Tag Archives: american stroke association

stroke

8 Banner Health facilities earn stroke quality awards

The American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Stroke Association (ASA) have recognized eight Banner Health facilities in Arizona with the Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement award. 

These Banner facilities earned the coveted Quality award by meeting certain quality achievement measures and seamlessly implementing crucial programs and procedures such as stroke education, risk-reduction therapies and dysphagia screening:

  • Banner Baywood Medical Center (Mesa)
  • Banner Boswell Medical Center (Sun City)
  • Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center (Sun City West)
  • Banner Desert Medical Center (Mesa)
  • Banner Estrella Medical Center (Phoenix)
  • Banner Thunderbird Medical Center (Glendale)
  • Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix
  • Banner – University Medical Center Tucson

Receiving the highest recognition, Banner Del E. Webb and Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix qualified for recognition on the Target: Stroke Elite Plus Honor Roll. This acknowledgment indicates that the facility’s time to thrombolytic therapy was within 60 minutes in 75 percent or more of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tPA, (the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke) AND door-to-needle time within 45 minutes in 50 percent of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with IV tPA.

Banner Thunderbird, Banner Estrella and Banner Boswell gained qualification for recognition on the Target Stroke: Elite Honor Roll which denotes a facility’s time to thrombolytic therapy to within 60 minutes in 75 percent or more of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with IV tPA.

Banner Desert, Banner Baywood and Banner – University Medical Center Tucson qualify for recognition on the Target: Stroke Honor Roll. These hospitals met quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment to within 60 minutes in 50 percent or more of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with IV tPA.

Although patients benefit from the comprehensive list of guidelines, hospitals implementing the program also see value. Each participating facility in the program has access to clinical tools and resources, professional education opportunities and a competitive advantage in the health care marketplace. Since the program was started in 2003, 1,656 hospitals have entered more than 2 million patient records into the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke database, providing thorough research that is also accessible to all participating institutions.

According to the AHA and ASA, stroke strikes 795,000 Americans a year, leading to more than 137,000 fatalities. This translates into a stroke death every four minutes

Headquartered in Arizona, Banner Health is one of the largest nonprofit health care systems in the country. The system owns and operates 28 acute-care hospitals, Banner Health Network, Banner – University Medicine, Banner Medical Group, long-term care centers, outpatient surgery centers and an array of other services, including family clinics, home care and hospice services, pharmacies and a nursing registry. Banner Health is in seven states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada and Wyoming.

Get With The Guidelines® is the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s hospital-based quality improvement program that provides hospitals with the latest research-based guidelines. Developed with the goal of saving lives and hastening recovery, Get With The Guidelines has touched the lives of more than 5 million patients since 2001. For more information, visit heart.org/quality or heart.org/QualityMap

stroke

HonorHealth hospitals recognized for stroke care

HonorHealth Deer Valley Medical Center, HonorHealth John C. Lincoln Medical Center and HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center have received the Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for the treatment of stroke patients. 

Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality helps hospital teams provide the most up-to-date, research-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. HonorHealth Deer Valley Medical Center, HonorHealth John C. Lincoln Medical Center and HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include aggressive use of medications and risk-reduction therapies aimed at reducing death and disability and improving the lives of stroke patients.        

HonorHealth Deer Valley Medical Center, HonorHealth John C. Lincoln Medical Center and HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center also received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll for meeting stroke quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. People who suffer a stroke who receive the drug within three hours of the onset of symptoms may recover quicker and are less likely to suffer severe disability.

“Our health care providers are dedicated to improving the quality of stroke care,” said Tom Sadvary, CEO, HonorHealth. “Patients can trust that they are receiving the highest quality care based on internationally-respected clinical guidelines.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number four cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States.  On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

stroke

Abrazo hospitals offer free stroke checks

Abrazo Health is offering free StrokeCheck events  in May to raise  awareness about stroke  risk factors, symptoms and treatments.

Stroke is the Number 4 cause of death in the United States, killing nearly 129,000 people a year. Someone in the U.S. has a stroke once every 40 seconds, according to the American Stroke Association.

Abrazo Health is teaming up with the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association to provide community education and health screenings including glucose checks. The schedule is:

• May 6: 7-11 a.m., West Valley Hospital, 13677 W. McDowell Road, Goodyear.

• May 8: 8 a.m. to noon, Paradise Valley Hospital, 3929 E. Bell Road, Phoenix.

• May 12: 8 a.m. to noon, Arizona Heart Hospital, 1930 E. Thomas Road, Phoenix.

• May 15: 8 a.m. to noon, Arrowhead Hospital, 18699 N. 67th Ave., Glendale.

• May 20: 8 a.m. to noon, Maryvale Hospital: 5102 W. Campbell Ave., Phoenix.

• May 22: 8 a.m. to noon, North Peoria Emergency Center, 26900 N. Lake Pleasant Parkway, Peoria.

• May 28: 8 a.m. to noon, Phoenix Baptist Hospital, 2000 W. Bethany Home Road,

StrokeCheck includes blood pressure and heart rate, body mass index, review of family history and risk factor assessment, stroke education and materials and counseling with a licensed medical professional. Participants are requested to bring a list of current medications and recent lab work to the sessions. For the glucose screening, please fast 6-8 hours prior to the test. If you have not fasted, the test cannot be performed.

For more information, go to AbrazoHealth.com/strokecheck. Registration is required. Please call 855-292-WELL (9355).   

Stroke Warning Signs

Warning signs of a stroke include:

F: Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A: Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S: Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Are the words slurred? Can the patient repeat the sentence correctly?

T: Time: Get the affected person to a hospital right away to receive the most effective treatment.

Act fast and call 9-1-1- immediately at any sign of stroke.

stroke

Two Valley Hospitals offer free stroke checks

In honor of Stroke Awareness Month in May,  Mountain Vista Medical Center and Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital are partnering with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association to offer free stroke-risk assessments through the health initiative, StrokeCheck.

Hospitals will provide free screenings that may include blood pressure checks, cholesterol screenings, pulse checks for peripheral artery disease (PAD) and body mass index (BMI) calculations. Additionally, attendees can fill out stroke-risk assessment checklists, enjoy light heart healthy refreshments, and will have the opportunity to speak with medical professionals such as a cardiologist, nutritionist and pharmacist regarding screening results.

Screening events will take place on:

  • May 11, 9 a.m. – Noon at  Mountain Vista Medical Center, 1301 S. Crismon Road, Mesa
  • May 11, 9 a.m. – Noon at Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital, 1500 S. Mill Ave., Tempe

In the U.S., stroke, or “brain attack,” is the fourth leading cause of death and the American Stroke Association estimates, on average, a stroke occurs every 40 seconds.  Fortunately, nearly 80 percent of strokes are preventable with proper education and awareness.

 

Appointments are required and are limited. To make an appointment at Mountain Vista Medical Center call 1-877-924-WELL (9355) and to make an appointment at Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital call 1-877-351-WELL (9355).

To learn more about stroke care services at Mountain Vista Medical Center or Tempe St. Luke’s Hospital, visit www.mvmedicalcenter.com or www.tempestlukeshospital.com.

NM Gold Plus Stroke Award

John C. Lincoln receives stroke award

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital received the Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for the treatment of stroke patients.

Get With The Guidelines Stroke helps hospital teams provide the most up-to-date, research-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include aggressive use of medications and risk-reduction therapies aimed at reducing death and disability and improving the lives of stroke patients.

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital also received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll for meeting stroke quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. People who suffer a stroke who receive the drug within three hours of the onset of symptoms may recover quicker and are less likely to suffer severe disability.

“Our health care providers are dedicated to improving the quality of stroke care,” said Donna Sells, orthopedic/neurosciences service line administrator. “Patients can trust that they are receiving the highest quality care based on internationally-respected clinical guidelines.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number four cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

For more information on stroke, visit JCL.com/stroke.

Arizona Heart Walk - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Heart Walk Encourages Businesses, Individuals To Lead Healthy Lifestyle

Achieving corporate health: American Heart Association’s Arizona Heart Walk encourages businesses, individuals to change the way they think about their health

Richard Schulz, CEO of HealthSouth in Scottsdale and chairman of the American Heart Association’s Arizona Heart Walk, knows a healthy lifestyle doesn’t happen by accident.

It takes work.

And something else.

“You have to make it fun,” Schulz says.

In his chairman duties, Schulz meets with representatives from companies to participate and to secure sponsorships for the Heart Walk.

The Heart Walk is a non-competitive 5K walk/run and 1-mile walk at Tempe Town Lake. The event, in its 20th year, celebrates those who have made lifestyle changes and encourages others to make changes to feel better and to live longer.

It also serves as the Phoenix chapter’s of the American Heart Association’s major fundraiser, spokeswoman Jessica Brown says. The goal this year is to raise $900,000 for research, outreach and education, Brown said.

About 15,000 people are expected to take part in the walk.

Large health-related employers tend to big players in the event, Brown says. For example, Banner Health, which runs 14 hospitals, three research centers and other properties in Arizona, had nearly 1,000 registered Heart Walk participants in 2011. Catholic Healthcare West, which operates three hospitals in the area, had 1,023.

Besides the walk, Schulz encourages companies to make a commitment to making becoming fit companies.

As part of that commitment, HealthSouth, Banner and Catholic Healthcare West have engaged in a program with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association called “My Heart. My Life.” The program is designed to change the way Americans think about their health. It’s about embracing an overall healthier lifestyle to improve cardiovascular health.

This movement is a national rallying cry for change, Brown said, through simple behavior adjustments that help people feel better and live longer. The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association has developed a number of activities under the umbrella of My Heart. My Life. Among them: increased health education, advocacy for better public policy in important health areas such as anti-smoking laws, and helping communities find ways to eat healthier and stay physically active.

“We see examples every day at work,” Schulz says. But other kinds of companies are also climbing on the wellness bandwagon, he says.

One such company is Scottsdale Insurance. A subsidiary of Nationwide Insurance, Scottsdale Insurance specializes in excess and surplus policies as well as specialty insurance.

If you run a fund-raising golf tournament with a car as a prize for hitting a hole-in-one, Scottsdale Insurance will write a policy so that one lucky shot doesn’t submarine your charitable intentions.

Scottsdale Insurance employs about 1,400. Most are in the Valley, but the company has agents across the country.

The parent company encourages community involvement. Pete Harper, vice president of finance and CFO, was drawn to the American Heart Association because some relatives had suffered from cardiovascular problems. The Heart Walk promoted awareness of the need for fitness at the company, which has increased.

“Now, you’ll see groups of walkers at lunchtime,” he says.

Harper said that as the company became more health conscious, he did, too.

“Before, about the only thing I did was play racquetball,” he says.

A healthier workforce is more productive and experiences lower absenteeism, Harper says. Although some of the benefits are difficult to quantify, others are not.

“We’ve seen slower growth in our health care-related costs than other companies,” he says.

And heart health is at the heart of the matter. Heart disease was the No. 1 killer in the U.S. in 2009 (the most recent year that figures are available), the Centers for Disease Control reported. Stroke was No. 4.

“Heart disease is an area we have some control over,” HealthSouth’s Schulz says. “There are some hereditary factors, but there’s a great deal of literature that shows we can reduce risk with lifestyle changes.”

The good news is mortality rates from heart disease started declining around 1950 and have continued to decline, CDC figures show.

The bad news is there are some alarming developments that if they go unchecked would reverse that trend. The American Heart Association reports that about one-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese. Most experts believe childhood obesity increases the risk of heart disease and stroke in adulthood.

The American Heart Association has established a standard of ideal cardiovascular health. Right now, 1 percent of U.S. population meets that standard. Among children 12-19, the percentage is zero.

And many people are kidding themselves about the healthy lifestyle they lead, Brown said. In an American Heart Association survey, 39 percent of Americans questioned thought they were in ideal cardiovascular health.

The American Heart Association set a goal to in improve cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent by 2020 and came up with My Heart. My Life.

The idea is to make simple changes that can make a big difference, such as eating healthier, exercising 30 minutes a day, controlling cholesterol and blood pressure. The organization offers online trackers for walkers and, of course, an application for smart phone users to create walking paths.

Education and awareness are important, but for a company to encourage its employees to pay more attention to cardiovascular fitness, a dose of healthy competition can boost motivation, Schulz says.

“You can have different groups compete and see who can lose the most weight,” Schulz says.

Making wellness enjoyable is key. Sharon Opitz, wellness director at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, says the wellness program at the Catholic Healthcare West facility includes zumba and yoga sessions, a farmer’s market and cooking demonstration classes.

Catholic Healthcare West tries to incorporate spirituality and stress reduction in its wellness programs, says Robert Lichvar, wellness director at Chandler Regional Medical Center and Mercy Gilbert Medical Center.

20th Heart Walk

When: Feb. 25 at 9 a.m. At 10 a.m., the Heart Healthy Festival begins, and features live music, interactive booths and giveaways.
Where: Tempe Beach Park
Cost: Free, though participants qualify for a T-shirt by raising $100
Purpose: Supports the American Heart Association’s research programs and initiatives that promote the prevention, treatment and better patient care in the areas of cardiovascular disease, the leading killer in the United States.
Website: phoenixheartwalk.org
Participants: About 15,000 people participate each year
Fundraising goal for 2012: $900,000
Where does the money go: To fund research, educational programs and community outreach
Who are some of the biggest corporate participants: Banner Health, Catholic Healthcare West, Scottsdale Insurance, HealthSouth

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012