Phoenix Children’s earns highest-achievable 3-year accreditation

Business News | 8 Oct |

Phoenix Children’s Hospital has received a three-year accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). CARF International is an independent nonprofit accreditor of health and human services aimed at raising care standards for service providers.

“We’re thrilled to achieve this accreditation,” said Laura Wilner, MD, Division Chief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Medical Director of Inpatient Rehabilitation at Phoenix Children’s. “Rehabilitation services are crucial for patients and families at Phoenix Children’s, and having a peer-reviewed stamp of approval from CARF is truly very exciting for the entire organization.”

Phoenix Children’s newest accreditation reflects the highest level of achievement awarded to an organization by CARF. To achieve it, the health system underwent a rigorous process that included an internal examination of both clinical and business practices, an on-site survey conducted by CARF-selected practitioners and the development of a Quality Improvement Plan. The Quality Improvement Plan demonstrates the organization’s ability to address any areas for improvement.

“Our staff provides every patient with the therapies, resources and care they need to recover,” said Elizabeth Linos, director of rehabilitation services at Phoenix Children’s. “Our services may begin on the acute care floors, but that care continues beyond our patients’ discharge dates.”

The 12-bed Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Program is a part of the Frances H. McClelland Pediatric Rehabilitation Department at Phoenix Children’s. The largest pediatric rehabilitation department in the state, our team is focused on helping patients reach their optimal level of independence through family-centered care and a multi-disciplinary approach. The Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Program accepts patients throughout the state and region and has recently added capabilities to care for patients on ventilator assistance who need intensive inpatient rehabilitation.

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