Tag Archives: downtown phoenix

CityScape Phoenix

Snow and ‘Frozen’ cool things off at CityScape

It may be hot in the Valley but things are cooling way down in the heart of downtown Phoenix during Cool Summer Nights at CityScape with snow, a snow slide, movies and more!

As a part of Summer in the City from CityScape, Cool Summer Nights will offer guests two opportunities to gather in Patriots Park to watch a feature film on the big screen at the outdoor movie theater while enjoying free shaved ice, board games and, best of all, four tons of snow and a snow slide!

Event details include:

  • Cool Summer Nights at CityScape
  • Thursday, July 23 and Thursday, August 20
  • 6:30 p.m. until 9:00 p.m – Movies begin at 7 p.m. (both nights)
  • Movie night in Patriots Park featuring a big screen outdoor theatre.
  • Disney’s “Frozen” will be shown on July 23 and Grease will be shown on August 20.
  • Four tons of real snow and a snow slide.
  • Special guest appearance by Elsa on July 23.
  • Free shaved ice for the first 200 guests.
  • Board games including Operation, Jenga, Twister, Battleship, Chutes & Ladders, etc.
  • Guests are encouraged to dress up as their favorite Frozen and Grease characters.
  • Guests should bring their own chairs/blankets.
  • This event is free and open to the public.
OTF Downtown Phx Ribbon Cutting

Orangetheory opens first urban location in Valley

Orangetheory Fitness, an energizing group interval fitness concept broken into cardiovascular and strength training, opened its 18th Valley location in the heart of Phoenix. The new studio is located under Lucky Strike and Stand Up Live at CityScape Phoenix, next to CVS.

“We are honored to join the Downtown Phoenix neighborhood and become a part of this vibrant community,” said Matt Kafora, owner of the newest Orangetheory Fitness studio. Kafora is also the owner of three additional Orangetheory Fitness locations in the Valley. “Our newest location is a perfect fit for the vivacious CityScape Phoenix development. We cater to the hustle and bustle of downtown Phoenix, from the working professional to the busy college student. This workout offers a fun and unique way for members of all levels to stay active and meet their various fitness goals.”

Orangetheory Fitness is backed by the science of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Orangetheory’s heart rate monitored training is designed to keep heart rates in a target zone that stimulates metabolism and increases energy. Led by skilled personal trainers, participants use a variety of equipment including treadmills, rowing machines, TRX Suspension Training and free weights. Participants can expect to burn anywhere from 500 to 1000 calories per 60-minute session. The result from this workout is the “Orange Effect” – meaning more energy, visible toning and extra calorie burn for up to 36 hours post-workout.

Orangetheory Fitness Downtown Phoenix also features Orangetheory Fitness’ newest heart rate monitoring system, OTbeat. This system uses Bluetooth connection to give quick stats on calories burned, track the amount of time spent in different zones during a workout and more. In addition to using OTbeat during class, members can also utilize the monitoring system to track physical activity outside of class.

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New condos breaking ground in Downtown Phoenix

In the midst of the economy picking up and the surge of urban growth and development in downtown Phoenix, there is new affordable condo project breaking ground. Since the launch of en Hance Park, four units have already sold with sales anticipated to move quickly.

The 59,000-square-foot condo complex is an affordable, thoughtful living option by Chilean-based developer Sencorp. With 49 units designed for the live/work lifestyle, many downtown residents can enjoy all of the amenities offered in the area including: dining, entertainment, museums, local venues and freeways.

The project is located at 1130 N. 2nd Street, across from the 32-acre Margaret T. Hance Park and adjacent to Roosevelt Row. The complex will offer units ranging in square footage from 400 to 1,100 with prices starting at $150,000. Construction is scheduled for completion in summer 2016.

PhxArtMuseECDT3015

Phoenix Art Museum exhibitions through end of 2015

Andy Warhol: Portraits
March 4—June 21, 2015

One of the most influential artists of the 20th century, Andy Warhol was at the forefront of the Pop Art movement and known for his brightly colored images. This exhibition examines Warhol’s fascination with celebrity culture and the “world famous,” featuring nearly 200 screen print paintings, drawings, videos, paintings and photographs from his student days in the 1940s to the New Wave-era 1980s. Also on view will be an installation of Warhol’s reflective Silver Clouds, helium-filled metalized balloons.

Pattern Play: The Contemporary Designs of Jacqueline Groag
April 4—August 9, 2015

Following the prolonged trauma of World War II a renewed public appetite for color and pattern flourished in Britain. Czech-born Jacqueline Groag was one of the most versatile female designers of the post-war period. From the colorful and playful to the abstract and representational, Groag’s work contributed to Britain’s spirit of renewal and defined the popular “contemporary” style.

One-of-a-Kind: Unique Photographic Objects from the Center for Creative Photography
April 11—October 19, 2015

This unique photography exhibition covers the entire history of the photographic medium from the 1840s to the present day—works highlight several photographic processes from negative or digital capture to daguerreotypes and Polaroid prints. On view will be photographs by David Emitt Adams, Pierre Cordier, Betty Hahn, Bill Jay, Chris McCaw, Joyce Neimanas, Susan Rankaitis and Andy Warhol.

Hidden Histories in Latin American Art
May 9—August 23, 2015

The focus of this exhibition is an investigation of the means by which some Latin American and Latino artists spotlight stories or histories marginalized by the media in their artistic practice. Historically, many artists have sought to expose parallel truths existing outside of the mainstream. The artists in this exhibition explore neglected yet pressing histories, such as the violence against women in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico; the marginalization of indigenous communities in Guatemala; and the fate of civilians “disappeared” by military and paramilitary groups in Colombia.

Hidden Histories will include works by Teresa Margolles (Mexico, born 1963), Doris Salcedo (Colombia, 1958), Graciela Sacco (Argentina, 1956), Luis González Palma (Guatemala, 1957) and Annie López (US, 1958), among others. The exhibition encompasses approximately 1,400 square feet and includes works from the Phoenix Art Museum’s permanent collection as well as loans from other institutions and private collections.

From New York to New Mexico: Masterworks of American Modernism from the Vilcek Foundation Collection
June 7—September 7, 2015

Enjoy masterworks of American Modernism from the early 1910s to the post-war era. Artists including Georgia O’Keeffe, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove and Marsden Hartley explore a wide range of modernist approaches with emphasis given to American cubism, nature-based abstractions of the Stieglitz Circle and regional modernism from the American Southwest.

American and European Art from the 1920s and 1930s
June 13—November 15, 2015

From the highs of the Roaring ‘20s to the depths of the Depression and the beginnings of the Second World War, the art of the period expressed the interests and concerns of the era. This focused exhibition features highlights from the Museum’s collection.

Masterworks of Spanish Colonial Art from Phoenix Art Museum’s Collection
September 5, 2015—March 6, 2016

View remarkable Spanish Colonial artworks created in the 17th and 18th centuries that were recently acquired by Phoenix Art Museum, including an 18th-century Mexican painting of the Virgin of Guadalupe that will be on display at the Museum for the first time.

Gianfranco Ferré Designs
October 24, 2015—February 28, 2016

According to Gianfranco Ferré, drawing is the expression of freedom and rigor, creativity and method, but also a working tool and the point of departure for a project. This exhibition brings together more than 80 sketches by Ferré both illustrative and technical along with examples of how the sketches are translated into a three-dimensional garment.

INFOCUS PhotoBid
October 30—November 20, 2015

Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads: Gold
October 3, 2015—January 31, 2016

Renowned Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei took as his inspiration twelve bronze sculptures of Chinese zodiac creatures that once graced an elaborate Qing dynasty fountain in Yuanming Yuan, an 18th century imperial retreat outside Beijing designed by two European Jesuits. Their heads were looted by British and French troops in the Second Opium War in 1860. Today many view them as a symbol of cultural theft. The artist recreated them in 2010 as a subversive commentary on the nature of looting and repatriation. Also part of the exhibition will be a video about the artist and 18th-century Chinese bronze works from Phoenix Art Museum’s collection.

The White Shirt According to Me. Gianfranco Ferré
November 4, 2015—January 18, 2016

The white shirt became a hallmark of Gianfranco Ferre’s (1944- 2007) style. Trained initially as an architect, Ferre’s work is rooted in the philosophy that his customer wants functional, classic yet powerful clothes constructed from high quality materials. This exhibition includes drawings, technical details, sketches, photographs and videos in addition to Ferre’s virtuoso interpretations of this classic design.

Liliane Tomasko: The Last 10 Years
November 21, 2015—February 14, 2016

The artist’s paintings are veiled in darkness—evocative and emotionally charged. Over the last decade the underlying drawings beneath the layers of thick paint have evolved into her “inside out” paintings. A reversal of process, the colorful textiles are strewn, stacked and composed—undulating and transforming from abstraction to mountain vistas. From darkness into light, the viewer is transported to another time and space within these intimate, quiet and edgy interior settings.

Cameos: Sculpture in Miniature
November 28, 2015—April 17, 2016

Showcasing intricate carvings in gemstones, shell, and glass that measure just one to three inches each, this exhibition features more than 150 European cameos from the 18th and 19th centuries. Among the many detailed designs are biblical and mythological scenes, images of gods, goddesses and philosophers, as well as historical portraits.

Photographic Still Life
December 5, 2015—May 15, 2016

This exhibition will draw on the rich resources at the Center for Creative Photography to explore photography’s contribution to the still life genre and to contrast these photographic works to painted still lifes from the collection of Phoenix Art Museum. Photographers included are Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Josef Sudek, Arthur Tress, Jo Ann Callis and Jan Groover.

Hines and Nibblers Group pic

Hines feeds homeless in downtown Phoenix

Hines, the international real estate firm, joined forces Friday, May 29, with Phoenix’s Lodestar Day Resource Center to help end homelessness.

Along with Nibblers Catering, employees from several of Hines’ Phoenix properties served nutritious meals and water to hundreds of Valley community members dealing with homelessness. Representatives from Hines’ properties, including Renaissance Square, 24th At Camelback and U.S. Airways, supported staff in the charitable efforts.

“As members of the local community, Hines encourages its employees to donate a day of public service each year,” said Chris Anderson, Managing Director and Local City Leader for Hines. “We participate in many charitable events throughout the year.”

Plexus Worldwide will turn downtown Phoenix pink

Scottsdale-based Plexus Worldwide, a leading direct marketing weight loss and health supplement seller, is alerting locals that they may be surrounded by a sea of pink if they are near the Phoenix Convention Center Thursday, June 4 through Saturday, June 6.

More than 6,500 Plexus Ambassadors (independent product resellers) from across the U.S. and Canada will descend on Phoenix to attend Plexus Worldwide’s “One Plexus 2015” annual convention. This is the first time the Scottsdale based company has held its national convention in Arizona. Last year it was held in Dallas. Pink is a big color for Plexus. Not only because of the fact that a high percentage of Ambassadors are women, but because the company’s signature product, Plexus Slim, is often informally referred to as the “pink drink” by Ambassadors.

Just four years ago, Plexus Worldwide had revenues of less than one million and in 2014 Plexus surpassed $310 Million.  In 2015, it was named No. 30 on the Direct Selling News (DSN) List of Top 50 Revenue-Generating Companies in Direct Selling within the United States and No. 56 Globally.  In 2014, it was named the #8 on the 2014 Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing companies.

Plexus Worldwide has more than 200 employees in Arizona and more than 200,000 associates, which it calls Ambassadors, across the United States and Internationally.

CityScape

Downtown Phoenix shows cultural, developmental boom

There’s a loud and steady drumbeat in Downtown Phoenix. It’s music from a concert or festival. It’s the clinking of glasses on restaurant patios. It’s the bustle of students trying to make it to class on time. It’s the “beep beep” of construction crews building new and renovating old.

It’s the sound of progress.

Downtown Phoenix is in the midst of a cultural and developmental boom. From large-scale projects like the Biosciences Partnership Building, Arizona School for Law and Society, Union @ Roosevelt and Luhrs City Center to major events like Super Bowl Central, VIVA PHX, McDowell Mountain Music Festival and Comicon, there’s overwhelming evidence to support the idea that Downtown Phoenix is growing into a broader, more interesting, and more textured community.

Consider these numbers:

  • $4.6 billion in investments over a 10-year period
  • 1.2 million square feet of commercial construction underway, including 600 hotel rooms and 650 residential units
  • 800,000 square feet of retail space
  • 8 million square feet of office space
  • 15,000 students, with more facilities on the way
  • 67,000 employees
  • Over 6 million event attendees annually
  • 170 restaurants
  • Expanding bike and transit culture with more than 1 million light rail boarders at Central Station annually

Downtown Phoenix is part of a national trend that is seeing millennials and baby boomers seeking out live/work/play urban lifestyles.

“Downtown Phoenix has been growing for 10 years with investments from both the public and private sectors,” said Dan Klocke, Downtown Phoenix Inc.’s vice president of development. “Right now, what we’re seeing is all that effort meeting up with demographics.”

Heart Health, WEB

Arizona research saves lives of cardiac arrest victims

Survival rates for victims of cardiac arrest are increasing dramatically – all because of research being done right here in Arizona. You can learn about that and how to do CPR at the next session of Mini-Medical School 2.0 at The University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

Mini-Medical School 2.0 is a community lecture series held by the downtown Phoenix medical school that covers various cutting-edge health topics. The lecture take places on Wednesdays, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. in the Virginia G. Piper Auditorium at the College of Medicine – Phoenix campus. The event is free.

The second spring session, on April 1, will feature a lecture from Bentley J. Bobrow, MD, who has been the medical director of the Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma for the Arizona Department of Health Services. He has been instrumental in studies conducted by the university’s Arizona Emergency Medicine Research Center. Dr. Bobrow will discuss the increasing survival rates from cardiac arrest. Attendees also will have the opportunity to learn chest compression-only CPR on mannequins.

To register, please click here.

 

Office Productivity, Interior Design

StartUp PHX Challenge free office giveaway extended

The stakes keep getting higher for the Valley’s best and brightest startup companies as they compete to win free office space alongside innovation leaders like Uber at 111. W.  Monroe in Downtown Phoenix. After receiving dozens of entries for the StartUp PHX Challenge, organizers have decided to extend the contest to Wednesday, April 15th. A top-tier panel of Phoenix-based business experts will review the applications before selecting a winning tenant that will be announced on Monday, April 23rd.

“We have received applications from some aspiring game changers in the startup world,” said Tim O’Neil of Ironline Partners. “From app developers to fashion designers,  creative entrepreneurs are ready to take the next step in growing their brands by taking physical office space and adding more employees,” he said.

The winner of the StartUp PHX Challenge will call the 12th floor of 111 W. Monroe their professional home, with a fully-furnished 1,200 square foot office space featuring panoramic city and mountain views. In addition to six free months office space, Goodman’s Interior Structures, another Phoenix-based company passionate about doing good and fueling growth, will provide a complete office furniture system.

Ownership, which includes Ironline Partners,  is delivering a best in class, amenity rich property with five star customer service, at competitive pricing. The team acquired the 50-year-old office tower in April 2014, favoring the property’s core urban location and functional configuration, which is ideal for both large corporations and small, entrepreneurial businesses.

“We love being part of the new, dynamic Phoenix CBD,” O’Neil said. “The next generation of business owners is making its mark here, and collaborative work space, with modern amenities and social environments is the new norm.”

Startups are encouraged to enter the StartUp PHX Challenge by applying online on the 111 W. Monroe website. Complete application, contest rules, details and restrictions are available at: www.111westmonroephoenix.com/startupphxchallenge

Ironline Partners bringing Adaptive Reuse Project to Phoenix

Phoenix will soon see new life breathed into a warehouse property in the downtown core. The building, located at 841 E. Jefferson, was recently purchased by Ironline Partners for $3 million. The local developer has plans to convert the property into a modern, relevant space for the right tenant.

Kevin Calihan with CBRE’s Phoenix office negotiated the sale on behalf of Ironline Partners. Kevin Lange with Keyser Commercial and Rod Beach with Cresa represented the seller, Phoenix-based Jefferson Partners, LLC. Bryan Taute and Charlie von Arenstchildt, also with CBRE, will handle the marketing and leasing assignment on the redeveloped property.

841 E. Jefferson was formerly home to Goodman’s Furniture and served as a showroom and warehouse. However, Ironline Partners believes the property is ideally located for redevelopment in the dynamic central business district. Situated at the southwest corner of Jefferson Boulevard and 9th Street, the property is next door to Chase Field, right on the Metro Light Rail line and steps from numerous retail amenities.

“Downtown Phoenix has seen significant revitalization over the last several years and adaptive reuse projects like the one planned at 841 Jefferson have played a major part in that revitalization,” said Bob Karber, Principal with Ironline Partners, whose other redevelopment projects include 2828 N. Central and 111 W. Monroe, both in central Phoenix.

According to the Downtown Phoenix Partnership, more than $4 billion has been newly invested in office space, retail, restaurants, educational facilities and convention space and hotel rooms in the area. This investment has transformed Downtown Phoenix into a center for employment, education, professional sports, living, and arts and culture. The dramatic changes over the past five years are providing a surge in momentum for additional development. 841 Jefferson looks to capitalize on that momentum. 

“An economically strong central business district is a vital component to a metropolitan area’s overall economic growth,” said CBRE’s Calihan. “As people return to city centers, so do office users. 841 E. Jefferson will be able to offer employers the unique and creative office environment their target employee base is looking for. In fact, several tenants have already shown interest in the space.”

841 E. Jefferson boasts 25-foot, wood-truss ceilings and an open-concept floor plan. Initial design plans show large banks of windows and rolling-overhead glass doors to be added during renovation to ensure maximum exposure of natural light and the creation of cross-functional indoor/outdoor space.

The existing building is approximately 48,500 square feet, but development plans call for the addition of a mezzanine, which will bring the building to 60,000 square feet. The building will offer potential users heavy parking, which can often be difficult to find in urban environments. The property’s parking along with direct access to the Metro Light Rail will serve high-density users well, meaning 841 Jefferson has the potential to bring hundreds of new employees to Downtown Phoenix.

Development of 841 E. Jefferson is slated to begin this quarter.

Portland on the Park gains traction with larger units

Portland on the Park, the highly anticipated sister property to Downtown’s award winning Portland Place, has received significant interest from potential homebuyers with 25 units already reserved. The property also has noted a surge in requests for larger floor plans, and in response, has redesigned selected homes. This change led to the creation of four new premium floors called “Club Level Residences” which feature penthouse floor plans. Although the number of total units has decreased from 170 to 149, the overall livable square footage of the property has increased with many of the new floor plans offering more space. Construction of the four-building property will begin this spring and is slated for completion in the summer of 2016.

“Our buyers are sophisticated and know exactly how they want to live,” says David Newcombe of Habitat Urban, designated broker for Portland on the Park. “The interest to live Downtown has been tremendous. Premium buyers are seeking urban amenities and comfort, yet still want a spacious home with lock and leave convenience. By actively listening to our future homeowners, our developers made floor plan changes that meet the needs of this exciting market. It’s refreshing to be involved with a project that is so engaged in Downtown, and is focused on doing what’s best for the neighborhood and the city.

Portland on the Park will consist of four interconnected structures including four-, 12- and 14- story towers with a five-story parking garage for resident and guest use. High-end touches are standard throughout the Tower Residences, Club Level Residences and Penthouse Suites and include things like reclaimed hardwood flooring, quartz counters, soft-close cabinetry and frameless glass showers. Most homes will have a private six-foot deep outdoor balcony, with some measuring more than 40 feet in length.

The urban living project is situated between the three-acre Portland Park and the 32-acre Margaret T. Hance Park along Central Avenue. It will be a welcome addition to the Central Arts District and neighboring Roosevelt Row, the nationally acclaimed arts community. Home sizes range from 745 to 2,490 square feet with 21 floor plans from which to choose. Tower and Loft Residences begin in the low $200,000s with Penthouse Suites available under $1 million.

phoenix

UA’s Phoenix campus has nearly $1 billion economic Impact

University of Arizona President Ann Weaver Hart and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton today announced that the economic impact of the UA’s downtown Phoenix academic medical center in 2013 was $961 million, according to a report released by nationally recognized consultants Tripp Umbach.

“Our College of Medicine and the academic medical center have become key generators of economic impact for Phoenix and Arizona,” said President Hart. “It is through the great support of the city, the state and our partners in the medical center that we have been able to achieve this kind of impact.”

The Tripp Umbach report outlines the impact of the health science colleges and the surrounding academic campus as defined by the City of Phoenix master plan that includes education, research and clinical facilities over a designated 28-acre area.

Among the findings:
• The economic impact of the overall biomedical campus in downtown Phoenix in 2013 was nearly $1.3 billion, of which $961 million is attributed to the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix presence.
• In 2013, the academic medical center accounted for 9,355 direct and indirect jobs. The UA College of Medicine – Phoenix is responsible for 7,185 of those jobs.
• The academic medical center generated more than $56.5 million in state and local government revenues in 2013 as a result of operational, employee and visitor spending. Of that total, $44.5 million is attributable to the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix.
• The estimated economic impact of the academic medical center will reach $3.1 billion by fiscal year 2024-25.

The report was commissioned by the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix and the City of Phoenix.

“The activity on the downtown biomedical campus puts top-notch health care and the best-trained health professionals in our backyard, but it also creates high-value jobs in our city,” said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton.

The Phoenix Biomedical Campus plays host to four UA health science colleges – the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health as well as the colleges of nursing and pharmacy. Also on campus are three NAU programs – physician assistant, physical therapy and occupational therapy as part of the university’s College of Health and Human Services. Arizona State University’s School of Nutrition and Health Innovation is housed in the Arizona Biomedical Collaborative south of the Translational Genomic Research Institute (TGen).

The Biosciences Partnership Building is the latest development in the steady expansion of the downtown Phoenix campus and emerging academic medical center. In 2012, the award-winning Health Sciences Education Building opened, housing health education for both the UA and Northern Arizona University. Construction continues on The UA Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s. The cancer center, a 220,000-square foot outpatient and research facility, is scheduled to be completed in 2015.

345N7thAve_AerialView

Wood Partners to develop 220-unit apartment complex downtown

A venture formed by Wood Partners in Marietta, Ga. (Ryan Dearborn, CEO) plans to develop 220 apartments at the southeast corner of N. 7th Avenue and W. Fillmore Street in downtown Phoenix. ALTA Fillmore LLC (Wood Partners entity) assembled the 4.09-acre site in two cash transactions totaling just under $4.8 million. Morgensen Inc. in Cody, WY, sold 3.14 acres for $3.685 million. That parcel is occupied by a roughly 30,000-square-foot commercial building that will be razed.  Junction LLC in Carefree sold a nearly 1-acre parcel to complete the assemblage. That property, with an address of 345 N. 7th Avenue, sold for $1.11 + million. The land is now occupied by a 6,000 square-foot commercial structure that will also be demolished. Wood Partners was represented in the transaction by Kim C. Kristoff of NAI Horizon in Phoenix. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank in Phoenix represented the sellers.

The proposed apartment project will anchor the northwest corner of the Downtown Core while enhancing quality lifestyle by enhancing the potential of a live and work community with access to Downtown community activities only a short walk away.  Todd Taylor, Wood Partners, realizes the potential of Downtown Phoenix, “We are very excited about this real estate given the dynamism and renaissance underway in downtown phoenix today.”  The proposed upscale rental community is being called Alta Fillmore. Design plans from Biltform Architecture in Phoenix show a four-story structure with elevator service, balconies, shading and perimeter landscaping. The gated community will have studio, one and two-bedroom units ranging from roughly 575 to 1,175 square feet.  Rental rates are yet to be determined.  Development cost (land and buildings) is estimated by Wood Partners at about $35 million.  Wood Partners has an unidentified equity partner that was secured through NorthMarq Capital in Phoenix.

Reached for comment, Council member Michael Nowakowski said “the City of Phoenix benefits tremendously by forward thinking, quality development by national firms such as Wood Partners that improve the human experience of the city neighborhoods while making close-in accessibility possible for the young working professional and families alike.”

Construction is slated to start in the second quarter of 2015, with an opening to follow in the second quarter 2016. The build out is expected to take 21 months. The contractor is WP West Builders Arizona LLC, an affiliate of Wood Partners.  In the past 15 months, it has been reported that the privately-held Wood Partners has bought five multi-family development sites in Phoenix, Chandler, Scottsdale and Tempe to build a total of 1,313 apartments. Wood Partners reports seeking several other sites in the region and is actively negotiating a half dozen properties to anticipate a development portfolio over the next half decade.

Giant Host Committee Visit Phoenix Football Unveiled in Downtown Phoenix

Cornerstone of Super Bowl Central unveiled

Giant Football Unveiled Mayor Greg Stanton SpeaksWith 83 days until the kick-off of Super Bowl XLIX, the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and Visit Phoenix today are unveiling a super-sized football mounted in Downtown Phoenix, which will serve as the cornerstone for Super Bowl Central. Towering more than 20 feet high, it measures more than 32 feet around, and weighs in excess of 7,000 pounds.

“This massive installation for Super Bowl XLIX stands for the fun and lasting memories in store for fans, and for the heightened profile and lasting benefits for Arizona as we welcome our third Super Bowl in 19 years,” said Jay Parry, President and CEO of the Arizona Super bowl Host Committee.

Located at the northwest corner of Washington Street and Central Avenue, the enormous football made of 7,000 pounds of steel, as well as wood and foam, is 2,000 percent larger than a regulation football.

“Super Bowl Central is a postcard from downtown Phoenix to the world,” said Win Holden, chair of Visit Phoenix. “This super-sized football not only marks the epicenter of downtown Phoenix’s fan experience, but it’s destined to star in scores of selfies and social-media posts.”

Fans are invited to take their photos in front of the newly installed giant football and share them on social media using #SB49.

Super Bowl Central will be a free, family-friendly, football-themed fan campus featuring street-level merchants and restaurants, local food trucks, beer and wine gardens, a concert stage, network broadcast stages and a nightly fireworks show. The 12-block area in downtown Phoenix will be the hub of fan activities for Super Bowl XLIX from Wednesday, January 28 through Sunday, February 1, 2015.

ASU's Arizona Center for Law and Society

ASU law school to break ground next week

The official groundbreaking for Arizona State University’s new $129 million law school building in downtown Phoenix, the Arizona Center for Law and Society, is set for Nov. 13.

The ceremony will take place at the northwest corner of Taylor and First streets starting at 8 a.m. Attending the ceremony will be ASU President Michael M. Crow, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Dean Doug Sylvester. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Phoenix Councilman Michael Nowakowski also are expected to attend.

“The Arizona Center for Law and Society is another wonderful addition to our growing campus in the heart of Phoenix,” Crow said. “Having the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law in Downtown Phoenix fits perfectly with ASU’s mission of building strong learning and career connections with media, health care, corporate and government organizations for the more than 11,500 students in the downtown campus.”

Construction on the Arizona Center for Law and Society began in July. The new building will be ready for classes by August 2016. The College of Law currently occupies its home of almost 50 years, Armstrong Hall, on the Tempe campus. ASU and the College of Law are committed to ensuring that the Armstrong name will be honored in the new law school.

The Arizona Center for Law and Society is being funded by the city of Phoenix — which is providing land and $12 million — construction bonds through Arizona State University and private donations. ASU Law has set a capital campaign goal of $50 million for construction of the building. The College has raised more than $34 million so far.

“This could not have been possible without the generosity of our alumni and connected legal communities,” Sylvester said. “We are particularly honored that long-time Phoenix attorney Leo Beus and his wife, Annette, recently made a $10 million contribution to the building’s capital campaign. ”

The building is planned to be approximately 280,000 gross square feet with two levels of underground parking. It will have 18 rooms in which classes will be regularly scheduled, including one large lecture hall dedicated to university undergraduate education. Features of the new law school include a high-tech courtroom and an active learning classroom.

“Not only will the new law school have state-of-the-art learning facilities, it also will provide our students with incredible opportunities,” Sylvester said. “The downtown location is near the courts and the city’s legal district, which will prove invaluable to our students in the form of internships, externships and networking.”

The Ross-Blakley Law Library, currently located in a separate building near the law school in Tempe, will be moved to the new building. The library will occupy multiple floors and create the main circulatory structure of the center. The first floor of the building will have retail space consisting of a school bookstore and a café.

The Arizona Center for Law and Society also will include space for two think tanks, multiple centers with cross-disciplinary focus and the new ASU Alumni Law Group, the first teaching law firm associated with a law school.

The lead architects on the project are Ennead Architects and Jones Studio, with DPR Construction as the lead builder.

Sundance Lots_LGI Homes, Cassidy Turley, WEB

LGI Homes Arizona buys 151 lots in Buckeye

Cassidy Turley announced the sale of 40 finished and 111 platted lots in the master-planned subdivision of Sundance, located in Buckeye, AZ. LGI Homes Arizona, LLC (NASDAQ: LGIH) purchased the lots for $3.9 million. The seller was Kaufman Capital Sundance, LLC.

Cassidy Turley Vice Presidents Brian Rosella and Will French negotiated the transaction on behalf of the seller.

The Sundance master-planned community, located just south of Interstate 10 at Watson Road, includes an 18-hole championship golf course, outdoor swimming pools and a 15,000 square foot community recreation center. Located just west of Downtown Phoenix, Sundance residents have panoramic views of the White Tank and Estrella Mountains and easy access to a variety of amenities including shopping, restaurants, medical facilities and Estrella Community College.

The C3 office building, in Los Angeles, was re-imagined by Gensler to include more "front doors" for suites, which are depicted by the colorful stairways on the building's exterior.

Office Mate: The creative endgame for functional obsolescence

Forget the corner office. These days, it’s about the coffee shop around the corner, the food trucks outside the lobby, the light rail that passes an office building every 15 minutes.

The work place is all about the worker. Employee and entrepreneur are synonymous. Human resource departments are working in concert with building owners, managers, developers and brokers.

Employee demographics are spanning radically different generations with equally varied needs for a work-life balance. These are all observations shared by industry experts, from international architecture, design and planning firm Gensler, to brokerage houses and developers in the Phoenix Metro.

About a decade ago, traditional offices began to open up for collaborative space. Since then, office environments have contracted around the remote worker and many other trends that ultimately call for very specific, versatile influenced by a company’s DNA. A demand for trendy, compact work environments that encourage collaboration, focus, creativity and accommodates mobility has led to many new speculative and build-to-suit office developments tailored to an end-user’s needs. This is all while vacancy rates in the market hover around 25 percent.

However, many experts say this statistic is misleading. It’s weighed down by the many office buildings constructed in the ’80s or earlier that are structurally — and aesthetically — outdated.

Courtesy of Cassidy Turley

Courtesy of Cassidy Turley

THE OBSOLETE
As Cassidy Turley’s head of research, Zach Aulick, puts it: “functional obsolescence” are the buzzwords of 2014.

Aulick cites Rockefeller Group Vice President and Regional Director Mark Singerman’s assessment at a Bisnow event that vacancy rates in the market were much lower, by about 5 to 7 percent, without including obsolete buildings. Aulick, prompted by such buzzings and the news that speculative and build-to-suit development was happening despite vacancy rates higher than 20 percent, looked into the functional obsolescence among office properties in the Phoenix Metro and found that Singerman was right.

Net absorption of office buildings constructed after 1990, Aulick reports, accounted for 4.4MSF in 1Q 2014. In that same period of time, buildings completed prior to 1990 were reportedly declining in about 320KSF and 200KSF in 1Q and 2Q, respectively. The major contributors or obsolete space is parking ratios and floor plate size.

Midtown, Aulick says, is perhaps one of the hardest hit areas with 10MSF of office and an average age falling pre-‘90s. That area’s options are limited by available space. It takes entrepreneurship, says Cassidy Turley’s Vice President of Marketing Alison Melnychenko, to recognize the highest and best use for the land on which an obsolete building sits.

GETTING IN THE GAME
If an owner isn’t going to sit back on 80 percent occupancy, there are a few options that could raise the appeal of an outdated building. The first move is to retrofit a space — tear out floors or half floors to make higher ceilings. That can be costly and reduces overall volume. The other option is to add to the building’s function. For instance, the Freeport McMoran Center in downtown Phoenix had high user demand for parking. It was turned into a Westin hotel. Buildings along Central Avenue have been converted into apartments and condos — a trend CBRE Senior Vice President of Office Services Bryan Taute says will likely continue.

Retail and industrial buildings are sometimes flipped into office spaces, given the parking issue can be solved. This is more popular in areas such as Midtown or near the airport.
“I think Midtown has the potential to figure a way out of (obsolescence),” says Taute. “If building owners are willing to sell them to new owners with capital to give creative funky ideas. I’m a big believer in mass transit and infill.”

The general idea among people is that Phoenix won’t pay for that kind of re-activated space. But there is more enthusiasm than meets the eye, says Gensler Principal Beth Harmon-Vaughan. Brokers, developers, business owners, she says, see the potential and there are a handful of undisclosed projects in the pipeline on which Gensler is already working.

This call center space features a blue webbing on the beiling as a navigational tool that unites a uniuqe 75KSF floorplate.

This call center space features a blue webbing on the beiling as a navigational tool that unites a uniuqe 75KSF floorplate.

On a local level, a call center space built in an old Motorola manufacturing facility was designed by Gensler to “control the churn” of the company’s employees who go through 12 weeks of extensive training. The existing building’s unique floor plate led Gensler to use a blue webbing on the ceiling as a navigational tool that brings the 75KSF area together.

The call center is proof that these trendy spaces aren’t just for software and video gaming companies either. Real estate offices such as CBRE in Los Angeles have adopted these new space use trends, and Gensler says more professional and traditionally staunch companies such as law firms are coming onboard.

CBRE’s office in L.A., co-developed with Gensler, has a “free-address” system of office space use, often called “hot desking,” which can be reserved for individual use during certain times.

Despite the increase in remote work, companies still want employees to come to the office. Whether its the highly crafted informality of a Quicksilver office’s mix-matched meeting chairs in a windowless warehouse or the raw floors, pet amenities and employee-generated wall art at Facebook’s Menlo Park campus, the younger generation is revolutionizing office space.

Other trends include authenticity – designing the DNA of a company into its office spaces – and having a “front door” instead of anonymous-feeling lobbies. Gensler’s design of Los Angeles’ C3, for example, achieves a “front door” feel through colorful exterior stairwells to upper-story suites.

Phoenix may not be on that level, but change is coming — even to the ’80s-heavy areas of Midtown.

Mod turned a re-purposed Midtown lobby constructed in 1985 into a co-op office space that helps keep the building's outdated features from making it obsolete.

Mod turned a re-purposed Midtown lobby constructed in 1985 into a co-op office space that helps keep the building’s outdated features from making it obsolete.

It just takes a drive down Central Avenue to see the buildings in need of change. The Class-B high-rise at 2828 N. Central Avenue was built in 1985 and offers the typical functionally obsolete issues, parking ratios and small floor plates, explains Aulick. However, it was a building that — with a little renovation — could be turned into the headquarters for the co-op workspace known as “mod on Central.” It’s stylized as a hotel, features a cafe and is a public workspace for remote employees that, as Lynita Johnson, of Olson Communications says, are looking for somewhere that’s “never boring or beige.”

“It’s the way you want to work, because it’s the way you like to live,” she says of the development. Finance and law firms are among the next wave of industries adopting the new kind of office space. Old, dated, standard offices such as Rose Law Group’s former eight-year residence has transitioned into a high-tech, smart, fun, sleek and creative space in Old Town Scottsdale, near a cultural hub of restaurants.

Rose Law Group’s employees skew “young and energetic,” says Jordan Rose, founder of Rose Law Group. “We are 85 percent below the age of 40.” “If we weren’t locked into our old lease we would have been the first to the open floor plan party at least six years ago,” says Rose. “We knew as soon as we moved into the old space that we needed a more collaborative atmosphere that would only be achieved through design.

That said, traditionally law firms are not known as hot beds of creative thought and collaboration. We have a bit of a different model in that we employ lawyers and non-lawyer planners, MBAs, project managers and energy consultants who can help shape the ultimate advice we provide our clients. Sometimes legal advice in a box is just really bad for a client’s bottom line.”
Non-traditional changes include minimizing the firm’s waiting room area, meant to remind the team that clients shouldn’t wait long to see their attorney.

Conference rooms and open space areas are named after employees and balconies that can be used to host meetings. Offices are centered around a park space where people can eat lunch. There are also a few old, full-sized arcade games.

ELBOW ROOM
As space allotted per employee continues to drop to about 167 SF per person — down nearly 100 SF in the last few years, with CoreNet Global estimating a further drop to 151 SF by 2017 — developers are tasked with finding ways to make the workplace more enjoyable. Right now, that looks like raising the roof (or, rather, knocking out floors in high-rises). Floor-to-floor heights in buildings constructed in previous decades have been about 13.5 feet. Now, says Sven Tustin, vice president of development and investment for Trammell Crow, they’re about 15 to 16 feet floor-to-floor.

While eight-foot ceilings won’t make an office building obsolete, Taute says a space will be more challenging to sell and demand a lower rental rate than an office with higher ceilings. Buildings with lower parking ratios typically see leasing 80 percent of its space as success.

Tustin has seen some significant repurposing happen in southern California, most recently at Playa Vista, a former Howard Hughes hangar that received a $50M makeover that includes an office campus for media, entertainment and tech firms.

“There’s an authentic experience to be had,” says Tustin. “In Phoenix, it’s a little more challenging. Our office employment is a little less creatively geared and more focused on labor.”
Midtown is the only submarket that has experienced negative absorption over the last decade, thanks to the light rail, amenities and the right neighborhood.

“The trick,” says Tustin, “is buying those buildings cheap enough. “We’ve explored a lot of new developments for infill. We’ve been promoting this initiative quite a bit and one thing we’ve been concerned with is our flight of the younger demographics who view places as more fun.”

Trammell Crow has challenged itself to create a project that could be just as fun, though not as extreme, as Playa Vista. Also, Phoenix doesn’t boast a lot of old warehouses, notes Taute.

Trammell Crow is working on a 200KSF project at Cooper Road and Loop 202 that’s a two-story tilt-up office building with 50KSF floor plates and 16-foot, floor-to-floor heights. The building, he says, targets software and financial service companies. Trammell Crow is focused on creating “the arrival experience” with escape areas, shade structures and “the small things.”

“Developers have probably emphasized aesthetics more than the experience of a building,” says Tustin. “I think it’s worth reallocating the investment toward the employee.” zThis is where Millennials come in.

“From my perspective, it’s a lot more fun because in Phoenix it has always been about price and the things that create it as a commodity,” says Taute. “Now, the office space is being looked at as an attraction tool, which means people are willing to spend more money. If they can get the rents, to make cool office space…All of those things are good for our city. The longevity is better than cookie cutter office buildings.”

Biosciences_Partnership_Building_poster

UofA breaks ground on 245KSF Biosciences Partnership Building

With a shovel of dirt, construction began Thursday on the 10-story Biosciences Partnership Building; the latest development in downtown Phoenix.

 

University of Arizona President Ann Weaver Hart and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton tilled the soil ceremoniously marking the beginning of the 2-year design and construction for the 245,000-square foot research building on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

 

“This building will foster collaborations with scientists that will lead to more cures, better treatments and bring more federal and private dollars to the state,” said President Hart. “We will pursue expanded partnerships with industry that we hope will lead to groundbreaking discoveries in the areas of neuroscience, cardiovascular and thoracic science. This building will allow us to further these efforts and, ultimately, improve lives.”

 

As announced earlier this year by the university and the City of Phoenix, plans are in place to construct the 10-story, 245,000-square-foot research building just north of the Health Sciences Education Building on the downtown campus.

 

“This building will serve the medical school and beyond with important research and faculty to teach the next generation of health professionals,” Stanton said. “Of course, this just adds to the economic vibrancy of downtown. The research facility initially will bring construction jobs, and then high-paying, research-related jobs, including specialized technicians and other support staff for faculty and scientists.”

 

The 2-year construction on the $136 million building is expected to translate into nearly 500 jobs initially and another 360 permanent jobs at build out.

 

“The Bioscience Partnership Building represents yet another milestone as the city and the university develop a major academic medical center in downtown Phoenix,” said Stuart D. Flynn, MD, dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix. “Research in this building, in collaboration with our partners, will advance healthcare for all and expand our role as an economic driver for the city, valley, and state.”

 

The building is the latest development in the steady expansion of the downtown Phoenix Biomedical Campus and expanding academic medical center. In 2012, the award-winning Health Sciences Education Building opened, housing health education for both the UA and Northern Arizona University. Construction continues on The University of Arizona Cancer Center at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s. The cancer center, a 220,000-square foot outpatient and research facility, is scheduled to be completed in 2015.

 

The Phoenix Biomedical Campus plays host to four UA health science colleges – the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health as well as the colleges of nursing and pharmacy. Also on campus are three NAU programs – physician’s assistant, physical therapy and occupational therapy as part of the university’s College of Health and Human Services. Arizona State University’s School of Nutrition and Health Innovation is housed in the Arizona Biomedical Collaborative 1 building just southwest of the education building and immediately south of the Translational Genomic Research Institute (TGen).

 

The funding for the Biosciences Partnership Building comes from the Stimulus Plan for Economic and Educational Development bonds approved by the legislature in 2008that paid for construction of the Health Sciences Education Building and related campus improvements. Research focus areas include neurosciences, healthcare outcomes, cancer and precision medicine.

The finale was a version of “Hey Jealousy,” made famous by the Tempe-based Gin Blossoms. Scott Johnson (center) of Honeygirl is a member of the Gin Blossoms. Ty Lusk (right) also played on the final number.

Valley Partnership raises donations to the tune of $8,000

Valley Partnership’s inaugural Rock For A Cause benefit concert raised more than $8,000 to purchase outdoor musical instruments for 2014 Community Project recipient Arizona Foundation for the Handicapped (AFH).

Detail shot of instruments between acts.

Detail shot of instruments between acts.

The concert at the Monarch Theatre in Downtown Phoenix drew an estimated crowd of 300. More than 250 tickets were sold in advance. A total of 34 musicians performed, including Valley bands Soul Country, Heartlyn Rae, Ty Lusk, Ruca, The Nate Nathan Band and Honeygirl.

Inviting local musicians associated with Valley Partnership to perform in a benefit raising money to build a sensory experience at Perry Rehabilitation Center that includes a musical instrument garden seemed like a natural fit,” said Community Project Committee Co-Chair Dena Jones. “I am blown away by the support we received from our partners, the talented musicians and our generous sponsors.

The community project planning committee made our inaugural fundraiser for the 27th community project a huge success. I have already been approached to start planning the next one,” Jones said.

Crowd shot inside the Monarch Theatre in downtown Phoenix.

Crowd shot inside the Monarch Theatre in downtown Phoenix.

In addition to ticket sales, money also was raised at the concert through a “50-50” raffle and silent auction. Auction items included hotel stays, restaurant gift cards, courtside seats at a Suns game, and autographed sports memorabilia.

Valley Partnership, which represents the commercial, industrial and master-planned real estate development industry in Metro Phoenix, undertakes a community project each year. Rock For A Cause raised money to build a sensory garden that includes permanent, outdoor musical instruments and other therapeutically integrated elements as part of the project.

The goal of the 27th community project is to enhance the quality of life for those served at AFH which will include many therapeutic elements, a sensory garden, a built-in grill, seating for outside dining, the re-purposing of a sports court and a landscape screen. Community Project day is Nov. 8 at the Perry Rehabilitation Center, 3164 E. Windsor Ave., Phoenix.

The huge success of Rock For A Cause is due to the tremendous effort of Dena, her entire committee and the volunteer musicians,” said Richard Hubbard, President and CEO of Valley Partnership. “That success will only be surpassed by the great effort Valley Partnership will put into the 2014 Community Project at Arizona Foundation for the Handicapped. We are looking forward to it.”

AFH is a human services organization whose primary mission is to provide quality, individualized services to those with physical or intellectual challenges in the least restrictive environment.  It offers programs for adults with physical or intellectual challenges to assist them in achieving desired outcomes.

One of Valley Partnership’s cornerstones is community service. Each year, it selects a non-profit organization that can benefit from the skills, efforts and supplies provided by its partners to renovate and enhance facilities for children and those in need. Over the past 27 years, Valley Partnership has contributed more than $3.5 million to the community through these projects.

LUSTRE Deck Ceremony 4.jpg

Hotel Palomar offers chic urban weddings

At Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar Phoenix no two weddings ever feel the same thanks to the variety of unique indoor and outdoor settings, locally-inspired food and beverage options, high design and more, that come together to make every moment, every bite and every stylish detail all about a memorable “I do.”

What makes a wedding at Hotel Palomar so unique?

• 360-degree views of the surrounding mountains, skyline view of downtown Phoenix skyscrapers, historic buildings and city lights
• A variety of stunning venues from a rooftop pool deck to sophisticated ballrooms
• Chef-driven cuisine focused on local artisan and farm fresh organic ingredients, and handcrafted cocktails
• Wedding packages starting from $1,500

As downtown Phoenix’s newest boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix offers more than just stunning ballrooms and private dining rooms. One of the most awe-inspiring outdoor wedding venues in all of downtown Phoenix is LUSTRE Rooftop Garden, which is perched on the hotel’s third-floor pool deck and offers 360-degree views of the surrounding mountains, downtown skyline of skyscrapers, historic buildings and city lights. LUSTRE is one of the Valley’s most impressive city venues to host anywhere from 20 to 200 guests to eat, drink and dance the night away under the stars.

For indoor options that also offer captivating downtown views, the Zia Room extends the entire west side of the hotel with three walls of oversized windows delivering unparalleled views overlooking the city. The Dreamcatcher Ballroom also plays hosts to wedding celebrations, with a stately space with soaring ceilings, breathtaking chandeliers and a gallery of large windows with views overlooking CityScape Phoenix. Each venue is also available for bridal showers, rehearsal dinners, cocktail receptions and soirees of all occasions for up to 200 guests.

Creative catering designed to exceed expectations is also on the menu at Hotel Palomar Phoenix. The hotel’s on-site, award-winning restaurant, Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails, is available to create a menu specifically outfitted for each couple. Blue Hound’s talented culinary team focuses on contemporary American gastro-lounge fare that pairs seasonal, chef-driven cuisine with handcrafted cocktails. Restaurant and wedding menus are thoughtfully prepared to highlight skillful flavor presentations with a sampling of the region’s best organic produce and free-range meats.

Wedding packages at Hotel Palomar Phoenix start from $1,500 and offer a number of enhancements specifically catered to a variety of tastes, budgets and styles. With all wedding packages, the hotel provides a complimentary dance floor, celebratory toast, wedding cake, black pintuck or cream damask linens and votive candles.

For information about weddings at Hotel Palomar Phoenix, visit www.hotelpalomar-phoenix.com/wedding or call 602-253-6633.

The Enclave at 32nd

Watt Communities announces multifamily, in-fill projects

Watt Communities of Arizona has doubled its Phoenix project pipeline and brought its total local construction commitment to more than $21 million with the announcement of two new urban infill communities: The Enclave at 32nd Street and 16 Ocotillo. The move grows the company’s local presence and expands its product offerings to include single-family detached homes and urban townhomes in close-in suburban neighborhoods.

“We now have four flags on the map representing two concepts that we are extremely proud of and excited to bring to Phoenix,” said Steve Pritulsky, President and CEO of Watt Communities of Arizona. “They are all decidedly infill locations and will feature innovative indoor-outdoor living styles that today’s buyers are looking for.”

The Enclave at 32nd Street is located on 3.46 acres just south of the southwest corner of 32nd Street and Cactus Road, in the Paradise Valley Mall area of North Phoenix. The community is directly off of the 51/Piestewa Freeway and immediately north of the highly acclaimed Basis Charter School. It is also situated less than one mile from the Phoenix Mountain Preserve recreation area.

Scheduled to break ground in late 2014, The Enclave includes 31 two-story, single-family detached homes ranging from approximately 1,700 to 2,200 square feet. All homes deliver a welcoming front porch concept, creative side patios, builder-installed front yards and common area landscaping, walkable interior courtyards, and private rear-entry, two-car garages.

“This development is based on a private drive design developed by our partners in California, and is a unique concept here in Arizona,” said Paul Timm, COO of Watt Communities of Arizona. “Having just one point of entry for the community adds a level of privacy and allows residents to own a small oasis within a bustling urban corridor. It is innovative housing in and active location, but also peaceful.”

Dorsey/Biltmore

Dorsey/Biltmore

The second community, 16 Ocotillo, sits on 2.8 acres at the southwest corner of 16th Street and Ocotillo Road, between Maryland and Glendale avenues in North Central Phoenix. It is within walking distance to the area’s burgeoning 16th Street “Restaurant Row,” a Sprouts grocery store and diverse retail services. The community is being designed as a gated, single-family detached home community and is located near Piestewa Peak, which sits just one half mile away.

The Enclave at 32nd Street land acquisition closed escrow on May 13 for $1.275 million. Timm of Trust Realty Advisors represented the buyer, Watt New Leaf-Cactus LLC. John Werstler of CBRE represented the property seller, The Northern Trust Company as Trustee of the Edmund P Mell GST Trust. The 16 Ocotillo land acquisition closed escrow on May 8 for $1.6 million. The buyer was Watt New Leaf-16 Ocotillo LLC. Ray Cashen of Cashen Realty Advisors represented the property seller, The Estate of Mon Jame Lee and The Lee Living Trust.

In late 2013, Scottsdale-based New Leaf Communities and Watt Communities of Santa Monica, Calif. announced their joint venture (Watt Communities of Arizona) and entered the Phoenix market with two inaugural projects: Dorsey Lane, a 51-unit townhome project located in central Tempe (just south of the southwest corner of Broadway Road and Dorsey Lane), and Biltmore Living, a 40-unit townhome project located in the Camelback Corridor (less than a mile south of 24th Street and Camelback Road).

Those communities will provide contemporary, three-story urban townhomes ranging in size from 1,400 to 1,800 square feet. Amenities include gated entry, private two-car garages and common areas with a pool/ramada/sundeck, outdoor poolside kitchen and landscaped paseos.

“These are urban locations within established employment cores,” said Pritulsky. “They match the quality and vibrancy of their neighborhoods, and will allow residents to move from renting to owning without giving up their urban lifestyle.”

CityScape Residences model penthouse

CityScape welcomes first residents

CityScape Phoenix marked its final development milestone in February when the first residents moved into the CityScape Residences, a collection of 224 luxury apartments that sit atop Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar Phoenix.

The leasing office is now open daily from 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. along with a fully furnished, one-bedroom model on the 14th floor.

Expansive views and high-energy surroundings merge with sophisticated home finishes within all 224 residences. Residents have 24-hour access to the four-star hotel services of Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar Phoenix, including in-room dining by Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails, housekeeping, concierge, valet parking, business center and laundry services. Additionally, residents will enjoy parking with direct access into the residential tower, a private 24-hour state-of-the-art fitness center, a community area and an exclusive swimming pool 175 feet above Jefferson Street.

“CityScape is known for many things – most notably, work and play, but now it will take on a new component – live,” said Keith Earnest, Executive Vice President of Development at RED. “Our residents will have full access to the 24-hour vibrancy and energy of the neighborhood. What you find in two city blocks at CityScape is typically separated by miles in other cities. We’ve built a strong, tight-knit community and now we look forward to welcoming people who will call CityScape home.”

CityScape Residences offer unique studio, one- and two-bedroom floor plans with floor-to-ceiling windows, gourmet kitchens with prep islands and gas ranges, and luxurious bathrooms with sizeable closets. The residences range from 560 to 2,373 square-feet and include 23 two-story one, two- and three-bedroom penthouses on the top floors. All residences offer magnificent views of the city skyline and mountains beyond.

In addition to the hotel and community amenities, residents are automatically enrolled in a residents-only membership program at participating CityScape retailers and restaurants. Living at CityScape Phoenix puts residents just a few steps away from the best concert venues, theatres, professional sports venues and museums in Arizona.

“I have lived in Phoenix nearly my entire life and have never seen Downtown as vibrant as it is now, nor has there ever been a place more exciting to live than CityScape Residences,” said Irene McCready who works three blocks away at a major corporation and is the first resident to move in. “I sold my house last year and watched and waited for the CityScape Residences to become available. It’s like living at a resort with 24-hour room service and security, a resident-only pool and gym and full access to the hotel’s amenities. The spectacular views of South Mountain from my apartment and the never-ending variety of things to do are exactly what I was looking for in a home.”

CityScape Residences will be professionally managed by Alliance Residential Company. With resident move-ins underway, this signifies the completion of construction at the $500 million mixed-use destination.

For more information on CityScape Residences, call 866-628-0589 or visit www.cityscaperesidences.com.

For more information about CityScape Phoenix, a retailer directory and to see what’s happening, visit www.cityscapephoenix.com. Ample and convenient underground parking is available and validated by many retailers.

Cityscape Unit A1

Cityscape Residences Pool

Cityscape Penthouse 2

CityScape Plaza - Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

CityScape Phoenix Attempts Pilates World Record

CityScape Phoenix will attempt to break the world record for biggest Pilates class with 863 participants in celebration of International Pilates Day on Saturday, May 4 with participants lining Central Avenue in Downtown Phoenix.

CityScape Phoenix, in partnership with Gold’s Gym, IMX Pilates Studio, Pilates by Fitness Solutions and Remedy, a Pilates & Massage Studio, will attempt to break the Guinness World Record. Currently standing at 862 people, CityScape plans to crush the world record that was achieved in Spain in 2009 by having 1,000 people simultaneously practicing Pilates at Patriots Square at CityScape and along Central Avenue. The class will be led by IM=X Pilates Master Trainer, Chanda Fetter, who has personally led more than 4,000 mat Pilates classes.

Participants of all ages and skill levels are welcome to bring their mats and water and join in this exciting event. Arrival is encouraged at 8am with the hour class beginning at 9:30am. There will be live music, food and vendors in the park following the class from 10:30am to noon.

“It’s going to be an exciting morning in Downtown Phoenix and the record will be measured at a point during the class when everyone is participating,” said Celine Hacche, marketing director of CityScape Phoenix. “Health, wellness and bringing the community together are big priorities for us at CityScape and we’ve had great success in our free fitness classes that change on a seasonal basis.”

During the class, guests will learn proper technique, tone, strengthen and improve their body and working abs, buns and thighs. This event is free and open to the public.

Every Saturday morning since March 16, CityScape has been hosting “Pilates in the Park”, offering free Pilates classes at Patriots Square Park leading up to this world record attempt.

After participating in the world record attempt, Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails at Hotel Palomar Phoenix is offering participants a special offer during its Punch Brunch where you will receive half off your entrée with the purchase of any breakfast cocktail.

For more information, visit www.cityscapephoenix.com/pilates or call 602-772-3900.

Phoenix Brewers Invitational: Get Crafty 2012

Craft Beer, Live Music At The Phoenix Brewers Invitational's Get Crafty 2012

This weekend at Heritage Square in downtown Phoenix, it’s all about beer, live music, food trucks, beer and, yes, even more beer. The inaugural Phoenix Brewers Invitational, Get Crafty 2012, will feature more than 60 craft breweries, live entertainment by 80 Proof, beer-related vendors, beer memorabilia, home brewing demonstrations and a wide variety of local foods from some of Arizona’s best food trucks.

And, even better: Admission into the festival grounds is free. However, to consumer beer, 21-and-over attendees must purchase the 2012 souvenir mug for $10. Beer is sold separately using tokens, priced at $1 each for a 3-oz sample. Or, trade in four of your tokens for a full, 12-oz serving.

Want more? VIP admission will also be available, which will include an invitation to an open house preview party hosted at Phoenix Ale Brewery on Thursday, December 6 and exclusive entry into the VIP beer garden on either Friday or Saturday with catered food, private bathrooms and a meet-and-greet with brewers. The VIP ticket is only available through pre-sale purchase for $125 per person, per day.

Some of the invited breweries include (beers subject to change):

  • Phoenix Ale Brewery (Phoenix, Ariz.), Fretzy’s Unfiltered Pale Ale
  • Borderlands Brewing Company (Tucson, Ariz.), Noche Dulce Vanilla Porter
  • Dogfish Head Brewery (Milton, Del.), 60 Minute IPA
  • Maui Brewing Co. (Kahana, Hawaii), Bikini Blonde
  • Boulder Beer Co. (Boulder, Colo.), Hazed & Infused
  • Full Sail Brewing Company (Hood River, Ore.), Amber Ale
  • Coronado Brewing Company (Coronado, Calif.), Orange Wit
  • Mission Brewery (San Diego, Calif.), Amber Ale
  • Left Coast Brewing Company (San Clemente, Calif.), Hop Juice Double IPA
  • Rubicon Brewing Company (Sacramento, Calif.), Monkey Knife Fight Pale Ale
  • Marin Brewing Company (Larkspur, Calif.), IPA
  • Ass Kisser Ales (San Jose, Calif.), Vanilla Pale Ale

As for live music, 80 Proof, a California-based reggae rock band, is scheduled to perform on the Zia Records Stage at 8 p.m. on Saturday, December 8 (day two of Get Crafty 2012). A battle of the bands is also scheduled for Friday, December 7 (day one); as many as 12 local bands will battle it out for a chance to be one of the beer festival’s featured performers, with the chance to open for 80 Proof. The winner will be chosen by popular vote from festival goers. Some of the competing bands include Bird City, Versions of You, Cartoon Lion, We Are Searchers, Inept Hero, Cosmic Goat, Libertine Social and Johnny Lee.

And just when you thought it couldn’t get any better: A percentage of the proceeds from this event will benefit the Beer for Brains Foundation, a national, nonprofit organization of craft-beer lovers, distributors and brewers, who are committed to raising public awareness about brain cancer, engendering compassion for its victims and helping fund groundbreaking research leading to a cure. Based in Arizona, the Beer for Brains Foundation is one of only a handful of beer industry-related charities currently operating in the United States.

As a final note, drink responsibly. The Phoenix Brewers Invitational urges patrons to take advantage of the Valley Metro Light Rail, located just blocks away from the festival.

To purchase tickets, for a schedule of events and for more information about the Phoenix Brewers Invitational, visit phoenixbrewfest.com.

Phoenix Brewers Invitational: Get Crafty 2012

Where: Phoenix Heritage & Science Park, 115 N. 6th St., Phoenix, AZ 85004
When: December 7-8, 2012, 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. each day
Cost: General admission ticket: $10, VIP tickets: $125 pre-sale
Contact: (480) 234-4232
Online: phoenixbrewfest.com