Tag Archives: Burch & Cracchiolo

Larry Ortega 2

Blais heads Bar's Young Lawyers Division

Burch & Cracchiolo associate attorney, Casey S. Blais, has begun serving his year-long term as president of the Maricopa County Bar Association Young Lawyers Division.  The term runs through December 31, 2014.  The mission of the MCBA Young Lawyers Division is to involve young and new lawyers in serving the community and enriching the profession while focusing on the specific needs of young and new lawyers

Blais practices in the areas of commercial litigation, real estate law, landlord/tenant disputes, and insurance defense / personal injury litigation. He regularly represents individuals, lenders, developers, and other private and public entities. Casey received his J.D. from the Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law in 2008. Prior to law school, Casey attended Brigham Young University where he double majored in Linguistics and Economics. He is admitted to practice in Arizona and the United States District Court for the District of Arizona.

kitten

Ingold elected to Humane Society board

Burch & Cracchiolo partner Susanne E. “Susie” Ingold has been elected to the board of directors of The Arizona Humane Society. She has been committed to AHS since 2005 and been a member of the “Compassion with Fashion” annual fundraising luncheon committee since 2010.

Ingold has practiced at Burch & Cracchiolo for fifteen years concentrating her practice in labor and employment, commercial and general liability litigation and construction.  She also serves as co-chair of the firm’s Construction Defect and General Liability section.

Ingold received her J.D. from the University of Arizona and her B.A. with honors from Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri.  Ingold also currently serves on the University of Arizona Law College Association board of directors. Recently, she was a member of Valley Leadership’s Class XXXIV which concluded in June 2013.

legal

Top Lawyers list: Government relations

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Clare Abel
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
602-234-9920
bcattorneys.com
Abel concentrates her practice primarily in the areas of real estate, zoning and condemnation Law. She is listed in Southwest Super Lawyers, Best Lawyers in America and Arizona’s Finest Lawyers.

S. David Childers
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4880
kutakrock.com
Childers served on the U.S. Secretary of Health & Human Services’ Task Force on Long-Term Health Care Policies, and the Governor’s Private Sector Task Force on Long Term Care and the University of Arizona College of Business & Public Administration National Board of Advisors.

Robert D. Dalager
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8540
gknet.com
Dalager practices governmental affairs and land use law.  Prior to joining Gallagher & Kennedy, Dalager was with the Arizona State Senate for nearly 10 years.

Gregory Y. Harris
Lewis and Roca LLP
602-262-0218
lrlaw.com
Harris has extensive experience appearing before state and federal agencies and in state and federal court, and appears regularly before the Arizona Legislature.

Yvonne R. Hunter
Fennemore Craig, P.C.
602-916-5386
fclaw.com
Hunter’s practice focuses primarily on government affairs. Hunter formerly served as an Assistant Arizona Attorney General in the Arizona Attorney General’s Office.

Joseph A. Kanefield
Ballard Spahr LLP
602-798-5468
ballardspahr.com
Kanefield’s practice is focused on government relations, civil and appellate litigation, public-private partnerships, administrative law, state and local tax matters, gaming, and election and campaign-finance law.

Timothy A. La Sota
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-452-2712
tblaw.com
La Sota practices in the areas of government relations, regulatory and administrative law, election law, land use and procurement.

Paige A. Martin
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4827
kutakrock.com
Martin, an AV Preeminent Peer Review Rated partner in the firm’s Scottsdale office, and primarily represents governmental entities and private employers.

Mary R. O’Grady
Osborn Maledon, P.A.
602-640-9352
omlaw.com
As a former solicitor general for the State of Arizona, O’Grady has a unique breadth of experience with public law issues. Her areas of expertise include election and campaign finance law and state constitutional law.

Jordan Rose
Rose Law Group
480-505-3939
roselawgroup.com
Rose practices in the areas of government relations, municipal issues, land use, zoning, administrative law, renewable energy, and lobbying.

John B. Shadegg
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5204
steptoe.com
Shadegg, former U.S. Congressman, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in1994 and served eight terms before retiring from Congress in 2010.  He practices in Steptoe’s Government Affairs and Public Policy group.

David K. Udall
Udall Shumway PLC
480-969-3043
udallshumway.com
Udall has successfully represented a variety of clients with zoning and development issues before the City of Mesa, Maricopa County, Town of Gilbert, City of Chandler, and Casa Grande.

technology

Technology and the law

We all know how quickly technology is changing.

But how will changes in technology affect changes in the law?

As Arizona enters its second century, three Arizona attorneys weigh in on the legal changes they see coming as technology continues to rock our world.

Cheryl Walsh, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.: Just 107 years ago, the Wright Brothers flew a plane for the first time.  Who could have imagined then that we would have the technologically-rich world we have today?  With that in mind, we do have technological advancements in our midst today that are ripe for challenge and examination. For instance, access to information and data as a result of technology can increase safety and efficiency of  law enforcement substantially; however, privacy and personal rights must be balanced in the process. The Supreme Court will be tackling this issue in the current session by considering the admissibility of GPS tracking device information obtained without a warrant. Cameras are everywhere and soon we will enter our homes and businesses with eye recognition technology that will make the individuality of fingerprinting more obsolete than ever.  Protecting our rights while advancing our civilization is a delicate balance.

Yu Cai, associate in Polsinelli Shughart’s science and technology practice group: Intellectual property development and protection will become an essential part of any business plan. Particular attention must be paid to the recent change in patent law from “first to invent” to “first to file,” requiring earlier interaction and involvement between inventors and their legal representatives.

John E. Cummerford, co-managing shareholder, Greenberg Traurig: Until fairly recently, “privacy” — as we think of it today — was a rare commodity. The word “privacy” doesn’t even appear the Constitution, no doubt because it was so uncommon when the Constitution was drafted. Technology has sharply reduced — and in my view, will soon eliminate — the whole notion of personal privacy.  Naturally, this will cause a lot of worry and fear.  But, when nobody’s privacy is safe, how will that affect our own inclination to invade the privacy of others?  I think it will cause people to actually become more respectful of others, and will — for lack of a better term — cause them to avert their eyes.

That is, will the muck-raking reporter who makes a living ferreting out scandals and embarrassing others really want someone to find out, say, his own bank balance, or what websites he has visited, or with whom he has been keeping company and put that information on the web?  Probably not, although that information may be readily available.  And so, I think that recognition that we are all vulnerable to invasions of privacy will foster more civility and I dare say more kindness among people.  And that will be a good thing indeed.