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Top5-southern-az

Top 5 Accommodations: Southern Arizona (Spring-Summer 2014)

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Get ready to experience Arizona’s spring/summer 2014 Top 5 Accommodations in Southern Arizona! And use Experience AZ to guide you toward a visit that will make you want to come back time after time to keep crossing the must see hot spots off your Top 5 lists.



Top 5 Accommodations: Southern Arizona

Canyon Ranch
8600 E. Rockcliff Rd. Tucson, AZ 85750

(800) 742-9000
Website
Canyon Ranch offers dozens of fitness activities, spa cuisine, wellness consultations in preventive medicine, nutrition, stress management, spiritual awareness, and body and skin care treatments.

Loews Ventana Canyon Resort
7000 N. Resort Dr. Tucson, AZ 85750

(520) 299-2020
Website
Loews features 398 guest rooms, four restaurants and lounges, eight tennis courts, two Tom Fazio-designed golf courses, fitness trails, swimming pools and a full-service spa.

Westward Look Resort
245 E. Ina Rd. Tucson, AZ 85704

(800) 722-2500
Website
Set high in the foothills overlooking Tucson and warmed by an abundance of desert sunshine, Westward Look Resort is a rejuvenating resort environment inspired by the beauty of its pristine natural surroundings.

Miraval Resort & Spa
5000 E. Vía Estancia Miraval Tucson, AZ 85739

(800) 232-3969
Website
The Miraval experience includes fresh locally sourced ingredients to make flavorful food, growth and development activities that make the heart pump, fabulous spa services that ignite the senses and an unrivaled team of wellbeing specialists to help make positive and lasting change in your life.

Radisson Suites Tucson
6555 E. Speedway Blvd. Tucson, AZ 85710

(520) 721-7100
Website
Nestled in an upscale midtown neighborhood, the Radisson Suites Tucson is perfect for travelers who want to explore the rich culture and beautiful scenery of the Southwest. Amenities include a business center, fitness center, wireless Internet and an oversized pool.

sun-fact-southern-az
The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain’s Serenity pool. Photo: Barbara Kraft

Top 5: Southern Arizona Accommodations (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Southern Arizona Accommodations — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Loews Ventana Canyon Resort

7000 N. Resort Dr.,
Tucson, AZ 85750
(520) 299-2020
loewshotels.com
Features 398 guest rooms, four restaurants and lounges, eight tennis courts, two Tom Fazio-designed golf courses, fitness trails, swimming pools and a full-service spa.


The Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain

15000 N. Secret Springs Dr.,
Marana, AZ 85658
(520) 572-3000
ritzcarlton.com
Nestled in the high Sonoran Desert against the Tortolita Mountains, The Ritz-Carlton features a destination spa; world-class hiking; Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf; indoor and outdoor dining, including True American Cuisine at CORE Kitchen and Wine Bar — all within a striking canyon setting.


Canyon Ranch

8600 E. Rockcliff Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85750
(800) 742-9000
canyonranch.com
Dozens of fitness activities, spa cuisine, wellness consultations in preventive medicine, nutrition, stress management, spiritual awareness, and body and skin care treatments.


JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa

3800 W. Starr Pass Blvd.,
Tucson, AZ 85745
(520) 792-3500
jwmarriottstarrpass.com
Rich with culture, history and beauty, this resort is complete with world-class spa facilities, nationally acclaimed golf courses, fine dining and award-winning restaurants, and perfectly designed convention and meeting spaces.


Westward Look Resort

245 E. Ina Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85704
(800) 722-2500
westwardlook.com
Set high in the foothills overlooking Tucson and warmed by an abundance of desert sunshine, Westward Look Resort is a rejuvenating resort environment inspired by the beauty of its pristine natural surroundings.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

Top 5 Southern Arizona Accommodations (Spring-Summer 2012)

Top 5: Southern Arizona Accommodations (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Southern Arizona Accommodations — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Canyon Ranch

8600 E. Rockcliff Rd., Tucson, AZ 85750
800-742-9000
canyonranch.com
Dozens of fitness activities, spa cuisine, wellness consultations in preventive medicine, nutrition, stress management, spiritual awareness, and body and skin care treatments.


JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa

3800 W. Starr Pass Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85745
520-792-3500
jwmarriottstarrpass.com
Rich with culture, history and beauty, this resort is complete with world-class spa facilities, nationally acclaimed golf courses, fine dining and award-winning restaurants, and perfectly designed convention and meeting spaces.


Loews Ventana Canyon Resort

7000 N. Resort Dr., Tucson, AZ 85750
520-299-2020
loewshotels.com
Features 398 guest rooms, four restaurants and lounges, eight tennis courts, two Tom Fazio-designed golf courses, fitness trails, swimming pools and a full-service spa.


Ritz-Carlton, Dove Mountain

15000 N. Secret Springs Dr., Marana, AZ 85658
520-572-3000
ritzcarlton.com
Nestled in the high Sonoran Desert against the Tortolita Mountains, The Ritz-Carlton features a destination spa, world-class hiking, Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf, indoor and outdoor dining including True American Cuisine at CORE Kitchen and Wine Bar, all within a striking canyon setting.


Westward Look Resort

245 E. Ina Rd., Tucson, AZ 85704
800-722-2500
westwardlook.com
Set high in the foothills overlooking Tucson and warmed by an abundance of desert sunshine, Westward Look Resort is a rejuvenating resort environment inspired by the beauty of its pristine natural surroundings.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012

Tucson Resorts - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

World-Class Tucson Resorts Are Diamonds In The Desert

Diamonds in the desert: World-class Tucson resorts offer a wide range of amenities for romance or family fun

By Michael Truelsen and Teresa Truelsen

The Valley of the Sun is peppered with destinations for weekend getaways, but sometimes a drive down the 51, 101 or 202 doesn’t put enough distance between you and your daily grind.

If you want more “away” in your getaway, head south on Interstate 10 to Tucson. The Old Pueblo, with its Southwestern flavor and character, is rich with places to relieve the stress of the work week. Whether your agenda includes romance or family fun, the perfect resort is waiting just down the road.

“The tone will be casual, relaxed, and friendly versus the frenzy of activity you might find in Phoenix,” says Jessica Stephens, director of communications and public relations at the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau.

The Arizona Inn

Tucson Resorts: The Arizona InnFor a real taste of Tucson and its charm, settle in at the Arizona Inn (2200 E. Elm Street,  (520) 325-1541, arizonainn.com). Founded in 1930 by Arizona’s first congresswoman, Isabella Greenway, the Arizona Inn is on the National Register of Historic Places. This unassuming resort is tucked away in a residential area near the University of Arizona campus, which you can explore on a complimentary bicycle.

Relax in a casita-style room with a view of the tranquil central garden, while taking advantage of the Inn’s free WiFi. Finish your day with dinner in the AAA Four Diamond Award-winning dining room. Try the Arizona Inn Getaway package (starting at $499.50), which includes two nights accommodations, a fresh fruit basket and bottle of wine in your room, a three-course dinner for two, and breakfast for two each morning.

Westward Look Resort

In the foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains, the Westward Look Resort (245 E. Ina Road, (800) 722-2500, westwardlook.com) offers another peek into Tucson’s past. The luxurious resort opened in the early 1900s. Its 80 acres are home to three pools, tennis courts, nature trails, stables, a full-service spa and the award-winning GOLD restaurant, where the chef prepares meals with foods grown in the resort’s garden.

Once a month, Westward Look’s Cooking with the Chef program allows visitors to spend a day with executive chef James Wallace, learn about the Chef’s Garden, share a lunch made with the freshest ingredients, and take home recipes from the master. Get in the saddle with the Trail’s End Horseback Riding Package (starting at $480), which includes two guided horseback rides, dinner for two at Lookout Bar & Grill, and a fiesta basket fit for a vaquero with beer, chips and salsa.

Loews Ventana Canyon

Tucson Resorts: Loews Ventana CanyonAt the east end of the Catalina Mountain foothills, Loews Ventana Canyon Resort (7000 N. Resort Dr., (800) 234-5117, loewshotels.com) has been collecting awards for years, including the AAA Four Diamond for 25 consecutive years. This pet-friendly destination will pamper you and your pooch or kitty. With two golf courses, two pools, hiking trails, five places to grab a bite and a full-service spa, there’s plenty to fill a weekend.

Want to really pamper Fluffy? No problem. Ventana Canyon’s Woofie Weekend package offers accommodations for you and your pet, a “Wag Your Tail Delight” meal for your pet that is delivered to your room, a luxury pet mat, a bowl, mat and tags. And the resort waives the $25 pet cleaning fee. Woof!

Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa

Tucson Resorts: Westin La Paloma Resort & SpaIn celebration of its 25th anniversary, the Westin La Paloma Resort & Spa (3800 E. Sunrise Dr., (520) 742-6000, westinlapalomaresort.com) is offering a great deal. This award-winning resort boasts five pools, a 177-foot water slide, a Jack Nicklaus signature golf course, the Red Door Spa, award-winning chef Janos Wilder’s J-Bar, plus great activities for the kids.

Enjoy all this through Dec. 31, with two nights at the resort’s best rate, the third night is $19.86, in honor of the year La Paloma opened. The anniversary deal also includes 25 percent off throughout the resort and spa.

JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort

Hit the links, the spa or both at one of the more recent additions to Tucson’s resort lineup. You won’t see JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort & Spa (3800 W. Starr Pass Blvd., (520) 792-3500, jwmarriottstarrpass.com), until you round the bend. With its emerald Arnold Palmer golf courses, it’s a jewel tucked into the rocky Tucson Mountains on the city’s west side.

The Hashani Spa offers traditional massage and skin care to more exotic Ayurvedic treatments. It’s perfect after a day on the golf course. Bring the kids and make it a family weekend with the Starr Pass Family Fling and Swing Package (starting at $149 per night,), which includes unlimited rounds of golf for up to four people, free meals for kids 12 and younger, plus use of the pools, Lazy River and Monsoon Falls water slide.

Ritz Carlton Dove Mountain

If it’s relaxation and golf you want – although some might say golf is the opposite of relaxation – try the Ritz Carlton Dove Mountain (15000 North Secret Springs Drive, Marana, (520) 572-3000, ritzcarlton.com). In the beautiful Tortolita Mountains northwest of Tucson, Dove Mountain’s courses are highly regarded. It is home of the Accenture Match Play Championship, attracting the likes of Tiger Woods, Geoff Ogilvy and Stewart Cink.

Play 18 holes on the Jack Nicklaus course, enjoy a 50-minute massage or facial, and get breakfast the next day with the Sonoran Golf and Spa Adventure (starting at $589 per night with a two-night minumum). Or go all out on the links with the Unlimited Golf package (starting at $439 for two people per night). That offer provides unlimited golf, use of all golf practice facilities, and unlimited use of a golf cart. Or skip the golf altogether and indulge in two 50-minute massages with the Signature Spa Deal.

Other resorts to consider:

Omni Tucson National Golf Resort and Spa

2727 W. Club Dr.
(520) 297-2271
omnihotels.com

Hilton El Conquistador Golf & Tennis Resort

10000 N. Oracle Rd.
(520) 544-5000
hiltonelconquistador.com

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For more information about these Tucson resorts:

arizonainn.com
westwardlook.com
loewshotels.com
westinlapalomaresort.com
jwmarriottstarrpass.com
ritzcarlton.com
omnihotels.com
hiltonelconquistador.com

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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

The Wigwam, litchfield Park, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona’s Tourism Industry Has A Legacy Going Back More Than 100 Years

As one of the largest economic drivers, tourism has helped to shape Arizona’s culture and lifestyle long before it even became a state in 1912.

The Arizona Office of Tourism won’t be releasing 2010s tourism economic impact numbers until July, but in 2009, more than 35 million visitors spent $16.6 billion in Arizona. In addition, the industry generates an estimated $2.4 billion in local, state and federal tax revenues.

To trace the beginning of this industry’s roots, you must go back to the late 1800s, when the railroad finally crossed Arizona (it crossed Southern Arizona in 1881 and Northern Arizona in 1883). Jim Turner, historian and author of “Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State,” says that during this time, the Fred Harvey Company and Santa Fe Railway began marketing tours of Pueblo Indian villages in New Mexico and the Hopi villages in Arizona. Harvey’s stamp on Arizona is still evident today, most notably at the Grand Canyon with the continued operation of his El Tovar Hotel, wGrand Canyon Hotel, Williams, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011hich opened in 1905.

The Grand Canyon Hotel in Williams was also popular during this time, because for several years it was the closest hotel to the Grand Canyon at 65 miles away. Built in 1891, the hotel is considered the oldest in the state still in operation. It sat vacant for more than 30 years until 2004, when Oscar and Amy Fredrickson bought it and performed extensive renovations following decades of neglect.

“There’s such a niche for this type of business with the historic aspect of Route 66 and the hotel itself,” Fredrickson says.

The tourism market changed drastically in the 1920s. Factories began offering employees two-weeks paid time off, and with the advent of affordable cars and roads crossing the United States, such as Route 66 in 1926, more people began taking cross-country vacations. This was the start of automobile tourism in Arizona, Turner explains, with auto camps and motor hotels popping up every few miles along the entire highway.

Dude ranches also began operating throughout Arizona, especially in Wickenburg, where at the height of dude ranching popularity there were 13, says Julie Brooks, executive director of Wickenburg’s Chamber of Commerce. Today that number is down to four. Some of the closed dude ranches, she says, have reverted back to private family homes, while others have actually taken on the needs of other industries, such as the transition of Slash Bar K Ranch into The Meadows, a treatment center for addiction and trauma.

Among those dude ranches still operating is the Flying E Ranch, a 19,500-acre working ranch that transitioned into a dude ranch in 1946. In its infancy, the ranch had eight guest rooms, but that has now increased to 17 rooms, including two family houses, for a total occupancy of 34. The original guest rooms still contain their original chairs and lamps.

Many of the Flying E Ranch’s guests are repeat customers, says general manager Andrea Taylor, adding that one of the lessons she’s learned over the years is that guests don’t want anything at the ranch to change.

“I find that I can’t pull away from tradition,” she says. “People have grown to love what they have here. It’s like coming home to grandma’s house.”

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix, which first opened in 1929, also has evolved with the ever-changing needs of tourists. Celebrities were often found at the resort. Marilyn Monroe was quoted as referring to the pool there as her favorite, and Irving Berlin wrote his famous “White Christmas” while sitting by the same pool. The resort has had several additions and renovations since then, especially during the 1970s and 1980s. One of the most recent changes came in 2009, when the Arizona Wing was renovated and renamed Ocatilla at Arizona Biltmore. This “hotel within a hotel” offers even more amenities and elite service for those looking for the ultimate in a pampered vacation.

Tourism died down during World War II, Turner says, as everyone was involved in the war effort. But after the war, thanks to savings bonds and the GI Bill, people could afford to travel again. For the next several decades, motor hotels continued to thrive, but the fascination with the Western lifestyle slowly dissipated as destination tourism rose. Picking up in the 1970s and strengthening even today, tourists now seek the ultimate destination vacation experience, especially in areas that promote golf and spas, Turner says.

As the needs and wants of travelers evolved, hotels throughout the state also changed to accommodate them. The Westward Look Resort in Tucson, which was originally built as a family home in 1912, transitioned into a guest ranch in the 1920s, and evolved once again in the 1960s, when it became Tucson’s first resort. Today, in addition to deluxe accommodations and luxurious spa activities, the resort also encourages guests to engage in recreational tourism through its nature programs, which include horseback riding and hiking trails.

A more recent example of the continuing evolution of hotels is The Wigwam in Litchfield Park. The Wigwam’s identity has altered several times during its history. Originally built as an organizational house for Goodyear Tire and Rubber executives in 1918, it became a dude rancThe Wigwam, Litchfield Park, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011h in 1929, and as with The Westward Look Resort, it later added more deluxe amenities including golf and spa activities. The Wigwam just completed a $7 million renovation in January, a process that was necessary to not only stay current with today’s tourists, but also to prepare for the next generation.

“The Wigwam has been here for almost 100 years because it’s always been the type of property that adapted to different generations and different travelers and how those needs are ever changing,” says Frank Ashmore, director of sales and marketing at The Wigwam.

Sedona has always been a popular city for tourists, as well, due to its red mountain scenery. But in the late 1980s, it became even more well known when it was decided that Sedona had more metaphysical spiritual centers than anywhere else in the world, Turner says. Suddenly people were flocking to Sedona to discern this phenomena for themselves. This continues to be a draw for tourists today and many books can be found on the subject.

Business tourism also has had a large impact on Arizona, especially in the Greater Phoenix area. George Munz, general manager at the Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix, says 85 percent of the hotel’s guests are staying in town for business. The needs of business travelers, he says, are different from leisure travelers, especially in terms of speed and efficiency. And business tourism, Munz adds, helps boost leisure tourism as well.

“While (a guest) may come to my hotel for business, they may come back and go to the Royal Palms or Camelback Inn or The Phoenician,” Munz explains.

Even sports have played a part in Arizona’s tourism growth. While MLB spring training camps can be found throughout Greater Phoenix, the impact of sports tourism is probably most apparent in Glendale. After the opening of Westgate City Center, Jobing.com Arena and the University of Phoenix stadium, the number of Glendale’s hotels doubled and its occupancy more than tripled, says Lorraine Pino, tourism manager at the Glendale Convention and Visitors Bureau.

It was thanks in part to this sports surge that Glendale took the steps necessary to change its tourism office into an official CVB.

“Our tourism literally exploded over the past few years and with that we really needed to have that official designation,” Pino says.

Tourism in the entire West Valley will get to reap the benefits of the Glendale CVB, as Pino and her team will now work to promote all 13 cities in the region.

Debbie Johnson, president and CEO of the Arizona Hotel and Lodging Association, says that the efforts of hotels and tourism leaders throughout Arizona has helped mold the state into what it is today and where it will go in the future.

“Arizona wouldn’t be where we are today if we didn’t have the tourism industry we have,” she says. “I really believe (tourism) is what makes Arizona so special.”

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011