Tag Archives: Burch & Cracchiolo

123rf.com: inq

Sharon J. Oscar joins Burch & Cracchiolo

GetFileAttachmentBurch & Cracchiolo, P.A., has announcesd that Sharon J. Oscar has joined the firm. Oscar practices in the areas of commercial real estate law and equine law.

Oscar’s real estate practice spans over 30 years and focuses on the sale, acquisition, leasing and property management of all types of commercial properties, including shopping centers, retail, office, industrial, vacant land, medical and hotel, for both sellers and buyers and landlords and tenants. She also has extensive experience in title insurance and escrow matters, having served as in-house counsel for two major title insurance companies. Her equine law practice covers comprehensive legal services including the purchase, sale and leasing of horses and horse properties, transaction work covering such contracts as waivers and releases, training, boarding and management agreements, transfers and assistance with association registrations, and assistance with entity formation, insurance, litigation and estate planning aspects of horse-related needs.

Oscar received her J.D. from Northern Ohio University College of Law in 1975 and her B.A., magna cum laude from the University of Arizona in 1972.  She is an AV 5.0 Preeminent Peer Review Rated attorney by Martindale-Hubbell and has been recognized by US News Best Lawyers in America since 2010 and by Southwest Super Lawyers since 2008.

DSC_1504

Big crowd honors Arizona’s Most Influential Women

A crowd of nearly 500 people packed Chateau Luxe in Phoenix Thursday night to honor Az Business and AZRE magazines’ Most Influential Women in Arizona Business.

“The Most Influential Women issue of both magazines is easily our most popular issue of the year,”said AZ Big Media  Publisher Cheryl Green. “This year, we had more than 2,000 women under consideration and chose 50 influential women, five Generation Next women to watch and 12 groundbreakers in commercial real estate.”

DSC_1514
DSC_1514
DSC_1514
DSC_0030
DSC_0030
DSC_0030
DSC_1332
DSC_1332
DSC_1332
DSC_0035
DSC_0035
DSC_0035
DSC_1333
DSC_1333
DSC_1333
DSC_1334
DSC_1334
DSC_1334
DSC_1351
DSC_1351
DSC_1351
DSC_0051
DSC_0051
DSC_0051
DSC_1371
DSC_1371
DSC_1371
DSC_1372
DSC_1372
DSC_1372
DSC_0066
DSC_0066
DSC_0066
DSC_0062
DSC_0062
DSC_0062
DSC_0063
DSC_0063
DSC_0063
DSC_0113
DSC_0113
DSC_0113
DSC_0058
DSC_0058
DSC_0058
DSC_1517
DSC_1517
DSC_1517
DSC_1374
DSC_1374
DSC_1374
DSC_1380
DSC_1380
DSC_1380
DSC_1382
DSC_1382
DSC_1382
DSC_1383
DSC_1383
DSC_1383
DSC_1386
DSC_1386
DSC_1386
DSC_1389
DSC_1389
DSC_1389
DSC_1390
DSC_1390
DSC_1390
DSC_1391
DSC_1391
DSC_1391
DSC_1392
DSC_1392
DSC_1392
DSC_1393
DSC_1393
DSC_1393
DSC_1395
DSC_1395
DSC_1395
DSC_1397
DSC_1397
DSC_1397
DSC_1400
DSC_1400
DSC_1400
DSC_1402
DSC_1402
DSC_1402
DSC_1403
DSC_1403
DSC_1403
DSC_1405
DSC_1405
DSC_1405
DSC_1408
DSC_1408
DSC_1408
DSC_1411
DSC_1411
DSC_1411
DSC_1413
DSC_1413
DSC_1413
DSC_1415
DSC_1415
DSC_1415
DSC_1416
DSC_1416
DSC_1416
DSC_1419
DSC_1419
DSC_1419
DSC_1421
DSC_1421
DSC_1421
DSC_1423
DSC_1423
DSC_1423
DSC_1424
DSC_1424
DSC_1424
DSC_1426
DSC_1426
DSC_1426
DSC_1430
DSC_1430
DSC_1430
DSC_0268
DSC_0268
DSC_0268
DSC_1432
DSC_1432
DSC_1432
DSC_0130
DSC_0130
DSC_0130
DSC_1433
DSC_1433
DSC_1433
DSC_1434
DSC_1434
DSC_1434
DSC_1435
DSC_1435
DSC_1435
DSC_1438
DSC_1438
DSC_1438
DSC_1439
DSC_1439
DSC_1439
DSC_1440
DSC_1440
DSC_1440
DSC_1441
DSC_1441
DSC_1441
DSC_1442
DSC_1442
DSC_1442
DSC_1444
DSC_1444
DSC_1444
DSC_1446
DSC_1446
DSC_1446
DSC_1448
DSC_1448
DSC_1448
DSC_1450
DSC_1450
DSC_1450
DSC_1452
DSC_1452
DSC_1452
DSC_1453
DSC_1453
DSC_1453
DSC_1455
DSC_1455
DSC_1455
DSC_1457
DSC_1457
DSC_1457
DSC_1458
DSC_1458
DSC_1458
DSC_1459
DSC_1459
DSC_1459
DSC_1460
DSC_1460
DSC_1460
DSC_1462
DSC_1462
DSC_1462
DSC_1464
DSC_1464
DSC_1464
DSC_1465
DSC_1465
DSC_1465
DSC_1466
DSC_1466
DSC_1466
DSC_1471
DSC_1471
DSC_1471
DSC_1472
DSC_1472
DSC_1472
DSC_1473
DSC_1473
DSC_1473
DSC_1478
DSC_1478
DSC_1478
DSC_1480
DSC_1480
DSC_1480
DSC_1482
DSC_1482
DSC_1482
DSC_1486
DSC_1486
DSC_1486
DSC_1489
DSC_1489
DSC_1489
DSC_1490
DSC_1490
DSC_1490
DSC_1493
DSC_1493
DSC_1493
DSC_1495
DSC_1495
DSC_1495
DSC_1497
DSC_1497
DSC_1497
DSC_1498
DSC_1498
DSC_1498
DSC_1500
DSC_1500
DSC_1500
DSC_1503
DSC_1503
DSC_1503
DSC_1504
DSC_1504
DSC_1504
DSC_1508
DSC_1508
DSC_1508
DSC_1509
DSC_1509
DSC_1509
DSC_1510
DSC_1510
DSC_1510
DSC_1512
DSC_1512
DSC_1512
DSC_1518
DSC_1518
DSC_1518
DSC_1521
DSC_1521
DSC_1521
DSC_0070
DSC_0070
DSC_0070
DSC_1524
DSC_1524
DSC_1524
DSC_0073
DSC_0073
DSC_0073
DSC_1526
DSC_1526
DSC_1526
DSC_0074
DSC_0074
DSC_0074
DSC_1527
DSC_1527
DSC_1527
DSC_0076
DSC_0076
DSC_0076
DSC_1532
DSC_1532
DSC_1532
DSC_0080
DSC_0080
DSC_0080
DSC_1535
DSC_1535
DSC_1535
DSC_0082
DSC_0082
DSC_0082
DSC_0085
DSC_0085
DSC_0085
DSC_0086
DSC_0086
DSC_0086
DSC_0089
DSC_0089
DSC_0089
DSC_0090
DSC_0090
DSC_0090
DSC_0092
DSC_0092
DSC_0092
DSC_0095
DSC_0095
DSC_0095
DSC_0096
DSC_0096
DSC_0096
DSC_0099
DSC_0099
DSC_0099
DSC_0101
DSC_0101
DSC_0101
DSC_0102
DSC_0102
DSC_0102
DSC_0105
DSC_0105
DSC_0105
DSC_0106
DSC_0106
DSC_0106
DSC_0109
DSC_0109
DSC_0109
DSC_0115
DSC_0115
DSC_0115
DSC_0117
DSC_0117
DSC_0117
DSC_0119
DSC_0119
DSC_0119
DSC_0122
DSC_0122
DSC_0122
DSC_0124
DSC_0124
DSC_0124
DSC_0126
DSC_0126
DSC_0126
DSC_0127
DSC_0127
DSC_0127
DSC_0129
DSC_0129
DSC_0129
DSC_0236
DSC_0236
DSC_0236
DSC_0238
DSC_0238
DSC_0238
DSC_0243
DSC_0243
DSC_0243
DSC_0246
DSC_0246
DSC_0246
DSC_0248
DSC_0248
DSC_0248
DSC_0250
DSC_0250
DSC_0250
DSC_0251
DSC_0251
DSC_0251
DSC_0253
DSC_0253
DSC_0253
DSC_0255
DSC_0255
DSC_0255
DSC_0259
DSC_0259
DSC_0259
DSC_0260
DSC_0260
DSC_0260
DSC_0262
DSC_0262
DSC_0262
DSC_0264
DSC_0264
DSC_0264
DSC_1537
DSC_1537
DSC_1537
DSC_0270
DSC_0270
DSC_0270
DSC_1539
DSC_1539
DSC_1539
DSC_0272
DSC_0272
DSC_0272

Green said all the women featured have earned influence in their respective fields through demonstrated track records of profitability, leadership and innovation.   

The women selected to the 2015 list for 2015 and honored Thursday were:

Amy Abdo, director, Fennemore Craig

Jennifer Anderson, senior vice president and regional manager, Wells Fargo

Karen Anderson, researcher, ASU’s Biodesign Institute

Lauren Bailey, founder, Upward Projects

Glynis Bryan, CFO, Insight Enterprises

Rita Cheng, president, NAU

Judith S. Gordon, associate professor and associate head for research at the University of Arizona Department of Family and Community Medicine

Alisa Gray, shareholder, Tiffany & Bosco

Sue Hasenstein, BMO Harris Bank

Melissa Ho, Polsinelli

Bo Hughes, CFO and COO, Pinnacle Bank

Veronique James, CEO, The James Agency

Isabelle Jazo, senior vice president of strategy, LaneTerralever

Carolyn J. Johnsen, Dickinson Wright

Eileen Klein, Arizona Board of Regents

Rosey Koberlein, CEO, Long Companies

Becky Kuhn, executive vice president, Banner Health

Betsy Kuzas, chief operating officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Michelle Lawrie, economic development director, Goodyear

Nona Lee, SVP and general counsel, Arizona Diamondbacks

Hope Leibsohn, member, Sherman & Howard

Stacey L. Lihn, Gallagher & Kennedy

Tina Machado, president, CodeRed-I

Carol May, president, Wisdom Natural Brands DBA SweetLeaf

Sara McCoy, first female to manage a power plant for SRP

Erica McGinnis, president and CEO, AIG Advisor Group

Tammy McLeod, vice president, APS

Rose Megian, president and CEO, Health Net of Arizona

Dion Messer, general counsel – intellectual property, Limelight Networks

MaryAnn Miller, senior vice president, Avnet

Ioanna Morfessis, president, IO.Inc.

Harriet Mountcastle-Walsh,VP and General Counsel, Honeywell

Annette G. Musa, Arizona market president, Comerica Bank

Christine Nowaczyk, senior vice president, Bank of Arizona

Deborah Pearson, Arizona State Credit Union

Susan Pepin, president and CEO, Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust

Suzanne Pfister, president and CEO, St. Luke’s Health Initiatives

Christina Roderick, principal, REDW

Patricia Rourke, market president, Bankers Trust

Lisa Sanchez, COO, The CORE Institute

Adelaida V. Severson, president and CEO, Bushtex

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-AZ 9th District

Sherri Slayton, Alliance Bank of Arizona

Wendi A. Sorensen, Burch & Cracchiolo

Molly Stockley, vice president of hospital growth, CTCA

Cathy Valenzuela, president, Arizona Business Bank

Kimberly Van Amburg, CEO, Casino Del Sol Resort

Cheryl Vogt, managing director, Marsh

Cynthia Walter, president, BAGNALL

Lori L. Winkelman, Quarles & Brady LLP

The groundbreakers selected from the commercial real estate world were:

Kathy Bollinger, executive vice president of University Medicine, Banner Health

Danielle Casey, economic development director, City of Scottsdale

Cindy Cooke, senior executive vice president, Colliers International

Karen Halpert, senior vice president, Head of Property Management, VEREIT, Inc.

Diane Jacobs, principal, Holly Street Studio Architects

Alison Melnychenko, vice president of marketing , DTZ

Jody Pokorski, partner, Snell & Wilmer

Barbi Reuter, COO, Cushman & Wakefield

Maria Salenger, senior associate, Jones Studio

Cathy Thuringer, principal, Trammell Crow

Alisa Timm, director of management services, Lincoln Property Company

Vicki Williams, senior vice president, commercial real estate, Alliance Bank of Arizona

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Denyse Airheart, interim director of economic development, City of Maricopa

Jessica Benford, shareholder, Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

Dr. Ivana Dzeletovic, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Stephanie Parra, executive director, T.W. Lewis Foundation

Teresa M. Pilatowicz, of counsel, Garman Turner Gordon

Douglas

Douglas L. Wood joins Burch & Cracchiolo

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. announced that Douglas L. Wood has joined the firm as an Associate. Wood is an attorney who practices in the areas of business and corporate law, estate planning and probate, and tax controversy. Prior to joining the firm, Wood practiced as a certified public accountant with a large national accounting firm focusing his practice on taxation.

During his time in the accounting profession, he addressed numerous tax matters for a variety of clients including tax compliance for various partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Wood specialized in the construction and real estate industry, performing a variety of services related to clients in this industry such as 1031 like kind exchanges and cost certification engagements related to Arizona low income housing tax credits.

Wood also participated in numerous financial statement attestation engagements such as audits, reviews, and compilations during his practice as a certified public accountant.  Prior to working as a certified public accountant, he was a legal intern at Higgs, Fletcher, and Mack in San Diego where he focused his practice on corporate law and tax controversy.

Wood received his J.D. from California Western School of law in 2013. Prior to law school, he attended the University of Missouri – Columbia where he graduated with a Master’s of Accountancy with an emphasis is taxation.

Wood graduated cum laude and was the recipient of the Givens Family Accountancy Scholarship. He is admitted to practice law in Arizona. Wood is also a certified public accountant in the state of Arizona. He is a member of the American Institution of Certified Public Accountants.

law

Chambers USA ranks Burch & Cracchiolo as leading firm

Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. has been ranked as a leading law firm in the newly published Chambers USA 2015 America’s Leading Lawyers in Business. The Firm’s Managing Partner, Edwin C. “Ed” Bull was selected for inclusion in Chambers USA  as a leading individual attorney in Arizona in Real Estate, Land Use and Zoning. B&C shareholder M. Brennan Ray was selected as an “Up and Coming” attorney also in the Land Use and Zoning practice group.                                                   

The Chambers USA rankings are based on extensive research conducted by Chambers and Partners Legal Publishers, a highly respected English publisher of renowned directories assessing and ranking the world’s leading lawyers. Chambers USA is published annually by Chambers & Partners to assess and rank the leading attorneys and law firms in the United States, based on peer and client reviews. Chambers’ researchers conduct in-depth interviews of clients, colleagues and the lawyers themselves to develop the rankings for the law firms and attorneys.

Chambers’ rankings are based solely on the research team’s findings and there is no cost for inclusion.

 

Andrew-Abraham

Burch & Cracchiolo attorney Andy Abraham earns honor

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. today announced that shareholder Andrew “Andy” Abraham has been named one of  the 2015Top 50 Attorneys in Arizona” by Southwest Super Lawyers.

Abraham is certified as a Real Estate Specialist by the Arizona Board of Legal Specialization. His practice focuses primarily in the areas of commercial litigation, real estate-related litigation and real estate finance and transactions. Abraham also has substantial experience in the area of franchisor/franchisee relations. Abraham was selected 2014 Phoenix metro ”Lawyer of the Year” by Best Lawyers in America for Real Estate Law and Real Estate Transactions and has been honored in every edition of Southwest Super Lawyers since 2007. He is included among Arizona’s Finest Lawyers and is an AV® Preeminent 5.0 out of 5 peer review rated attorney in Martindale-Hubbell.

Superwoman, WEB

Wendi A. Sorensen named to ‘Top 25 Women Attorneys’

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. today announced that shareholder Wendi A. Sorensen has been named one of the 2015 “Top 25 Women Attorneys in Arizona” by Southwest Super Lawyers.  Sorensen was also named to the prestigious list in 2013.  Sorensen has been selected as a Southwest Super Lawyer for five consecutive years beginning in 2011.
 
Wendi Sorensen

Wendi Sorensen

Sorensen has been certified by the State Bar of Arizona as a specialist in Personal Injury and Wrongful Death law due to her nearly three decades of litigation experience for both insurance companies and plaintiffs in both state and federal court.  Her practice focuses on aggravated liability and damages matters, including  Federal Motor Carrier (trucking accident) cases, vehicular products liability matters, construction site injury and death matters, and premises liability cases.  She has been recognized among Arizona’s Finest Lawyers and currently serves as a member of the Arizona State Bar committee responsible for conferring certification status in the area of Personal Injury and Wrongful Death law.  In addition, Sorensen is co-chair of the Personal Injury section for the Maricopa County Bar Association.

 
Prior to joining Burch & Cracchiolo, Sorensen served as Chief Trial Attorney and Major Case Counsel for one of the largest commercial insurance carriers in the world.  Sorensen received her B.S. in business/economics from Westminster College in 1981 and her J.D. from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University in 1984.  She is licensed to practice law in Arizona and California.
skd258400sdc

Super Lawyers: Burch & Cracchiolo

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. announced that 19 attorneys have been selected by Southwest Super Lawyers as top attorneys

in Arizona for 2015. Fifteen attorneys have been recognized as Southwest Super Lawyers and four have attained the title of Super Lawyers Rising Stars.

Burch & Cracchiolo’s 2015 Southwest Super Lawyers include:

• Daniel Cracchiolo, Business Litigation

• Edwin C. Bull, Land Use/Zoning

• Andrew Abraham, Real Estate

• Brian Kaven, Personal Injury Defense-General

• Clare H. Abel, Real Estate

• Edwin D. Fleming, Business Litigation

• Ian Neale, Personal Injury Defense: General

• Bryan F. Murphy, Business Litigation

• Martha C. Patrick, Tax

• Ralph D. Harris, Commercial Litigation

• Susanne E. Ingold, Employment Litigation

• Steven M. Serrano, Family Law

• David M. Villadolid, Labor & Employment Law

• Todd A. Julian, Personal Injury Plaintiff-General

• Wendi A. Sorensen, Personal Injury Defense-General

The 2015 Rising Stars include:

• Casey S. Blais, Business Litigation

• Melissa Iyer Julian, Business Litigation

• Tonya K. Macbeth, Family Law

• Laura J. Meyer, Business Litigation

Wendi Sorensen

Wendi A. Sorensen named partner at Burch & Cracchiolo

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A., announced that Wendi A. Sorensen has been named a partner with the Firm.

She is a certified Specialist in Personal Injury and Wrongful Death Law and currently serves on the Arizona State Bar committee that confers certification status in this practice area. Sorensen brings thirty years of litigation experience in the catastrophic personal injury/products liability practice area and in federal and state court matters focusing on transportation and vehicle liability, including complex vehicular claims.

Sorensen received her JD from Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law in 1984 where she was a Pedrick Scholar. She graduated summa cum laude with a BS degree in Business/Economics and Behavioral Sciences from Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah in 1981.

Sorensen has been selected as a Southwest Super Lawyer every year since 2012, and in 2013 was named one of the “Top 25 Women Attorneys in Arizona” by the respected ranking organization.  In 2014 she was named a Top Lawyer in the Specialist category by Arizona Business Magazine.

Greg Rosenthal

Gregory A. Rosenthal named partner at Burch & Cracchiolo

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A., announced that Gregory A. Rosenthal has been named a partner with the Firm.

He is an AV® Preeminent peer review rated attorney with Martindale-Hubbell whose practice focuses on civil litigation matters, representing clients in cases involving
serious personal injury, wrongful death, products liability, negligence, premises liability and construction matters.  Rosenthal joined Burch & Cracchiolo after a distinguished
career with Rosenthal Law Offices.

Rosenthal received his JD from University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law in 1989 and his B.A. with distinction in Speech Communications in 1986, also
from the University of Arizona.

Rosenthal is admitted to practice law in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and the United States District Court for the District of Arizona.
He is a member of the Arizona Association of Defense Counsel.

Stevens joins Burch & Cracchiolo

Ann Marie Stevens, Burch & Cracchiolo

Ann Marie Stevens, Burch & Cracchiolo

The law firm of Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A., announced that Ann Marie Stevens has joined the firm as an Associate. Stevens joins Burch & Cracchiolo after serving as a law clerk for the Honorable Kent E. Cattani of the Arizona Court of Appeals, Division One. Stevens will focus her practice on commercial litigation, labor and employment, and real estate law.

Stevens received her J.D. from Arizona Summit Law School (formerly known as Phoenix School of Law) in 2012 where she was a Governor Raul Castro Merit Scholar. She ranked number one in her class of 112. While in law school, Stevens served as managing editor of Phoenix Law Review, Volume V. Stevens received her B.A. in political science, magna cum laude, from University of Southern California in 1990.

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...
azbigmedia_mostinflu...

They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

socialmedia_icons

Social Media Prenups Trending In Valley

First comes love, then comes marriage, the baby carriage, and, for many Americans, divorce. Even if a couple doesn’t have an estate to divvy, family matter lawyers are reporting emerging trends that may have couples wishing they had signed prenup.

As the director of family law at Rose Law Group, Kaine Fisher has prepared many high-profile pre- and post-nuptial agreements. Some have had unusual provisions, such as what happens if a spouse transmits a sexually transmitted disease or a clause that liquidates damages for infidelity. However, there’s a new trend he and other local lawyers are touting — social media clauses.

Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the first places millions of people turn to share their thoughts, photos and lives. It’s where professional and personal relationships grow, thrive and, sometimes, end. And, when the inevitable happens, there’s a chance the scorned and burned feelings will turn up on social media platforms in the form of private or unflattering information or photos about the other person. This is where the expertise and intervention of attorneys is rapidly required.

“Over the past couple of years, I have noticed an explosion of requests by clients wanting to include what is more affectionately known as a ‘social media clause’ in their pre- and post-nuptial agreements,” Fisher says. “At the onset of a marriage, such provisions are effective in setting relationship boundaries. However, at the end of one, these provisions are are typically used as swords to achieve greater financial gain.” 

The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers reported more than 80 percent of U.S. divorce attorneys say social networking is a rising topic in divorce proceedings. Social media has been a staple in divorce proceedings since MySpace was introduced in 2003, but Norma Izzo Milner, a litigator focusing in the areas of alternative dispute resolution, family law and domestic relations with Jennings, Strouss and Salmon Law Firm in Phoenix, is still surprised by how few clients still aren’t considering social media prenups.

“Once I provide some basic legal information about how social media can play a part in or impact either a relationship or the ending of one, they tend to take precautions and limit their social media activity,” she says.

People just can’t seem to help themselves, Fisher says, adding that they also don’t always have control over what hits the web.

“A jaded ex-girlfriend or a careless spouse can expose, either intentionally or intentionally, private photographs or videos of you that you  never wanted anyone to see,” he says.

“The reality is, most people connect through cyber space and report daily activities from what they are eating to how they are feeling. This can be a dangerous outlet for people facing the emotional challenges of a divorce or legal separation,” Milner says.

The amount of couples who enter into prenuptial agreements, despite a divorce rate of 3.6 per 1,000 people, is surprisingly low, says Milner. The two leading causes of getting a prenup, she says, is to protect an estate or to prevent the difficulty and costs of a divorce, based on previous experience.
“I find it surprising that the majority of people spend a large percentage of their daily time engaged in some form of social media, but do not think about how it might impact their lives long-term,” she says. “I generally have to bring the topic up for discussion with my clients.”

Social media prenups can be drafted as inclusive of existing and future platforms. In the event of being blocked from an ex’s social media pages, Milner says couples can include an term that enables access to personalized web content for a period of time after separation.

The family law group at Burch & Cracchiolo hasn’t used a social media clause in any of the prenups it has drafted, but recognizes it as something that’s on the horizon, says Marketing and Client Development Manager Chris Long.

Chris Ingle, an attorney at Rose Law Group who specializes in online defamation and protection of intellectual property, has not encountered a social media prenuptial case outside of the new articles and online buzz.

“I have to say that if somebody approached me with that idea, I’d recommend against that very strongly,” he says.

It’s a matter of a dispute escalating into a court battle that becomes public record and costs “a small fortune,” he says, adding, “It takes what started out as a disagreement and turns it into a full-fledged litigation war. I don’t think that’s in everyone’s best interest.”

Ingle recommends couples who are going their separate ways to write a non-disparagement clause, which promises couples won’t go out of their way to say anything bad about the other person or have anyone do that on their behalf.

It’s not necessarily the words that have many people preoccupied — there are images and the revenge porn industry to consider.

“If you’re going to let somebody take those photos and videos, you have to trust them implicitly,” says Ingle. “Once it gets out there (online), it’s difficult (to reverse).”

Some options, particularly for people whose images or videos are posted on a website by a third party (presumably an ex), include filing for copyright of the footage. It’s “cheap and easy,” says Ingle, to get a copyright. Unless your significant other challenges the claim, someone can generally submit a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) request to the hosting website and get the photo or video removed.

For couples who drafted their prenups pre-Zuckerberg, who, by the way, had a relationship agreement drafted up before his marriage to Priscilla Chan that required 100 minutes of alone time away from Facebook’s headquarters, Milner still suggests considering a dialog about social media in the relationship and, potentially, a post-nuptial agreement.

“It’s never too late to have the discussion and spell out expectations and healthy boundaries to avoid future problems,” she says.

martha_patrick

Martha C. Patrick – Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Martha C. PatrickShareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo
Certified as a tax specialist, Best Lawyers in America has named Patrick the 2014 Phoenix tax “Lawyer of the Year.” Patrick represents clients in tax controversies.

Greatest accomplishment: “Successfully resolving my clients’ issues with the IRS. Nothing could be greater or provide more satisfaction.”

Surprising fact: “When I was 18, I wanted to be a long-haul truck driver.”

Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue, Az Business Magazine celebrates the amazing women who make an impact on Arizona business.

Click here to see all of the 2014 Most Influential Women.

Larry Ortega 2

Blais heads Bar's Young Lawyers Division

Burch & Cracchiolo associate attorney, Casey S. Blais, has begun serving his year-long term as president of the Maricopa County Bar Association Young Lawyers Division.  The term runs through December 31, 2014.  The mission of the MCBA Young Lawyers Division is to involve young and new lawyers in serving the community and enriching the profession while focusing on the specific needs of young and new lawyers

Blais practices in the areas of commercial litigation, real estate law, landlord/tenant disputes, and insurance defense / personal injury litigation. He regularly represents individuals, lenders, developers, and other private and public entities. Casey received his J.D. from the Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law in 2008. Prior to law school, Casey attended Brigham Young University where he double majored in Linguistics and Economics. He is admitted to practice in Arizona and the United States District Court for the District of Arizona.

kitten

Ingold elected to Humane Society board

Burch & Cracchiolo partner Susanne E. “Susie” Ingold has been elected to the board of directors of The Arizona Humane Society. She has been committed to AHS since 2005 and been a member of the “Compassion with Fashion” annual fundraising luncheon committee since 2010.

Ingold has practiced at Burch & Cracchiolo for fifteen years concentrating her practice in labor and employment, commercial and general liability litigation and construction.  She also serves as co-chair of the firm’s Construction Defect and General Liability section.

Ingold received her J.D. from the University of Arizona and her B.A. with honors from Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri.  Ingold also currently serves on the University of Arizona Law College Association board of directors. Recently, she was a member of Valley Leadership’s Class XXXIV which concluded in June 2013.

legal

Top Lawyers list: Government relations

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Clare Abel
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
602-234-9920
bcattorneys.com
Abel concentrates her practice primarily in the areas of real estate, zoning and condemnation Law. She is listed in Southwest Super Lawyers, Best Lawyers in America and Arizona’s Finest Lawyers.

S. David Childers
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4880
kutakrock.com
Childers served on the U.S. Secretary of Health & Human Services’ Task Force on Long-Term Health Care Policies, and the Governor’s Private Sector Task Force on Long Term Care and the University of Arizona College of Business & Public Administration National Board of Advisors.

Robert D. Dalager
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8540
gknet.com
Dalager practices governmental affairs and land use law.  Prior to joining Gallagher & Kennedy, Dalager was with the Arizona State Senate for nearly 10 years.

Gregory Y. Harris
Lewis and Roca LLP
602-262-0218
lrlaw.com
Harris has extensive experience appearing before state and federal agencies and in state and federal court, and appears regularly before the Arizona Legislature.

Yvonne R. Hunter
Fennemore Craig, P.C.
602-916-5386
fclaw.com
Hunter’s practice focuses primarily on government affairs. Hunter formerly served as an Assistant Arizona Attorney General in the Arizona Attorney General’s Office.

Joseph A. Kanefield
Ballard Spahr LLP
602-798-5468
ballardspahr.com
Kanefield’s practice is focused on government relations, civil and appellate litigation, public-private partnerships, administrative law, state and local tax matters, gaming, and election and campaign-finance law.

Timothy A. La Sota
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-452-2712
tblaw.com
La Sota practices in the areas of government relations, regulatory and administrative law, election law, land use and procurement.

Paige A. Martin
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4827
kutakrock.com
Martin, an AV Preeminent Peer Review Rated partner in the firm’s Scottsdale office, and primarily represents governmental entities and private employers.

Mary R. O’Grady
Osborn Maledon, P.A.
602-640-9352
omlaw.com
As a former solicitor general for the State of Arizona, O’Grady has a unique breadth of experience with public law issues. Her areas of expertise include election and campaign finance law and state constitutional law.

Jordan Rose
Rose Law Group
480-505-3939
roselawgroup.com
Rose practices in the areas of government relations, municipal issues, land use, zoning, administrative law, renewable energy, and lobbying.

John B. Shadegg
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5204
steptoe.com
Shadegg, former U.S. Congressman, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in1994 and served eight terms before retiring from Congress in 2010.  He practices in Steptoe’s Government Affairs and Public Policy group.

David K. Udall
Udall Shumway PLC
480-969-3043
udallshumway.com
Udall has successfully represented a variety of clients with zoning and development issues before the City of Mesa, Maricopa County, Town of Gilbert, City of Chandler, and Casa Grande.

technology

Technology and the law

We all know how quickly technology is changing.

But how will changes in technology affect changes in the law?

As Arizona enters its second century, three Arizona attorneys weigh in on the legal changes they see coming as technology continues to rock our world.

Cheryl Walsh, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.: Just 107 years ago, the Wright Brothers flew a plane for the first time.  Who could have imagined then that we would have the technologically-rich world we have today?  With that in mind, we do have technological advancements in our midst today that are ripe for challenge and examination. For instance, access to information and data as a result of technology can increase safety and efficiency of  law enforcement substantially; however, privacy and personal rights must be balanced in the process. The Supreme Court will be tackling this issue in the current session by considering the admissibility of GPS tracking device information obtained without a warrant. Cameras are everywhere and soon we will enter our homes and businesses with eye recognition technology that will make the individuality of fingerprinting more obsolete than ever.  Protecting our rights while advancing our civilization is a delicate balance.

Yu Cai, associate in Polsinelli Shughart’s science and technology practice group: Intellectual property development and protection will become an essential part of any business plan. Particular attention must be paid to the recent change in patent law from “first to invent” to “first to file,” requiring earlier interaction and involvement between inventors and their legal representatives.

John E. Cummerford, co-managing shareholder, Greenberg Traurig: Until fairly recently, “privacy” — as we think of it today — was a rare commodity. The word “privacy” doesn’t even appear the Constitution, no doubt because it was so uncommon when the Constitution was drafted. Technology has sharply reduced — and in my view, will soon eliminate — the whole notion of personal privacy.  Naturally, this will cause a lot of worry and fear.  But, when nobody’s privacy is safe, how will that affect our own inclination to invade the privacy of others?  I think it will cause people to actually become more respectful of others, and will — for lack of a better term — cause them to avert their eyes.

That is, will the muck-raking reporter who makes a living ferreting out scandals and embarrassing others really want someone to find out, say, his own bank balance, or what websites he has visited, or with whom he has been keeping company and put that information on the web?  Probably not, although that information may be readily available.  And so, I think that recognition that we are all vulnerable to invasions of privacy will foster more civility and I dare say more kindness among people.  And that will be a good thing indeed.