Expert offers 5 favorite Arizona culinary road trips

Above: Li’l Abner’s Steakhouse in Tucson. Experience AZ | 3 Sep |

One of the best ways to social distance this September is by hitting the road and taking a good old fashioned road trip to some of Arizona’s sleepy towns and hidden gems. Peggy Fiandaca, winemaker and co-owner of LDV Winery, shares some of her favorite culinary road trips — including where to stay and grab a bite and of course, a glass of wine — such as:

Turquoise Room at La Posada Hotel in Winslow

A great place to stay and experience incredible southwestern cuisine prepared by Chef John Sharpe who focuses on local and Native American ingredients in inventive ways.

Café Roka in Bisbee

Opened in Old Bisbee in 1992 by Chef Rod Kass and Sally Holcomb, the restaurant features quality, locally sourced ingredients that inspire incredible meals (especially when paired with a local Arizona wine!).

LB Cantina in Florence

Serving Sonoran Style Mexican cuisine for more than 40 years, LB Cantina is a perfect place to add to your list of culinary road trips and to dine before strolling the town’s short historic Main Street or having a beer at the River Bottom Grill. Other notable stops include the McFarland State Historic Park and nearby Tom Mix Memorial, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, The Windmill Winery, and St. Anthony’s Monastery, a Greek Orthodox Monastery.

Elvira’s Restaurant in Tubac

This restaurant is known for a long list of moles they have perfected. After enjoying some modern Mexican food, wander through the town’s art galleries; visit the Tubac Presidio State Historic Park and Tumacacori National Historical Park; play a round of golf at Tubac Golf Resort and Spa, where the movie Tin Cup was filmed; or drive into Nogales to explore a border community.

Li’l Abner’s Steakhouse in Tucson

Not much has changed since it was established in 1947, except that this quirky steakhouse is now surrounded by master-planned communities. But the beautiful patio — ideal for sitting under the stars and smelling steaks being grilled over mesquite — still remains.

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