Tag Archives: DPR Construction

MEETING OF THE MINDS: Jeff Ehret interviews CIIC founders Jefferson Begay and Urban L. Giff during the 2013 conference opening.

Building the bridge: CIIC Conference sets sights on university program

Entering its 11th year, Arizona State University’s Construction in Indian Country conference is a means to recruit prospective Native American construction students, educate local tribes and foster industry connections. It is also a key contributor to the CIIC endowment, which has raised $400,000 and put 14 students through the construction management program at ASU. It is currently supporting nine undergraduates, including Shane Cody who came to the program after working in the industry as a field laborer.

“I really enjoyed my working experience in the field, but I knew that obtaining a management position would require me to obtain a construction management degree from a university,” Cody says. Cody contacted the CIIC through the suggestion of his ASU adviser and has since landed two internships with DPR Construction offices.

Program chair Allan Chasey, at the Del E. Webb School of Construction, is proud of what the CIIC conference and endowment have accomplished, but when he stepped into his current role at the school a year ago, he says he saw more to the CIIC culture; he saw a full academically involved program. The first step toward making the conference into a year-round program was replacing an events coordinator with a program manager. The department landed Jerome Clark, who had extensive experience with the Intertribal Council of Arizona and an understanding of Chasey’s vision.

“The question we find ourselves asking more often is nation-building for tribes — what does it take for a tribe to build up their nations. build up its hospitals, roads, etc.,” Clark says.

The CIIC’s updated vision includes more conversations with tribes, research into tribal construction laws and potentially building a clearing house. But first, CIIC must address its 2014 theme, “Bridging Our Communities – Building for Our Futures,” — the key to its future as a program.

The Conference

11TH ANNUAL CONSTRUCTION IN INDIAN COUNTRY
April 28 to 30
Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino
5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler
http://ciic.construction.asu.edu

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RED AWARDS 2014: Best Public Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


McCord Hall
Owner: Arizona Board of Regents, for and on behalf of Arizona State University
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: RSP Architects
Design Architect: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates
Size: 128,000 SF
Location: 450 E. Lemon St., Tempe
Completed: June 24, 2013

ASU McCordThe W. P. Carey School of Business’ new state-of-the art facility, McCord Hall, is home to Arizona State University’s graduate, MBA and executive education programs. Consisting of instructional spaces, administrative offices, student and career services and social spaces, this monumental structure is designed to last a century on ASU’s Tempe campus. The structural slab and roof structure are a post-tensioned concrete that can be re-tensioned years from now to renew their strength. The building boasts numerous sustainable features, including a façade-specific shading system and a roof designed for a photovoltaic array that can provide electricity for buildings across the whole campus.

Mesa Fire Station 219 received LEED Gold Certification, the first for a fire station in the City of Mesa.

Project News: Sept/Oct 2013

>> DPR renovations include multiple healthcare projects

Healthcare projects kept DPR Construction busy with renovations at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Banner Boswell and Osborn Medical Center:

** The EP Cath Lab No. 1 project at St. Joe’s was a 1,300 SF renovation of the existing cath lab room to meet ADHS Health Guidelines. HKS was architect for the $365,000 project.

** The Banner Boswell hybrid OR project included updated staff lockers, finishes upgrades to the pre-op area and renovating 2 standard ORs and providing a new hybrid OR. HKS was architect for the $11M project.

** The Osborn MC project included the remodeling of the 18 diagnostic care unit rooms and support space. HVAC and electrical upgrades were also performed. Synectic Design was architect for the $700,000 project.

Two non-medical projects included the Chandler central plant expansion at Digital Realty and the Chandler K&L suites also at Digital Realty. Subcontractors included Bel-Aire Mechanical, Alliance Fire Protection, Cupertino Electric, Ace Controls, D.H. Pace, Ganado Painting & Wallcovering, Progressive Roofing and Metal Weld.

 

>> Royal Palms Resort and Spa unveils renovation of T. Cook’s

The Royal Palms Resort and Spa, Phoenix’s historic boutique resort, unveiled the restaurant’s three-month revitalization project in early September. Royal Palms teamed with Phoenix-based creative design team Bar Napkin Productions and its Founding Principal Haley Balzano to develop the interior design which boasts vibrant shades of authentic colors of the desert and an overall softer palette. Boldly colored chairs surround rustic wooden tables adding depth and diversity to the dining room, while iron chandeliers create a sense of intimacy and stimulate enchanting experiences and romance. The project also features a newly crafted wine and tequila room and an expanded bar. Howard S. Wright, a Balfour Beatty company, was the general contractor.

 

>> W.E. O’Neil Construction picked for Hohokam Stadium Renovation

W.E. O’Neil Construction was hired as construction manager at risk for the renovation of Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, which will serve as the 2015 spring training facility for the Oakland A’s. The Chicago Cubs are getting a new facility in 2014 — Riverview Park — and the A’s are leaving Phoenix Municipal after this coming Cactus League season. The Mesa City Council voted unanimously for the hiring W.E. O’Neil to provide input on several aspects of the project and the procurement of five hydrotherapy tanks for a total cost just shy of $560,000. The GC will also have a hand in project design, cost-estimating, development and coordinating with the city during the construction process. Under a facilities use agreement signed with the A’s, the City of Mesa covers the first $15M of the renovation and the accompanying Fitch Park, and will split the next $5M with the team.

 

>> El Mirage Police facility tops out

The El Mirage Police facility project topped out recently. The current facility is housed in trailers and modular buildings that are outdated and do not provide the proper space for law enforcement personnel to function in a safe and secure environment. The new police station will be the first building in a civic area that will ultimately include other structures. The site for construction is directly south of the City’s new award-winning Gateway Park. Voters approved the funding in the fall of 2011 and Arrington Watkins, architect/designer, along with D.L. Withers Construction, were awarded the project.

 

>> Mesa Fire Station 219 earns LEED Gold Certification

Mesa Fire Station 219 received its LEED Gold certification and plaque, the first for the City of Mesa. The project, completed in 2012 by D.L. Withers Construction and designed by Perlman Architects, used several sustainable practices that included solar panels, a solar hot water system, insulated concrete exterior walls and an insulated cool foam roof.

 

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DPR Construction Building Out Las Vegas Law Firm Gordon Silver

 

DPR Construction’s Phoenix Regional Office is managing all construction services for DPR throughout Nevada, led by Corporate Office Leader Michael Rauschenberger.

The Gordon Silver Corporate Headquarters Tenant Improvement is designed by architect Gary Lee Partners.

Gordon Silver, a law firm, chose Alliance Project Advisors with eight offices across the nation, to oversee the work.

Subcontractors include American Demolition, Helix Electric and Ideal Mechanical T.

The project began in August with an expected completion date of 1Q 2014.

The 55,000 SF tenant improvement at 3960 Howard Hughes Parkway encompasses full demolition and build-back on the 7th, 8th and 9th floors, with high-end millwork and finishes for the partners offices on the 8th and 9th floors.

The existing 9th floor Data Center will remain operational, feeding the swing space via fiber runs between the buildings until the new data center on the 7th floor is complete. The 7th floor will consist of several conference rooms and a high-end lobby area.

 

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DPR Construction's Phoenix Office 1st Net-Zero Commercial Building in Arizona

 

DPR Construction’s Phoenix office continues to make sustainability history.

The general contractor’s headquarters at 222 N. 44th St. in Phoenix is now the largest building in the world and only the second in the U.S. to achieve Net-Zero Energy Building certification to date.

Its Phoenix office has been officially certified as an NZEB by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) through its Living Building Challenge (SM) program.

rsz_dpr_hq_4Producing as much or more energy than it consumes, the building achieved LEED-NC Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). By being both the owner and contractor for the renovation project, DPR was able to push the limits on its sustainability goals for the circa-1972 building and turned the remains of an abandoned retail boutique into a “living lab” for the Arizona community.

“Net-zero is possible, even in one of the most extreme climates in the country,” said Dave Elrod, Regional Manager, DPR Construction. “We purposely chose a building that was nearing the end of its intended lifecycle in a redeveloping area to show our commitment to Phoenix and to demonstrate the impact revitalization can have on an urban environment.

“This building is another proof point of our ability to walk the walk of sustainability. Our Phoenix office will be a ‘living lab’ where anyone can see firsthand how our sustainable technologies work together in real life.”

The renovated 16,533 SF office building is located in Phoenix’s Discovery Triangle. In less than 10 months, the team, which included national design firm SmithGroupJJR and global consulting firm DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability, researched, designed, permitted, and built a highly-efficient, modern workplace with a number of innovative sustainability features including:

>> 87 operable windows working in tandem with the energy monitoring system to open and close based on the relative indoor and outdoor temperatures;

>> 87-foot zinc clad solar chimney which creates a convection current to release hot air out of the building while drawing cooler air in;

>> Shower towers that act as evaporative coolers by working together with the operable windows and solar chimney to regulate building temperatures;

>> Twelve 8-foot Isis Big Ass Fans that enable free air flow within the office;

>> 82 strategically positioned Solatubes that nearly eliminate the need for artificial daytime lighting;

>> Online building dashboard to track the energy production of its 78.96 kW DC photovoltaic system and energy consumption of the building;

>> A “vampire” shut-off switch to thwart any electrical devices – microwaves, cellphone chargers, radios – that draw energy from power plugs when there are no occupants in the building.

In addition, the large, open interior encourages creativity and collaboration using only glass walls, plyboo-slat walls and plantings to mark conference and meeting areas. DPR employees are encouraged to take breaks at their onsite gym, two green-screened courtyards, café, or wine bar.

DPR’s headquarters won the 2012 RED Award from AZRE magazine for Most Sustainable Project.

“As we continue to push the sustainability envelope, the design decisions we make are so connected to how our buildings perform,” says Mark Roddy, design principal for SmithGroupJJR.

“We were able to take a 40-year old building and transform it as a living example for the community and DPR’s employees. This project demonstrates that it is possible to live and work sustainably, even in a desert environment.”

 

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John C. Lincoln Sonoran Health and Emergency Center Construction Visible

 

Visible construction of John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is rising on 22 acres south of Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix.

The medical complex was designed by the Devenny Group and is being built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5M.

Initially, the $18M Sonoran Health and Emergency Center will be a 40,000 SF facility housing emergency and medical imaging services and breast health with 3-D mammography. It will employ approximately 40 staff members.

The facility cost funds site work, construction, furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include a 120-bed hospital that ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix.

The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 27 primary care physician practices including 12 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for the under- and uninsured members of the community.

Ground was broken and construction began on the Sonoran Health and Emergency Center during the first week of December 2012. Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development.

The medical complex remains on target to open in December 2013.

 
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JCL building Sonoran Health and Emergency Center

Visible construction of John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is rising on 22 acres south of Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix. The medical complex remains on target to open in December 2013.

Initially, the $18 million Sonoran Health and Emergency Center will be a 40,000-square-foot facility housing emergency and medical imaging services and breast health with 3-D mammography. It will employ approximately 40 staff members.

The facility cost funds site work, construction, furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include a 120-bed hospital that ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix. The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 27 primary care physician practices including 12 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for the under- and uninsured members of the community.

The medical complex was designed by the Devenny Group, Ltd., and is being built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5.6 million.

Ground was broken and construction began on the Sonoran Health and Emergency Center during the first week of December 2012. Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development. Santa Monica, Calif.-based Macerich still owns an adjacent 55 acres in the development along I-17 south of the Carefree Highway.

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John C. Lincoln N. Mountain SCC Renovation Wins National Award

 

In recognition of the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital’s completely reimagined and rebuilt Specialty Surgical Care third floor, the American Society of Hospital Engineering (ASHE) selected the hospital as recipient of its annual Vista Award for the year’s most outstanding renovation project.

Only one of the nation’s 6,000 hospitals is so honored each year by ASHE, a division of the American Hospital Association.

The $9M, 21,350 SF North Mountain hospital floor was completely gutted and then transformed into a new facility that is now the standard for future construction design throughout the Health Network. DPR Construction was the general contractor; Orcutt | Winslow was the architect.

The groundbreaking model was based on input from a hospital team of nursing and other patient care staff members regarding concepts that worked well in other hospital units and additional features to improve the patient experience.

“The team approach was the key to the success of the project,” said Sheila Gerry, senior vice president for Real Estate and Facilities Development. “More than 100 people worked closely together to find consensus solutions and make decisions to create an environment for the highest patient satisfaction, and to do all this within a very brief 10-month window, a tight timeline and budget.

“They succeeded because they believed in the project and in each other,” she added.

During conception and construction, hospital team members met weekly with the architects, engineers, contractors and interior designers. The result was a unit with 28 larger-than-average private rooms for elective orthopedic, neuro, spine and urology surgical patients.

Adding elegance to medical excellence, the timeless design allows John C. Lincoln’s state-of-the-art medical technology to be delivered in an atmosphere of comfort and convenience, complete with a “wow” factor for patients and visitors.

At each end of the floor, 14 rooms encircle the interdisciplinary clinical collaboration stations in order to increase visibility of staff. Each station includes designated dictation and charting areas to support better communications between doctors and clinical staff.

Patient rooms are not only high-touch with personal comfort in mind, but are also high tech for medical management functions. Room flow and efficiency is enhanced through proximity of necessary medical supplies and equipment, electronic health records, hand-washing and other evidence-based design applications.

“I wanted to create a unit that is collaborative and addresses the viewpoints of all staff members so that it will help us do our jobs even better,” said Erin Kennedy, RN, SSC charge nurse and nursing staff liaison to the SSC planning team. “Input from nurses, clinical staff and doctors made sure that everything necessary to excellent patient care and experiences was included.

“After a year of experience working in the SSC, I can say without hesitation that we have the ideal unit that we wanted to create.”

“From the personal welcome upon arrival to the individual get well card delivered upon discharge, Specialty Surgical Care wraps each patient’s high tech health care in layers of medical caring and personal attention unique in the Valley,” said Judy Bernhardt, SSC clinical director. “We are proud that our patient satisfaction scores top the charts.”

The 2013 Vista Award for Renovation will be presented to John C. Lincoln on Feb. 25 during the opening session of ASHE’s 2013 International Summit and Exhibition for Health Facility Planning, Design and Construction in San Francisco.

 

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Banner MD Anderson expanding

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center on the Banner Gateway campus will break ground in January 2013 on an expansion of its outpatient cancer facility, offering a new service and additional equipment and treatment areas to meet the needs of its rapidly growing patient population.

The 111,000-square-foot expansion will take place to the south of the existing 130,000-square-foot building and will add:

·  Three linear accelerators (two at opening and one vault for future use) for a future total of six, used for external beam and internal radiation treatments
· 30 additional clinic exam rooms for a total of 60 rooms
· 13 additional infusion bays for a total of 53
· Expansion of Laboratory Intake Center and Welcome Center
· The Cox Center for Integrative Oncology and Cancer Prevention, funded in large part by a grant from the James M. Cox Family Foundation
· Dedicated space for the Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy program
· Additional shell space for future expansion needs

“We’re proud to be living our vision of providing premier cancer services in the Valley,” said Todd Werner, CEO of Banner MD Anderson. “Our patients deserve nothing less than the best care and treatment options available.”

Banner MD Anderson will break ground on the $62.6 million expansion project on Jan. 22. The newly added area will open in spring 2014.

“We’re excited that we can expand our facilities and in turn, serve more people,” said Maggie Row, vice president of clinical operations for MD Anderson Cancer Network. “We look forward to enhancing our services in partnership with Banner Health and continuing to elevate the quality of care available in Arizona.”

Since opening in 2011, the cancer center has experienced rapid growth in outpatient volume. The center’s model of multi-disciplinary care, coupled with its relationship with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, has attracted more than 5,000 patients and resulted in 50,000 patient visits since opening. In addition, more than 50 subspecialty physicians are now providing cancer care to patients in need.

The new Cox Center for Integrative Oncology and Cancer Prevention will incorporate traditional cancer treatments with evidence-based integrative therapies, such as relaxation techniques to aid in pain and/or stress management. The center will include individualized prevention, screening and diagnosis programs, rehabilitation and community outreach programs, and will also be an invaluable community resource for cancer prevention education.

Project architects are HKS, Inc. and the general contractor is DPR Construction.

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110,000 SF Expansion To Break Ground at Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert will break ground in January 2013 on a 110,000 SF expansion of its outpatient cancer facility.

Project architect will be HKS, Inc. and the general contractor is DPR Construction.

The expansion will take place south of the existing 130,000 SF building and will include:

>>  Three linear accelerators (two at opening and one vault for future use) for a future total of six, used for external beam and internal radiation treatments;

>> 30 additional clinic exam rooms for a total of 60 rooms;

>> 13 additional infusion bays for a total of 53;

>> Expansion of Laboratory Intake Center and Welcome Center;

>> The Cox Center for Integrative Oncology and Cancer Prevention, funded in large part by a grant from the James M. Cox Family Foundation;

>> Dedicated space for the Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy program

>> Additional shell space for future expansion needs.

“We’re proud to be living our vision of providing premier cancer services in the Valley,” said Todd Werner, CEO of Banner MD Anderson. “Our patients deserve nothing less than the best care and treatment options available.”

Banner MD Anderson will break ground on the $62.6M expansion project on Jan. 22. The newly added area will open in 2Q 2014.

“We’re excited that we can expand our facilities and in turn, serve more people,” said Maggie Row, vice president of clinical operations for MD Anderson Cancer Network. “We look forward to enhancing our services in partnership with Banner Health and continuing to elevate the quality of care available in Arizona.”

Since opening in 2011, the cancer center has experienced rapid growth in outpatient volume. The center’s model of multi-disciplinary care, coupled with its relationship with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, has attracted more than 5,000 patients and resulted in 50,000 patient visits since opening. In addition, more than 50 subspecialty physicians are now providing cancer care to patients in need.

The new Cox Center for Integrative Oncology and Cancer Prevention will incorporate traditional cancer treatments with evidence-based integrative therapies, such as relaxation techniques to aid in pain and/or stress management. The center will include individualized prevention, screening and diagnosis programs, rehabilitation and community outreach programs, and will also be an invaluable community resource for cancer prevention education.

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John C. Lincoln Unveils North Mountain Hospital Entrance Renovation

A $5M reconstruction project to redesign and rebuild the entrance of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital at Dunlap Ave. and 2nd St. in Phoenix will be unveiled Nov. 29.

The renovation was made possible when David and Joan Lincoln and his sister, Lillian Lincoln Howell – descendants of John C. Lincoln – donated $4M to upgrade and reconstruct the entrance.

Additional major contributors include the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation Guild, Lincoln GIVES, the Health Network employee giving program and the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Auxiliary.

Construction began in January 2012 as part of a larger renovation at the North Mountain Hospital. DPR Construction is the general contractor and Orcutt | Winslow is the architect.

Areas to be unveiled include the hospital’s main entrance, lobby, gift shop, spiritual center, admitting, coffee bistro and newly designed donor wall. The final phase of renovations will begin on Nov. 30 and include enhanced indoor public dining and the addition of outdoor and staff dining areas.

“This gift will allow us to re-invent the patient and visitor experience at the North Mountain Hospital,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Network. “We’ll create a welcoming and warm entry lobby that is the pathway to healing for patients, visitors, staff and the community.”

The transformation of the 12,840 SF areas of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital creates a soothing and calming environment for patients and visitors. The journey to wellness begins here – on the Pathway to Healing – with a welcoming and inviting experience on par with the quality of care provided by nurses, physicians and staff throughout the John C. Lincoln Health Network.

“The hospital is dear to our family’s hearts, and it is important that the lobby reflect the quality of care received inside the hospital,” David Lincoln said shortly after the donation was made. “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression, and this is our chance to make a great first impression to our patients and visitors.”

Marcia Mintz, CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation, noted that “this gift demonstrates the philanthropic leadership of the Lincoln family and serves as a principal gift model for the Foundation and our developing donor base.

“We are grateful for the generous support of the Lincoln family whose governance and philanthropic support have been steadfast for more than 80 years. This is a reflection of their continuing pride in the direction and mission of this organization.”

>> John C. Lincoln Sonoran Health and Emergency Center

Shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division sold 22 acres of land on October 15 for $5.6M to John C. Lincoln Health Network. Macerich still owns 55 acres at the Sonoran Crossing development along Interstate 17 near Carefree Highway.

“We plan to start with a free-standing emergency center, primary care offices and diagnostic imaging, including 3D mammography. We will eventually expand to build a hospital and add medical office buildings in the future,” Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of John C. Lincoln Health Network, said in astatement.

The master plan for the Emergency Center and Diagnostic Imaging has been completed.

Devenney has been selected as architect to design the first building, which will include an Emergency Department, Diagnostic Imaging Services and Medical Offices.

DPR has been selected as the general contractor. Ground will break/construction will start on the North Valley facility during the first week of December.

John C. Lincoln’s investment in building construction and equipment is approximately $18M, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln Senior Vice President, Real Estate and Facilities Development.

The cost does not include construction of the 120-bed hospital which ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The $18M funds site work for a 40,000 SF building; construction of the Emergency Department, Diagnostic Imaging and medical offices; and purchase of medical equipment.

A new 120-bed hospital and medical campus will be developed on the site at a time to be determined based on future developments in the area economy and population growth

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in north central Phoenix.

 

 

Construction Project News - July August 2012

Construction: Project News July/August 2012

BRYCON BUILDING ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY FOR HOPI TRIBE

Brycon Construction is the general contractor and Jarratt Architecture is the architect for the $3.5M, 12,000 SF Hopi Assisted Living Facility in the Upper Village of Moenkopi, southeast of Tuba City. The facility is a 16-bed, masonry and wood new ground up. Brycon, working with the Hopi Assisted Living Facility Task Team, was able to increase the expected fl oor plan area by 3,000 SF and include an on-demand/solar hot-water system. Estimated completion is 4Q 2012.

BRIGNALL GC FOR INDIAN CULTURAL CENTER; RENOVATING 2 ARTS BUILDINGS

Brignall Construction has been selected as general contractor and SmithGroupJJR will provide design services for the 44,000 SF Yavapai-Prescott Indian Cultural Center to be built on the Yavapai- Prescott Indian Reservation. The new cultural center will be located on a 3.5-acre site on the reservation. The building will contain spaces for a museum and cultural education center. Brignall also is renovating Arizona Opera and Ballet Arizona buildings for the City of Phoenix. The opera project, 1636 N. Central Ave., will be completed in two phases. Phase I is the construction of an 8,700 SF rehearsal hall and 3,200 SF storage facility and all site work and improvements. Phase II will completely gut the existing 16,800 SF building to allow for new offices, fi tting rooms, coaching rooms, the costume department and storage. Motley Design Group is the architect. The other project, 2835 E. Washington St., is the renovation of a 52,800 SF warehouse to include a black box theater, three rehearsal studios, the administration department and storage warehouse. Architect is Durkin + Durkin Architects.

D.L. WITHERS, ORCUTT | WINSLOW TEAM UP FOR 2 NEW PHOENIX SCHOOLS

D.L. Withers is general contractor and Orcutt | Winslow is architect for the new M.C. Cash K-8 Elementary School. Th e 105,000 SF campus is being built adjacent to the existing M.C. Cash Elementary School, which will replace the old campus. Once the new campus is open, the old structures will be demolished to make way for new recreation and sports fi elds. Both firms also combined eff orts on the 80,000 SF Painted Rock Academy, Greenway Rd. and Black Canyon Freeway. Th e academy is the second school in the Reid Traditional Schools family. It will have the capacity to serve more than 700 K-8 students. Th e structure will include more than 30 classrooms, a library and a cafeteria. The school is scheduled to open Aug. 13.

DPR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS INCLUDE NEW OPERATING ROOMS AND CLEAN LAB

DPR Construction was awarded the $3.7M, 7,383 SF Phase 1 GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) Lab at Caris Life Sciences in Phoenix. Th e fast-track TI project includes a 1,200 SF mezzanine. Lord Aeck Sarent | Van Boerum & Frank Associates is the architect; GF Group is the engineer. In addition, DPR is building two operating rooms — one hybrid and one CVOR — at University Medical Center in Tucson. Shepley Bulfinch and Richardson and Abbott are architects for the $6.5M, 22,600 SF project. Phoenix project subs: UMEC, Wilson Electric, Able Steel, KTI Tile, Ganado Painting and Star Roofing. Tucson project subs: J.B. Steel, RBG Construction, Sun Mechanical and Stark Electric.

REHABILITATION MEDICINE BUILDING RISING AT VA CAMPUS

A $9.5M, 36,000 SF Rehabilitation Medicine Building is currently under construction at the Veterans Affairs campus, 650 E. Indian School Rd., Phoenix. General contractor for the building, developed by the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, is RCDS Contractors Inc. The architect is Westlake Reed Leskosky. Th e 2-story building will off er a new rehabilitation area to house physical therapy, prosthetics and orthotics departments. Expected completion date of 2Q 2013.

ADOLFSON & PETERSON FAST-TRACKS 4 CHARTER SCHOOLS

Adolfson & Peterson Construction and Schoolhouse Development, LLC completed work on four charter schools in Metro Phoenix that open this upcoming school year – Paideia Academy of South Phoenix, The Odyssey Institute for Advanced and International Studies in Buckeye, and two American Leadership Academy campuses (Mesa and Queen Creek). The four campuses were fast-tracked and completed at the end of June. Details:

  • Paideia Academy: New 47,800 SF preschool, K-6 charter school and family services center to accommodate 850 students at 7777 S. 15th Terrace;
  • The Odyssey Institute for Advanced and International Studies: New 34,900 SF college-preparatory charter school with a 29,000 SF gymnasium;
  • American Leadership Academy Queen Creek Campus (K-6 and 7-12): New 31,350 SF K-6 and 38,500 SF 7-12 charter schools with a 29,000 SF gymnasium;
  • American Leadership Academy Mesa Campus (K-6): New 31,350 SF K-6 charter school.

MCCARTHY AWARDED CONTRACT FOR PHASE III OF CHANDLER WATER PROJECT

The Southwest Region of McCarthy Building Companies was awarded a contract for preconstruction and construction services for the Phase III Airport Water Reclamation Facility Expansion project, 905 E. Queen Creek Rd., in Chandler. Th e project is a 7 MGD expansion that will allow the Airport Water Reclamation Facility to treat up to 22 MGD on a maximum month basis. In 4Q 2009, McCarthy completed construction of the Phase II Chandler Airport Water Reclamation Facility Expansion project. It expanded the facility’s liquid processing from 10 MGD to 15 MGD. Th e anticipated construction schedule of Phase III is June 2012 to June 2014.

SUMMIT BUILDERS NAMED GC FOR MARRIOTT PROPERTY IN TEMPE

Summit Builders is general contractor for the $28M, 173-room Residence Inn by Marriott to be built at 125 E. Fifth St. in Tempe. The developer is Finvarb Group and the architect is LawKingdom Architects of Kansas City, Mo. The hotel in Downtown Tempe will feature guest suites with fully-equipped kitchens. It will offer state-of-the-art amenities, including an outdoor rooftop pool and fire pit with panoramic views of downtown, 3,500 SF of meeting space and 5,700 SF of ground-level retail. Expected completion is 1Q 2014.

MERIT PARTNERS DEVELOPING 260,000 SF WAREHOUSE IN TOLLESON

Merit Partners of Scottsdale broke ground on a 260,000 SF build-to-suit industrial warehouse in Tolleson. Colliers International represented MiTek Industries Inc. in negotiating a 10-year lease agreement for the warehouse at 7890 W. Lincoln St. Nitti Graycor is general contractor and Ware Malcomb is the architect.

Construction: P&Z

CITY OF GOODYEAR

The City of Goodyear has been processing a 2012 revision to its Engineering Design Standards & Policy Manual and its Engineering Standard Details. A draft revision of these standards was completed in 2010 but was never taken through for City Council approval. The current 2012 version is an updated version of the 2010 draft.

The Engineering Department has posted the 2012 version in the City’s “draft documents” web page for the development community to view and to provide comments. In order to keep the process at a manageable size, the document has been broken into groups that will be up for review at different times throughout the year. Review time allotted for each group is 20 business days. Visit: ci.goodyear.az.us/index.aspx?NID=36

CITY OF TEMPE

In accordance with Arizona Revised Statutes, the City of Tempe gave notice of proposed adoptions of, or changes to, city taxes or fees. Th e City adopted its final property tax levy for fiscal year 2012-13 on June 28. Information can be found by contacting the City of Tempe Finance and Technology Department at (480) 350-8350.

CITY OF AVONDALE

Avondale’s new Alarm Ordinance took eff ect on May 1. Residents and businesses are required to register their burglar alarms online with Public Safety Corporation’s CryWolf at crywolf.us/avondaleaz. The new program is aimed at cutting down on false alarm activations in the City along with the amount of time police officers spend responding to false alarms. Under this program residents will not be fined for the first two false alarms that occur within the same year.

CITY OF MARICOPA

The City of Maricopa has joined more than 20,000 communities nationwide that are allowed to purchase federally-backed flood insurance. Th is availability follows the community’s adoption and enforcement of ordinances to reduce flood losses and acceptance by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Property owners wishing to take advantage of this program should be aware that there is a 30-day waiting period before the flood insurance coverage goes into effect.

Lenders must require borrowers whose properties are in a designated flood hazard area to purchase flood insurance as a condition of receiving a federally backed mortgage loan in accordance with the Federal Disaster Protection Act of 1973.

The P&Z column is compiled by Dave Coble and George Cannataro with Coe & Van Loo Consultants, cvlc.com.

AZRE Magazine July/August 2012

Banner MD Anderson Lantern Of Hope

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Lantern Of Hope Honored

The Lantern of Hope positioned at the entry to Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, was recognized among 15 architectural lighting design projects throughout seven countries at the 29th Annual International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Lighting Design Awards. The ceremony was held May 10 in Las Vegas. The cancer center, located in Gilbert, Ariz., is a unique collaboration between Banner Health and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Positioned at the entryway of the $109 million cancer center, the award-winning Lantern’s vivid, uniform glow serves as a beacon of hope and a symbol of the center’s commitment to the eradication of cancer. Judges noted the subtle color usage as a distinct differentiating factor within the project as many times color is over utilized in lighting design projects. Judges also noted the exceptional execution and design composition of the silhouette lighting in the vertical tower and the even wash of the horizontal awning.

“Symbols of hope abound at Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center,” said cancer center CEO Todd Werner. “We are honored that our lantern provides inspiration among such prominent architectural lighting design projects across the world.”

The Lantern of Hope was created with accessibility, maintenance and longevity in mind. Robust, yet small scale, IP66 luminaries with long-life LEDs were selected to withstand the hard desert climate and are situated in a double row at the base of the four-story panel spans in single rows at the bottom of the single-story spans.

The panels cladding the structure were cut to represent the canopy of the Palo Verde tree, also known as the “nurse” tree, fittingly, and filter sunlight to the entry and balconies through a fabric scrim by day while being backlit at night to create an inspiring visual icon. Playful contrasts of light and shadow provide a soft, luminous space of transition to the building during the day and relaxing vantage points for the ever-changing natural light show are offered from adjacent second and third floor balconies.

Generally, the Lantern glows in lavender – the universal color for cancer awareness. Through the use of a DMX control package, Banner MD Anderson officials can also use the Lantern to communicate cancer awareness months, holidays and special events through smoothly fading color and kinesis.

In addition to the Lantern of Hope, the center was designed merging the “high-tech” world of medicine with the “high touch” needs of cancer patients to provide holistic care. The center’s unique environment also incorporates proven evidence-based design theories to enhance healing such as natural light, artwork, water features and views of nature. Patient and family amenities at Banner MD Anderson include an expansive lobby, outdoor balconies, large patient rooms and treatment areas as well as unique boutique retail services.

Architect for the Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center was Cannon Design. General contractor was DPR Construction.

Located at US 60 and Higley Road, the 130,000-square-foot state-of-the-art facility is housed on the Banner Gateway Medical Center campus in Gilbert, Ariz. Banner MD Anderson joins Arizona’s leading health care provider with the nation’s leading cancer center to provide patients and their families the highest quality care possible. Top areas of patient care include medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgery, pathology, laboratory, diagnostic imaging and other supportive clinical services.

You can find out more about Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center at www.bannerhealth.com.

Banner MD Anderson Lantern of Hope

The Lantern Of Hope Wins IALD Award Of Excellence

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Lantern of Hope positioned at the entry to Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert was recognized among 15 architectural lighting design projects throughout seven countries at the 29th Annual International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Lighting Design Awards.

The ceremony was May 10 in Las Vegas.

Positioned at the entryway of the $109M cancer center, the award-winning Lantern of Hope’s vivid, uniform glow serves as a beacon of hope and a symbol of the center’s commitment to the eradication of cancer. Judges noted the subtle color usage as a distinct differentiating factor within the project as many times color is over utilized in lighting design projects. Judges also noted the exceptional execution and design composition of the silhouette lighting in the vertical tower and the even wash of the horizontal awning.

“Symbols of hope abound at Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center,” said cancer center CEO Todd Werner. “We are honored that our lantern provides inspiration among such prominent architectural lighting design projects across the world.”

The Lantern of Hope was created with accessibility, maintenance and longevity in mind. Robust, yet small scale, IP66 luminaries with long-life LEDs were selected to withstand the hard desert climate and are situated in a double row at the base of the four-story panel spans in single rows at the bottom of the single-story spans.

The panels cladding the structure were cut to represent the canopy of the Palo Verde tree, also known as the “nurse” tree, fittingly, and filter sunlight to the entry and balconies through a fabric scrim by day while being backlit at night to create an inspiring visual icon. Playful contrasts of light and shadow provide a soft, luminous space of transition to the building during the day and relaxing vantage points for the ever-changing natural light show are offered from adjacent second and third floor balconies.

Generally, the Lantern of Hope glows in lavender – the universal color for cancer awareness. Through the use of a DMX control package, Banner MD Anderson officials can also use the Lantern of Hope to communicate cancer awareness months, holidays and special events through smoothly fading color and kinesis.

In addition to the Lantern of Hope, the center was designed merging the “high-tech” world of medicine with the “high touch” needs of cancer patients to provide holistic care. The center’s unique environment also incorporates proven evidence-based design theories to enhance healing such as natural light, artwork, water features and views of nature. Patient and family amenities at Banner MD Anderson include an expansive lobby, outdoor balconies, large patient rooms and treatment areas as well as unique boutique retail services.

Architect for the Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center was Cannon Design. General contractor was DPR Construction.


Located at US 60 and Higley Road, the 130,000 SF state-of-the-art facility is housed on the Banner Gateway Medical Center campus in Gilbert. Banner MD Anderson joins Arizona’s leading health care provider with the nation’s leading cancer center to provide patients and their families the highest quality care possible. Top areas of patient care include medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgery, pathology, laboratory, diagnostic imaging and other supportive clinical services.

RED Awards 2012 - DPR Construction

RED Awards 2012: Most Sustainable Project, DPR Construction Phoenix Headquarters

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for Most Sustainable Project was DPR Construction Phoenix Headquarters.


Most Sustainable Project

DPR Construction Phoenix Headquarters

Developer: DPR Construction
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: SmithGroupJJR
Size: 16,533 SF
Location: 222 North 44th St., Phoenix
Completed: October, 2011

DPR ConstructionSustainable is an understatement when it comes to DPR Construction’s Phoenix Headquarters. The Net-Zero building produces as much energy as or more than it consumes. This is done via the largest solar chimney that rests atop the facility’s roof. It  releases pre-cooled air and lowers air density. Enormous ceiling fans produce maximum air without the necessary speed to reduce energy usage. Arizona’s constant sunlight led to DPR’s inclusion of solatubes. Led by SmithGroupJJR’s research, these solatubes are implemented to provide natural lighting throughout the building, which was a retail building constructed in 1972. An additional sustainable highlight is the vampire shut-off switch that disconnects 90% phantom loads after each workday. The project utilized more than 32% recycled resources and exported 78% of recycled materials. DPR made use of several sustainability techniques to participate in the Energize Phoenix efforts while also serving the community through its convenient location to Sky Harbor International Airport and the METRO light rail.

dpr.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


Honorable Mention

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Developer: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Size: 760,000 SF
Location: 1919 E. Thomas Rd., Phoenix
Completed: October, 2011


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Construction Project - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Construction Project News

Construction project news from Phoenix College, McCarthy Building Companies, CyrusOne, D.L. Withers Construction and more.

Phoenix College remodeling work includes student union

Construction Projects - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Addition and remodeling work to the existing Hannelly Student Center continues at Phoenix College. The main construction project is remodeling of the Learning Center Building into a student union with an exterior patio. Work includes 45,650 SF of remodeling and 13,000 SF. Expected completion of the $16.8M project is 3Q 2012. D.L. Withers is the general contractor; RNL Design is the architect.

McCarthy projects include solar station, new school building

McCarthy Building Companies is completing construction of the 145-acre Cotton Center Solar Station in Gila Bend. The $14.3M project involves installation of the largest (18 mw) photovoltaic ground-mounted solar tracking system in Arizona. Installation includes PV racking system, modules and electrical system. The 75,000 solar panels are arranged in 1,566 rows connected to 108 single-axis trackers. On sunny days the construction project is expected to produce enough energy for 4,500 residential customers. Developer is SOLON Corporation and APS. Subcontractors include Blount Contracting, Buesing Corp., Schuff Steel, Ironco, and Delta Diversified. Expected completion is late 4Q 2011.  … McCarthy completed a new, 2-story, 67,000 SF building that houses 32 classrooms, a library, dining room and administrative offices at Aguilar Elementary School in Tempe. HDA was the architect for the $11.6M renovation project. Subcontractors: E&K of Phoenix, Kortman Electric, Maverick Masonry, Midstate Mechanical, Schuff Steel, Progressive Roofing and Suntec Concrete.

1 MSF data center scheduled to break ground in 2012

CyrusOne, a data center colocation provider, plans to build a 1 MSF facility in Chandler with construction set to begin in 2012 and completion expected by early 2013. CBRE helped complete the sale of a 40-acre parcel at Continuum, a 152-acre master-planned science and technology business park located in the Price Corridor. This facility will serve as the primary location for CyrusOne’s West Coast colocation operations, targeting the Northern and Southern California markets. Luke Walker, David Carder and Nick Di Paolo of CBRE’s Phoenix office represented the seller, Capital Commercial Investments Inc. of Austin, Texas. CyrusOne was represented by Mark Bauer of Jones Lang LaSalle in Phoenix.

D.L. Withers to build MCSO 911 call center

D.L. Withers Construction will begin work on the $80M, 120,000-140,000 SF Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office 911 Dispatch Center and Administration Building in 2Q 2012. The 5- to 7-story building  at the SWC of 5th Ave. and Madison in Phoenix will house the 911 dispatch center and consolidate MCSO administrative functions.  Architect is Gabor Lorant Architects. Expected completion is 3Q 2013.

DPR wraps up renovation at Hospice of Arizona

Construction Projects - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011DPR Construction completed a 12,064 SF renovation of a one-story unoccupied building and existing site area for Hospice of Arizona in Mesa. The interior build-out included 13 resident/patient rooms, staff support and administrative spaces, family gathering areas, a cafe, outdoor courtyard and a commercial kitchen. The Greenfield Comfort Garden, a feature of the exterior site, honors former Arizona Gov. Rose Mofford. Projects DPR is completing in 4Q 2011: Willis TI, Scottsdale, 24,992 SF; West Valley Medical Center PACU renovation, Goodyear, 3,500 SF; SARRC Vocational & Life Skills Academy TI, Phoenix, 10,159 SF; and Merkel Corp. TI, Scottsdale, 25,804 SF.

Mortenson selected for 3 projects on NAU campus

Mortenson Construction has been awarded three projects on the Northern Arizona University campus in Flagstaff, including a new Science & Health Building and major renovation to the Multipurpose Events Center. The $55M, 120,000 SF Greenfield Science & Health Building will add new teaching and research labs and classrooms. Expected completion is 3Q 2014. The $18.5M events center project is a major renovation of the 94,000 SF NAU Fieldhouse into a multipurpose center. Work includes space reconfiguration, structural repairs, a new west entrance and new acoustics and lighting. Expected completion is 1Q 2013. A $3.5M renovation to the Lab 17 building includes HVAC balancing and fire and life safety updates. Expected completion is 4Q 2011.

Pegasus Construction completes TI in Goodyear building

Pegasus Construction completed a $140,000, 2,800 SF tenant improvement of an existing building at 1380 N. Litchfield Road in Goodyear for New Orleans-based Naked Pizza. The project includes a kitchen and customer area for takeout and delivery, an open office area to train kitchen staff and a conference room. The building will eventually become the local corporate office for Naked Pizza. Architect was Reece Angell Rowe Architects. Subcontractors included Uniko Glass and Mirror, Sunset Acoustics, Northwest Floor & Wall, JJJ Electric, Freedom Fire Protection, Diamondback Builders Services, Commercial Service Company, Banker Insulation, AZ Professional Painting, ABBA Aire and Mountainview Flooring.

Kraus-Anderson breaks ground on multi-family project

The Phoenix office of Kraus-Anderson Construction Company broke ground on a 17,176 SF supportive housing project at 1140 E. 5th Ave. in Mesa. The 18-unit accessible apartment complex will serve low-income individuals with physical disabilities. The multi-family building will include 14 one-bedroom units, four two-bedroom units, resident parking and a community building. The complex is located in an infill site and will feature landscaping using native species, pedestrian paths leading through the 2-acre, three-building site, and underground storm water infiltration system. Expected completion is 1Q 2012.

STG Design, MT Builders complete retirement community

Construction was completed recently on the 176,332 SF, $17M Alta Vista Retirement Community in Prescott. STG Design provided architectural services and MT Builders was the general contractor. The project consists of two senior living communities linked by a shared 14,000 SF recreation center. There are 44 units of assisted living and 88 units of independent living. The development is situated on a 6-acre parcel with a view of the mountain ranges that surround Prescott.

On the drawing board

Scottsdale-based AZ Sourcing LLC is planning to build a 1.5 MSF business center in Casa Grande to be named Phoenix Mart. Colliers International has been hired to sign up prospective tenants. The proposed $150M project will include a convention center. Tenants will sell merchandise ranging from consumer products, automotive products and food. … An apartment complex in Scottsdale is being proposed by a local developer who plans to demolish the old Barcelona nightclub at 73rd St. and Greenway-Hayden Loop. Plans by Scottsdale Place LLC call for a four-story, 240-unit apartment complex at the site. …  LWI Advisory Group of Del Mar, Calif., has submitted plans to the City of Gilbert for a 382-unit apartment complex near SanTan Village. The proposed complex is near the SWC of Ray Rd. and SanTan Village Parkway.

Hospital Construction - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Please Do Not Disturb: Hospital Construction Zone

During hospital construction, constant planning and communication are top priorities for healthcare builders

The foremost focus in upgrading or expanding a hospital is keeping the work concealed from the patients. So says Steve Whitworth, Kitchell’s Healthcare Division manager, about hospital construction.

It’s not like adding or enlarging a store in a retail center, which might force shoppers to step around a construction barrier for a few days or have the piped-in music occasionally punctuated by a floor sander.

“In a mall, people will be inconvenienced. In a hospital, a patient’s health is at stake,” Whitworth says. “In every single project we strive to be invisible. The ability to heal depends on the environment a patient is in. It‘s the only thing that matters at the end of the day.”

The dilemma is that hospitals, as much or more than other commercial real estate structures, need to continuously get bigger and better, he says.

“Planning, planning, planning,”  is the key to keeping healthcare facilities humming smoothly while making major renovations, says Jay Stallings, associate administrator at Banner Desert Medical Center, which unveiled a major emergency department makeover in August.

That mantra is echoed by other key players — from hospital administrators to construction engineers — who are continuously upgrading and expanding Arizona’s top hospitals to address medical care’s changing needs and technology advances while keeping the work virtually imperceptible to patients and staff.

Finding solutions

Banner Thunderbird Tower - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Unlike other types of commercial real estate overhauls or tenant improvements, healthcare property renovations come with a whole host of hurdles, from meeting infection control standards to keeping emergency entrances accessible.

The biggest hurdle — no down time.

“What makes a hospital unique, is that it’s a 24/7 facility. There’s never a good time to do the work,” says Sundt Construction’s Russ Korcuska, who has been piloting hospital construction projects in Arizona for two decades.

To maintain top-notch patient care, innovation and expansion is necessary, but upgrading existing facilities means you can’t turn off the power, the water or other utilities, you can’t block fire escape routes or ambulance entrances, you can’t let construction dust or other contaminants get in the air, and you can’t make a lot of noise or cause other disturbances that could impact patients or staff operations.

“If a surgeon is working on somebody’s brain, you can’t be creating vibrations on the other side of the wall,” Korcuska says. “It’s extremely challenging.”

That’s why planning an entire project and all possible contingencies to the tiniest detail before ever flipping a power switch is so critical, says DPR Construction’s Guy Sanders, who is just finishing up Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center’s three-story expansion of operating rooms and pre/post operative care areas.

Especially in renovating older hospitals where documentation of what’s in the ceiling and under the floor is not always complete or accurate, he says. “Knowledge of a campus is critical,” Sanders says. As is double-checking before digging.

During the Banner Good Samaritan project, he planned for alternative power sources to keep all ongoing operations running smoothly based on detailed building documentation. Still, during the planning process, he flipped a breaker and did a walk-through of the whole hospital to ensure the documentation was correct. It wasn’t.

Sanders found some equipment mislabeled and had to do some rewiring — and re-documenting.

Proper planning is crucial

Chris Jacobson of McCarthy Building Companies is just completing a major project at Banner Thunderbird Medical Center. He added a new six-story tower and emergency department expansion in the spot where the old ambulance entrance stood, and then renovated all the newly vacated space after 25 departments relocated to the tower. The project is slated to wrap in January.

It has been a five-year, multi-phased project, with planning for every phase starting almost a year in advance, he says.

Jacobson and his crew had to design everything from infection, noise and dust control to fire exits — and figure out how to get workers and materials in and out of the construction sites without bringing them through the hospital. They plotted everything, “even down to which tools to use.”

“You have to get creative about how to get the work done without coming in with a wrecking ball,” he says.

The biggest challenge was how to keep the existing emergency department functioning while “de-constructing” the old ER entrance. Jacobson says the solution devised in the planning process — building a covered bridge from a new temporary ambulance entry a short distance from the construction site — was key to McCarthy landing the job.

“It was a big challenge that nobody had figured out,” he says.

And that wasn’t the only temporary structure the construction experts had to design and build before even starting the main event. They crafted fire-rated, sound-insulated  temporary walls, new directional signage,  and a complete hospital kitchen in a trailer.

They even planned and built a temporary super-structure that looked like a massive, free-standing fire escape outside the hospital tower to get workers and materials to upper floors without ever opening a hospital door.

McCarthy used a similar technique for building out Yuma Regional Medical Center’s upper floors, which were pegged for expansion space when the hospital was first built. The engineers planned and built an outdoor elevator and trash chute to keep patients and staff below from commingling with construction workers or debris on indoor elevators.

At Banner Good Samaritan, DPR had to excavate an area between the central power plant and the new expansion. Before bringing in the backhoe, Sanders employed a “vacuum” truck to suck up some of the dirt and expose the utilities.

Among the most interesting planning tools McCarthy engineers use are laser scans of a hospital’s ceilings and floors to find exactly where all the pipes, wires and ducts are located, and 3D modeling software to virtually tuck new utilities amongst the old.

“The old way was you had guys with flashlights and measuring tapes,” Jacobson says.

Sometimes engineers have to detour planned utility upgrades to avoid a virtual collision. That’s much better than having workers face a real utility roadblock and have to rethink routes in the middle of a messy construction site, he says.

If planning is atop the experts’ priority list for minimizing patient disruption during construction, keeping everybody in the loop scores a close second place.

A critical component of both planning and construction stages of any healthcare project is communication with all the stakeholders, says Stallings, whose new triple-sized, state-of-the-art emergency department took seven years from drawing board to debut.

Stallings says involving every hospital department touched by the project from start to finish made the process as painless as possible for them and especially for patients.

“This was a collaborative project with physicians, staff, clinicians, infection control, environmental services,” he says. “All were impacted. We worked hand-in-hand with the architects and construction staff. We had weekly construction meetings, sometimes daily, with all who were impacted.”

“We provide an important service to the community. We couldn’t shut down the emergency department and continue to be a hospital,” Stallings says. “In the moment when somebody needs help, we have to be there. We take that very seriously. Our approach was  transparency (to patients), collaboration, a high level of communication and training.”

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

MD Anderson Cancer Center Lantern of Hope - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center Brings Hope, Treatment To Arizona

The MD Anderson Cancer Center on the Banner Gateway campus in Gilbert represents a new era of hope, treatment and care for cancer patients and their families.

And like many Banner Health facilities, the MD Anderson Cancer Center was designed and built with patient care in mind. Using the proven model called “evidence based design,” the center’s design is specifically built with healing and comfort in mind. Features such as a healing garden, a bistro-style café, a community learning center and even a boutique offering wigs and other personal items all work in concert to provide the best possible experience for cancer patients and their families. The facility, which opens Sept. 26, was designed by Cannon Design and built by DPR Construction — both leading firms with significant experience designing and building health care facilities.

The design also seamlessly merges the “high-tech” world of medicine with the “high touch” needs of cancer patients to provide care in a holistic way. Natural light, art work, water features and views of nature all work in harmony at the center. In addition, patients receiving chemotherapy and other infusion treatments will get this care in a bright, open environment with floor-to-ceiling windows that provide mountain views — patients can even receive treatments on outdoor balconies while enjoying the Arizona weather.

“We are here to offer hope, comfort and industry-leading care to cancer patients and their families,” said Pam Nenaber, CEO of Banner Gateway Medical Center and the Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center. “The design of our facility will enable us to serve the community well.”

A Medical and Architectural Marvel

Several years in the making, the 133,000 SF, $109M state-of-the-art facility will deliver an unprecedented level of cancer care in Arizona. The center is a collaboration between Phoenix-based Banner Health and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The center is MD Anderson’s first full clinical extension outside of Houston and will support the multi-disciplinary care approach pioneered at MD Anderson, continually ranked as a leading provider of cancer care.

“Building on an existing occupied campus can be challenging,” said Hamilton Espinosa, national healthcare specialist for DPR Construction. “With all projects, we work through phasing and logistics plans to ensure that construction does not impact operations, paying special attention to traffic and emergency vehicle operations.

“One of the unique elements of the building is what we call ‘the Lantern of Hope,’ a three-and-a-half story architectural feature at the main entrance. Made of Gore Tenara architectural fabric, which is the same fabric used for the retractable roof over Centre Court at Wimbledon, and cut aluminum panel, the feature lights up akin to a ‘beacon of hope’ and includes a water feature underneath to serve as a place for reflection.MD Anderson Cancer Center - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

The Lantern of Hope was built by Chandler-based Kovach Inc., a nationwide exterior cladding contractor. Kovach provided the aluminum panels that make up the lantern’s distinctive silhouette. Starting with 30,000 pounds of raw aluminum, the panels took shape in Pennsylvania where they were milled into 38 massive plates. They were then transported to Minnesota where each one was cut into a unique pattern using a computer controlled high pressure water jet cutting tool.

Upon arrival in the Valley, each panel received structural fixtures necessary to mount them onto the lantern’s framework. As a final step, the panels were finished with a copper slag blast treatment to give them their final appearance, each weighing more than 700 pounds. The structure, which mirrors branch patterns found on the palo verde tree, rises nearly 60 feet above the center’s open-air entry area.

The design also presented an opportunity for Cannon to showcase its expertise in the project.

“Designing for a cancer patient varies quite a bit from designing for other typical healthcare patients,” said David Polzin, one of the design and planning leaders. “A cancer patient can access care over 100 times during the first year following diagnosis for surgery, radiation treatment, chemotherapy, physician visits, imaging scans, etc.

“When we first started this project, the client team was considering locating the cancer center on one of their downtown urban hospital campuses which would have been challenging for patients to access. During project, the client agreed that locating the cancer center on the Banner Gateway campus in Gilbert would provide better access for patients.”

The cancer center is sited and designed as a standalone building on the campus to provide convenience for patient access, Polzin said. A guiding principle for the building design was to merge the “high tech” with the “high touch” needs of cancer patients and their families. The building design includes simple wayfinding on each of the three floors, along with orientation to the desert landscape. For radiation patients who come for treatment over the course of 30 days in a row, convenient parking is located directly outside the center.

For infusion/chemotherapy patients whose treatment can last anywhere from two hours up to eight hours, the infusion center is located on the top floor with views to the mountains.

The Future is Now

The Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center will also inject some economic muscle into the state. Besides employing hundreds in well-paying health care jobs, the center is already attracting other health care and related industries.

A major hotel chain is planning to open a hotel nearby and other retail spaces are planned and in the works. The cancer center adds to a growing bio-medical cluster in Gilbert while town officials have been busy pushing the synergies health care operators bring to the region.

“The new Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center represents a major milestone towards our strategic goal of becoming a regional and national leader within the rapidly advancing life science industry,” Gilbert Mayor John Lewis said. “We’ve established new services, resources, and incentives to enhance our life science and business environment and attract organizations that will have a positive impact on our future economic growth.”

The Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center’s three-story outpatient facility will employ roughly 250 staff and 70 specially trained physicians. There are 30 multi-specialty clinic exam rooms, nine radiation oncology exam rooms and 40 infusion therapy stations. In addition, 76 inpatient rooms at Banner Gateway will be dedicated to cancer patient care. The center is the first of three phases — later plans call for an additional 200 SF expansion.

For more information about the Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, visit MD Anderson Cancer Center’s website.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

DPR Construction New Headquarters

Old Boutique Gets New Life As DPR Construction's Headquarters [VIDEO]

Rising from the remains of the former Castle Boutique on 44th Street and Van Buren, DPR Construction’s new Phoenix headquarters – the DPR Boutique – opened today as a living laboratory for how to live and work sustainably in the desert environment.

Located in the heart of the Discovery Triangle development zone, the DPR Boutique is on track to be the first Net Zero building in Arizona, where on-site renewable energy generation is equal to or greater than consumption. It is a short walk from the 44th Street light rail stop and incorporates numerous green building features and systems to inspire, educate and encourage clients and the community on green building design.

“We’re proud of our new office and how it physically, environmentally and visibly represents our core values and culture,” said Dave Elrod, regional manager of DPR Phoenix. “While many building owners may think it’s impossible to turn a 30-year-plus old building at the end of its intended life cycle into something forward-thinking and sustainable, that is precisely what we’ve achieved for our new home.”

DPR Construction New Boutique HeadquartersTo help celebrate the building’s opening, councilman Michael Johnson and the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center’s (SARRC) GardenWorks program participated in a ceremonial planting and ribbon cutting.

DPR Construction has built its reputation in green construction through excellence in client projects. The company wanted its Phoenix headquarters to reflect its commitment to innovative construction practices and sustainable design. DPR took on the challenge to turn an existing structure into a completely net-zero building that is also a comfortable and efficient workspace for its employees. Using prior experiences, the team was able to reduce design time and sustainability consulting fees by 75 percent.

“SmithGroup is excited to be a part of part this visionary project undertaken by DPR,” said Mike Medici, AIA, managing director SmithGroup. “Their innovative approach will be a leading example of sustainable urban development for the Greater Phoenix area.”

Examples of the building’s sustainable design:

  • Clad in zinc, the roof’s solar chimney is an integral part of the building’s passive heating and cooling design. The zinc used for this solar chimney is extra material from a previous project, making good use of existing resources.
  • Other features of the natural ventilation system include automatically adjusting windows, shower towers and tubular daylighting.
  • Four shower towers provide up to four tons of cooling at peak operating conditions.
  • The towers feature inexpensive plastic tubing and dual shower heads to create air flow pulling water up and dispersing it back through the shower heads and misting heads to provide evaporative cooling effect.
  • 79-kilowatt solar array offsets 100 percent of power demand while providing shaded parking.
  • The xeriscape landscaping is designed to provide shade and provide additional passive cooling.

“We are excited to open our new office to the public and share the numerous green building features and systems,” Elrod said. “People will be able to see for themselves that it is possible to live and work sustainably in this desert environment. We hope our visitors will be informed, educated, and most of all inspired to think about changes they can make in their own projects, at work and at home.”



Take quick look at DPR Construction’s Annual Open House event on Nov. 3:

 

University of Arizona College of Medicine

UA College Of Medicine Health Sciences Education Building Celebrates “Topping Out”

Health Sciences Education Building, UA College of MedicineA major Downtown Phoenix development project hit a big milestone October 5, 2011 with the “topping out” of construction of the Health Sciences Education Building on the campus of the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

The final beam of the building was ceremoniously lifted and secured at its highest point with workers and college staff and faculty celebrating midday Wednesday.

The $129M, 264,000 SF building – being built in a joint venture by DPR Construction and Sundt Construction, Inc. – will allow the state to take the next step in expanding its medical education facilities.

The new six-story building will house administrative offices, lecture halls, classrooms, class laboratories and a learning resource center. CO Architects is the design and executive architect; Ayers Saint Gross is associate architect and master planner.

The College of Medicine-Phoenix plans to expand its class size and add instruction as Northern Arizona University will also bring a physician’s assistant and physical therapy programs to the Health Sciences Education Building. 


In its fifth year in Downtown Phoenix, the College of Medicine currently anchors the campus with 192 medical students, admitting 48 per year. After the completion of the Health Sciences Education Building in 3Q 2012, the university plans to admit up to 80 students per class and eventually reach a capacity of 120 per class to address the critical need for physicians in Arizona.

Also on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus are the UA College of Pharmacy and the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, the headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute and International Genomics Consortium, and Arizona Biomedical Collaborative building.

For more information about the Health Sciences Education Building, visit ahsc.arizona.edu.

Health Sciences Education Building, UA College of Medicine

Most Admired Companies - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

2010 Most Admired Companies Award Winners

Arizona Business Magazine and BestCompaniesAZ are honored to unveil the winners of our inaugural Arizona’s Most Admired Companies Awards.

With 43 winners, we think you’ll agree the awards selection committee has done an outstanding job in determining some of the most admired companies in our state.  Our primary goal in developing this program was to find those organizations that excel in four key areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, social responsibility and customer opinion.  This list features the most prestigious companies in our state, providing us the opportunity to learn from the best.

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 69
Recent Award: AIA Kemper Goodwin Award – 2009
WEB: www.a-p.com

AlliedBarton Security Services
Headquarters: Conshohocken, Penn.
Year Est.: 1957
No. of Employees in AZ: 1,047
Recent Award: Brandon Hall Research Award for Best Integration of Learning and Talent Management – 2009
WEB: www.alliedbarton.com
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American Express
Headquarters: New York
Year Est.: 1850
No. of Employees in AZ: 7,219
Recent Award: Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies – 2010
WEB: www.americanexpress.com
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Arizona Charter Academy
Headquarters: Surprise
Year Est.: 2001
No. of Employees in AZ: 61
Recent Award: Elks Lodge Community Partner of the Year – 2010
WEB: www.azcharteracademy.com
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Banner Health
Headquarters: Phoenix
Year Est.: 1999
No. of Employees in AZ: 27,528
Recent Award: Gallup Great Workplace Award – 2009
WEB: www.bannerhealth.com
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BeachFleischman PC
Headquarters: Tucson
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 104
Recent Award: Accounting Today’s Best Accounting Firms to Work For – 2009
WEB: www.beachfleischman.com

To buy a print version of the 2010 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies
go to MagCloud.com

Arizona's Most Admired Companies November-December 2010

Anderson Banner Cancer Center, AZRE March/April 2010

Medical: M.D. Anderson Banner Cancer Center


M.D. ANDERSON BANNER CANCER CENTER

Developer: Banner Health
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: Cannon Design
Size: 120,000 SF
Location: Higley Rd. & US 60 in Gilbert

The $107M development will include a 3-story building dedicated to outpatient services. The center will treat inpatients on two floors inside Banner Gateway Medical Center, which was built in 2007. Construction on the cancer center began December 2009, with completion scheduled for fall 2011.

AZRE March/April 2010