Tag Archives: future generations

Oil Absorbing seaswarm Robot

Oil Absorbing Robots, Energy Awareness Month And More

Here’s the latest green news on oil absorbing robots, energy awareness month, eco-moms going strong, and others.

Fresh & Easy Opens First Store with CO2 Refrigeration
A recently-opened Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market in Southern California is the first to use naturally-occurring carbon-dioxide refrigeration, and the first to be certified by the EPA’s GreenChill Partnership, an award granted to fewer than 40 of the nation’s 35,000 grocery stores. The natural refrigerant reduces the impact of the store’s refrigeration on the ozone layer by about 70 percent.

Fleet of Robots Designed to Clean Up Oil
Scientists at MIT have developed robots they call Seaswarm capable of cleaning oil spills through their super-absorbent “nanofabric.” They run on very little energy, solar-powered, and communicate with one another through global positioning systems and wireless communications. They’re small enough to reach hard-to-reach places and can clean for weeks at a time. This LA Times article features a Q&A with the director of MIT’s Senseable City Laboratory, who led the researchers on the project.

China Beat US in Offshore Wind, Europe Still Trounces Everyone Else in Solar Power
Two reports have come out recently demonstrating that the United States has some fierce competition in renewable energy. China has built the first major offshore wind farm outside of Europe despite Cape Wind’s progress. Europe itself was responsible for 80 percent of new solar PV systems installed last year, with Germany dominating that market.

Making Energy Awareness Month a Boon for Green Initiatives
A little-known fact: October is Energy Awareness Month. A complement to Earth Day in the spring, it’s the perfect opportunity to encourage employee activities and simple acts to conserve energy (the month’s other goal besides awareness).

Eco-Moms Represent $1.45T in Buying Power
A new category of moms has come into play: “EcoAware Moms.” Representing 69 percent of mothers and numbering 51 million, these moms see eco-friendly choices as the chance to teach important behaviors to their kids and to leave a legacy for future generations. They’re also more likely to believe they have control over how healthy their home is.

Photo Credit: A project by the MIT Senseable City Lab senseable.mit.edu/seaswarm
Photos by Kris Krüg and Andrea Frank
Graphics by Adam Pruden www.adampruden.com

Future Generations Go Green

The American Dream Reborn Through Sustainability

When my father’s grandparents immigrated to America, they had one objective: to give their children, and some day their grandchildren, a better life. They worked hard and sacrificed to instill the desire to make thing better for the next generation, my grandparents.

Maybe you can remember the sacrifices you saw growing up, how past generations saved money and withheld pleasure from themselves in order to make sure the next generations strived.

That generation is long gone and has been replaced with an American culture that is more focused on the here and now. We don’t think as much about the future, particularly one that doesn’t include us. Today, we look out more for our own best interest. Yes, of course, we want our children to have a better life than us, that is, as long as our lives are exceptionally good.

In 1928, Herbert Hoover was elected president based on the promise of prosperity. “A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage” boasted the campaign slogan, and people lined up at voting booths. Think about that for a moment – to our ancestors the thought of owning a car and having a good meal seemed like a dream! Times have changed.

Our society is in debt, and I am not just talking about our financial woes. We are borrowing resources from future generations: their trees, water, air, flora, fauna. And we have no plan or intention to pay it back, leaving the bill and a big mess to our children and their children.

So the question is: How do we deal with environmental issues that will exist beyond our allotted time here on earth, affecting generations that may never even know our names but will remember our water bottles?

Issues like global warming, pollution, loss of biodiversity and an economy based on carbon will have a much larger effect on our ancestors than it ever will on us, and the solutions for those issues will take generations to fix. Weaning ourselves from carbon is not as easy as electric cars and solar panels, carbon-based fuels are used for much more than powering our cars and heating and cooling our homes. Plastic, makeup, diapers, medical equipment, roads, computers, nearly everything you have in your home in some way or another is connected to these products. Our demand continues to grow and the technology to replace oil, coal and natural gas will take time to evolve and take even longer to meet our growing needs.

So what can we do? First, we need to start thinking beyond our own lifetime and the impact that our actions today will have on future generations and take personal responsibility for those actions. It is a seedy picture of those 25 generations from now weeding through mounds of our plastic, living amongst a significantly smaller circle of species, and enduring famine and disease as a result of decisions made by us today.

Second, we need to demand accountability of our government and the companies we support, asking them to create positions and departments that represent the rights of future generations. In addition, our justice department needs to aggressively defend the rights of those inheriting this planet.

Finally, we need to reconnect to our instinct of sacrificing to create a better world for our children.

To our children, our impact will not be taught from history books but seen in the evidence we left on the planet we lived.