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ActiveRx

ActiveRx: Choose How You Age

ActiveRx redefines the way people age by providing strength therapy, a proven system that gives seniors the opportunity to maintain their independence, autonomy and the ability to continue to do the things they love to do.


A couple, both well into their 80s, knew their granddaughter’s wedding was approaching and were worried about being able to attend. With the wedding across the country, traveling had become more difficult for them.

However, by receiving strength training with the ActiveRx team, they would not only surprise themselves in their ability to make it to her wedding, but they would surprise guests as well — on the dance floor.

“As they got to know each other, our therapist started to bring in music and dancing became part of the therapy sessions,” says Bob Berkman, vice president of sales and marketing at ActiveRx. “So the first time they danced wasn’t at the wedding; they have been dancing for weeks in therapy.”

Berkman adds that this story illustrates why ActiveRx is making the effort to put time and care back into healthcare.

Through medically supervised exercise, ActiveRx provides senior physical therapy and rehabilitation in order to enhance function and independent living for seniors and aging adults.

But what makes them unique, according to Berkman, is the relationship building with personalized plans geared toward individual’s specific wants and needs. For instance, the aforementioned couple’s therapist made the wedding their goal to reach and later began to incorporate dancing into the sessions after learning that the couple loved to dance and would enjoy dancing at the wedding.

ActiveRx“Do you think something like that would come up if they just came in and were asked ‘What seems to be the problem today?’ Then passed on?” Berkman asks. “No.

“With our model, you get to know what they really value, what they fear and what’s important to them.”

Older adults now have to power to choose how they age.

Matt Essex, founder and CEO of ActiveRx, says that, yes, one will physiologically decline and lose a lot of strength as one ages — if he or she doesn’t do anything about it. He says the average person will lose 30 percent of his or her strength by the time he or she is 65 and then another 30 percent every decade thereafter.

Essex adds this loss will also cause a major drop in a person’s functionality and mobility, eventually causing seniors to lose their independence, which can also lead to an increase of falls and a decrease in bone density.

Strength therapy can change this.

“Even people well into their 90s can rebuild their strength,” Essex says. “I’ve seen it. This is what changed me 15 years ago; I saw a man that was in his mid-90s and has just about every condition imaginable go from between a wheelchair and a walker to not having to use either of those anymore.”

Essex says part of ActiveRx’s goal is to correct any misconceptions. He says most of his clients are happy to participate in the therapy after receiving the facts, knowing that there is now a place that understands them and their needs.

“I think most seniors think they need to be active but are being told by their doctors andActiveRx even their loved ones that being active means walking more,” Essex says. “They are rarely being told to really crank out some heavy weights so they can maintain their bone density and strength.”

And this doesn’t take as much time as one would think, according to Essex.

“You don’t need to be on a body building routine where you are lifting weights for two hours a day, everyday and eating 12 raw eggs,” Essex says. “You need to make it a priority, but we are only talking about two percent of one’s week. We are talking about two to three hours out the total hours you have in a week.”

Berkman says that ActiveRx is not only for the person who has had an accident or has lost his or her function, but it is also geared toward the person who wants to be proactive and preserve his or her health.

“Ultimately, it’s not just about me here; it’s not just me who’s done this,” Essex says. “It’s everybody here at our company who believes in this and has taken the leap to try to get the word out because we feel it’s so important.”

For more information about ActiveRx, visit activerx.com.

ActiveRx
7331 E. Osborn Dr., #410
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
(480) 443-0409