Coldwell Banker

How to establish trust with your bank

According to a recent survey, financial services and banks were noted as the least-trusted industries in 2012.  Despite the fact that the financial crisis occurred five years ago, people are still concerned about the reliability of banks.

The 2012 Edelman Trust Barometer had more than 30,000 online respondents, in which only 46% of U.S. respondents said they trusted the financial services industry, and only 41% said they trusted banks. Clearly, the last few years tainted the banking industry’s image, and it is taking time for public perception to change.

Despite what the public may think due to the history with the bank crisis and the bad press, banks are not inherently sneaky or dishonest. But like any business, it comes down to building relationships.

To establish trust with your bank, there are a few precautions you can take that will help to set the foundation for a strong relationship.

Don’t put all your eggs in one basket

When you are establishing your business, don’t have all your banking relationships at one bank. For example, many bank documents will cross collateralize loans and bank accounts – both personal and business. Set up your operating business account at one bank and payroll at another. It is also a good idea to open personal accounts and loans at a completely different bank than your business.

Grow the relationship

While it is vital to have a great relationship with your primary banker, you need to move beyond that relationship in the bank. Bankers are transient and move positions within the bank or to another bank quite often. If you only build a relationship with your banker and your banker is promoted or leaves the bank, you will be left with no allies. Get to know your banker’s boss and associates. You never know who will be your banker tomorrow.

Know your bank

The relationship you are trying to establish is really with the bank, so take the time to learn about the banks you do business with. Understand the services they offer. Search the Internet to read blogs and reviews from happy and unhappy business customers. This will help you better understand if this bank is a good fit for you.

Sources and uses of cash

When you talk to a banker about the best loan for your company make sure the banker understands what the money will be used for. Don’t assume the banker knows. For example, if you need money to fund payroll and pay vendors, you need a working capital loan. A working capital loan is based on short-term assets (accounts receivable and inventory) and is used to finance short-term liabilities (payroll, accounts payable).  Don’t let a banker talk you into an SBA term loan to finance working capital. Match assets and liabilities – short term loans fund short-term liabilities and long term loans fund equipment and real estate.

Read the loan documents

So many smart business people are more concerned with the terms on their cell phone contract, but never bother to read or understand the details on a commercial bank loan. While most bank loan documents are standard and the bank may not make any changes, a business owner should still have an attorney review all the documents. The attorney’s role would be to advise you on what is in the documents – what are events of default?  What are cure periods? What should the business owner make sure they do in terms of financial reporting, notice of management or ownership change?  If you understand your loan documents, you will be better protected against surprises.

The public’s perception of the banking industry is clearly still hindered by the scandals, government accusations and lawsuits brought on by the financial crisis. Fortunately, the reality of the situation is better than it is perceived.

Regardless of the industry’s image, it is always best for business owners to take a proactive approach. Taking the time to get to know your bank is the key to building a long term successful relationship; one that you can feel confident in, where you can trust your financial service provider.

 

Robyn Barrett is founder and managing member of FSW Funding, formerly Factors Southwest LLC, specializing in factor financing for small to mid-size companies. For more information visit: www.fswfunding.com