Tag Archives: Jones Studio

Photo by Mike Mertes, Az Big Media

Maria Salenger – Most Influential Women In Commercial Real Estate

Maria Salenger, AIA
Senior associate, Jones Studio; Co-founder, partner, Colab Studio
Years in the industry: 21

In 2011, architect Maria Salenger and her husband, a fellow architect, were featured in the Wall Street Journal for their unconventional abode hidden in the middle of a 1950s Phoenix neighborhood. Salenger works for Jones Studio, which recently completed the Mariposa Land Port of Entry and the Mesa Community College Performing Arts Center, and is the co-founder of Colab Studio with her husband. The award-winning architect serves the design studios and their clients in visioning sessions, research and project development.

What is the hardest professional or personal challenge you’ve faced and how did you overcome it?
Two weeks with my toddler in the hospital; along with receiving support from family and friends, we planned small pleasures like a picnic in the courtyard to remind us of the outdoors.

What do you consider your greatest professional accomplishment?
Co-chairing the American Institute of Architects National Women’s Leadership Summit in Phoenix. My colleagues and I welcomed extraordinary thinkers and creators from across North America to our city.

What is your most memorable deal or project and why?
Designing the Arizona 911 Memorial at the state capital with my two partners. We were personally thanked by victims’ family members for honoring their loved ones in this way.

What is your favorite part of your job?
Looking for new perspectives from which to solve problems.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up and how did that aspiration affect your career?
Dentist, chef, graphic designer, architect, artist – in that order. I looked for a path with richness and diverse opportunities.

What is one little-known fact about you?
I like building codes!

2015 RED Award logo

RED Awards 2015: Best Redevelopment Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 10th annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2014 and the construction teams involved. RED Award trophies were handed out in 10 project categories, to six brokerage teams and safety, subcontractor, architect, general contractor and developer of the year awards were also presented. AZRE also recognized Sunbelt Holdings President and CEO John Graham with a lifetime achievement award. Click here to view all 2015 RED Awards Winners.

L7C4274Mesa Community College Performing Arts Center

Developer: Maricopa Community Colleges
Contractor: Layton Construction Co., Inc.
Architect: Jones Studio
Size: 48KSF
Location: Mesa
Completed: October 2014

An unused Harkins Theater set the stage for Mesa Community College’s new performing arts center, thanks to the innovative design and execution by Jones Studio and Layton Construction. The project reused about 75 percent of the movie theater to create a 48KSF multifunctional facility from a 26KSF structure. The MCC PAC features a 460-seat multipurpose theater, individual musical practice spaces, classrooms, band practice rooms. The architecture, which most notably uses masonry in refreshing ways, is inspired by the musical structure of songs. The north masonry wall is folded along an ascending diagonal line derived from the opening clarinet glissando of “Rhapsody in Blue” by George Gershwin. The exterior wall was used as a canvas for salvaged movie seat stanchions that will create engaging shadows throughout the day.


AZRE announces 2015 RED Awards finalists

Every February for the last 10 years, AZRE magazine has shone a spotlight on the commercial real estate industry through its annual Real Estate Development (RED) Awards. This year, a record number of projects and brokerage teams were nominated for a chance to be recognized at this year’s RED Awards.

For tickets to this year’s RED Awards, click here.

After lively debate and a few unanimous decisions among this year’s selection committee, AZRE proudly announces the 2015 RED Award finalists are, in alphabetical order:

Congratulations to this year’s contending projects:
Adelante Healthcare Peoria
Banner Estrella New Tower Addition
Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center Phase II Clinic Expansion
Bottled Blonde/Livewire
Broadstone Lincoln
Chandler Regional Medical Center
CityScape Residences
College Avenue Commons
Coyote Center at Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Pecos Campus
CyrusOne, Building 4
General Motors IT Innovation Center
GoDaddy Global Technology Center
Great Hearts Academies, Arete Preparatory Academy
Heritage Marketplace
Lewis Prison Complex Expansion
Liberty Center at Rio Salado
Marketplace at Lincoln & Scottsdale
Mesa Community College Performing Arts Center
Ocotillo Brine Reduction Facility
Phoenix Sky Train Stage 1A
SkySong, The ASU Innovation Center — SkySong 3
Start @ West-MEC, Innovation Center
Sun Devil Marketplace
Sunset Heights Elementary School
Sussex Properties for TLC Label
The Newton
University of Arizona—McKale Center Renovation
University of Arizona—Old Main renovation

And the companies that have been nominated as finalists with the above projects:
ADM Group
Alliance Residential Builders
Alliance Residential Company
Ameris Construction
Arizona Board of Regents
Arizona Department of Administration
AV3 Design
Axis Projects Corporation
Balmer Architectural Group
Banner Health
Butler Design Group
BWS Architects
Cam-8, LLC
Carollo Engineers
Cawley Architects, Inc.
Chasse Building Team
City of Phoenix
Corgan Associates, Inc.
CyrusOne Inc.
Dick & Fritsche Design Group
Dignity Health
DLR Group
DPR Construction
Emc2 Architects Planners, PC
Evening Entertainment Group
Fanning Howey
Fimbres Studio
Follett Higher Education Group
Gannett Fleming, Inc.
Great Hearts Academies
HKS, Inc.
Hunt Construction, an AECOM Company
Iconic Design Studio

Intel Corporation
JE Dunn Construction
John Douglas Architects
Jones Studio
Layton Construction Co., Inc.
Liberty Property Trust
LGE Design Build
Maricopa Community Colleges
Mark IV Capital
McCarthy Building Companies, Inc.
McCarthy Kiewit Joint Venture
MD Heritage LLC
Modus Development
Mortenson Construction
Okland Construction
ORB Architecture, LLC
Orcutt | Winslow
Peoria Unified School District
Plaza Companies
Poster Frost Mirto
RED Development
RJM Construction
RSP Architects
Ryan Companies US, Inc.
Sundt Construction, Inc.
Sussex Properties
The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
Venue Builders
Venue Projects
Wespac Construction Inc.


Brokerage Team Finalists

Pat Feeney, Dan Calihan and Rusty Kennedy
Todd Fogler, Ryan Eustice and Jami Savage-Gray
Tom Adelson, Jim Fijan, Jerry Robert and Corey Hawley

Leroy Breinholt
Trent Rustan
Tyson Breinholt

Cushman & Wakefield
Chris Toci and Chad Littell
Jackie Orcutt, John Grady and Mackenzie Ford
Larry Downey

Mike Haenel, Andy Markham and Will Strong
Robert Buckely, Tracy Cartledge, Steve Lindley

Anthony Lydon and Marc Hertzberg
Bill Honsaker, Anthony Lydon and Marc Hertzberg
Dave Seeger, Karsten Peterson and Mark Gustin
John Bonnell and Brett Abramson
Mark Detmer and Bo Mills
Pat Harlan, Steve Sayre and Kyle Westfall
Pat Williams, Steve Corney, Vicki Robinson and Andrew Medley

Lee & Associates
Craig Coppola and Andrew Cheney

Velocity Retail
Andy Kroot
Darren Pitts and Dave Cheatham

The project and brokerage team winners will be announced at the RED Awards reception on Thursday, Feb. 26, at the Arizona Grand Resort between 6 and 8 p.m. At the event, winners of AZRE’s 2015 developer, general contractor, architect and subcontractor of the year awards will also be announced.

Tickets are now available for the RED Awards. here for more information.

ASU's Arizona Center for Law and Society

ASU law school to break ground next week

The official groundbreaking for Arizona State University’s new $129 million law school building in downtown Phoenix, the Arizona Center for Law and Society, is set for Nov. 13.

The ceremony will take place at the northwest corner of Taylor and First streets starting at 8 a.m. Attending the ceremony will be ASU President Michael M. Crow, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Dean Doug Sylvester. Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Phoenix Councilman Michael Nowakowski also are expected to attend.

“The Arizona Center for Law and Society is another wonderful addition to our growing campus in the heart of Phoenix,” Crow said. “Having the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law in Downtown Phoenix fits perfectly with ASU’s mission of building strong learning and career connections with media, health care, corporate and government organizations for the more than 11,500 students in the downtown campus.”

Construction on the Arizona Center for Law and Society began in July. The new building will be ready for classes by August 2016. The College of Law currently occupies its home of almost 50 years, Armstrong Hall, on the Tempe campus. ASU and the College of Law are committed to ensuring that the Armstrong name will be honored in the new law school.

The Arizona Center for Law and Society is being funded by the city of Phoenix — which is providing land and $12 million — construction bonds through Arizona State University and private donations. ASU Law has set a capital campaign goal of $50 million for construction of the building. The College has raised more than $34 million so far.

“This could not have been possible without the generosity of our alumni and connected legal communities,” Sylvester said. “We are particularly honored that long-time Phoenix attorney Leo Beus and his wife, Annette, recently made a $10 million contribution to the building’s capital campaign. ”

The building is planned to be approximately 280,000 gross square feet with two levels of underground parking. It will have 18 rooms in which classes will be regularly scheduled, including one large lecture hall dedicated to university undergraduate education. Features of the new law school include a high-tech courtroom and an active learning classroom.

“Not only will the new law school have state-of-the-art learning facilities, it also will provide our students with incredible opportunities,” Sylvester said. “The downtown location is near the courts and the city’s legal district, which will prove invaluable to our students in the form of internships, externships and networking.”

The Ross-Blakley Law Library, currently located in a separate building near the law school in Tempe, will be moved to the new building. The library will occupy multiple floors and create the main circulatory structure of the center. The first floor of the building will have retail space consisting of a school bookstore and a café.

The Arizona Center for Law and Society also will include space for two think tanks, multiple centers with cross-disciplinary focus and the new ASU Alumni Law Group, the first teaching law firm associated with a law school.

The lead architects on the project are Ennead Architects and Jones Studio, with DPR Construction as the lead builder.

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”


* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group

Working Internationally - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Working Internationally: Designs on the International Market

AIA Arizona members are bringing their skills to the global stage by working internationally.

From Tucson to Phoenix, the rush and excitement of working internationally has hit Arizona architectural firms. With projects in a range of countries from China to France, AIA Arizona  members are bursting upon the global scene and blazing a trail of innovation and expertise in a once untapped market.

The following firms, with niche expertise and wide reaching diversification, are some of the ones to watch.

Vision at Orcutt|Winslow

Working Internationally - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Vision and high-tech presentation made the difference for architects at Orcutt|Winslow. Though they were able to make initial contact with investors in India, through personal contacts, Vispi Karanjia explains that it was their renderings and video that set them apart from their competitors.

“When proposing this project we went over and above what the client was expecting and that is what gave us the success,”  Karanjia says.

There are two reasons that Karanjia says he believes American companies, specifically Orcutt|Winslow, can be successful in countries such as India.

One is vision and the ability to present that vision expertly. One visit to Orcutt|Winslow’s website will allow you to see that vision in the stunning video that highlights the Sahana Pride at Sion project the firm currently is taking from vision to reality. This high-rise luxury residential building is currently in the works and will meet the needs of India’s growing economy.

The second reason Karanjia gives for success in the international market is the growing need for countries such as India, China and even Brazil.

“As the people are exposed to a rise in disposable income and success they have a increased need and desire for a better lifestyle, better housing and infrastructure,” Karanjia says.

This is where companies such as Orcutt|Winslow can find opportunities. Karanjia explains that though Mumbai has a need for more building, sometimes it is difficult to find architects who are not generalized in India.

“Our company offers expertise and specialization that is sometimes hard to find,”  he says. Which is what opens the door to the International arena.

Building Bridges

For Eddie Jones, principal, at Jones Studio, working internationally is more about getting “a much better perspective of what we all share.”  For his firm and its projects in China and on our own border with Mexico, the opportunity to work internationally is an opportunity to embrace a philosophy of respect for the “dignity of everyone.”

A major border project, the Mariposa Land Port of Entry, is an effort by Jones Studio to build a bridge in international commerce. An area of contention in Arizona and one that has a huge impact on both international relations and homeland security, the Mariposa Land Port of Entry is an international project that poses more challenges than most.

Jones asserts that his studio endeavored to create a welcoming space that minimizes fear and apprehension. In an area that is surrounded by desolation, Jones Studio created a garden of respite.

Jones Studio is committed to creating spaces that people can both live in efficiently and enjoy. The studio’s dedication to opening communication lines across political boundaries is true to a global mindset. Something that is surely needed as the world becomes smaller and communication becomes pivotal to the future of the U.S. economy.

Scientific Expertise

In the arenas of forensic science and laboratory research, the design team at SmithGroup is a leader in architectural innovation.  International governments and universities alike seek the expertise of SmithGroup’s Arizona office to design high quality research labs.

“The international community looks to us as global experts in forensic and medical laboratory design,” explains SmithGroup’s Arizona leader, Mike Medici.

In a stunning effort, SmithGroup designed the largest forensic science facility in the world in Toronto. International governments are beginning to look to emulate the forensic science standards found in the U.S. and SmithGroup is on the cutting edge of such design, poised to take the lead in this growing market.

In addition to the forensic science laboratories, medical facilities and university research labs are at the top of SmithGroup’s international projects list. At Pohang University of Science and Technology in South Korea, the firm is designing a digital research facility and the university’s first science and tech lab for marine biology.

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Read about AIA’s Sharing Success here.


AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

AIA Arizona - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

AIA Arizona: Sharing Success

AIA Arizona members thriving and forging ahead with diverse projects.

Despite tough economic times, there are innovative architectural firms and members of AIA Arizona that are thriving and pushing ahead in a shallow market pool. There are many reasons these firms are doing well, some of which may be surprising.

Open to Risk and Flexibility

One thing most successful firms can agree upon is that being open to taking risks with both design and in diverse markets, is a major key to staying busy in a slow economy. Kim Fernandez of ABA-Architects details that, “you have to be a risk taker and push for the growth of the firm.”

Additionally, Eddie Jones of Jones Studio asserts that his firm’s success comes from being open to new opportunities when they present themselves and successful firms a have a sort of “fearlessness,” in accepting diverse projects. Andrew McCance of Andrew A McCance, Architect took the biggest risk when he went out on his own three years ago.

“I started my company on my own three years ago and I am still here and working,” he says. The risk takers in architecture seem to be those who are leading the way in success during this tough economy.

In addition to taking risks, firms must be flexible with how they approach business. Those who are flexible are often able to maneuver into an optimal and timely position.

Mike Medici of SmithGroup explains that one way his firm is staying successful is by being at the right place in the market at the right time. Fernandez has also found that a need to tap markets her firm  would not have gone to in the past is important. She asserts that firms really need to go for the work and expand their circle.

ABA-Architects in Tucson has ventured to Arizona’s neighbor, New Mexico, to find some success in the Southwest part of that state. The DLR Group is finding flexibility in staffing by being able to utilize its Arizona talent pool to balance with its national offices in a work share agreement.

Tom O’Neil, principal at DLR Group says, “This way we can keep talented people and keep tax-paying employees in Arizona.” This flexibility has proven lucrative for firms proving that flowing with the market can provide success even when that market is flowing a bit slower than the industry would like.


A major driving force in finding new business opportunities is sustainability. With the Architect 2030 initiative, which challenges the building community to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by the year 2030, as a guide, many firms are striving toward green building practices as never before.

“Sustainability is a driving force with government and university projects because they are looking at usable facilities for long stretches of time,” Medici explains. “Thirty or 50 years into the future they want to still be able to utilize their space efficiently.”

SmithGroup’s work with the University of Hawaii at Hilo proves this dedication with a design that integrates harmoniously with the surrounding landscape. Another design firm driven by the 2030 initiative is DLR Group. O’Neil explains that “energy modeling” is paramount in sustainability helping drive new business and cut costs for clients.

Fernandez has also found that federal projects are one of the leading sources for her firm’s project proposals. These projects require builders to use sustainable practices and track those practices clearly. Additionally, Henry Tom with Line and Space tells of how its work with the San Diego National Wildlife Preserve (above) pushes the team to hold to its role as a leader in “resource-conserving design.”

He explains that much of its work puts the firm in contact with environmentalists who are working to preserve those areas and want their architecture to do the same.  The DLR Group’s Arizona office is in the building stages of a “near NetZero” elementary school in Paradise Valley, which is utilizing not only less energy but is striving toward sustainability with rainwater collection initiatives and other innovative strategies.

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011