Tag Archives: city of phoenix

Business Management

Phoenix IDA hires economic development, HR administrators

The Industrial Development Authority of the City of Phoenix, AZ (“Phoenix IDA”), has appointed of Paul Magallanez as its community and economic development administrator and James T. Barham as its human resources and legal affairs administrator.

James T. Barham

James T. Barham

“Paul and James bring tremendous economic development, human resources and legal skills to the Phoenix IDA team. Together, Paul and James will help the Phoenix IDA advance its vision of strengthening economic development, jobs, home ownership and our communities through public-private partnerships,” said Juan Salgado, executive director of the Phoenix IDA.

Magallanez has worked in economic development and housing for 16 years. He previously served as the economic development director for the City of Tolleson. He negotiated development agreements on the City’s behalf, assisted developers in navigating through the zoning and permitting process and implemented economic development strategy

Paul Magallanez

Paul Magallanez

plans. He also served as the City of Phoenix’s deputy housing director for six years. A member of the International Economic Development Council, Arizona Association for Economic Development, Greater Phoenix Economic Council’s Board of Directors and Hispanic Leadership Forum del Oeste’s Board of Directors, Magallanez was honorably discharged from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1988. He earned his masters of public administration from Arizona State University.

Barham worked as an attorney at Kutak Rock LLP for seven years where he represented clients in tax-exempt and taxable public finance and secured lending transactions. He also consulted with clients to establish employee evaluation, incentive and disciplinary processes. His HR experience began as a human resources generalist at Aviano Air Base in Italy after being honorably discharged from the U.S. Air Force in 1993. In 2015, he earned a Professional in Human Resources certification. He is a member of the Society for Human Resource Management, National Association of Bond Lawyers and American Bar Association. He earned his law degree from Creighton University School of Law.

electricity

Phoenix ranked No. 1 for energy efficiency

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy has ranked Phoenix the Number 1 big-city local government in the nation for energy efficiency. The Council lauded the city for achieving its 2015 goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in local government operations and then resetting its targets to be even more stringent.

The City of Phoenix shared the Number 1 ranking for local governments with Denver and New York. The overall energy efficiency ranking for Phoenix was 18th out of 51 large cities.

“When it comes to energy efficiency, the City of Phoenix leads by example. We don’t ask others to do what we aren’t willing to do ourselves,” said Mayor Greg Stanton. “So it was gratifying – but not surprising – to see our local government lead the nation in energy efficiency.”

Stanton added, “Our goal as a metropolitan area is to break into the top 10 and ultimately top this list in all categories in the coming years, and we are heading in the right direction.”

Bioscience in Arizona - AZ Business Magazine November 2008

UA, Phoenix will expand Phoenix Biomedical Campus

The University of Arizona, the anchor tenant of the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, and the City of Phoenix have entered into an agreement to expand the university’s presence on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.

The agreement approved by the Phoenix City Council on Wednesday calls for the university, Banner Health, and any potential development partners, to develop up to five acres on the biomedical campus aligned with the City Council-adopted Comprehensive Master Plan. Included in the agreement is the planning and development of an academic and innovative outpatient primary care clinic that will be designed to advantage all of the new advances and technology to improve patient care.  This 40,000 to 60,000 square-foot clinic will be jointly planned and developed by the UA and Banner Health.

“The University of Arizona has been a critical and transformative partner in the development of the Phoenix Biomedical Campus,” said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. “This agreement will move that partnership forward by advancing the academic medical enterprise of the school, advancing science, creating jobs and enhancing medical care for Phoenix residents.”

Leading efforts to develop the biosciences in downtown Phoenix, the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix opened its doors in historic buildings in 2007.  Since then, the medical school has graduated more than 250 new physicians and has built close to a million square feet of capital projects on the downtown campus.  The UA has invested nearly $450 million in building projects on the campus.

“These new projects will expand the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, enhancing its contributions to both the biosciences and the vibrancy of the Phoenix and statewide economy,” said Ann Weaver Hart, president of the UA. “We are continuing to execute the UA plan of training superior physicians and other healthcare professionals, advancing biomedical research and healthcare practice, and serving our community.”

According to a recent study by Tripp Umbach, the UA’s presence on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus had an impact of $961 million in 2013. In addition, the employment impact for 2013 was 7,185 jobs with tax revenue of $44 million. At full build-out, the UA’s presence is expected to have an economic impact of more than $3.1 billion per year.

The agreement also calls for the City and the UA to develop an updated master plan for the area, focusing on uses, density and proposed development schedules. The City will provide the UA a no-cost exclusive 10-year lease option for development of the property.

“The continued development of this education and biomedical hub is a great catalyst for the citizens of District 8,” said Councilwoman Kate Gallego, who represents the downtown area. “We have seen the area make great strides with the development of the campus, bringing not just construction but permanent jobs in the biosciences to our city.”

The UA’s presence on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus includes the College of Medicine – Phoenix, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and the Eller College of Management.  Additional programs on the campus include Alumni Association, the UA Foundation and Admissions.  Additional programs are exploring an expansion to Phoenix.

“Our partnership with the University of Arizona has been crucial to the success of the growing bioscience and medical education hub in downtown,” said Vice Mayor Daniel Valenzuela, chair of the city council’s Downtown, Aviation and Redevelopment Subcommittee. “This agreement demonstrates our commitment to the Phoenix Biomedical Campus and cements our national reputation as a mecca for higher education and biosciences research.”

sky harbor

Phoenix awards Faithful+Gould contract for airport evaluations

Americas-based leading integrated project and program management consultancy, Faithful+Gould has been awarded a contract by the City of Phoenix perform facility-wide assessments of three airports: Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, Phoenix Deer Valley Airport, and Phoenix Goodyear Airport.

Maximizing Facility Value for the City of Phoenix
Airport facilities include passenger terminals, gates, parking garages, hangars, and off-site maintenance facilities. Faithful+Gould’s team will collect and prepare data for integration into an enterprise-infrastructure and facilities-management solution. The report will provide the airport team with comprehensive capital planning forecasts. It will recommend repairs and replacement priorities, asses remaining life of equipment and facility features, and estimate current and potential costs.

Forming a Basis for Future Contracts 
Faithful+Gould is a partner of the City of Phoenix, and has provided facility condition assessment (FCA) services for Sky Harbor since 2008. The firm provided the airport invaluable knowledge about its current and future needs for fully-informed strategic decision making.

Faithful+Gould was awarded the new contract due to the quality of these services.

Dean Leonard, Faithful+Gould strategy facility condition (SFC) service lead for the western U.S., said, “I’m incredibly pleased to be continuing assessments for the City of Phoenix. Our relationship with Sky Harbor, in particular, has been a source of mutual benefit over the years. I look forward to continuing that tradition of success.”

Faithful+Gould’s airport facility experts bring facilities to compliance with current codes and standards while providing objective analysis of infrastructure to determine condition, code compliance, efficiency, life expectancy, and future repair and upgrade costs. The firm’s FCAs often include life cycle analysis replacement cost, Facility Condition Index (FCI) and asset and equipment inventory.

airport

Deborah Ostreicher named assistant aviation director

Ostreicher, Deborah 2Following a national search, Deborah Ostreicher has been selected as the newest Assistant Aviation Director for the City of Phoenix. The Aviation Department oversees Phoenix Sky Harbor, Deer Valley and Goodyear airports and is an active member of the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Authority.

Ostreicher has been with the city since 1996 where she began as the Air Service Development Manager. In 2005 she was promoted to Deputy Aviation Director where she managed the Public Relations Division, overseeing communications, customer service, community outreach and air service development.

Since November of last year, she has been running the City’s Communications Office, working directly for city manager Ed Zuercher while together they recruited a new communications director. Julie Watters of Glendale took over as the Phoenix communications director today.

In her new role as Assistant Aviation Director, Ostreicher will focus on a variety of areas, including noise information, air service development, legislative issues, planning, environmental and public relations.

“I am grateful to Deborah for her leadership in the City’s Communications Office over the past seven months,” said Phoenix City Manager, Ed Zuercher.  “Deborah’s background in aviation, business, community outreach, marketing and public relations will make her a tremendous asset to the Aviation Department’s executive team.” 

Deborah serves on a variety of local boards related to business and travel but is also on the board of New Pathways for Youth, where she is an active volunteer for the homeless children mentoring program.

In 2012, she won the highly-coveted Athena Award for excellence in business, mentoring and community outreach and in 2013 received the National Child Labor Committee’s Lewis Hine award for work with children.

Prior to joining the city, Deborah spent a decade working in Europe and the Middle East, holding positions including Marketing Director for MicroAge Computers Central Europe and Marketing Manager for Prince Charles’ corporate responsibility diversity initiative in the United Kingdom.

She earned her Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Maryland and her MBA in International Business from the American University in Washington, D.C.

Prior to joining the city, Deborah spent a decade working in Europe and the Middle East, holding positions including Marketing Director for MicroAge Computers Central Europe and Marketing Manager for Prince Charles’ corporate responsibility diversity initiative in the United Kingdom.

She earned her Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Maryland and her MBA in International Business from the American University in Washington, D.C.

 

Fresh Water is Becoming Scarcer with the Planet's Changing Climate

City of Phoenix invests to protect water supplies

The Phoenix City Council has approved a three-year partnership with the National Forest Foundation (NFF) to help protect Phoenix’s water supply. The NFF’s work will consist of watershed improvement projects on National Forest lands in northern Arizona.

Through the partnership, the City of Phoenix will invest $200,000 per year in the Northern Arizona Forest Fund, a program developed by the NFF and Salt River Project (SRP) that is designed to improve forest health and water quality in the Salt and Verde River watersheds.

The National Forests in northern Arizona provide most of the water to the Salt and Verde Rivers, which are vital surface water supplies to downstream users in the greater Phoenix metropolitan areas. Most of Arizona’s surface water resources are sustained by high-elevation forested watersheds that capture rain and snow and then carry surface water downstream. Past forest management practices have created conditions that challenge the health of Arizona’s forests and the sustainability and quality of Arizona’s water supplies.

Developed in partnership with SRP, the NFF’s Northern Arizona Forest Fund works with local governments, businesses and Arizona residents that want to invest in the lands and watersheds they depend on. The NFF then partners with the U.S. Forest Service, local nonprofits, and private contractors to implement projects that reduce wildfire risk, improve streams and wetlands, enhance wildlife habitat, restore native plants, and limit erosion and sediment into Arizona streams, rivers, and reservoirs.

“It is critical, particularly in the midst of a long drought, that we restore our forests and protect watersheds from catastrophic fire,” said U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.). “This partnership between the City of Phoenix, SRP and the National Forest Foundation, is just the type of collaboration that will safeguard the forests and our water supply.”

“In an era of climate change and continued drought, the City of Phoenix must take direct steps to protect the lifeblood of our economy – our water supply,” said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. “This partnership will do exactly that. We must protect and preserve the rivers and watersheds that our City relies upon for continued economic prosperity.”

The NFF and SRP launched the Northern Arizona Forest Fund in 2014 with the goals of connecting Phoenix area residents and business with the forests and watersheds where their surface water supplies are born, and spurring investment in the health of those watersheds.

“The water from the watersheds that fill the reservoirs in SRP’s water system starts as snow in the forests of northern Arizona,” said General Manager Mark Bonsall, SRP’s chief executive officer. “Stewardship of these watersheds is a fundamental principle for SRP. That’s why we are working with our partners and customers to address important forest health issues. We are very pleased that the City of Phoenix has decided to be the first municipality to partner with us and the NFF in this important effort. Phoenix’s leadership in supporting restoration of our watersheds demonstrates a real commitment to the long-term vitality of the Valley.”

“Looking at the detrimental effects and costs that unhealthy forests and wildfire can have on water quality, this partnership was an easy decision,” said Councilman Bill Gates. Following the 2002 Colorado Hayman Fire, Denver Water has spent over $45 million reducing post-fire erosion into streams and dredging sediment from reservoirs. “This is a sensible, relatively low-cost approach for helping ensure reliable water supplies for our citizens,” said Councilwoman Thelda Williams. “I applaud our Water Services Department for helping develop this important partnership.”

Municipal investments in watershed health are becoming more common across the West. Cities like Denver, Santa Fe, and Flagstaff have formed partnerships to support forest health work in their watersheds. “The City of Phoenix has demonstrated its foresight and commitment to sustainability by joining with us on the Northern Arizona Forest Fund,” said Bill Possiel, NFF President. “Although other Western cities are investing in watershed health projects, most are located in close proximity to their forested watersheds. With this partnership, the City of Phoenix is truly setting an example for other municipalities that are more remote from, but still dependent on, water supplies that originate on National Forest lands.”

Implementation of the Northern Arizona Forest Fund’s first two projects is already underway. One project is designed to reduce wildfire risk and protect endangered species habitat near the Happy Jack area on the Coconino National Forest. The other project will reduce erosion and sedimentation into Oak Creek by improving drainage from forest roads on the Coconino National Forest near Sedona.

In 2016, the Northern Arizona Forest Fund will implement six high priority projects on all five National Forests in northern Arizona – the Apache-Sitgreaves, Coconino, Kaibab, Prescott, and Tonto National Forests.

The City’s strategic role and the overall success of the Northern Arizona Forest Fund will be a key topic at the third annual conference on forest and watershed health, “Finding Solutions: Healthy Forests, Vibrant Economy,” scheduled for Oct. 7-8 at the Doubletree Resort by Hilton in Scottsdale.

For more information on the Northern Arizona Forest Fund, contact Marcus Selig, NFF’s Southern Rockies Regional Director at mselig@nationalforests.org or visit https://www.nationalforests.org/who-we-are/regional-offices/southernrockies/azforestfund or http://www.srpnet.com/water/forest/.

first solar

Bill prohibiting energy usage report fines passed

A bill supported by NAIOP Arizona and a coalition of 10 other industry groups prohibiting a municipality from requiring an owner, operator or tenant of a business, commercial building or multifamily property from  measuring and reporting energy usage and consumption or face a fine was signed by Gov. Doug Ducey.

SB 1241, sponsored by Sen. Nancy Barto, R-Phoenix, and amended by Rep. Warren Petersen, R-Gilbert, pre-empts cities from enacting this type of mandatory reporting. Ducey signed the bill on Monday.

“These types of costly energy reporting ordinances are hard to comply with as they force property owners to collect information for dozens of tenants who view this type of information as private or proprietary,” said Tim Lawless, President of NAIOP Arizona.

Lawless said this information also can be used by interest groups to “shame” building owners, leading to a movement to mandate expensive retro-fit improvements for facilities that can hold up the sale of buildings. “These proposals have a chilling effect on economic development,” Lawless said.

In January, the City of Phoenix considered a draft ordinance that would mandate owners of buildings more than 50,000 square feet report their energy usage on a government website or face a Class 1 misdemeanor and pay a fine of not less than a $500 for every instance there is a violation.

According to the draft, the ordinance would have affected 1,398 buildings and would have been similar to energy reporting in Austin, Boston, Chicago, Washington D.C., New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Seattle.

“We do not have a problem with a voluntary energy reporting system,” Lawless said. “Some of our members who specialize in LEED would welcome that. In short, the market should dictate energy efficiency and the market is already going in that direction as younger professionals prefer these working environments.”

Trillium

Treble in paradise: Paying for music in public spaces

Three performance rights organizations, or PROs, protect a majority of recording artists’ work from unauthorized use in public spaces. The two largest — ASCAP and BMI — are household names, but the smallest of the group, SESAC, is quickly becoming a well-known resident at multifamily properties. A third party working for SESAC has contacted multifamily property managers in Arizona about paying licensing fees for fitness centers, clubhouses and pool areas. These notices come monthly, unless requested to stop.

The notices claim the illegal use of one song can cost up to $750. At that rate, playing about an hour of illegal songs could cost a single property $7,500. SESAC doesn’t clearly call out apartment complexes among businesses that need licensing, according to its website’s FAQs.

Copyright owners have the right to control public performances of copyright materials. However, there are grey areas. As MEB Management Senior Vice President and Director of Operations Mark Schilling points out, when property owners apply for a swimming pool permit through Maricopa County, it’s considered a semi-private space.

This is the linchpin — the line between public and private space at apartment complexes, including the lobby, common areas and model apartments. Stephen Anderson, attorney at Anderson & Associates in California, says it’s difficult to make definitive calls on whether or not a property manger needs to invest in a music license until there’s a court case that sets the guidelines. However, he says this may not happen for a while and it may be cheaper for most of the smaller property managers to settle a case like this outside of court.

The National Apartment Association reports that annual license fees paid to PROs is priced by unit. It’s roughly $200 a year for every 300 units. While this doesn’t seem like a lot compared to paying $7,500 an hour for music, Schilling points out that property managers should conduct risk management analyses of properties.

“It’s a risk management scenario right now because we don’t know all the facts or which way it would go,” says Schilling, referring to unnecessarily buying licenses for properties.

Some of the requirements necessitating license, according to ASCAP’s website and MEB Management Project Manager Christy Alvarado, include having televisions that are not diagonally larger than 55 inches and having no more than six speakers in an establishment and no more than four in one room.

“This is a whole new arena for us,” says Alvarado, who added that in February MEB Management began an audit of its properties for the PROs’ licensing criteria.

 

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Valley Leadership announces 2015 CEO Advisory Circle

Valley Leadership, the region’s premier leadership organization, announced its 2015 CEO Advisory Circle membership.  The CEO Advisory Circle will help Valley Leadership hone its focus on meeting future leadership needs in a fast-paced, ever-changing landscape.

The nine 2015 CEO Circle leaders were selected from diverse industries for their expert perspective on leadership, and for their long-standing commitment to and understanding of the Valley.

“The CEO Circle goes beyond a traditional advisory board format,” said Don Henninger, CEO Advisory Circle facilitator, “These leaders are not only committed to the success of Valley Leadership, they are dedicated to leading the way in fostering and promoting strong leadership for our region’s future.”

Leaders will meet quarterly to discuss Valley Leadership’s programming and goals, and offer advice on how to meet the needs associated with changes in leadership.

“The opportunity to tap this level of experience and diverse perspective is important as Valley Leadership continues to lead the way in leadership development programming,” says Brad Vynalek, partner at Quarles & Brady LLP, Valley Leadership board director and alum. “Their advice will be invaluable to Valley Leadership and the greater community.”

Vynalek and Katie Campana, fellow directors and alumni, worked with Don Henninger to create the Circle on behalf of the Valley Leadership Board. 

“Valley Leadership is looking forward to receiving high-level advice from the members, which will be applied to the strategic work of the board,” said Campana, community affairs and community development officer for Wells Fargo.  “This is a key leadership project important to the future of the Valley.”

2015 Valley Leadership CEO Advisory Circle

Hon. Rebecca Berch, Arizona Supreme Court

Supervisor Steve Chucri, Arizona Restaurant Association

Dr. Michael Crow, Arizona State University

Derrick Hall, Arizona Diamondbacks

Sharon Harper, Plaza Companies

Edmundo Hidalgo, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc.

Eileen Klein, Arizona Board of Regents

Paul Luna, Helios Education Foundation

Ed Zuercher, City of Phoenix

Don Henninger, CEO Advisory Circle Facilitator

2015 RED Award logo

RED Awards 2015: Best Public Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 10th annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2014 and the construction teams involved. RED Award trophies were handed out in 10 project categories, to six brokerage teams and safety, subcontractor, architect, general contractor and developer of the year awards were also presented. AZRE also recognized Sunbelt Holdings President and CEO John Graham with a lifetime achievement award. Click here to view all 2015 RED Awards Winners.

SkyTrain-1Phoenix Sky Train, Stage 1A

Developer: City of Phoenix
Contractor: McCarthy Kiewit Joint Venture
Architect: Gannett Fleming, Inc.
Size: 60KSF
Location: Phoenix
Completed: July 2014

Working “airside” on a one-mile stretch of a project at the 10th busiest airport in the country requires teamwork and meticulous planning. The McCarthy Kiewist Joint Venture managed to do all of this while completing a project ahead of time and under budget. The Phoenix Sky Train connects Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport’s (PSHIA) Terminal 4 with terminals 2 and 3. PSHIA services more than 40 million passengers a year, and the project’s objective was to relieve unnecessary congestion on Sky Harbor Boulevard. The LEED certified project sourced 20 percent of its materials from recycled materials and 20 percent of used products made within 500 miles of the project location. More than 50 percent of construction waste was salvaged or recycled, and 107 caissons, ranging from four to nine feet in diameter, support the station, elevated guideway and taxiway bridge extensions of the Phoenix Sky Train Stage 1A development.

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton at Art d'Core Gala at Crescent Ballroom.

Stanton lauds downtown Phoenix for creativity, growth at Art d’Core Gala

Crescent Ballroom played host to the second annual Art d’Core Gala Saturday night.

Art d’Core Gala was presented by Artlink, Downtown Phoenix Inc. and the City of Phoenix’s Office of the Mayor. The event celebrated the arts and culture of downtown Phoenix and kicked off the festive season that will occur over the coming weeks.

Attendees were encouraged to dress in creative formal attire and each guest did not disappoint. From bright cocktail dresses to decorative suits, Crescent Ballroom was adorned with sea of creatively styled outfits.

The Phoenix Theatre opened the gala with a musical number. The tap routine was pulled from its current show Anything Goes, which premiered over the weekend.

Artlink President Catrina Kahler delivered opening remarks, followed by Downtown Phoenix Inc. CEO David Krietor. He expressed that downtown Phoenix is becoming more like the model downtown cities that Phoenix has aimed to become.

“If you want urban, and you want diverse, and you want interesting, downtown Phoenix and the core part of Phoenix have never been stronger than they are now,” Krietor said.

Mayor Greg Stanton then addressed the crowd for his annual “Celebrate Downtown Address,” which had the crowd cheering for all the things the city has accomplished.

Stanton highlighted the recent Super Bowl success as well as the landscape changes the city has been working toward. Last year, the city broke ground on more than one million square feet of commercial space.

“I have made it my No. 1 priority as mayor of this city to build an innovation based export economy that lifts everybody up and that starts right here in our downtown,” Stanton said.

He also lauded the universities in downtown Phoenix that are working together to bring a greater change.

Through partnerships with Arizona State University, University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University, the city is able to build and produce tech startups, medical advancements and other innovations downtown. As for the arts, Stanton thanked ASU for making an investment in the warehouse district that opened up more spaces for artists.

Music in the city has also bloomed including the upcoming Viva Phoenix festival as well as Crescent Ballroom, which plays host to a variety of shows every week.

Current construction on Roosevelt Row is aiming to make the area more walk able for pedestrians and more shaded than ever before. In downtown, the new Complete Streets policy has made the streets more accessible to pedestrians and bicycles, including the new Grid Bike Share.

In addition, he toasted the growth in events, the arts community, those who make downtown what it is and the overall improvement of downtown Phoenix.

The remainder of the night was filled with music, dancing, and mingling as well as a raffle.

Although the kickoff celebration is over, the main event is still to come. Art Detour 27 takes place in downtown Phoenix March 7 and 8. Over the weekend, this self-guided tour will allow people from all over the Valley to experience the arts and culture that downtown has to offer.

“Three Birds” by contemporary artist Lauren Lee

Petitioners seek adaptive reuse of GreenHAUS boutique

Roosevelt Row is known as a hub for culture, food, and art, but plans for a new residential space could take away decade-old murals.

GreenHAUS owners Cole and Danya Reed closed their boutique at the end of last year and moved to Oregon in January to have more secure parental rights for the son they are expecting sometime in mid-March.

Since then, the fate of the local space has been uncertain.

Baron Properties received the deed to 222 E. Roosevelt last summer as well as the deed to the neighboring lot at 1002 N. 3rd St.

The City of Phoenix granted Baron a total demolition permit for both spaces Jan. 15, which expires March 15.

The argument of keeping 222 E. Roosevelt revolves around adaptive reuse, which is the idea of incorporating old buildings rather than demolishing them.

The building is home to decades worth of history. On the inside, murals by Ted DeGrazia that date back to 1950 decorate the interior. As for the outside, the mural “Three Birds” by contemporary artist Lauren Lee covers one side of the building.

Before the building was greenHAUS, it was home to 307 Lounge, which offered a place for the LGBT community of Phoenix to hangout.

Petitioners Pete Petrisko and Bob Diehl started a petition about two months ago on change.org when the preliminary site plans did not show the existing building anywhere in the plan.

Diehl said that the community did react when they heard about the fate of the building. Since December, more than 4,000 people have spoke out in one way or another, including 1,200 people who have signed the online petition.

Even if the building itself couldn’t be saved, efforts were being made to save the DeGrazia murals.

There are two murals inside the building, a 4 foot by 4 foot piece as well as another piece that stands about 6 feet tall.

The 4 foot by 4 foot piece is painted directly onto drywall. A Tucson Museum agreed to cut the piece from the drywall.

The other piece, however, was painted directly onto the plaster on the mason reconstruction of the original building. Diehl said that multiple experts have looked at the situation.

The experts reported that cutting into the plaster would atomize the mortar holding the bricks together. In turn, it would ruin significant portions of the painting. It would also cost more to do this than to move the entire building, which was one of the options.

There have been no moves to revise the plans for the new residential complex by Baron.

Adaptive reuse is a growing concept that aims to incorporate older buildings into a modern landscape.

“There has to be a different approach to the destruction of buildings that have survived fifty years and are still intact, at least in downtown Phoenix. They do make a difference in the sense of place, continuity, and the sense of a city being lived in, loved and hated,” Diehl said.

lesbians

Phoenix Earns Perfect Score on Equality Index

For the second straight year, the City of Phoenix has earned a perfect score of 100 on the Human Rights Campaign’s municipal equality index (MEI), which measures how supportive U.S. communities are of the gay and lesbian community.

Last year, Phoenix was one of the most improved cities in the nation and became the first Arizona city to earn a perfect score. This year, Phoenix was joined by both Tucson and Tempe.

“People are taking notice that Phoenix is one of the most diverse and friendly cities in America, and that’s good for everyone,” Mayor Greg Stanton said. “We are a more vibrant and more economically viable city when we treat every person equally under the law.”

In February 2013, the City Council passed a sweeping anti-discrimination ordinance that made it unlawful to discriminate against someone based on sexual orientation, gender identity or disability for the purposes of employment, public accommodations, housing, and government contracts.

Over the past year, Phoenix doubled housing grants awarded to the non-profit organization one-n-ten to provide housing for LGBT youth and the City Council called on Gov. Jan Brewer to veto S.B. 1062, the so-called “right to discriminate” bill, with an 8-to-1 vote.

“I am proud that the City of Phoenix supports equality and inclusion for all of our employees and residents,” Councilwoman Laura Pastor said. “I applaud the Mayor’s leadership on this issue and look forward to continuing the progress the City has made.”

“Today’s announcement underscores what many of us already know: after years of hard work by community leaders and advocates, Phoenix is a city that believes in equality through and through,” said Councilwoman Kate Gallego. “From the everyday residents who have made change in our city by advocating for equality to the elected leadership, our city has embraced full equality for all of our residents as a fundamental value, not just a sound bite. I look forward to working with Mayor Stanton and my other colleagues in continuing to improve our city and working to make the change we need to bring full equality to all Arizonans.”

“Phoenix’s continued leadership to promote equality is strengthening our economy,” said Angela Hughey, co-founder of ONE Community, a coalition of socially responsible businesses that actively support diversity. “We’ve come a long way, and I’m proud that we have elected officials who will continue to make sure that all of our diverse citizens is celebrated, respected and protected.”

ArtsAwards

Phoenix Center Announces Mayor’s Arts Awards

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Phoenix Center for the Arts will present the Mayor’s Arts Awards, November 21, 2014, from 7:00-9:00 p.m. Tickets cost just $75 and are available for purchase at the Phoenix Center for the Arts box office or by calling 602-254-3100.

Art lovers and community-minded individuals can reserve their spot in this interactive arts experience and show their support for Phoenix Center for the Arts. The event will serve as Phoenix Center for the Arts’ signature fundraiser and enable the Center to continue providing vital arts and education opportunities for the Phoenix community year round.

Bucking the traditional gala format, the Mayor’s Arts Awards event will feature an interactive tour of the facility, featuring live performances in nearly every artistic medium, one of a kind raffle prizes, and the Mayor himself, presenting awards to this year’s deserving honorees. This year’s event will feature a brand new Honorary Artist award to the list of commendations. The Honorary Artist award will be given to a community member who has demonstrated leadership by finding creative solutions for the arts in the City of Phoenix.

The Mayor’s Arts Awards serve to identify outstanding leaders in six areas; Visual Arts, Theatre, Music, Dance, Public Art, and Creative Writing. An eighteen-person committee of experts in each medium will perform a two-stage selection process to nominate candidates. Nominees are be chosen based on the criteria of innovation, impact, and integration.

Event Facts:

What: The Third Annual Mayor’s Arts Awards
Date/Time: Friday, November 21, 2014, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Admission: $75
Where: Phoenix Center for the Arts, 1202 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix AZ 85004
Parking/Transportation: Limited street parking available. Avoid the hassle and take METRO Light Rail to the McDowell/Central Ave or Roosevelt/Central Ave. Bike racks are also available.
Presenting Organization: Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Phoenix Center for the Arts
Information: info@centerforthearts.org or 602-254-3100
Facebook: PhoenixCenterForTheArts
Twitter: @PhxCenterArts
Instagram: @PhoenixCenterfortheArts

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

Circle West - Barrister Building - West Elevation 08 25 14

PB Bell, Davis Enterprises to redevelop ‘Psycho’ building

P.B. Bell Companies, a leader in multi-family housing and commercial real estate development and management, and Davis Enterprises, an investment and development company serving Arizona’s retail and office sectors for six decades, have been selected by the City of Phoenix to redevelop the historic Barrister Place building in downtown Phoenix.

City officials chose the P.B. Bell Companies/Davis Enterprises collaboration from among seven bidders seeking to redevelop Barrister Place and two adjacent parcels on the southeast corner of Central Avenue and Jefferson Street. The collaborators’ plans call for an adaptive-reuse renovation effort that centers on creating and operating a boutique mixed-use community on the site. Special emphasis will be placed on preserving the building’s historic façade while modernizing the interior to carry it, and the accompanying development, into the future.

“The Barrister building is an iconic piece of downtown Phoenix history and we are honored to be involved in helping write its next chapter,” said Mike Trueman, vice president of development for P.B. Bell Companies.

Originally opened in 1915 as the Jefferson Hotel, the six-story, concrete-and-brick Barrister Place once was hailed as the state’s tallest building. The City of Phoenix acquired the building in 1990 and used it to house offices and the Phoenix Police Museum before moving those operations and closing the building in 2010. But, perhaps the building’s most famous role was a cameo shot in the opening scene of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 classic horror film, “Psycho.”

Trueman said like the Barrister building, P.B. Bell and Davis Enterprises have deep roots in the Phoenix community, making the team an ideal match for the redevelopment project. The collaboration aligns two long-time, family-owned investment and development companies. Logan Van Sittert, a notable architect, is also a partner and principal on the project with Davis Enterprises.

P.B. Bell Companies was founded by Phil Bell in 1976 with a goal of becoming a leader in the multi-family acquisitions, development and property management industry. Davis Enterprises has been investing in and developing retail and office space in Arizona since 1948. The company, which focuses primarily on high-density infill redevelopment and multi-tenant space, is now managed by the third generation.

“We are two legacy companies working together on a legacy project,” said Mark Davis, partner, Davis Enterprises.  Circle West Architects of Phoenix rounds out the development and design team.

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Kara Kalkbrenner – Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Kara KalkbrennerActing Fire Chief, City of Phoenix
Kalkbrenner is a Phoenix native who manages nearly 2,000 personnel and a $300 million budget for the Phoenix Fire Department. She is the first woman to lead the department.

Greatest accomplishment: “To have the honor and privilege of serving the citizens of Phoenix for nearly three decades.”

Surprising fact: “I am a homebody. My biggest joy in life is spending time with my family.”

Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue, Az Business Magazine celebrates the amazing women who make an impact on Arizona business.

Click here to see all of the 2014 Most Influential Women.

Sundt Group Photo

Sundt delivers truck load of water for summer heat relief

Sundt Construction Inc., with help from its subcontractors and suppliers, hosted its fifth annual Thirst Aid Water Drive, delivering a semi-truck-load of nearly 200,000 bottles of water to St. Joseph the Worker, a Human Service Campus agency, on Friday, June 6, 2014.

As Phoenix’s summer temperatures hit triple digits, employees from Sundt’s corporate headquarters in Tempe, Arizona, once again participated in the Thirst Aid water drive to benefit St. Joseph the Worker, a nonprofit organization that aids homeless and other disadvantaged individuals throughout the Phoenix area. Many homeless and disadvantaged people suffer from thirst, heat-related illness and even death when temperatures soar in the summer months.

Sundt organized the company’s first Thirst Aid event in 2010 with the hope of collecting 120 cases of water (2,880 bottles). That goal was crushed by the collection of nearly 50,000 bottles. The number tripled the following year when 149,000 bottles came through the door – so many that St. Joseph the Worker was able to share with the entire Human Services Campus. Contributions from Sundt and its partners continue to increase annually. In 2013, Sundt and its partners donated 191,000 bottles of water. This year’s collections totaled approximately 193,000, with additional donations continuing to pour in.

As a result of Sundt’s efforts, St. Joseph the Worker, in collaboration with the Human Services Campus service providers, has not had to turn away any individual who needed water.

The Human Services Campus, an unprecedented collaboration of 15 homeless service providers, was created in 2005 to address the growing demand for services by people experiencing homelessness. Each day, 1,300 men and women access resources such as shelter, physical and mental health services, dental care, substance abuse treatment, employment services and housing placement.

Collectively, each agency works with their supporters to collect donated water and heat relief funding to be able to provide for the needs of the individuals utilizing services on the Human Services Campus.

Each year, the City of Phoenix holds a water drive and places hydration stations around the community. With the support of its collective donors, St. Joseph the Worker and other Human Service Campus providers no longer have to reach out to the City of Phoenix for assistance. By providing for the individuals on the campus through this collective effort, the City of Phoenix is able to assist smaller agencies that do not have the support of organizations such as Sundt.
Sundt Assembly Line

Parallel_USBankCenter

Renovated US Bank Tower leases 100KSF to tenant

Following a nearly $3 million renovation of the landmark US Bank Center in downtown Phoenix, Parallel Capital Partners has renegotiated nearly 100,000 square feet and more than $25 million in total lease consideration with existing tenants Valley Metro Rail Inc. (57,074 square feet renewed to 2026); Xerox (31,861 square feet renewed to 2020); and Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (20,451 square feet renewed to 2024).

Additionally, the City of Phoenix Police Department recently leased 3,290 square feet of administrative space on the first floor, affording them a more strategic presence in the downtown district.

According to Matt Root, CEO of Parallel Capital Partners, a San Diego-based investment firm, the successful transactions come on the heels of a comprehensive two-year capital improvement program made to the landmark property, which was originally constructed in 1976 and last renovated in 2005.

“With these latest transactions, the 31-story tower – the second highest building in Arizona – has reaffirmed its status as one of the Phoenix area’s top commercial properties,” Root said. The 373,013-square-foot office building is located on 1.66 acres at 101 North 1st Avenue and 21 West Van Buren in downtown Phoenix, Ariz.

Root attributes the successful negotiations to the property’s ideal location in the downtown south submarket, as well as the many recent improvements which include extensive renovations of the main lobby and parking garage entries, corridors and other common areas; an energy efficient lighting retrofit; patio and landscaping upgrades and a complete facade renovation of the tower stonework and the adjacent 21 West Van Buren parking garage.

The architect for the renovation was Phoenix Design One and the general contractor was Stevens-Leinweber Construction, Inc.

mayor

Stanton, Gallego Work to Close Gender Pay Gap

Mayor Greg Stanton and Councilwoman Kate Gallego announced Tuesday a new effort to ensure that City of Phoenix contractors – those paid with taxpayer dollars – practice equal pay for equal work among men and women.

This morning, on National Equal Pay Day, Stanton asked Gallego to lead an effort over the next few months to draft an equal pay measure that better ensures fair pay in the workplace, and includes mechanisms to enforce the policy.

Across the nation, women are paid 77 cents for every dollar their male counterparts make. Although it trails the District of Columbia in pay equity, Arizona has the smallest pay gap among the 50 states: women earn about 86 percent of what their male counterparts earned. [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics]

“The fact that women are paid less for the same work as men is a strike at our core values,” said Stanton. “We have a responsibility to do something about it, and we can take the lead in Phoenix by making sure that companies who do business with the city pay equal wages for equal work.”

“We know that when women win, Phoenix will win,” said Gallego. “I look forward to the day when Equal Pay Day will be January 1. Women should no longer have to work more than four additional months to make the same salary that men did last year. I appreciate Mayor Stanton’s leadership on this important issue.”

Later this year, Gallego will present her recommendation for a City Council vote. As a state, Arizona last considered equal pay legislation in the 1970s. [Source: “BLS data: Arizona has lowest gender pay gap among states,” Cronkite News Service, Feb. 1, 2014]

“I applaud the efforts of my colleagues to close the gender wage gap here in Phoenix,” said Councilwoman Laura Pastor. “Especially in District 4, home to many working families and female-headed households, this effort has the potential not only to help women in the workforce, but to truly move our community forward.”

Equal Pay Day aims to raise public awareness about the gap between men’s and women’s wages. The date – April 8 – was selected to represent how long into the year women must work to earn what men made last year.

Over the course of a woman’s career, pay inequality adds up. “A women who worked full time, year round would typically lose $443,360 in a 40-year period due to the wage gap, and have to work 12 years longer than her male counterpart to make up this gap.” [Source: Fifty Years and Counting: The Unfinished Business of Achieving Fair Pay, National Women’s Law Center, 2013]

Wage discrimination harms families. Women are the primary breadwinners in more than 41 percent of families with children, including 8.6 million families across the country headed by single mothers. [Source: National Women’s Law Center]

The gender gap has not closed in nearly a dozen years. Women earned 77 percent of their male counterparts’ earnings in both 2002 and 2013. [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics]

Minorities experience the most significant pay gap. Hispanic women make 53 percent of what white men make; Native American women make 60 percent; and African-American women make 64 percent. [Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 American Community Survey]

There is a gender pay gap in nearly every occupation. A 2014 report from the American Association of University Women found that, “From elementary and middle-school teachers to computer programmers, women are paid less than men in female-dominated, gender-balanced, and male-dominated occupations.”

Education does not close the gender gap. “At every level of academic achievement, women’s median earnings are less than men’s median earnings, and in some cases, the gender gap is larger at higher levels of education.” [Source: The Simple Truth About the Gender Pay Gap, American Association of University Women, 2014]

At all education levels, even after experience is considered, the wage gap gets worse as a woman’s career progresses. “A Bloomberg Businessweek story examined wage gaps within occupations and found that out of 265 major occupations, women’s median salary exceeded men’s in only one occupation – personal care and service workers.” [Source: FAQ About the Wage Gap, National Women’s Law Center, September 2013]

Professional women sometimes experience the most significant pay gap. “Female CEOs earn 69 cents for every dollars earned by their male counterparts, and female lawyers make tens of thousands of dollars less than their male peers.” [Source: Think Progress, Jan. 29, 2013]

Female newspaper editors, for example, earn 79 percent of their male counterparts, and male paralegals earn 11 percent more than women in the same job. [Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics]

The pay gap grows and wage loss accumulates over the course of a woman’s career. “By the time women reach 39, their wage growth pretty much stops altogether.” Wage growth for men continues until age 48. [Source: “Mapping the Glass Ceiling,” New York Times, May 29, 2012].

Women without children experience wage discrimination. Just a year out of college, women make 82 percent of the wage of male peers who do similar work.

Gensler__Melrose Final Rendering_CUT

Melrose Gateway Sign Installation Commemoration Nov. 20

District 4 Councilman Tom Simplot and community members will celebrate the installation of a new gateway arch across Seventh Avenue just north of Indian School Road with an event 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 20.

“The Melrose District and Seventh Avenue as a whole are two of the most vibrant, growing areas of central Phoenix. It’s an artistic and community hub, and this gateway is a perfect way to celebrate its diverse identity,” said Councilman Simplot.

The arch adds a distinctive artistic element to one of Phoenix’s main arterial streets, constructed using an 80-foot steel truss structure with 24-foot columns.  Lit at night, the sign lettering mirrors Seventh Avenue’s distinctive curve in the Melrose district.

“Business owners and community members are ecstatic about the arch,” added Seventh Avenue Merchants Association president Teresa Stickler.  “We really see it as aiding our mission of building and beautifying our community.”

The Melrose arch is made of half-inch steel plates, with decorative lettering etched in using a plasma cutter.  All together, the truss and panels weigh approximately 43,000 pounds, with each column weighing 9,800 pounds.

The Weitz Company was the contractor for the project, with Gensler as the prime consultant and architect, and the firms of Aztec Engineering Group, Inc; PK Associates and Henderson Engineers serving as the design team.

Hamer - June 2011-fornewsletter

Gap is Narrowing on Immigration Reform

Various Arizona Chamber and business leaders have made numerous visits to Washington, D.C. over the years to push for reform of our nation’s badly broken immigration system. As a border state, we understand this issue well. For years, the business community in Arizona has been pressing Congress and the Administration for a secure border, workable visa and guest worker programs, nationwide employee verification programs such as E-Verify, and a way for those who did not enter the country legally but are now contributing to our state to get right with the law, especially those brought to this country as children. The failure of the federal government to act resulted in Arizona and many other states trying to do immigration reform on their own, resulting in a patchwork of policies nationwide.

But it is obvious today that all roads to reform lead through Washington, particularly in light of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Arizona v. U.S., which held that state attempts to regulate immigration were preempted by federal immigration law.

This past Tuesday, when a group of about 20 Arizona business, faith and law enforcement leaders visited with all nine of our U.S. House members, we were not alone. Over 600 leaders from over 40 states took to Capitol Hill to urge House Members, with a focus on the Republican majority, to support bringing legislation to the floor this year.

I had the privilege to address the gathering on Monday night at the opening reception to discuss why reform is so important and beneficial to our economy and security. Our country’s greatest comparative advantage is that the best, brightest and hardest workers from across the globe desire to work in our country.

Before we hit the Hill on Tuesday, we gathered at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to prepare. The U.S. Chamber and their Senior Vice President Randel Johnson have been the lead business organization on this entire reform effort. At the kickoff meeting we heard from conservative icon Grover Norquist, who made the free-market case for reform.  Former Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Holtz-Eakin and Rebecca Tallent of the Bipartisan Policy Center remarked that all credible studies of reform point to significant economic and budgetary benefits. Fresno County (Calif.) Sheriff Margaret Mims made a compelling case for the increased security reform could bring. Faith leaders offered a humanitarian case for reform, and our delegation was joined by a number of pastors working in coordination with a coalition called Bibles, Badges and Business.

While in Washington, we had the good fortune to run into ASU President Michael Crow, who is a strong supporter of reform. Our universities would benefit enormously from federal action. As Arizona Board of Regents President Eileen Klein says, “Our ability to produce a highly-skilled workforce and thriving research enterprise that stimulate a growing, vibrant economy for Arizona will be strengthened by balanced immigration laws that promote access to education and economic opportunities.”

Our conversations with our House delegation were positive. While it is fair to say that there were differences in approach, all of our representatives agree that our nation’s immigration system is badly broken, and I believe that they all want to have a hand in getting it fixed.

While we are very proud and thankful for the hard and good work of our two U.S. senators, John McCain and Jeff Flake, in crafting the Senate immigration proposal, it is clear that the House, as is its right, will draft its own plan and proceed with a series of bills as opposed to an omnibus. In fact, five different bills ranging from border security measures to efforts to fix some of our visa problems in the high-tech and agricultural sectors have passed two different House committees.

All agreed that we need to enhance our border security. Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery offered some suggestions on changes that would allow for him to be more effective in assisting in border security. Nationwide use of E-Verify, a system already in wide use in Arizona due to the requirements of the Legal Arizona Workers Act, is another common area of support. And all agree on the need for visa reform, although there are some differences in scope. There may be an effort in the House to expand on the number of lower-skilled visas available as compared to the Senate bill.

The most difficult issue is how to deal with the 11 million who did not enter this country legally. There is growing support for some type of legalization, and even citizenship for the Dreamers, those individuals brought to the U.S. as children. But it is hard to imagine the citizenship language in the Senate bill passing in the House.

Although there are differences between the Senate and House, those differences are narrowing. But as one of our congressmen told our group, if the House is faced with making an all or nothing choice when considering the Senate legislation, the House will go with nothing.

Hard work will be required to get a package passed. This is not naming a post office. This could be the first significant immigration legislation to pass since 1986. This will take real leadership from Congress and the White House, where our president needs to channel his inner Bill Clinton and put on the charm on Capitol Hill.

Leadership from the business community will be required, too. If the House considers reform this year, job creators from across the country should welcome the opportunity to help broker a deal between the House, Senate and President Obama. We’re doing our part in Arizona, and we’ll keep at it until a deal gets done.

Postscript: I want to thank everyone who joined our team to urge Congress to pass an immigration reform package.

Barry Broome, President and CEO, Greater Phoenix Economic Council
Lea Marquez Peterson, President and CEO, Tucson Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Bill Montgomery, Maricopa County Attorney
Jack Harris, former police chief, City of Phoenix
Mary Ann Miller, President and CEO, Tempe Chamber of Commerce
Chad Heinrich, Vice President of Public Policy and Economic Development, Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce
Vice Mayor Tony Rivero, City of Peoria
Steve Moore, President and CEO, Greater Phoenix Convention and Visitors Bureau
Pastor Gary Kinnaman
Pastor Bob Hake, Orangewood Church, Phoenix
Pastor Dan Steffen, Pure Heart Christian Fellowship, Glendale
Nan and Dick Walden, Farmers Investment Co., Sahuarita, Ariz.
Russell Johnson, President and CEO, Merchants Information Solutions, Inc.
Adam Estle, Bibles, Badges and Business
Brett Hunt, Bibles, Badges and Business

Glenn Hamer is the president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is committed to advancing Arizona’s competitive position in the global economy by advocating free-market policies that stimulate economic growth and prosperity for all Arizonans. 

Glenn Hamer is the president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is committed to advancing Arizona’s competitive position in the global economy by advocating free-market policies that stimulate economic growth and prosperity for all Arizonans. 

medical.research

Plans advance for Arizona Biomedical Corridor

Plans to establish a biomedical and advanced technology research and development campus in northeast Phoenix advanced this week as KUD International, a subsidiary of one of the world’s largest development, design and construction companies, announced its plans and submitted an application to acquire 225 acres for the project from the Arizona State Land Department.

The proposed campus is the cornerstone of the Arizona Biomedical Corridor, a collaboration between the City of Phoenix, Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic announced in 2012 to expand the state’s bioscience industry by clustering compatible organizations in the corridor, located in northeast Phoenix at 56th Street and Mayo Boulevard, just south of the Loop 101 freeway. The development lies adjacent to the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic.

Acquiring the land could take up to a year, KUD officials anticipate. In the meantime, KUD is moving forward on plans for the first building at the more than $1 billion research park, which upon completion could generate thousands of jobs in the region.

Wyatt Decker, Vice President, Mayo Clinic and CEO Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the project aligns well with Mayo Clinic’s plans in Phoenix and will play an integral part in its vision to continue to provide innovative, patient-centered medical care, supported by robust programs in research and education.

“The Arizona Biomedical Corridor will further strengthen the region’s growth as a national and international destination for healthcare-related research, education and private sector interests,” Decker said. “Our work with the City of Phoenix and ASU led to our relationship with KUD, a firm we believe will successfully complement and support our vision.”

Arizona State University President Michael Crow agreed, saying, “The development of the area adjacent to the Mayo Clinic Hospital, with its focus on biomedical and advanced technology research and manufacturing, is well aligned with ASU’s partnership with Mayo Clinic to create new health education and research facilities. We are encouraged that KUD shares our collective vision.”

KUD International LLC specializes in developing public-private projects around the world. It has extensive experience with large-scale developments that are founded on research and education and supported with a complementary mix of uses. The company is constructing a research park in Israel in conjunction with Ben-Gurion University that is similar to the one proposed in northeast Phoenix.

KUD International President and CEO Marvin Suomi said the collaboration with Mayo Clinic presented KUD with a sound basis to make a significant investment in establishing a major biomedical research and healthcare complex in north Phoenix. “We consider this a mission-driven project in alliance with Mayo Clinic, and procuring the land is the first step in realizing its vision set long ago,” Suomi said.

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer added, “I’m pleased the Arizona Land Department has accepted and advanced an application for this proposal, paving the way for the development of a premier medical and research facility in north Phoenix. Not only will this project create thousands of high-quality jobs, it will strengthen and secure our position as a global leader in providing world-class medical care. With the involvement of partners like the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, I know this project will be a point of pride for the entire state.”

Others involved with the project identify KUD’s relationship with Mayo Clinic, its expertise and its initiative in acquiring the state land as important factors that will help the Arizona Biomedical Corridor become a reality.

“I think this is another example of Arizona’s economic recovery and an indication of the growing strength of the Arizona real estate market,” said Arizona State Land Commissioner Vanessa Hickman. “This is a big win for State Trust Land beneficiaries and the result of careful negotiations between the Arizona State Land Department and the other collaborators.”

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton said, “In January 2012, I announced a vision to grow more high-wage jobs in Phoenix by creating a second bioscience campus on a 1,000-acre corridor in Desert Ridge in Northeast Phoenix. Because we already have great partners like Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, KUD’s investment plans are the key private interest we need to unlock the potential at this location for education and research and create a greater magnet to attract high-wage jobs to Phoenix.”

District 2 Councilman Jim Waring adds, “In February 2013, the City Council adopted a formal strategy to focus on high-wage, bioscience and technology uses within this corridor. I am very pleased to see that the private sector agrees and validates the City’s concept. The City of Phoenix will be a great partner in the project, focused on helping KUD start their development projects as quickly as possible.  Our business community tells us time and again that five-day site plan reviews and one-day construction permitting provides great value and we look forward to delivering this same great service to KUD.”

Klocke Dan dpp 6-14-05

Phoenix Public Market boosts micro-businesses

Micro businesses may be small, but they pack a big punch.

Though defined as businesses with less than five employees, www.microexec.com reports that micro firms “represent a staggering 99.7percent of all the employer firms in the country.”  That means more than half of all private-sector employees work for micro firms which pay “44 percent of the total private payroll in the county.”

A Small Business Administration (SBA) report in March 2010 showed that micro businesses created 64 percent of all net new U.S. jobs from 1993 to 2009.

For many micro-business owners, making their first foray into business can be a challenge.  The Phoenix Public Market provides very low-cost opportunities to promote products, establish revenue, and expand micro-businesses.  Along the way, they learn, perhaps make a few mistakes and grow in a low-risk environment.   Today, 45 vendors who started at the Phoenix Public Market now have products that can be found in major grocery stores and restaurants throughout the Valley.

In May, the Market will celebrate the grand opening of a new restaurant by St. Francis owner Aaron Chamberlin in the space that formerly housed Urban Grocery.  The restaurant is adjacent to the open air Market which supports over 100 micro businesses, many of whom will be selling products to the new restaurant.

Despite having to close the indoor Urban Grocery store last May, the open air Phoenix Public Market remains one of the Valley’s leading advocates for and tactical supporters of small business and has continued to grow and flourish.

Even with the setback and the financial challenges it generated, we were able to hold firm in our mission to create opportunities for small businesses that may not be able to open storefronts because of the cost.

Among the reasons we were able to maintain our focus and continue moving forward was the consistent and stalwart support from groups like the City of Phoenix and Bank of America.  The City of Phoenix has been a large supporter from a capital standpoint in building out the open air Market parking lot.  Bank of America was among the first to invest in the Phoenix Public Market with a three-year $25,000 grant and then stepped up with another $15,000 right after the grocery closed when we needed it most.

The impact of those efforts will be reflected long-term and locally. To date our micro businesses have sold over $7 million in local products.  Their support and our ongoing ability to provide opportunities for small businesses will create jobs and generate revenue, taxes and consumer traffic that will, ultimately, contribute to a stronger, more vibrant community.

Those benefits pay dividends to all of us.

 

Dan Klocke is Vice President, Development, for the Downtown Phoenix Partnership (www.downtownphoenix.com).  For information about the Phoenix Public Market, visit www.foodconnect.org.