or have the piped-in music occasionally punctuated by a floor sander.

“In a mall, people will be inconvenienced. In a hospital, a patient’s health is at stake,” Whitworth says. “In every single project we strive to be invisible. The ability to heal depends on the environment a patient is in. It‘s the only thing that matters at the end of the day.”

The dilemma is that hospitals, as much or more than other commercial real estate structures, need to continuously get bigger and better, he says.

“Planning, planning, planning,”  is the key to keeping healthcare facilities humming smoothly while making major renovations, says Jay Stallings, associate administrator at Banner Desert Medical Center, which unveiled a major emergency department makeover in August.

That mantra is echoed by other key players — from hospital administrators to construction engineers — who are continuously upgrading and expanding Arizona’s top hospitals to address medical care’s changing needs and technology advances while keeping the work virtually imperceptible to patients and staff.

Finding solutions

Banner Thunderbird Tower - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Unlike other types of commercial real estate overhauls or tenant improvements, healthcare property renovations come with a whole host of hurdles, from meeting infection control standards to keeping emergency entrances accessible.

The biggest hurdle — no down time.

“What makes a hospital unique, is that it’s a 24/7 facility. There’s never a good time to do the work,” says Sundt Construction’s Russ Korcuska, who has been piloting hospital construction projects in Arizona for two decades.

To maintain top-notch patient care, innovation and expansion is necessary, but upgrading existing facilities means you can’t turn off the power, the water or other utilities, you can’t block fire escape routes or ambulance entrances, you can’t let construction dust or other contaminants get in the air, and you can’t make a lot of noise or cause other disturbances that could impact patients or staff operations.

“If a surgeon is working on somebody’s brain, you can’t be creating vibrations on the other side of the wall,” Korcuska says. “It’s extremely challenging.”

That’s why planning an entire project and all possible contingencies to the tiniest detail before ever flipping a power switch is so critical, says DPR Construction’s Guy Sanders, who is just finishing up Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center’s three-story expansion of operating rooms and pre/post operative care areas.

Especially in renovating older hospitals where documentation of what’s in the ceiling and under the floor is not always complete or accurate, he says. “Knowledge of a campus is critical,” Sanders says. As is double-checking before digging.

During the Banner Good Samaritan project, he planned for alternative power sources to keep all ongoing operations running smoothly based on detailed building documentation. Still, during the planning process, he flipped a breaker and did a walk-through of the whole hospital to ensure the documentation was correct. It wasn’t.

Sanders found some equipment mislabeled and had to do some rewiring — and re-documenting.

Proper planning is crucial

Chris Jacobson of McCarthy Building Companies is just completing a major project at Banner Thunderbird Medical Center. He added a new six-story tower and emergency department expansion in the spot where the old ambulance entrance stood, and then renovated all the newly vacated space after 25 departments relocated to the tower. The project is slated to wrap in January.

It has been a five-year, multi-phased project, with planning for every phase starting almost a year in advance, he says.

Jacobson and his crew had to design everything from infection, noise and dust control to fire exits — and figure out how to get workers and materials in and out of the construction sites without bringing them through the hospital. They plotted everything, “even down to which tools to use.”

“You have to get creative about how to get the work done without coming in with a wrecking ball,” he says.

The biggest challenge was how to keep the existing emergency department functioning while “de-constructing” the old ER entrance. Jacobson says the solution devised in the planning process — building a covered bridge from a new temporary ambulance entry a short distance from the construction site — was key to McCarthy landing the job.

“It was a big challenge that nobody had figured out,” he says.

And that wasn’t the only temporary structure the construction experts had to design and build before even starting the main event. They crafted fire-rated, sound-insulated  temporary walls, new directional signage,  and a complete hospital kitchen in a trailer.

They even planned and built a temporary super-structure that looked like a massive, free-standing fire escape outside the hospital tower to get workers and materials to upper floors without ever opening a hospital door.

McCarthy used a similar technique for building out Yuma Regional Medical Center’s upper floors, which were pegged for expansion space when the hospital was first built. The engineers planned and built an outdoor elevator and trash chute to keep patients and staff below from commingling with construction workers or debris on indoor elevators.

At Banner Good Samaritan, DPR had to excavate an area between the central power plant and the new expansion. Before bringing in the backhoe, Sanders employed a “vacuum” truck to suck up some of the dirt and expose the utilities.

Among the most interesting planning tools McCarthy engineers use are laser scans of a hospital’s ceilings and floors to find exactly where all the pipes, wires and ducts are located, and 3D modeling software to virtually tuck new utilities amongst the old.

“The old way was you had guys with flashlights and measuring tapes,” Jacobson says.

Sometimes engineers have to detour planned utility upgrades to avoid a virtual collision. That’s much better than having workers face a real utility roadblock and have to rethink routes in the middle of a messy construction site, he says.

If planning is atop the experts’ priority list for minimizing patient disruption during construction, keeping everybody in the loop scores a close second place.

A critical component of both planning and construction stages of any healthcare project is communication with all the stakeholders, says Stallings, whose new triple-sized, state-of-the-art emergency department took seven years from drawing board to debut.

Stallings says involving every hospital department touched by the project from start to finish made the process as painless as possible for them and especially for patients.

“This was a collaborative project with physicians, staff, clinicians, infection control, environmental services,” he says. “All were impacted. We worked hand-in-hand with the architects and construction staff. We had weekly construction meetings, sometimes daily, with all who were impacted.”

“We provide an important service to the community. We couldn’t shut down the emergency department and continue to be a hospital,” Stallings says. “In the moment when somebody needs help, we have to be there. We take that very seriously. Our approach was  transparency (to patients), collaboration, a high level of communication and training.”

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Yuma Regional Medical Center Data Building, AZRE July/August 2011

IT: Yuma Regional Medical Center Data Center IT Building


YUMA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER DATA CENTER IT BUILDING

Developer: Yuma Regional Medical Center
General contractor: McCarthy Building Companies
Architect: Archsol
Location: Yuma
Size: 12,500 SF

The $5.2M freestanding data center will help YRMC transition to Electronic Health/Medical Records (EHR/EMR) and utilize tablet PCs for patient consultation. As a Tier 3 data center, the facility will have multiple independent distribution paths serving its IT equipment. Subcontractors include Delta Diversified, HACI Mechanical and Heywood Builders. Completion is expected by 3Q 2011.


AZRE Magazine, July/August 2011
Diversity Leadership Alliance Winners - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Diversity Leadership Alliance Winners

Govt./Nonprofit Category Winner Yuma Regional Medical CenterGovt./Nonprofit Category Winner
Yuma Regional Medical Center

Yuma Regional Medical Center (YRMC) is proud of having a diverse work force that represents the community and the patients it serves. That work force diversity includes ethnicity, cultural background, gender, age, economic means, physical and mental ability, family settings, educational levels, and religious beliefs.

By valuing diversity, YRMC seeks to achieve an environment where the total spectrum of differences is valued and integrated into every aspect of the hospital. YRMC classifies its various dimensions of diversity as human, cultural and systemic. Human diversity refers to the physical characteristics or life experience of an individual. Cultural diversity is characterized by fundamental beliefs, attitudes, assumptions, values and personal characteristics. System diversity is characterized by the integration of organizational structures and management operating systems where differences are involved or implicit.

YRMC strives not only for diversity within its walls, but also outside of them. The YRMC Community Outreach Team allows employees to connect with Yuma’s many diverse cultures. The program focuses on meeting the needs of winter visitors, migrant workers, military personnel, as well as the elderly, uninsured and Spanish-speaking population.

Diversity Champion Lee A. Barnett: Director of Technology, American ExpressDiversity Champion
Lee A. Barnett: Director of Technology, American Express

Lee A. Barnett’s dedication to diversity and Valley youth already is bearing fruit.

Barnett, the director of technology at American Express’ Valley operations, has been a member of the Diversity Leadership Alliance’s (DLA) board since 2007. He has been key in developing the DLA Youth Council, which assists high school sophomores, juniors and seniors to transition to higher education and work force readiness. The council also develops leadership skills among youth that are aimed at building an inclusive community.

Under Barnett’s guidance, the three-year-old DLA Youth Council has grown from 24 students to 120 students participating in monthly workshops. At this year’s DLA Youth Council ceremony, 12 students from several Phoenix-area high schools received recognition. They in turn expressed their gratitude for the confidence, support, and diversity awareness and training that DLA provides.

One student stated: “I went into the DLA being someone who preferred their own ideas and thoughts over others. I am extremely proud to say I am leaving the DLA being a person who now respects, accepts and is grateful for different ideas.”

Barnett’s dedication to the Youth Council is opening new horizons for many diverse high school students throughout the Valley.

Small Co. Category Winner Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority Inc.Small Co. Category Winner
Northern Arizona Regional
Behavioral Health Authority Inc.

Serving 10 Native American tribes, the Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority (NARBHA) has made a commitment to upholding diversity and cultural sensitivity in order to provide high-quality care to its patients.

NARBHA is the Regional Behavioral Health Authority for Coconino, Navajo, Yavapai, Apache and Mohave counties, serving more than 700,000 people throughout 62,000 square miles of Northern Arizona.

In 2001, NARBHA established a cultural competency plan as required by the Arizona Department of Health. The following year, NARBHA developed the Cultural Awareness and Diversity Committee, which uses community input to annually update the cultural competency plan. In 2003, the co-chair of the committee saw a gap in communications between NARBHA and the 10 tribes NARBHA serves. To improve coordination with the tribes, NARBHA created a new position called the Tribal Liaison.

The development of the cultural diversity committee, the cultural diversity plan, and employees devoted to cultural inclusion has improved NARBHA’s ability to provide services to diverse populations. The initiative has broken down barriers to tribal members’ access to care, created culturally responsive behavioral health programs in treatment clinics, and increased awareness statewide of the unique needs of diverse, rural communities. In addition, NARBHA focuses its hiring efforts on developing a work force that reflects the diversity and language needs of the community.

Large Co. Category Winner Cox CommunicationsLarge Co. Category Winner
Cox Communications

The Spanish word for “leader” is “lider.” It’s no surprise that LIDER is the name of Cox Arizona’s 12-week Leadership Development Program. The program was created to introduce the company’s frontline bilingual (Spanish/English) employees to leadership, and to develop future leaders that will help Cox grow its Hispanic customer base.

LIDER provides education on the leadership roles at Cox and Cox’s core competencies (influencing others, producing results, communication skills). The program is structured to address the uniqueness of Hispanic culture, and the combination of multiple cultures and languages in a business environment.

The four-year-old LIDER program is facilitated by the Cox Internacional leadership team and was developed through a collaborative effort of the company’s Arizona care, field training and human resources. Candidates are provided extensive development plans, participate in presentations by the local executive leadership team, review core leadership competencies, book reviews, and are given a final project that is presented in front of the Cox Arizona executive team. The program is cross-departmental and has seen a 33 percent promotion rate.

Development programs such as LIDER help to grow Cox’s diverse employee base. The company’s leadership team, from executives, VPs, directors and managers, participates and actively promotes self-development and growth.

Large Co. Category Winner Veolia TransportationLarge Co. Category Winner
Veolia Transportation

Veolia Transportation is committed to creating an environment of diversity and inclusion. Through its Diversity and Inclusion Program, Veolia’s overall human resource strategy includes recruiting, hiring, promoting, engaging and retaining the company’s diverse talent.

Veolia’s Diversity and Inclusion Program began with revamping the entire recruiting process to ensure Veolia became an Equal Opportunity Employer. Once on board, Veolia provides an employee orientation program that includes diversity training. In addition, all existing employees completed a diversity training class in 2008. Awareness and education regarding diversity have continued with the production of a monthly diversity newsletter. Also, an internal Mentoring Program was created to provide opportunities for new hires to be partnered with seasoned employees.

The need for a culture change was imminent at Veolia Transportation of Tempe. Due to a poorly run operation, new leadership was sought. A new, diverse team was brought together in 2007 to help transform the performance of the operation and improve the overall morale of employees. The diversity training initiative helped “create an environment of respect for our differences and inclusion.” Soon, Veolia’s slogan of “Together We CARE” became real. CARE stands for commitment, accountability, respect and empowerment. These are four values that are consistent with Veolia’s everyday operations in Tempe.

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Pat Walz VP - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

Electronic Health Records And Cancer Care Are On Pat Walz’s Radar For Yuma Regional Medical Center

Pat Walz
President and CEO
Yuma Regional Medical Center
www.yumaregional.org

As the new president and CEO of Yuma Regional Medical Center, Pat Walz is looking to the future. Walz, who was named to the top spot at Yuma Regional in June, has several plans to make the hospital a leader in the health care industry, including implementing an electronic health record system throughout the community, creating a residency program and strengthening the hospital’s cancer care.

He says he wants Yuma Regional to “be leading edge for the whole state of Arizona” in 10 years.

“We don’t want our patients to feel like they need to go to Phoenix or Scripps in San Diego or Tucson,” he says. “We want to provide the same level of service in this community.”

Walz, who has been in the health care industry throughout his career, has been with Yuma Regional for five years, adding that he’d like to stay “as long as they let me. I think this is where I’m going to end my career.”

During his time at Yuma Regional, Walz served as chief financial officer, and the financial stability he attained for the hospital is one of his proudest career achievements.

“We have a very healthy balance sheet, a double-A bond rating and a lot of financial support that makes us able to invest in technology,” which allows Yuma Regional to provide the best health care to the community, Walz says.

In addition to providing a stepping stone to his current position, Walz says one thing he has learned from his background in finance is to always speak the truth.

“From a finance standpoint, one thing I’ve always prided myself (on) is providing accurate information,” he says. “I think when you establish that with physicians, staff, community — anybody — then when you talk people believe you.”

Another way the hospital serves the community is by being a member of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association (AzHHA).
“I think having that connection is really important,” Walz says. “It’s kind of a venue (for) when we have issues out in the rural areas.”

Speaking to the Legislature with AzHHA’s backing gives rural communities a louder voice that can compete with urban areas, he adds.

“(My job is) exciting to me in that we have a good medical staff, an excellent leadership team and some really committed employees,” Walz says. “(Yuma Regional) commits to the employees as well. We have a very good benefit plan. We stay competitive with the areas we have to recruit from … It’s a pretty exciting place to be and the board has a commitment to quality and patient safety.”

Arizona Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010