Tag Archives: Goodyear

baseball

Goodyear Ballpark named best in Cactus League

After a long, fierce and competitive battle of the spring training ballparks, the results are in and it’s official.

Goodyear Ballpark – the spring training home of Major League Baseball’s Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians, has been voted as best place to see a spring training game in the Cactus League in USA Today’s 10Best Reader’s Choice Travel Poll.

Overall, Goodyear Ballpark – the crown jewel of the city which has been gaining notice on a national level also finished second nationally among Arizona and Florida spring training ballparks in the poll spearheaded by the newspaper’s longtime baseball writers Bob Nightengale and Paul White.

Goodyear Ballpark, which was completed in 2009 and seats 10,311, also recently was named the top “must see” spring training facility by National Public Radio’s Pittsburgh station’s travel reporter Elaine Labalme who traveled to spring training ballparks in both Arizona and Florida.

“This is quite an honor for Goodyear Ballpark,” Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord said of USA Today’s 10Best poll. “We’re proud to be recognized as the No. 1 ballpark in the Cactus League, and thank the fans for voting us there.”

This year marked the first year of the Best Spring Training Facility category in USA Today’s 10Best Reader’s Choice Travel Poll, an annual contest in the largest newspaper in the United States. Readers and fans were allowed to vote once a day for a month – from Feb. 24 to March 24.

Goodyear was edged out by Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte, Fla. – the spring training home of the Tampa Bay Rays. Salt River Fields, the spring training home of the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Colorado Rockies located on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian community, finished third.

“They told us we ran a great campaign,” said Debbie Diveney, business-operations supervisor of Goodyear Ballpark. “We tried to have fun with it – we even had fans voting live with us at the games – beginning with Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord’s urging the fans to vote during our opening weekend festivities on Feb. 28 – right up to the very end. It was a valiant effort on our part. Thanks to all the fans who participated. Wait ‘til next year.”

The Colony, Cush Wake

Estrella Makes List Of Top Master-Planned Communities

The Goodyear master-planned community of Estrella has been ranked 35th by the national independent research firm John Burns Real Estate Consulting (JBREC) on its annual list of Top 50 Master-Planned Communities of 2013. The rankings are based on new home sales and Estrella is one of only four Arizona communities to make the top 50. Estrella was also recently named Best Master-Plan Community for Children in Arizona Foothills Magazine’s Best of the Valley Rankings.

Estrella’s developer, Newland Communities, made a strong showing with five of its communities placing on the nation’s top 50 list – the most of any individual developer. The San Diego-based company’s top ranked communities are located in four different metro areas, making them the most geographically diversified developer in the country.

“We are pleased with the velocity of sales from the past year, and with new builders and product coming online, we expect continued growth for Estrella in 2014,” said Bill Olson, Senior Vice President and Division Manager for Newland Real Estate Group. “The recent accolades are truly a testament of Estrella’s unique amenities, such as its lakes and yacht club, and the tight-knit feel and true sense of community of a small-town. It’s not surprising so many people want to call Estrella home.”

Located only 17 miles west of downtown Phoenix, Estrella is home to more than 12,000 residents ranging from young couples to retirees. The community hosts regular arts and culture events, provides residents with top-notch amenities and its design includes plenty of parks and trails to support a healthy, outdoor lifestyle.

Currently there are three active builders in Estrella: AV Homes, T.W. Lewis by David Weekly Homes and William Ryan Homes. T.W. Lewis by David Weekly Homes has begun preselling in its newest neighborhood and CantaMia, the 55+ Community has nine new models under construction. With several other well-known builders in escrow, Newland is working to increase inventory to meet rising demand. To learn more, visit www.estrella.com.

loan programs - chateau on central 2

Goodyear Mayor co-chairs Luke AFB West Valley Council

The city of Goodyear remains front and center when it comes to being poised and prepared for the arrival of the F-35 Lightning II Fighter Jet pilot training program at Luke Air Force Base in early 2014.

But right now, members of the Luke West Valley Council – the regional group promoting the success of Luke and the economic vitality the F-35s are projected to bring to the region, are moving forward with Goodyear helping to steer more success for the future.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord was nominated and elected to be the incoming Co-Chair of the Luke West Valley Council during its quarterly meeting on Thursday, Dec. 19. Mayor Lord was thrilled to be elected to co-chair the group, along with Luke Air Force Base Brigadier General Michael Rothstein.

Mayor Lord succeeds El Mirage Mayor Lana Mook as co-chair to the council, which has more than 20 members.

“It’s an honor to be nominated and elected by my peers to serve on the group that represents our region,” Mayor Lord said. “Not only is the future of Luke Air Force Base vital to our city, but it is important to the region and state of Arizona and our country. Many people serving in the military or military-related jobs call Goodyear their home, and we’re proud that we were part of the partnership that was able to help secure the F-35 Fighter Jet program at Luke through strong community support.”

In her role as co-chair, Mayor Lord will lead the meetings and discussions in how to further the success of the base as it moves forward with expansion and other programs. Luke expects to see $260 million of construction over the next decade and other support businesses are expected to open with the arrival of the F-35A fighter pilot training program next year.

Luke West Valley formed in the 1980s to garner regional and community support for the importance of Luke’s success in the region. The group is comprised of Luke AFB officials, elected officials from 12 West Valley cities and Maricopa County as well as representatives from the governing bodies of Sun City and Sun City West. The meetings are also often attended by West Valley legislators and outside organizations that support and partner with Luke Air Force Base.

The Air Force has credited the strong community support as a factor that led to Luke Air Force Base being awarded the F-35 Mission by the Department of Defense.

economic development - 8 honored

GPEC honors Valley mayors for contributions

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) last night honored Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny and Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord at its annual dinner, which celebrates GPEC’s successes over the past year and looks ahead to upcoming initiatives. This year’s dinner sold out with an all-time high attendance of approximately 650.

Mayor Tibshraeny was presented GPEC’s Outstanding Regional Contribution award for his exceptional leadership, which has helped increase Greater Phoenix’s economic competitiveness and create a more diversified regional economy. His assistance in the successful recruitment of General Motors, Continuum Nationstar Mortgage and many other organizations has resulted in more than 4,800 jobs for the Chandler area and propelled economic prosperity for the surrounding region.

“Mayor Tibshraeny has expanded the region’s technology sector with his steadfast leadership and business savvy,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “Chandler’s innovative approach to economic development, and the entrepreneurial talent it recruits, is helping to make the Greater Phoenix region this country’s next high-technology hub.”

Mayor Lord received the Distinguished Service Award for her leadership in spearheading GPEC’s official protest against the U.S. International Trade Commission’s (ITC) proposed tariff on Chinese-manufactured photovoltaic panels. While the tariff was ultimately still imposed, Mayor Lord’s eloquently represented both Goodyear and the region on a national stage during a formal hearing at the ITC in Washington. She also expertly led GPEC’s Ambassador Steering Committee for three years, taking it from 130 participants to more than 1,200.

“Mayor Lord’s dedication to her community, its citizens and its employers are second to none,” Broome said. “Her leadership on the solar tariff issue greatly advanced the reputation of both Goodyear and the Greater Phoenix region, particularly abroad. As a result, she’s also shown the world’s businesses and entrepreneurs that the region supports, and advocates for, free trade.”

During the ceremony, GPEC showed videos highlighting each mayor’s successes. Those videos can be viewed at the following links:

Mayor Tibshraeny: https://vimeo.com/76570245
Mayor Lord: https://vimeo.com/76573543

PalmValleyPavillionsEast

CBRE Sells Palm Valley Pavilions East in Goodyear

CBRE has completed the sale of Palm Valley Pavilions East in Goodyear, Ariz. The 35,199 SF retail center commanded a sale price of $4.8M.

Andrew Fosberg, Steve Fernandez and Joseph Compagno of CBRE’s Phoenix office represented the seller, MEI Properties LLC of Buena Park, Calif. The international buyer, Toronto, Ontario-based Claxton Real Estate LP 1, was represented by Tivon Moffitt and Peter Bauman with Colliers International in Phoenix.

We continue to see an influx of Canadian investors in the metro Phoenix market,” said Fosberg. “We are seeing many of these investors shift their strategy from looking to purchase bank owned properties to well-located, stabilized assets, such as Palm Valley Pavilions East.”

Palm Valley Pavilions East is located at the southeast corner of Litchfield Road and McDowell Road and is adjacent to the masterplanned community of Palm Valley. The shopping center is shadow anchored by Target and tenants include Michael’s and Starbucks. The retail center was 100 percent occupied at the time of sale.  

Edgar Staren

CEO Series: Dr. Edgar Staren, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Dr. Edgar Staren is the CEO and President of the Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center in Goodyear, Ariz. Az Business Magazine and Grand Canyon University invited Dr. Staren to speak to an intimate audience of one hundred Arizona business owners and executives at Grand Canyon University on June 27th. In this lecture he shares his first hand experience as a cancer survivor and the importance of empowering the patient to be in control of their treatment. Dr. Staren also speaks to the value of not only technological innovation, but process innovation in health care and other industries.

Banner Good Samaritan

E.V. residents can preview Banner Health Center

East Valley residents and visitors can be among the first to see the new Banner Health Center at a free “Community Preview” from 8 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3, at the center located at 1435 S. Alma Road, south of the Loop 202 between West Pecos and West Germann Roads.

Participants can hear the opening remarks and join in the dedication at 8:30 a.m., followed by a celebration including healthy snacks, giveaways, children’s activities and information about Banner Health facilities and services. Community members are invited to meet the center’s primary care physicians and staff, tour the new center, and even make an appointment to see a physician.

Banner Health Center in Chandler will open for patient care on Wednesday, Aug. 7 starting at 7 a.m. Staff physicians will include two pediatricians, three family medicine physicians and one internal medicine physician with plans to increase in the future. Along with 18 exam rooms, basic imaging and laboratory services are also available on site for added patient convenience.

Banner Health Centers accept most insurance plans. The center will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday with same day and next day appointments available. Concierge staff answers the phones one hour before and one hour after center hours. To schedule an appointment or for more information, call (480) 668-1600.

The center will offer a wide range of services including:
·         Well-child checkups and immunizations
·         Adult physcials
·         Care for chronic conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and asthma
·         Treatment for ear aches, sore throats and infections
·         Sports injury and fracture care
·         Minor skin irritation treatment
·         Cuts and suture removal

The Banner Health Center in Chandler is the third of four in the East Valley to open after a shared groundbreaking on Oct. 25, 2012. Banner Health Center in Queen Creek opened May 1; a center in Gilbert opened May 22 and another will open in East Mesa in early September. An additional Banner Health Center opened in Goodyear within the planned community of Estrella on July 10, joining the existing Banner Health Centers in Peoria/Sun City West, Surprise, Buckeye in the Verrado Community, Maricopa, and South Loveland, CO.

Staying Innovative as a One Man Operation

Goodyear lands ASU business incubator program

When the new branch of the Maricopa County Library system is completed in Goodyear later this year, it could include expanded space for the business leaders of tomorrow to work and brainstorm through a partnership in an incubator program with Arizona State University.

During the Goodyear City Council work session on July 8, Tracy Lea, venture manager at Arizona State University’s SkySong incubator center unveiled its Alexandria Model, a program that will be inside an approximate 1,000-square-foot room in the new Goodyear branch library to serve as an entrepreneur and innovation center for those pursuing business ideas. The Alexandria concept is derived from a centuries-old library purpose dating as far back as 300 B.C. in Alexandria, Egypt, where townspeople came together to discuss issues, solve problems and expand on ideas.

The city council will vote on finalizing the agreement with ASU on the incubator program after it returns from its summer break.

City leaders were excited to see the presentation for the program, which will provide entrepreneurs of all ages the tools, resources and mentors to get on the pathway of development and establish themselves in the community.

“We appreciate SkySong because we know of its successes,” Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord said. “We are so excited about this partnership and look forward to hearing the successes that generate from our local entrepreneurs.”

Having a business “incubator” in Goodyear is one of City Council’s initiatives and the city’s Economic Development Department has been working with SkySong in south Scottsdale to make center a reality in Goodyear.

SkySong’s Tracy Lea said the center also could have a military focus as Luke expects to see $260 million of construction over the next decade.

During the meeting, Lea said, “The Alexandria Concept will create a wonderful pipeline for development. “It’s been extraordinary working with this group of people in this city, and, I believe this is such a rich environment for this to take flight.”

“The West Valley has some amazing growth right now,” Lea added. “Goodyear is creating a terrific growth pattern in and of itself.”

The library, which is budgeted at $1.1 million, will include 9,600-square-feet that will feature a 1,600-square-foot multi-purpose room in addition to the 8,000-square-feet of library space. Design work for the library is on schedule to be completed by the end of July and construction beginning as early as August.

 

F-35-Wallpapers-by-cool-wallpapers-2

Goodyear backs additional F-35 squadron at Luke

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord was among a number of state-wide officials during the Department of Defense’s announcement of three additional squadrons to the Air Force’s F-35A Lightning II fighter jet program at Luke Air Force Base.

Since the DOD’s initial announcement that Luke AFB will be the training center for the F-35s, cities and community groups throughout the West Valley have voiced their support for the military community and Luke’s mission of remaining the premier base for fighter pilot training.

“We are very pleased that Luke Air Force Base will now be home to three additional squadrons of F-35 Fighter Jets.” Goodyear Mayor Lord said. “The support of Goodyear and the surrounding West Valley communities played a huge role in this decision and we will continue to advocate on behalf of Luke and our military families.”

“Not only is this decision good for the security of our nation, but it will also have a huge economic impact on Goodyear, the West Valley and the State of Arizona.” Mayor Lord added.

The first three F-35A squadrons are scheduled to begin arriving at Luke AFB next year. Over the next several years, Luke will operate 170 aircraft; 144 will be the F-35A while 26 F-16s will remain for foreign military training.

Goodyear is among 13 Valley and West Valley municipalities partnering in the Luke Forward campaign that generated awareness of the positive impacts the Air Force’s next generation strike fighter will bring to the state. Through that community support involving tens of thousands of citizens participating in public hearings, the DOD recognized the importance of keeping Luke as the hub for fighter pilot training.

Two brand new training facilities are currently being constructed at Luke in preparation of receiving the F-35A fighter jets. An operations building will open later this year, while the 145,000 square-foot academic center is planned to open in mid to late 2014.

“This is great news for the region,” Goodyear City Manager Brian Dalke said of the DOD’s announcement on Thursday. “We value Luke Air Force Base as a neighbor as well as the economic support the military community currently provides to our city. We welcome the expansion of F-35 program with open arms. Not only will the program be beneficial for the local economy, it will strengthen national security.”

Banner Good Samaritan Hospital

Banner Health Center preview on June 29

West Valley residents can tour the new Banner Health Center in Goodyear from 8 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 29.The Center is designed to support high quality, convenient health care for the entire family.

Attendees will hear remarks by Banner Medical Group CEO Jim Brannon and Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord at 8:30 a.m., followed by a celebration including food, tours, giveaways, children’s activities and information about Banner Health facilities and services. Community members are invited to meet physicians and staff and even make an appointment.

“We want to become part of the fabric of the community by becoming the medical home residents look to for help in keeping their families healthy,” said Jim Brannon, chief executive officer of Banner Medical Group. “This Banner Health Center is designed to provide primary care to the entire family in one space. We want it to be the place you would choose for prevention, wellness, basic and complex medical care and the advice you need to thrive with chronic health conditions.”

At opening on July 10, staff physicians will include family practitioners and pediatricians. Banner Health Centers accept most insurance plans. The Center will be open extended hours from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Same-day appointments will also be available. Laboratory and X-ray services are also on-site.

Banner Health Center in Estrella will also be the gateway to the incredibly comprehensive services offered throughout Banner Health system, including Banner Estrella Medical Center and specialty facilities such as Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Cardon Children’s Medical Center and Banner Concussion Center.

This location at 9780 South Estrella Parkway joins the existing Banner Health Centers offering health care where you want it and how you want it in Gilbert, Queen Creek, Surprise, Verrado and Maricopa, Ariz. as well as South Loveland, Colo. For more information on the Banner Health Center in Estrella, visit www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterEstrella.

Health Insurance

AZ Isotopes bringing jobs to Goodyear

AZ Isotopes has selected the city of Goodyear as the site for a state-of-the-art facility which will improve the diagnosis and treatment of serious diseases. By producing several  medical isotopes that are either not currently available or difficult to obtain in Arizona, the Goodyear facility will support health care by giving physicians and their patients the most modern tools for diagnoses and treatments as well as research towards  improving medical outcomes.

Construction and operation of the facility also will result in high-quality jobs.  Initially, about 50 technical and managerial professionals will be employed.  As demand for the isotopes and the research program expands, additional high-quality positions will be added.  Substantial growth can be expected as industry analysts estimate the projected market for medical isotopes at about $6 billion by the year 2018.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord is highly supportive.  She stated: “We are excited to bring this new high-tech life sciences enterprise to Goodyear, along with highly skilled professionals and high-paying jobs.  Goodyear has everything companies like AZ Isotopes need to operate and grow their businesses.  We are growing and ready to help accommodate companies like AZ Isotopes to provide jobs and expand our work base.”

The Goodyear-based Western Regional Center for The Cancer Treatment Centers of America is also supporting the city’s efforts to help ensure that the new research and production facility is located nearby. It stated: “Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center (Western) in Goodyear applauds the city’s economic development efforts in healthcare initiatives which lower the nation’s reliance on foreign products.”  Edgar D. Staren, MD, PhD, President and CEO of Western added, “We look forward to a readily available local isotope supply that could support our patient needs.”  Additionally, several major universities (including the University of Arizona) have already expressed interest in taking advantage of the facility’s research capabilities.

The Goodyear location will contain the full spectrum of operations necessary for providing the highest quality support for medical care and research.  Included will be manufacturing, engineering, administrative, sales and executive positions.  AZ Isotopes has assembled an internationally-renowned team of top scientists and physicians to begin site preparation and facility design and construction.

The site for the Goodyear plant is a 10-acre tract along Litchfield Road, north of Maricopa 85 and close to the Phoenix-Goodyear airport.  Because delivery time is critical to the users of medical isotopes, the facility’s proximity to the airport is very fortuitous. AZ Isotopes President and COO David Barshis stated, “Goodyear offers an ideal location for our planned operations, and local government has been extremely helpful in the process expected to provide a key competitive advantage over other isotope manufacturers.”

The heart of the facility is a unique, variable-energy medical cyclotron accelerator capable of producing medical diagnostic imaging and therapeutic isotopes which are not currently available, or have limited availability, from other commercial sources in the U.S.  This facility will join other local cyclotrons supporting various related types of medical treatments in the area. Locally, the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic has already announced plans to construct a facility to house a cyclotron designed specifically to be used for fixed-beam proton therapy at its new $130 million cancer center.  And the Phoenix-based Banner Alzheimer’s Institute is currently replacing its smaller cyclotron with a new unit for production of isotopes that enable detailed brain imaging.

Edgar Staren

CEO Series: Dr. Edgar Staren

Dr. Edgar Staren is president and CEO of Cancer Treatment Centers of America — Western Regional Medical Center.

How is being CEO of CTCA different than being CEO of a more traditional company?
I end up having a different ability to empower my stakeholders (employees). We believe in our value, which is we are hopeful, we are empowering, we are responsive, we are ethical, we a re innovative and we are compassionate, and I believe that the empowerment aspect as a CEO means that I’m allowed to encourage my stakeholders to do everything they can to take care of our patients, which are our customers

What qualities do you think an effective CEO has to have in any business?
They need to have leadership, which is manifested by a dedication to personify the mission, vision, values, and the foundation upon which the organization is based. I believe that they need to have absolute integrity. Without that, they are simply not going to be trusted or admired and respected by their stakeholders. Particularly in the healthcare industry, I believe they need to be servant leaders. They need to be out there demonstrating the type of service to the customers that they would want to be demonstrating among all the stakeholders.

What strengths make you an effective CEO at CTCA?
I’ve had a personal tragedy that I believe turned into a professional blessing in that I am a cancer survivor myself. It has allowed me to understand where our patients come from and the things that are of value to them. That has been more educational for me than any of the schooling or mentoring that I had prior to that point.

What is the biggest challenge for the employees at CTCA?
It’s hard to be a CTCA stakeholder. We try and provide mother standard of care. If Mom’s ill, that becomes emotionally tough. We become close to our patients; we care about them dearly; we feel like they are family. And to go to those lengths, to go to those extremes that you go through to be able to take care of a patient like it’s mom, can be hard. On the other side of the coin, it is so gratifying to know that you are making a difference in someone’s life. I feel very privileged to be doing important work, work that I know makes a difference and I’m paid a salary for doing so. What a privilege.

What advice would you give to someone who wants a leadership role in the healthcare industry?
Be true to your mission, vision, and values. Personify those as a leader. Recognize that much of what you do is not in the words that are spoken, but in the actions that you take. I think that reflects that whole philosophy of servant leadership and if you end up being an exemplary servant leader, then you are likely to be successful in the position.

If you weren’t doing what you are doing now, what would you like to be doing?
I can’t imagine doing anything other than what I’m doing right now. I feel privileged.

Solar Power

Suntech closing Goodyear factory

Chinese solar panel maker Suntech Power Holdings Co. is closing its factory in Goodyear in part because of higher production costs.

The broader solar industry has struggled in recent years due to a steep price drop for solar panels. Global demand for panels has languished in Europe and elsewhere, even as manufacturing capacity soared.

Suntech’s solar panel manufacturing plant, which opened in October 2010, had 43 employees. The facility’s peak production was 50 megawatts per year in 2011. This was scaled back to 15 megawatts per year in November.

Suntech said Tuesday that the increased production costs were made worse by import tariffs on solar cells and aluminum frames imposed by the U.S. government and global solar module oversupply.

In November the U.S. International Trade Commission voted to impose unilateral tariffs of 35.97 percent on Suntech solar cells made in China. Suntech said these solar cells are a key component used at its Goodyear factory.

The company also said that the factory’s closing is in line with its restructuring efforts to rationalize production capacity and cut operating expenses by 20 percent this year.

U.S.-traded shares of Suntech fell 7 cents, or 6.1 percent, to $1.08 in midday trading. The stock has traded in a 52-week range of 71 cents to $3.68.

Traffic Congestion, Ways to Reduce in Phoenix, AZ

Public Identifies Transit Priorities for Southwest Valley

The Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG), in partnership with West Valley cities and through extensive input from residents, has completed a transit system study that identifies a local transit plan for the Southwest Valley.

MAG has worked in partnership over the past year with the cities of Phoenix, Avondale, Goodyear, Tolleson, Litchfield Park, the town of Buckeye, Maricopa County, and Valley Metro in developing the plan, which is based on the transportation needs and priorities identified by more than 2,000 Southwest Valley residents. Residents prioritized a local transit system that is accessible, affordable, convenient, and connects to regional transit services.

The short-, mid- and long-term strategies in the plan for local transit services will guide communities in implementing new services as additional revenues become available.

A drop-in open house will be held this week to enable residents to see the plan maps and talk to the project team:

Wednesday, March 20, 2013
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Centerra Mirage Elementary School
15151 W. Centerra Dr. South
Goodyear, AZ

The executive summary of the plan will be posted to the project website March 13th at http://www.azmag.gov/Projects/Project.asp?CMSID=4173. The full plan will be posted shortly thereafter. For more information, please contact Jorge Luna, MAG transit planner, atjluna@azmag.gov or by calling (602) 254-6300.

blog

CTCA hosts Blogger Summit

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) will be hosting its 2013 Blogger Summit on March 22-23 at the organization’s Western Regional Medical Center in Goodyear. The event will span two days, with an agenda of events and speakers that will provide bloggers with valuable information about what’s happening on the forefront of cancer care and treatment.

This year’s theme, Innovation in Cancer Care and Personalized Medicine, will include breakout sessions covering topics such as: precision cancer medicine, natural ways to manage side effects, quality of life and a survivorship discussion with Matthew Zachary – founder and CEO of Stupid Cancer, the largest support network in the United States for young adults facing cancer.

“It has been such a pleasure to partner with CTCA to support young adults affected by cancer,” says Zachary. “The blogger summit is yet another example of how we empower those affected to get busy living every day.”

At the age of 21, Zachary—then a concert pianist and composer—was diagnosed with pediatric brain cancer as a college Senior. Throughout the course of his treatment, Zachary found there weren’t any resources focused on cancer patients/survivors his age as they were all skewed too young or too old for his age group.

In 2007, Matthew founded Stupid Cancer, a nonprofit organization that empowers young adults affected by cancer through innovative and award-winning programs and services. Today, Stupid Cancer not only provides support to young adults facing cancer, but also acts as an expert resource to its vast global following.

Since 1988, CTCA has been helping patients win the fight against cancer using advanced technology with a highly personalized approach. The 2013 CTCA Blogger Summit will present influential cancer and health-related bloggers with information and resources to share with their readers, and allow them to keep their blogs on the cutting-edge of cancer related topics. If you are a blogger interested in attending the summit please email: Laura.Malamud@ctca-hope.com.

Stupid Cancer (formerly the I’m Too Young For This! Cancer Foundation) is a non-profit organization that empowers young adults affected by cancer through innovative and award-winning programs and services. We are the nation’s largest support community for this underserved population and serve as a bullhorn for the young adult cancer movement. Our charter is to ensure that no one goes unaware of the age-appropriate support resources they are entitled to so they can get busy living. For more information, visit http://stupidcancer.org.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor’s Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor's Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

healthcare

Banner Health Center to break ground in Goodyear

Elected and community officials from the City of Goodyear will join leaders from Banner Health on Thursday, Nov. 1 to break ground on a Banner Health Center located at Cotton Lane and Estrella Mountain Parkway.

Joining Banner leaders at Thursday’s ground-breaking will be Goodyear Mayor Georgia Long and Goodyear Director of Economic Development, Harry Paxton. The 18,000-square-foot center will open next summer. The Goodyear center comes on the heels of four similar ground-breaking celebrations Banner Health christened last week in the east Valley.

“We are pleased to be able to expand Banner’s presence in the Valley through this new health center,” said Jim Brannon, Chief Executive Officer for Banner Medical Group. “Through our community health centers we look to provide high-quality, convenient healthcare for the whole family — from young families to mature adults and everyone in between.”

Goodyear’s Banner Health Center will offer primary care including family medicine, internal medicine and pediatrics. In addition, rotating physician specialists are expected to be scheduled onsite to meet patient needs. Basic imaging and laboratory services are available onsite for added patient convenience.

The Banner Health Center in Goodyear will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays.

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GPEC makes case against solar tariffs

In support of the prospering solar industry in the Greater Phoenix metro area, City of Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord testified against proposed tariffs on Chinese-manufactured photovoltaic cells and modules at a hearing of the International Trade Commission in Washington. The City of Goodyear is a member of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and home to the only U.S. manufacturing hub for China-based Suntech, the world’s largest solar manufacturer. Mayor Lord is the only elected official testifying at the hearing.

“Greater Phoenix was one of the hardest hit regions in the nation during the economic downturn, but thanks to the hard work of leaders in our community, we’ve created an industry cluster for renewable companies to create a more diverse and sustainable employer base,” said Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, the region’s premier economic development organization. “Now, we’re home to more than 260 companies within the solar supply chain, 27 manufacturing facilities and more than 9,000 jobs associated with renewable energy companies and utility-scale projects – a significant number when considering that parts of our state are at more than 20 percent unemployment.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that if implemented, these tariffs would have a detrimental effect not only on our existing solar and renewable energy industry but also in our ability to attract further investments in this sector from around the world,” Broome added. “It would send a signal that the U.S. is closed for business when it comes to this flourishing global industry.”

GPEC works closely with companies on their expansion and relocation plans, including a concentrated approach to those making a foreign-direct investment in the United States. In recent years, it championed a renewable energy-specific incentive that has drawn numerous solar companies to Arizona, including Suntech. Additionally, there are another dozen Chinese companies with investments totaling $400 million that have identified the Greater Phoenix region as a potential location for their projects.

GPEC recently filed a formal letter of protest to the U.S. Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission against the tariffs. To view the letters, please visit www.gpec.org/tariff .

“Many of Goodyear’s economic development efforts center on solar or foreign-direct investment. As a small city located in a Foreign Trade Zone, we want more Suntechs – not less,” Mayor Lord said in her testimony. “In Goodyear, a town of just 70,000, Suntech employs more than 100 well-trained professionals and, if market demand continues, has plans to more than double that number.

“I’m worried that the imposition of punitive duties will put both current and future jobs at risk, in addition to those at related companies within the supply chain and the residual effects they could have on the people, schools and welfare of my community,” she added.

The Brattle Group recently reported that a 100 percent tariff would result in estimated job losses between 17,000 and 50,000 in 2014. Clearly, if implemented these tariffs would be detrimental not only to Arizona’s solar industry but also the entire industry nationwide and the U.S. economy as a whole, in addition to substantial job losses.

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CTCA Creates Organic Farm To Help Serve Patients

Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Western Regional Medical Center (WRMC) and McClendon’s Select are partnering up to create the first and largest hospital organic farm in the United States that will provide patients, caregivers, employees and community members in the greater Phoenix area with organic produce grown right in their own backyard.

CTCA is proud to partner with Arizona’s own McClendon’s Select, one of the country’s top organic farm companies, providing a whole new level to its integrative care model. McClendon’s Select has been supplying CTCA with organic produce from their family owned farms since 2009 and now will be managing the 25-acre farm located on WRMC property between Fillmore and the I-10 in Goodyear. Construction started last Friday on what will be an expected six-week process. The first planting will occur in early November and the first harvest is scheduled for December 15, 2012.

CTCA is the first cancer hospital in the country to provide its patients with organic produce grown directly on its own land. Patients will have access to fresh produce that has been picked at its peak nutritional value and can feel good knowing exactly where their food is coming from – in fact, they’ll be able to see it from the main hospital, or when driving in, and can even get involved with the patient and community gardens. “At CTCA one of our goals is to get test results to patients in minutes to hours rather than days or weeks, so it makes sense then that we would do the same thing for the food they eat – it’s fresh, homegrown and delivered from the farm to their fork all in the same day,” says Sharon Day, Director of Nutrition. “We are happy to provide high quality food and nutrition to our patients, caregivers, and employees, taking our quality of care to a whole new level.”

In addition to bringing in fresh, organic produce to CTCA’s culinary department directed by Executive Chef Frank Caputo, the hospital plans to host farmer’s markets, cooking demonstrations and both patient and community gardens open to the public. Any surplus produce will be managed by McClendon’s Select and sold at various farmer’s markets throughout the greater Phoenix area.

“It’s an honor to partner with CTCA in this capacity and my team and I at McClendon’s are excited to see how this will transform culinary services in health care across the country. We think this is a huge step for our industry and the value organic farms can bring to facilities like CTCA,” says Bob McClendon, owner and farmer at McClendon’s Select.

“We’ve always provided our patients with the highest quality of certified organic produce and meats since we opened in 2008. We will now be able to grow our own food onsite and deliver delicious, highly nutritional meals to our patients and employees on the same day we’ve gone out and picked it from the vine or pulled it out of the ground. It’s just incredible,” says Executive Chef Frank Caputo. “Our culinary team is excited to be able to offer this service to our patients and employees.”

CTCA offers a comprehensive and integrative approach to fighting cancer—all under one roof. Its integrative cancer treatment expands the boundaries of conventional care by bringing together traditional tools for fighting cancer, such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy, with supportive therapies, including nutritional support, naturopathic medicine, mind-body medicine, oncology rehabilitation, pain management, and spiritual support. Being able to offer patients home-grown, organic produce that is fresh from the “backyard” is just another way CTCA continues to provide patients with the very best options while fighting cancer.

CantaMia Community Center

CantaMia Community Recognized Nationally

CantaMia, an adult community center in Goodyear, has won two of the nation’s most prestigious awards from the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB).

CantaMia, which literally means “my song”, celebrates the lives of adults who have had surprising career changes late in their lives and after their children have been raised.

The community is a gated 587-acre, boutique-sized development, within the master planned larger community of Estrella.

the CantaMia features 16 different floor plans intended to house various family types: from single family homes with optional guest houses, to “lock and leave” attached homes.

Recipients of the “Best Green Community” award from NAHB, all the homes have solar and green features which make them 60 percent more energy efficient than an average home.

The community has also received the “Best For Sale Community Over 200 Homes” award. The competition, which is sponsored by NAHB’s 50+ Housing Council, is focused on the services providing housing for 50+ adults.

“We are extremely honored to have CantaMia win two significant NAHB awards, being judged against our competitors nationwide. This recognition of our commitment to create something fresh for the Baby Boomers marching toward retirement is very meaningful in this competitive industry,” said Carl Mulac, President of Avatar Properties, Inc., the community builder and developer.

At the center of the CantaMia community is the 30,000 square foot Village Center. There, residents and community members enjoy a wide range of activities and demonstrations, including live healthy cooking sessions, Zumba, Tai Chi, swimming, etc.

Avatar Properties, Inc. is heavily engaged in the land and home development of the community, as it is with other projects across Florida and Arizona. CantaMia is one its two main projects, with the other being the Solivita project near Orlando.

For more information, please visit the community’s website at www.cantamia.com.

Greater Maricopa Foreign Trade Zone - AZ Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

The Greater Maricopa Foreign Trade Zone Opens Up Business Possibilities In The West Valley

At a time when the West Valley could use an economic boost, officials have put the finishing touches on the proposed Greater Maricopa Foreign Trade Zone. Under the administration of WESTMARC, an acronym for Western Maricopa Coalition, this new Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) is seen as a welcome economic development tool that will spawn jobs and millions of dollars in new investment.

Participating cities are Avondale, Buckeye, El Mirage, Gila Bend, Goodyear, Peoria and Surprise. Initially, four sites in three of the cities have applied for FTZ status: two in Goodyear at Interstate 10 and Loop 303, one in Surprise near Bell Road, and one west of Buckeye in an unincorporated area. The Greater Maricopa Foreign Trade Zone is actually a series of trade zones, with each city acting independently but represented by WESTMARC.

Federal approval of WESTMARC’s application of the overall trade zone by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the Department of Homeland Security is expected before the end of the year. Launched in 1934, the federal Foreign Trade Zone program provides for reduced or eliminated federal taxes and fees in connection with imports and exports. For customs purposes, an FTZ is considered outside the United States.

Consultant Curtis Spencer, president of Houston-based IMS Worldwide, says there has been quite a bit of interest in West Valley sites from brokers looking for build-to-suit opportunities, particularly for solar and other manufacturers.

Spencer says developers generally pay the initial fee of about $50,000 to be in the FTZ depending on proposed use. Companies locating in an FTZ also pay an annual fee, but Spencer estimates the savings to a company can range from $300,000 to $1 million a year.

A typical business in an FTZ pays wages 7 percent to 8 percent more than a similar company not involved in exporting and importing, and employs 10 percent to 20 percent more workers, Spencer says.

“Foreign Trade Zone activities now exceed the statistical equivalent of imports and exports carried by truck into and out of Canada and Mexico,” Spencer says. “It’s a significant portion of our economy.”

A company in the West Valley area that decides to seek FTZ status puts in an application that will go through WESTMARC, which holds the federal permit, and on to the federal Foreign Trade Zone board. Zones are not limited to the four that have been selected. Likely candidate businesses for an FTZ range from high-tech manufacturers to distributors.

“It should give a major boost in investment and job creation,” Spencer says. “In the next 10 years we should have added hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of new investment.”

Basically, FTZs speed up the supply chain, reduce importing costs and provide better security, Spencer says.

“It’s faster, cheaper and better,” he adds.

Regarding security, companies that have been certified for FTZ status by federal authorities undergo extreme scrutiny, and therefore are not likely to be dealing with unfriendly countries or terrorist organizations. Concern over the importation of contraband has heightened since the attacks of 9/11.

Harry Paxton, economic development director for the city of Goodyear, says participating cities can use the FTZ as a marketing tool.

“It says that these communities are ready to accept businesses involved in international commerce,” he says.

Goodyear, which was among the first to express an interest in establishing an FTZ three years ago, hopes to fill some existing buildings by offering significant property tax breaks. Personal and real property taxes in an Arizona FTZ are cut by 75 percent.

But the perception that such tax reductions will have a negative impact on a city is incorrect, Paxton says. The assessed valuation of an activated FTZ reduces to 5 percent from 20 percent, but still generates additional revenue when compared to agricultural-use sites that collect $300 per 10 acres. What’s more, Paxton says, the FTZ becomes a catalyst for other development not requiring FTZ tax benefits, resulting in a full tax rate on those businesses.

“It’s a win-win,” he says. “It helps us become more competitive.”

Mitch Rosen, director of office and industrial development for SunCor Development Company, says his company owns 250 acres that will be part of the FTZ.

“The reason we’re interested is that we believe it to be an exceptional tool to stimulate the economic development of the West Valley,” he says. “It’s a good way to stimulate quality employment and it creates a competitive advantage for Arizona and the West Valley. It encourages businesses throughout the country to elect to locate in the West Valley.”

Jack Lunsford, president and CEO of WESTMARC, expects FTZs to spring up throughout the sprawling West Valley as cities become more aware of the benefits.

“We are thrilled,” he says, “to help bring this economic development tool to our West Valley communities that will assist them, especially at a time like this.”

www.imsw.com | www.suncoraz.com | www.ci.goodyear.az.us

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

Two new spring training stadiums

Two New Spring Training Stadiums Set To Debut In The West Valley

With football, hockey, baseball and possibly USA Basketball joining the mix, the West Valley is becoming an active sports mecca for the rest of the Valley. Recent additions to this bustling hub of game activity are new Cactus League training facilities in Glendale and Goodyear that will come online for the 2009 spring training season.

This year, the Cactus League set a record when 1.3 million fans (60 percent from out of state) attended spring training games. The Cactus League’s contribution to the state’s economy is more than $200 million a year.
“Spring training is a big draw and a great experience,” says J.P. de la Montaigne, Cactus League president. “We call it our Super Bowl every year.”

Glendale’s new facility will be the spring training complex for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Chicago White Sox. The state-of-the-art baseball stadium will have seating for 13,000, four major league practice fields, eight minor league practice fields, two practice infields and 118,000 square feet of major and minor league clubhouses for the two teams. Down the road, the 151-acre site will also have residential, restaurant and retail development, a four-star hotel and an 18-hole golf course developed by Rightpath Limited Development Group.

The Arizona Sports & Tourism Authority is funding two-thirds of the complex, and the city of Glendale is contributing one-third of the $90 million project, which is under construction on 111th Avenue west of the Loop 101 between Camelback Road and Glendale Avenue. Stadium construction started in November 2007 and will be finished in time for the 2009 spring training season.

Tom Harrison, construction executive for Mortenson Sports, a division of Mortenson Construction which is building the complex, says planning the facility took longer than anticipated, so they added a night shift in August to keep construction on schedule.

“This is an exciting project and we have the right team to get it accomplished on time,” Harrison says. “I’ve been involved in five other spring training facilities in the Valley, but this is truly the most unique. The Glendale facility will be more than just a place to watch the game.”

Harrison says the Glendale stadium will have a 1,400-foot-long lake as part of the facility. The lake will have an aesthetic function as well as serve as the irrigation source for the lush landscaping that will create a park-like setting at the stadium.

“This is not going to be a standard practice area,” Harrison says. “It’s going to be an aesthetically pleasing setting with benches so fans can enjoy their surroundings.”

Based on a 2006 economic impact study conducted by Economic Research Associates for the city of Glendale, the economic impact of moving the Dodgers and White Sox to Glendale could be as much as $19 million per year for the region.

“The new spring training facility fits well in our sports and entertainment district,” says Jennifer Liewer, senior marketing and communications manager for the city of Glendale. “The Dodgers and White Sox want to make this something that will last and be part of the community, so we know that when they get to Glendale it will become their home as well.”

The Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds will play at the Goodyear Ballpark, which will be located on a 3-acre parcel south of Yuma Road and east of Estrella Parkway. The ballpark will open in March 2009 for spring training for the Indians. The Cincinnati Reds will move their spring training operations to Arizona in 2010.

HOK Sport of Kansas City designed the baseball complex, which will have 8,000 lower-bowl fixed seats, 500 premium seats, 1,400 berm seats, six luxury suites, 3,000 parking spaces, and a state-of-the-art scoreboard and public address system. It will also have two group event areas: an outfield pavilion and bar with berm seating for 400 and a third-floor party deck behind home plate that will hold 150 people. Barton Marlow, a national construction services company out of Michigan, is building the ballpark complex.

The Goodyear Recreational Sports Complex, which will house the Cleveland Indians’ clubhouse/player development facility and two practice fields, is under construction on a 52-acre site east of Estrella Parkway about a half-mile south of the Goodyear Ballpark. It will be completed this month, at which time the Indians will begin using it. The Indians will use the clubhouse and two practice fields year-round. Besides the clubhouse, the Goodyear Recreational Sports Complex has six full-baseball practice fields, two half-baseball practice fields, a 36,000 square foot agility field, six covered practice batting cages and tunnels, three open practice minor league batting tunnels, six pitching mounds for the major league and six for minor league, an observation tower for the major league fields and a scoreboard.

Goodyear citizens approved a bond election in 2004 for $10 million to help build the recreational sports fields, so the city will be able to use the four minor league fields 10 months of the year. Regis Reed, Goodyear’s senior project manager, says the city plans to use the fields for city events, youth programsand high school tournaments since the fields are lighted to high school standards.

Ticket prices at the Goodyear Ballpark will be comparable to other Cactus League facilities, which are $8 for a lawn seat and up to $27 for a club or premium seat.

Nathan Torres, stadium manager for the Goodyear Recreational Sports Complex, says that based on a 2007 Cactus League survey, the economic impact of the Cleveland Indians moving to Arizona in 2009 will be more than $23 million. That number will grow to more than $47 million when the Cincinnati Reds are introduced in 2010.