2021’s 5 worst red-light runners caught on video

Above: The worst red-light runner in Scottsdale. Check out the video to see the full clip. Business News | 30 Dec, 2021 |

Mesa-based Verra Mobility, a leading provider of smart mobility technology solutions and the country’s largest provider of red-light and speed safety cameras, released today a video of 2021’s most egregious red-light runners. In the latest in the company’s annual series, this year’s worst red-light runners video vividly reinforces that red-light running is one of the most dangerous traffic scenarios on American roads.


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The videos in this year’s compilation come from ArizonaFloridaLouisiana, and North Carolina, highlighting how dangerous driving decisions and in-vehicle distractions can have a devastating impact on human life. The examples showcased in the video could have been captured anywhere and yielded similar disturbing results.

“Reckless and distracted driving continues to have a profound and devastating impact on drivers, passengers, and families,” said David Roberts, President and Chief Executive Officer of Verra Mobility. “By deploying more intelligent transportation systems such as road safety cameras, communities are empowered to help improve driver behavior and reduce crashes. At Verra Mobility, we focus on enriching lives through safer mobility solutions and helping to make sure that everyone can arrive home safely.”

Red-light and speed safety enforcement programs are known to deter and reduce dangerous driving behaviors that create needlessly unsafe conditions on our roads. These programs are endorsed by the U.S. Department of Transportation and numerous influential safety groups including the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, and the National Safety Council (NSC) among others as an important defense in the fight to reduce crashes and save lives.

In 2019, prior to the pandemic, 846 people, or an average of more than two people per day, died and an estimated 143,000 Americans were injured in red-light running crashes.[1] Communities of all sizes around the country face similar challenges in ensuring safer, easier mobility options. According to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, more than a quarter of fatal crashes at signalized intersections are the result of red-light running. That same report indicated nearly one-half of the victims were either passengers in the offending vehicle or were in the innocent vehicle that was hit while crossing the intersection on green.[2]

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