Tag Archives: Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

football

Experts: Central sports commission would boost Arizona

The 2015 Super Bowl kicked off an unprecedented run for the Phoenix metro area as the host of mega-sporting events. But if the Valley is going to continue to lure Super Bowls, NCAA championship football games and Final Fours, leaders in the sports community say the current system needs to be improved.

“We’re playing with a bow and arrow and everybody else is playing with a howitzer,” said Jon Schmieder, founder and CEO of the Huddle Up Group that is based in Phoenix and consults with sports commissions across the country.

The howitzer belongs to cities like Dallas, Houston, New Orleans and Miami that have deep pockets and one central sports commission with full-time staffers.

Phoenix, in conjunction with Glendale, Scottsdale, Tempe and Mesa, won bids for high-profile collegiate and professional events without the benefit of a unified sports commission to spearhead the effort. The successful bids were the results of hard work by dozens of people around the city, none of whom work together under one roof on a regular basis.

Phoenix might be in danger of falling behind other cities if it doesn’t update the system used to organize these events.

‘Herculean task’

In 2016, the College Football Playoff National Championship Game will be played at University of Phoenix Stadium. One year later, the Men’s Final Four rolls into the Valley.

These rotating events complement the annual large-scale sporting events that call the Greater Phoenix area home. For more than 40 years, college football pageantry has descended on the Valley with the Fiesta Bowl and, more recently, the Cactus Bowl. Phoenix International Raceway hosts two NASCAR races every year. The Waste Management Phoenix Open at TPC Scottsdale is arguably the most raucous and fan-friendly tournament on the PGA Tour.

And the city hosted two Super Bowls in seven years.

When the pieces fit together, the picture seems clear: Phoenix has carved out a place among the major host cities of the nation’s biggest sporting events.

The question now becomes: Can the metro area maintain its hot streak?

David Rousseau, president of the Salt River Project and chairman of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, worries the current system of assembling a different committee each time a new event comes to town could hinder future attempts to secure and produce the events.

“That (system), at some point, is going to start to be this frayed, fragmented effort,” he said. “I think there’s some value in just continuing to improve upon and refine that effort and you can only do that if you have that one platform model as opposed to startup efforts every time a new bid opportunity comes by.”

Only one person served on both the 2008 and 2015 Super Bowl host committees. Several members of the 2015 committee have transitioned to the Arizona Organizing Committee that will produce the college football championship game. But the majority of the Super Bowl host committee members have taken other jobs and gone their separate ways.

Each loss means some institutional knowledge gained from valuable experience is siphoned off, but the lack of overall consistency in personnel from committee to committee doesn’t necessarily mean a drop in the quality of the event.

By all accounts, the 2015 Super Bowl was a major success for the Valley. Rousseau hopes the economic impact report being produced by Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business will show numbers that equal or exceed the half-billion dollars of direct-spend money he said was captured around the 2008 game.

“We’ve never been better in terms of customer satisfaction than we are right now but we don’t have a staff to go ahead and go forward and secure that commitment for future bids,” Rousseau said.

Tom Sadler, president of the Arizona Organizing Committee, shined a positive light on the current model but also acknowledged there might be a better way to operate.

“I wouldn’t say it puts us at a disadvantage when we are bidding head to head … because at the end of the day we’ll rise to the occasion,” he said. “Could it be more efficient to have an overarching commission overseeing this so we’re not reinventing the wheel every year? The answer is yes.”

Sadler is a busy man in the landscape of mega-events en route to the Valley. As president and CEO of the Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority, he is the head of the group that oversees the operation of University of Phoenix Stadium. He was also co-bid chair for the Final Four.

“I would like to see an organization that would respond to not just the big three mega events – Super Bowl, college champ, Final Four – but soccer events, entertainment events, to be an agency that’s nimble enough to be on the leading edge of competition with these other cities,” Sadler said.

Cities that perennially host major sporting events in the country are the competition: Miami, Tampa Bay, Atlanta, New Orleans, Houston, Dallas, San Diego, San Francisco and Indianapolis. The New York Super Bowl opened the door for so-calledcold-weather cities to host the game.

Minneapolis was awarded the game in 2018, to be played in a new domed stadium.

Those cities, as well as many others in the rotation for at least one of the big events, have one central sports commission to oversee the recruitment and coordination of events of all sizes. The size and scope of the commission varies from city to city.

Individual committees can be formed on an as-needed basis or the commission itself can double as the host committee, as is the case with the Dallas Sports Commission.

“The sports commission is the local organizing committee (for the 2017 Women’s Final Four),” said Larry Kelly, communications and marketing manager for the Dallas Sports Commission. “It varies event to event but on all the collegiate and amateur events that we bring in, we’re the local organizing committee. And then on the major professional events, depending on the event, there will be a larger committee involved.”

The oldest sports commission in the country is the Indianapolis Sports Corp. Founded in 1979, its website lists close to 30 full-time employees who run departments like business development, finance and events.

Miami’s sports commission is one of the smallest, though the city is obviously a prime destination. The staff is comprised of only two people but the commission’s large board of directors, which includes ESPN college football analyst Desmond Howard, helps bring in all types of events.

“We have a very wide array of board members so that helps bridge a lot of the gaps and helps bring everyone together,” said Miami-Dade Sports Commission Associate Executive Director Mathew Ratner.

Despite the size and duties of a specific commission, the NFL requires each host city to form a new stand-alone committee to oversee the production of a Super Bowl. Even with an all-hands-on-deck mentality, the effort required for success is enormous.

“It is a herculean task put together an effective bid,” Sadler said. “It’s beyond herculean to execute these events when they come out.”

State fund

Two themes run through the discussion when the word “fundraising” comes up among metro-area leaders of the sports community: Arizona could benefit from a state fund for mega-events similar to the one used in Texas. Fundraising on an event-by-event basis is not a sustainable model for the future if Phoenix wants to remain competitive with other markets.

“Our fundraising focus was on largely (the) business community and I think we probably raised on the order of 70 percent of our dollars of the $30 million that it took to host the game from our business community,” Rousseau said.

With three mega-events landing in the Valley in consecutive years, the concern is each host committee must try to raise money from the same small pool of potential donors.

“We just can’t year in and year out count on the support from the private sector,” Sadler said. “I think it’s possible to do it for a few years in the short run, but year after year would be very difficult, and that’s why we need the state’s help.”

Texas has adjusted and amended its model over the years, but the concept has remained the same. If an event hosted in the state can prove a certain level of revenue was generated during its run, the state will reimburse the host committee for a percentage of its operating budget on par with the money earned.

The host committee can then pass some of those savings on to the rights holder of the event to hopefully ensure the event returns in the future and also roll some of the money over to pursue subsequent events.

Said Kelly: “The Texas Major Event Trust Fund program has been a tremendous success story for the city of Dallas and its ability to attract and retain major sporting events and certain citywide conventions to the state of Texas, and to Dallas.”

Texas has $50 million authorized for the fund for the 2015 fiscal year.

While many sports leaders in Phoenix agree a state fund would be beneficial, if not necessary, they also agree the $50 million figure is probably too high for Arizona.

“I frankly think that’s too rich of a model,” Rousseau said.

The exact dollar amount feasible in Arizona is debatable, but attempts to create such a fund have already begun.

In 2014, former state Rep. Tom Forese, R-Gilbert, introduced a bill that would have created a $10 million fund, though he and others were quick to say the fund must be carefully regulated.

“It’s a very competitive environment when you’re chasing opportunities like this, so you want to give the state every competitive advantage and yet you don’t want to be throwing money blindly at anything,” said Forese, now a member of the Arizona Corporation Commission. “So the model that we had was a revolving fund, and it was a fund that could be used in order to provide that competitive edge and then be reimbursed by the proceeds of the event.”

The bill did not make it through the Legislature, but Sadler, who helped promote the bill, hopes to keep the issue alive.

“Given the state’s current economic status, it wasn’t a great time to enter into that conversation, but we’re going to keep it on the front burner and see if we can get something enacted,” he said.

The challenges of raising money in the Valley can be daunting, and proponents of the fund say it would help ease the burden on both the host committees and local businesses.

The Phoenix metro area is home to only four Fortune 500 companies, according to the 2014 list compiled by Fortune magazine. By comparison, Dallas and Minneapolis both have 18 and Atlanta has 16.

Steve Moore, president and CEO of Visit Phoenix, has the unique experience of having worked with the Texas fund during his 14 years at the Houston Convention and Visitors Bureau and 14 years at the San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau. He has overseen Visit Phoenix for 13 years and sees the need for some kind of state fund for events.

“Those states that enjoy mega-event funding have clearly placed us at a disadvantage. It’s no longer just that our good weather is going to bring mega events here. It has to be an organized, consistent, well-funded effort that is a great business model, that is inclusive and aware, and abides by the sunshine (law) of open government.”

Questions without answers

The reason for a central sports commission, which would recruit and coordinate major sporting events in the Valley, seem plentiful. However, the idea is rife with questions.

Alan Young, COO of the Arizona Sports and Entertainment Commission, which primarily organizes youth and amateur events, sees several outstanding issues that would need to be addressed.

“I think the main question to ask is, what do the citizens believe?” he said. “What is the overall concept of this? Is building stadiums a drain on the economic impact of the community or is it a positive, is it a plus? Investing in these events – is it a drain on the citizens, the taxation, or is it a good investment? Is it a good business decision or not?”

Despite numerous questions, Young is in favor of a unified sports commission and a state fund.

“I certainly believe and our commission believes it’s a great business decision to invest in these types of events but getting the Legislature, getting the citizens, to buy into this has always been a difficult task,” he said.

Steve Moore speculated about the uses of a potential state fund for event production.

“Is this (state fund) something you’d use for a national political convention?” he asked. “That’s a partisan event. Would you use that for it? Is there an answer to that? That’s not a sports commission issue, but it’s a mega-event issue.”

Tom Sadler raised the issue of the year-round responsibilities of the prospective commission.

“What does this commission do between bids and between executing these bids?”
Opinions and theories are abundant in the sports community, and the discussion is ongoing. The goal, though, is the same for all.

“When we have these national sporting events … they’re massive economic drivers and so it’s much more than just sports,” said Commissioner Forese. “This is a way to put Arizona’s best foot forward, and also it’s a way to have people come and take a look at Arizona and consider moving here or moving their business here.”

football

Super Bowl generates $2M for local nonprofits

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, in partnership with the National Football League (NFL) Foundation, has distributed more than $2 million to 27 Arizona non-profit organizations.
The broad range of nonprofits was selected to receive funding based on their program’s significant impact on the education, health and wellness of local youth. An estimated 400,000 local kids will be touched by the programs being supported by the Super Bowl XLIX Legacy Grants.
The Host Committee partnered with Thunderbirds Charities, APS Foundation, UnitedHealthcare, Salt River Project (SRP), The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com, 12 News and Season for Sharing to select the recipients.
“Super Bowl XLIX was one of the biggest and best events Arizona has ever hosted, with our region rallying to show the world that Arizona is a vibrant and dynamic place. Supporting local non-profits will insure this event has a positive, long-term impact on the community,” said David Rousseau, Chairman of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.
“Every year, the NFL seeks to improve the surrounding communities of the Super Bowl host city and impact the area in a positive way long after the game has gone,” said Anna Isaacson, NFL Vice President of Social Responsibility.
 
The Legacy Grant recipients are:
 

§  Arizona Foundation for Women will implement the Raising Arizona’s Boys into Men program for coaches and male student-athletes, ages 13-23, in schools located in urban and rural areas of Arizona, including Native American populations.

§  Arizona Science Center (in partnership with The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com, 12 News and Season for Sharing) will support two projects including a state-of-the-art inflatable and portable planetarium and related programs; and the implementation of Focused Field Trips – one of ASC’s signature student/teacher engagement programs that provides free field trip experiences, teacher workshops and classroom materials for Title I, K-8 schools in Arizona.

§  Assistance League of Phoenix distributed a new pair of athletic shoes to more than 5,000 youth in need through the Operation School Bell Program.

§  ASU Foundation for a New American University funds will support a forum and workshop for up to 100 adults who work with local student athletes from middle school through college. The program will focus on the importance of teaching ethics, values and leadership, as well as techniques to effectively achieve this goal.

§  ASU Preparatory Academy received a newly refurbished athletic field and scoreboard to benefit K-12 students and the local community.

§  Balsz Elementary School District & Boys and Girls Club of Metro Phoenix (in partnership with Thunderbirds Charities) will purchase and install of a high quality, ADA-compliant play structure, shade cover, security fence and security cameras for the school’s playground in addition to building a new gym for the Boys & Girls Club of Metro Phoenix.

§  Barrow Neurological Institute funding supports two projects including the placement of certified athletic trainers at several thousand Arizona Interscholastic Association tournament events, ensuring the safety of more than 100,000 high school student-athletes; and direct services for victims of domestic violence.

§  Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale funding supports the L.E.A.N. (Lifestyle, Education, Activity and Nutrition) Program at the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale serving youth through organized sports, diabetes education and nutrition programming.

§  Challenger Learning Center of Arizona (in partnership with APS Foundation) will purchase software systems for two state-of-the-art mission scenarios with advanced technological capability, providing a critical component in its two-year overall simulator upgrade project. Additional upgrades include interactive labs, electrical work, labor, supplies and teacher training materials.

§  City of Phoenix FitPHX will support physical activity and nutrition education for children, ages 10-14, at Phoenix libraries and parks in several underserved neighborhoods. ASU interns studying health will teach nutrition curriculum and lead physical activities.

§  City of Tempe funding will help the construction of a fitness path in Tempe’s Escalante Park.

§  Crisis Nursery funding will support the refurbishment of playgrounds at Crisis Nursery, which serves vulnerable children and families throughout the Valley.

§  The Ecological Restoration Institute and Northern Arizona University (in partnership with SRP) will use the donation to support the protection of water supplies and restoration of forest health in Arizona.

§  Elevate Phoenix funds will support education programs that provide 4,000 mentor hours to teach, tutor and transport students at five Title I elementary and high schools.

§  Esperanca, Inc. will implement the “Health with a Latin Flavor” program for youngsters, 8-14 years old, focusing on lessons about nutrition, physical activity and making healthy snacks.

§  First Things First Foundation funding will support former NFL player Kurt Warner’s foundation, which is dedicated to impacting lives by encouraging everyone that all things are possible when people put “first things first.”

§  Florence Crittenton of Arizona will support young women in need through college preparatory courses, a Student Success Liaison, sports programs and transportation to sporting events, educational outings and tours of local colleges and universities.

§  The Larry Fitzgerald First Down Fund will support kids and their families in crisis, as well as health-related organizations that work with families.

§  Phoenix Indian Center will implement Forward Promise: A Community Partnership that Empowers American Indian Young Men. This unique education module focuses on physical fitness and health, grounded by teaching about traditional American Indian games and sports.

§  Phoenix Public Library (in partnership with The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com, 12 News and Season for Sharing) will use the donation to support a summer reading program to combat low literacy rates and provide community-based early literacy programming in high need areas of the city.

§  Playworks Arizona (in partnership with UnitedHealthcare) will provide a full-time coach in 18 Title I elementary schools, engaging more than 13,500 youth in daily physical activity at recess and throughout the day.

§  Positive Coaching Alliance will use funds to support a two-year Legacy of Positivity program for the Phoenix Union High School District aimed to transform the youth sports culture for the 16-school district. It includes 100 live, interactive character education workshops.

§  Read On Arizona provides a literacy program that will allow every preschool to 3rd grade student at 40 high-need elementary schools to have access to a digital library for an entire school year. Volunteers also will place books and bookshelves in early childcare sites across the Valley.

§  Rodel Foundation of Arizona (in partnership with APS Foundation) will create interactive electronic versions of approximately 1,500 mathematical problems across six grade levels of materials. Teachers who utilize the materials will have the flexibility to order lessons in multiple formats to maximize opportunities for interactivity.

§  Special Olympics Arizona funding will support healthy lifestyle programming through the purchase and distribution of sports equipment, health screening materials and Healthy LEAP educational manuals, which include Healthy Weight and Obesity, Sports Nutrition and Hydration, Exercise and Injury Prevention, Personal Hygiene and Prevention of Tobacco and Alcohol Use.

§  St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance (in partnership with The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com, 12 News and Season for Sharing) will procure and distribute 700,000 pounds of nutritious food, which will provide more than 58,333 meals for hungry children each month.

§  UMOM New Day Centers (in partnership with The Arizona Republic, azcentral.com, 12 News and Season for Sharing) will provide case management, food, medical care and other services to help homeless families residing in its Emergency and Extended Shelter overcome their barriers to attaining and maintaining housing.

super

Super Bowl fans get ‘Grand Canyon Experience’

image009The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced The Grand Canyon Experience Presented by NB|AZ, a super-sized, one-of-a-kind rock wall climbing experience for revelers who will visit Verizon Super Bowl Central in Downtown Phoenix, the week leading up to Super Bowl XLIX.

The interactive experience, set to open January 28th, will be the largest attraction inside Verizon Super Bowl Central and will feature 20 climbing positions and a breathtaking 18-ft. waterfall flowing down the center of the attraction, much like the Colorado River runs through the Grand Canyon. It will measure 30 feet tall by 100 feet wide, and will feature an 18-ft. video screen at the summit.

“Arizona is the Grand Canyon State and there is no better way to pay tribute to Arizona’s unique warmth, natural beauty and plentiful resources than to recreate a piece of our iconic natural wonder in the heart of Verizon Super Bowl Central for all our fans to enjoy. We are thankful to our partner, National Bank of Arizona, for their support in bringing this true Arizona experience to life,” said Jay Parry, president and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

The monument, designed to resemble the Grand Canyon and its unique formations, is being constructed with authentic rock texture to emulate the canyon’s terrain. Twenty climbers can ascend the wall at one time with climbing difficulty ranging from kid-friendly to professional.

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee commissioned Rockwerx, a leading builder of commercial and recreational climbing walls, to construct the monument. Due to its distinctive attributes, it had to be manufactured and built from scratch.

“As Arizona’s largest community bank, National Bank of Arizona is proud to bring The Grand Canyon Experience to everyone visiting our great state during Super Bowl XLIX,” said Keith Maio, president and CEO of NB|AZ.

The Grand Canyon Experience Presented by NB|AZ will be located on the corner of 1st St. and Jefferson. Fans, ages six and up, are invited to take on The Grand Canyon Experience Presented by NB|AZ starting on Wednesday, January 28th at 2 p.m. Tickets will be $5 and available to purchase at www.azsuperbowl.com in advance to secure an appointment to climb. Tickets also will be available onsite at Verizon Super Bowl Central. All proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Legacy Grant Foundation. Funds are distributed to non-profit organizations in Arizona.

For information about Super Bowl XLIX happenings, visit www.azsuperbowl.com or follow @azsuperbowl or @azsuperbowl_es on Twitter, #SBcentral, #sb49, and www.facebook.com/azsuperbowl or www.facebook/azsuperbowles.

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Jay Parry. Photo by Shavon Rose, AZ Big Media

Super Bowl’s impact on economy may last long after game

Early in the planning process for the 2015 Super Bowl, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee CEO Jay Parry was giving a presentation to Greater Phoenix Leadership and she referred to some of national perceptions of Arizona as “misperceptions.”

“An individual walked up to me after the presentation and said, ‘You did a great job, but just one point of clarification,’” Parry recounts. “‘Those are not misperceptions, those are reality.’ That was a good point. Some of those things are real, but there are so many positives about Arizona that offset the negatives.”

Parry, who was an executive with both the Phoenix Suns and WNBA champion Mercury before taking her role with Super Bowl committee, says that when the eyes of the world turn to Arizona for the Super Bowl on February 1, it will be the perfect time to showcase the progressive and innovative nature of Arizona. Az Business caught up with Parry near the future home of Super Bowl Central to talk strategy before the big game.

What has been your biggest challenge as CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee?
There is so much positive excitement about Arizona hosting the Super Bowl. People want to be supportive and they want it to be a big success for Arizona, so everyone wants to be involved. Channeling all that interest and excitement and figuring out a way to put it to the best use to make the event amazing has been a challenge.

Why do you think this Super Bowl is generating so much more buzz locally than when Arizona last hosted the game in 2008?
We’ve really worked to build that buzz. We got the bid in 2011 and started working on all the community events and buildup in 2012. We know that to make this a big success for Arizona and have the positive impact that we want, it takes getting the whole community involved and excited. We have a volunteer board of directors of 20 Arizona leaders and they’ve been instrumental in creating meetings and introductions to corporate leaders here. Trying to make all those stakeholders a part of the process has been our goal and it’s gotten everyone excited about the event.

How does being CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee differ from running a professional sports team?
There are a lot of similarities. But what I’ve learned is that there is nothing as big as the Super Bowl. It goes way beyond football. I attended the Super Bowl when Arizona hosted it in 1996 and in 2008, but when I got off the plane for the Super Bowl in 2013 in New Orleans, I said to myself, “This is so much bigger than I remember it being.” What I’ve realized is that there is a different dynamic from year to year. While some of the things stay the same, each host community brings its own stamp of personality to the event. Arizona’s hospitality industry is tailor made to host mega events and Arizona has become such an expert at it that we have a nice platform to work from. It just gets bigger and bigger.

How has adding the Pro Bowl to the mix impacted the planning process for the Super Bowl?
What we’ve been able to do is take the infrastructure and the planning for the Super Bowl and back it up a week. There is so much overlap with parking and transportation and aviation and volunteers, that it really made sense to have it span the whole week. Hosting the Pro Bowl is just another amazing coup for our state and a feather in our cap. When you take the perfect trifecta of the Pro Bowl, Waste Management Phoenix Open and the Super Bowl, all eyes from around the world will be on Arizona.

How has the Valley’s ability to host a Super Bowl changed since we last hosted the game in 2008?
Getting a Super Bowl is such a competitive process. For us to be selected to host again after seven short years is a testament to Arizona. The investment in the infrastructure in downtown Phoenix — from the light rail to the remodeled Convention Center to the extra restaurants that have been added to CityScape to the 3,000 hotel rooms in downtown Phoenix — is really what’s different for 2015. When we hosted the NFL in 2013, we walked through downtown Phoenix and ended up at the Hotel Palomar Phoenix on the pool deck. We looked out over Phoenix and the head of events turned to me and said, “This is a completely different place than it was in 2008.” That was a major win for us because they realized how much was done, and not just in Phoenix, but in Mesa and Tempe and Scottsdale and all the neighboring communities.

How will your efforts to make the 2015 Super Bowl a regional experience impact the visitor?
We want to make sure the entire Valley and the state gets to show its unique personality. Each of our communities is unique. From a visitor’s standpoint, the big difference will be Super Bowl Central, which will be located in downtown Phoenix. What the NFL learned from Indianapolis three years ago was the idea of a fan campus, where it’s the epicenter of activity. It has a lot of merit for visitors and they really enjoyed that, so the NFL built on that and we adopted that idea and created Super Bowl Central, which will be the biggest thing that Arizona has ever seen with its 12-block campus. Fans can migrate there and experience free family-friendly fun for the week leading up to the game, and then also have spokes throughout the Valley where they can enjoy other activities.

How do you think that super week — the Pro Bowl, Phoenix Open and Super Bowl — will impact Arizona’s tourism industry?
The sum total will be bigger than anything we’ve seen in Arizona before. The economic impact for the Super Bowl alone is estimated at more than $500 million. The Thunderbirds have measured the economic impact of the Waste Management Phoenix Open at more than $200 million. You add in the Pro Bowl on top of that and we don’t have a best guess yet, but you’re talking almost three-quarters of a billion dollars in economic impact for just that week. But what I get most excited about is the seeds that we are planting that week with all the exposure, all the media, all the visitors. It’s an enormous commercial for Arizona.

How do you hope business leaders and economic development leaders take advantage of Arizona’s role as host of the 2015 Super Bowl?
There is a lot of intention around capturing and growing that economic impact. We have a couple programs that the host committee leads. One is our CEO Forum, where we invite CEOs from outside of Arizona to come to Arizona for the weekend of the Super Bowl. We’ve created a three-day curriculum for them to meet local CEOs, learn why we are a pro-business environment and give the reason to relocate their business or expand their business in Arizona. We hope that builds more of an emotional connection with Arizona so they have real reasons and proof points why Arizona is different. The focus on economic development has been spearheaded by (Arizona Cardinals President) Michael Bidwill and (Salt River Project President) David Rousseau. Both of them have long standing commitments and have demonstrated ongoing business leadership in various local forums and organizations to build the Arizona business community.  So capitalizing on this with Super Bowl XLIX was a natural extension.”

What accomplishment as CEO of the Super Bowl Host Committee gives you the most pride?
We want it to be the best Super Bowl yet. By doing that, it will keep us in that regular rotation for hosting future Super Bowls and mega events, which is a lasting legacy from an economic development standpoint. Introducing the world to Arizona and demonstrating what our brand really is — progressive, youthful, energetic, committed to business — and telling that story on behalf of Arizona and creating a positive brand image would be a fantastic legacy for all of us.

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Super Bowl helps Arizona stay green

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and the NFL are teaming with Verizon to collect and safely recycle electronic waste in the Phoenix area.  The recycling event is open to the public and gives local residents an opportunity to actively participate in the “greening” of their community as part of Super Bowl.

The collection takes place on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 from 7:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Desert Ridge Market Place in North Phoenix behind the AMC Theater Building. All electronic items turned in for recycling will be handled by SMS, an e-Steward Certified recycler, that will dispose of the items in an environmentally responsible manner and keep items out of the local landfills.

Recyclable items include laptop and desktop computers; CRT (cathode ray tube) and LCD (liquid crystal display) monitors and televisions; computer cables, mice and keyboards; gaming consoles; telephones and answering machines; stereo and audio equipment; paper shredders; alarm clocks; printers; cameras; conferencing equipment; remote controls; earphones; small electronic appliances (such as coffee makers, toasters, toaster ovens and can openers); microwave ovens; vacuum cleaners; and electronic toys without batteries. Hard drives will not be wiped, and all batteries should be removed prior to turning in any items.

“The Super Bowl is a monumental one-day event. As a Host Committee it’s our mantra to leave a lasting legacy in our communities that extends beyond Feb. 1, 2015,” said Jay Parry, president and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “Beginning with the Host Committee’s first tree planting in April 2014, we’ve worked with all our community partners and the NFL to identify ways including solid waste collection, food recovery, material repurposing and a sports equipment and book donation drive that will leave a positive ‘green legacy’ in our backyard.”

“The NFL has spent more than two decades addressing the environmental impact of Super Bowl events and activities,” according to NFL Environmental Program Director Jack Groh. “This project with Verizon and the Host Committee lets everyone share in the greening of Super Bowl in their own community. Keeping e-waste out of local landfills is a way for all of us to do something positive.”

James Gowen, Chief Sustainability Officer at Verizon, said, “New electronics are very popular gifts each holiday season, but we all need to know where and how we are discarding our old devices. As more phones and tablets enter the marketplace, Verizon remains committed to collecting used models, helping to curb the rise in electronic waste.”

Verizon has collected 1.8 million pounds of e-waste at similar events since the launch of its recycling rally program in 2009. Verizon, together with SHI, ensures accredited and certified recycling vendors such as SMS in Phoenix, are selected for the events.

In addition to recycling e-waste, Verizon will collect no-longer-used cell phones, batteries, chargers, accessories and tablets as part of its Hopeline® from Verizon program, which provides support for non-profit domestic violence organizations and agencies nationwide. Since its launch in 2001, Verizon has donated more than 180,000 phones to victims and survivors and awarded millions of dollars in cash grants to support domestic violence prevention and awareness initiatives.

 

Jay Parry, president and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

Host committee unveils Verizon Super Bowl Central

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee formally announced today that Verizon will be the ‘Official Wireless Service and Solutions Provider’ of the Host Committee, as well as the title sponsor of Verizon Super Bowl Central. The Host Committee also unveiled the official Verizon Super Bowl Central logo, which will be seen prominently by the estimated one million attendees who will enjoy all the Super Bowl XLIX festivities in Downtown Phoenix.

Verizon is a major sponsor of the National Football League and Super Bowl. Now, it extends that relationship to the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

Verizon Super Bowl Central will be the hub of fan, media and sponsor activity, as well as entertainment from January 28 through February 1, 2015 in Downtown Phoenix. Located adjacent to the NFL Experience engineered by GMC and the Super Bowl Media Center presented by Microsoft, the 12-city block, free, pedestrian- and family-friendly, football-themed, outdoor fan campus will be the epicenter of Super Bowl XLIX activities and events.

Verizon Super Bowl Central will feature a multitude of daily activities including free, outdoor performances by national recording artists and local musicians, an autograph stage, nightly fireworks shows, the iconic Super Bowl XLIX Roman Numerals, as well as the Host Committee’s recently unveiled 20 ft. super-sized football and a beer garden. Verizon Super Bowl Central also will be the broadcasting headquarters to both national and local media outlets. Verizon will have a major presence at Verizon Super Bowl Central, so fans can engage with the latest technology, products and services. Fans will learn about NFL Mobile from Verizon from the league’s best players and feel the intensity of the game with cutting edge virtual reality.

“The fan experience is one of the most important parts of Super Bowl week, and together with the Host Committee, we are delighted to make it even better,” said Jay Jaffin, Vice President of Marketing Communications for Verizon Wireless. “Verizon has a long history with both the NFL and Arizona, so this was a natural step to deliver not only great wireless service, but super-fun activities for everyone coming to enjoy the game.”

“Joining forces with a powerhouse like Verizon will enhance the fan experience and keep them connected while at Verizon Super Bowl Central,” said Jay Parry, President and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “This is just the beginning of many more exciting announcements to come to make this a very fan-centric Super Bowl.”

In addition to being the title sponsor of Verizon Super Bowl Central, Verizon’s sponsorship includes participation in the Host Committee’s CEO Forum to encourage economic development. Verizon is one of Arizona’s largest employers.

From left: SPIKE, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee mascot; Councilman Bill Gates, City of Phoenix; Councilman Michael Nowakowski, City of Phoenix; Jim Hughes, First Solar, Inc. CEO; and David Rousseau, Chairman, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

Super-sized Super Bowl countdown clock unveiled

To build on the growing momentum and anticipation of Super Bowl XLIX the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and First Solar, Inc. unveiled the First Solar Countdown Clock in downtown Phoenix this morning. Over the next 60 days, the technologically advanced clock will provide the countdown to kick-off and keep fans “in the know” about events and activities coming up on the free, 12-city block fan campus known as Super Bowl Central.

The super-sized timepiece stands 13 feet tall, is made of aluminum and steel, and illuminated by more than 200 feet of LED lights. The First Solar Countdown Clock will display updated video content and a countdown to the kickoff of Super Bowl XLIX. It features three, 55 inch ultra-bright LED displays and nine First Solar panels, which were manufactured at the company’s US production facility outside of Toledo, Ohio.

“The First Solar Countdown Clock is the second exciting addition to Super Bowl Central, the epicenter of fan activity in Downtown Phoenix, and made possible by First Solar taking a strong local leadership role,” said Jay Parry, President and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

First Solar is also a partner of the Host Committee’s volunteerprogram. With the support of its employees, it is currently the largest single corporate volunteer group for the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

”Our association with the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee demonstrates First Solar’s commitment to our home town,” said Jim Hughes CEO of First Solar. “Our associates are proudly participating in a variety of volunteer community service programs.”

The First Solar Countdown Clock is located on the northeast corner of Jefferson and 1st Street, which will be the heart of Super Bowl Central. The free, football-themed, pedestrian and family friendly fan campus will feature a multitude of daily activities such as outdoor performances by local musicians and national recording artists, an autograph stage, the iconic Super Bowl XLIX Roman Numerals and a beer garden. It will run from Wednesday, January 28 through Sunday, February 1, 2015.

In November, the Host Committee unveiled the first Super Bowl Central attraction on the corner of Central and Washington. The super-sized football towers more than 20 feet high, measures more than 32 feet around and weighs more than 7,000 pounds. Fans are encouraged to visit both monuments, take selfies, share them on social media using #sb49 and make their own Super Bowl XLIX memories.

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NB|AZ partners with Super Bowl Host Committee

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces a new partnership with National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ). The partnership is a fully integrated program providing Official Sponsor designation, a custom media plan with traditional, digital and social elements, business development assets, as well as Presenting Partner status of the CEO Forum.

The recently announced CEO Forum is designed to directly foster Arizona economic growth, which correlates to the business and community goals of NB|AZ. The program leverages Super Bowl XLIX to host more than 50 business leaders from around the world and introduce them to the pro-business environment to encourage them to move or expand business operations in Arizona for a lasting economic impact.

“NB|AZ has a long tradition of supporting and leading economic development efforts across our state,” said CEO Keith Maio. “This partnership provides us with a platform to do what we do best, bring people together to talk about the great opportunities that exist in Arizona to grow business.”

The CEO Forum is unique to the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and started in 2008, which resulted in more than 1,000 jobs and over $400 million invested in the state.

“There has been tremendous interest and support in the CEO Forum by Arizona-based companies and CEOs. They see the value and recognize that hosting Super Bowl XLIX is about much more than football,” stated David Rousseau, chairman of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “As an Arizona-based company with storied leadership and community support, NB|AZ is a natural fit to support programs that accelerate economic development.”

NB|AZ is also a founding sponsor of the Arizona Leadership Forum. This year, Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals and Host Committee board member, along with Jay Parry, president and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, spoke at the 2014 Arizona Leadership Forum regarding the overall economic impact of hosting Super Bowl XLIX and the 2015 Pro Bowl.

Promoting Smart Growth in Down Economy

Super Bowl Host Committee announces CEO Forum

Today the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee formally announces the CEO Forum, a cornerstone program that will directly foster Arizona economic growth. The CEO Forum will welcome more than fifty (50) business executives from around the world to participate in a premier policy discussion about opportunities and challenges that will shape our future communities and businesses. The program will take place the weekend of Super Bowl XLIX in Phoenix and highlight the unique opportunities and positive business climate in Arizona.

“We want to introduce corporate decision-makers to Arizona and show them what our state has to offer. Arizona is pro-business and there’s a great workforce here. Our goal is simple, to encourage participants to move or integrate business operations to Arizona,” said David Rousseau chairman of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “We want to plant the seeds during Super Bowl XLIX and see Arizona business grow in the future.”

Super Bowl XLIX will serve as a tremendous catalyst to boost the Arizona business environment. The game and surrounding events and activities are expected to draw more than 100,000 visitors, which will ideally foster future business relocations and expansions in Arizona as well as continuing strong tourism.

The Arizona Commerce Authority is leading Arizona’s various economic development organizations in a collaborative effort to identify a diverse group of companies to participate in the CEO Forum, from Fortune 500 corporations to emerging, high-growth businesses. The Host Committee has engaged with several presenting sponsors that are heavily invested in supporting Arizona growth to create a world-class program that capitalizes on the interest and prominence of the Super Bowl, including Apollo Education Group, First Solar, Inc. and National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ).

A pillar of the CEO Forum will be the CEO Leadership Huddle, a multi-panel policy forum being conducted in partnership with The McCain Institute for International Leadership. The panels will focus on a range of topics with the common theme of global leadership and will be highlighted by discussions between prominent business leaders, international politicians and philanthropic visionaries. In addition, the CEO Forum will include many opportunities for attending CEOs to engage with Host Committee sponsors, Arizona’s business leaders, elected officials and other advocates. Additional program and panel details will be announced in January 2015.

The CEO Forum is unique to the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and was started in 2008 with Super Bowl XLII. The program brought more than 20 CEOs to Arizona for Super Bowl weekend and resulted in more than 1,000 jobs and over $400 million invested in the state.

One of the participants in the 2008 CEO Forum was Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, who led a sizeable business investment in Arizona after participating in the program. Dr. Soon-Shiong recently joined the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Board of Directors and continues to be an advocate for investment in Arizona. He also will play a key role in the CEO Forum curriculum.

Giant Host Committee Visit Phoenix Football Unveiled in Downtown Phoenix

Cornerstone of Super Bowl Central unveiled

Giant Football Unveiled Mayor Greg Stanton SpeaksWith 83 days until the kick-off of Super Bowl XLIX, the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and Visit Phoenix today are unveiling a super-sized football mounted in Downtown Phoenix, which will serve as the cornerstone for Super Bowl Central. Towering more than 20 feet high, it measures more than 32 feet around, and weighs in excess of 7,000 pounds.

“This massive installation for Super Bowl XLIX stands for the fun and lasting memories in store for fans, and for the heightened profile and lasting benefits for Arizona as we welcome our third Super Bowl in 19 years,” said Jay Parry, President and CEO of the Arizona Super bowl Host Committee.

Located at the northwest corner of Washington Street and Central Avenue, the enormous football made of 7,000 pounds of steel, as well as wood and foam, is 2,000 percent larger than a regulation football.

“Super Bowl Central is a postcard from downtown Phoenix to the world,” said Win Holden, chair of Visit Phoenix. “This super-sized football not only marks the epicenter of downtown Phoenix’s fan experience, but it’s destined to star in scores of selfies and social-media posts.”

Fans are invited to take their photos in front of the newly installed giant football and share them on social media using #SB49.

Super Bowl Central will be a free, family-friendly, football-themed fan campus featuring street-level merchants and restaurants, local food trucks, beer and wine gardens, a concert stage, network broadcast stages and a nightly fireworks show. The 12-block area in downtown Phoenix will be the hub of fan activities for Super Bowl XLIX from Wednesday, January 28 through Sunday, February 1, 2015.

urias

Super Bowl Committee aims to reach Hispanics

Urias Communications, a full service multicultural advertising and public relations agency was named Hispanic agency of record for the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. Urias Communications will be responsible for advertising, public relations and community engagement within Hispanic and other multicultural markets leading up to Super Bowl XLIX – 2015 in Arizona on February 1, 2015.

“More than 65 percent of Hispanics are NFL fans and more than 20 percent cite the NFL as their favorite sport,” says Jay Parry, CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “It is critical, with more than 30 percent of Arizona’s population, to have the entire community engaged and participating with us during this dynamic time in Arizona. We’re pleased to be working with an agency that is specifically focused on these efforts.” The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee has been committed to reaching Hispanics and building strong ties with Mexico. The committee participates in cross border relations and earlier this year, partnered with the Arizona Cardinals and USA Football to host a series of clinics for young athletes, coaches and mothers in Mexico City.

“This is a time to brand Arizona on the international stage,” says Lisa Urias, CEO of Urias Communications. “We look forward to creating opportunities for the local, national and international media to see Arizona as a young, vibrant and multicultural state with key ties to Mexico and the Americas.”

Unveiling the countdown clock are Phoenix Councilwoman Laura Pastor, CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Jay Parry, Phoenix Councilwoman Kate Gallego, Phoenix Councilman Bill Gates, Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and Chairman of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, David Rousseau.

Arizona Super Bowl Countdown Clock Unveiled

With 179 days and counting until Super Bowl XLIX, the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton today unveiled a countdown clock at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport which will mark the days, hours and minutes until the opening kick-off of the State’s third Super Bowl since 1996.

“We’re thrilled to have the Super Bowl XLIX countdown clock prominently located at Sky Harbor, the most highly-trafficked point of entry to the state. As we hit the six-month mark, this will help drive awareness and anticipation for the Super Bowl and all the surrounding events,” said David Rousseau, Chairman of the Board of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

The state-of-the art digital clock located in Terminal 4 at Sky Harbor is illuminated on a 55 inch, high-definition LED screen. After today’s unveiling on the west end of the baggage claim area, an additional countdown clock was illuminated on the east end of baggage claim in Terminal 4. The terminal serves more than 80 percent of Sky Harbor’s passengers.

“The city of Phoenix is ready to host its largest Super Bowl celebration yet,” said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. “Phoenix Sky Harbor will be the gateway to the Valley for tens of thousands of Super Bowl visitors and we are working closely with the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee to ensure the best fan experience the NFL has ever seen.”

In the month surrounding the big game, Phoenix Sky Harbor will serve an estimated 4 million passengers. The new PHX Sky Train will provide a quick, convenient ride from the airport to the light rail connection, giving football fans an easy way to travel to Super Bowl Central, a festival made up of 12 city blocks that will be the epicenter of free, fan fun, in Downtown Phoenix. Super Bowl Central will be held for four days leading up to the game.

Super Bowl XLIX will be played at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s third Super Bowl in 19 years. At Super Bowl XLII in University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

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Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Announces Board

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces its Board of Directors for Super Bowl XLIX. The board of directors is comprised of business leaders that volunteer their time to drive the state’s efforts for Super Bowl XLIX.

The Host Committee is a private, non-profit Arizona corporation. The mandate of the Host Committee is to galvanize local stakeholders in a united approach to hosting the largest single-day sporting event by maximizing positive media exposure, fueling the economic engine of Arizona and leaving a lasting legacy long after the excitement of the Big Game. The board was assembled in 2013 to begin planning and to garner local corporate support and sponsors.

Board members include:
● Board Chair David Rousseau, president, SRP

● Brad Anderson, executive vice president, brokerage office services, CB Richard Ellis

● Michael Bidwill, president, Arizona Cardinals

● Jose Cardenas, senior vice president and general council, Arizona State University

● David Farca, president, ToH Design Studio

● Jim Grogan, chief operating officer, International Capital Investment Company

● Michael Haenel, executive vice president, Cassidy Turley

● Mike Kennedy, partner, Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A. (chairman, Super Bowl XLII Host Committee in 2008)

● Dan Lewis, senior vice president, Sovereign Finance

● Jeffrey Lowe, president, MidFirst Bank

● Mary Martuscelli, regional president for the private client reserve, U.S. Bank

● Andrew McCain, vice president and CFO, Hensley Beverage Company

● Patrick McGinley, vice president of property management, Vestar

● Steve Moore, president and CEO, Greater Phoenix CVB

● Jodi Noble, partner, Deloitte

● Jay Parry, president and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

● Earl Petznick Jr., president and CEO, Northside Hay Company

● Ken Van Winkle, managing partner, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

● KJ Wagner, president and CEO, Willis of Arizona, Inc.

● David Watson, co-founder and managing partner, mybody and president and managing partner, Revolution Tea

● John Zidich, CEO, Republic Media Publisher, The Arizona Republic

“We have an impressive group of business leaders working together to meet the fundraising goals for Super Bowl XLIX and to maximize the opportunity to build the Arizona brand in this unparalleled global spotlight,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee chairman. “We want to promote Arizona as an ideal destination for businesses and tourists well beyond Super Bowl XLIX.”

Super Bowl XLIX is scheduled to be played at University Of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years. In Super Bowl XLII at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

For more information on the Board of Directors, please visit http://azsuperbowl.com/about-us/meet-the-team/

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Super Bowl Committee Launches Community Campaign

Today the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces its community campaign for Super Bowl XLIX. In addition to creating direct economic impact for Arizona, investing in the community and local nonprofits is paramount to the Host Committee’s mission to leave a positive lasting legacy from Super Bowl XLIX. The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee is partnering with the National Football League (NFL) Foundation to distribute more than $2 million to Arizona nonprofits leading up to Super Bowl XLIX on February 1, 2015.

With the launch of the “In the Community” web page, www.azsuperbowl.com/community, local nonprofits are encouraged to visit the site to learn about the Host Committee’s giving mission and focus areas. The legacy grants will focus on distributing dollars to local nonprofits that submit proposals with a key focus in education and youth health and wellness programs. The application will be available online June 23 until July 11.

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee has also partnered with the Arizona Community Foundation to provide the administration to distribute the foundation dollars. Their expertise in the nonprofit sector as well as the synergies in the foundation focus areas will be a tremendous asset to the Host Committee.

The NFL Foundation annually donates $1 million towards Super Bowl legacy programs and is matched by local private and public donations.

“Giving back to the local nonprofit community is a tremendous opportunity that will allow us to leave Arizona in a better place as a result of Super Bowl XLIX. We appreciate the local business leaders and corporations support to make this investment possible and look forward to the many legacy projects that will be funded leading up to the Big Game,” said David Rousseau, Chairman, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

The “In the Community” web page also features current community outreach events that the Host Committee has participated in throughout Arizona ranging from tree planting events to literacy fairs and football clinics. In addition, there is a donation page for the public to join the movement to leave a lasting legacy in Arizona by donating online and becoming an active philanthropist.

For more information, visit www.azsuperbowl.com/community.

From left: Stephen R. Lewis, Lieutenant Governor of Gila River Indian Community, David Rousseau, Chairman, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, Michael Bidwill, President of the Arizona Cardinals, Gregory Mendoza, Gila River Indian Community Governor, Jay Parry, President & CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and Christopher Mendoza, District 4 Councilman. Also attached is a photo of Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee mascot, SPIKE.

Super Bowl Committee teams up with Gila River Community

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announced its partnership with the Gila River Indian Community today during a press conference at the Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort and Spa in Chandler, Arizona. In attendance for today’s announcement were Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman David Rousseau, Gila River Indian Community Governor Gregory Mendoza, Arizona Cardinals President Michael Bidwill, and Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee mascot, SPIKE.

“We are proud to be partnering with The Gila River Indian Community and to work together to fuel the economic engine of Arizona,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman. “Our partnership will have multiple elements with a major focus on education, health and fitness for the youth of the Gila River Indian Community.”

A key component of the partnership will be working together to promote Arizona as the ideal location for businesses of all industries and sizes and a premier tourism destination well beyond Super Bowl XLIX. As part of the partnership, The Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort and Spa will be an official team hotel. The partnership will also include various economic and community initiatives to build relationships among all of Arizona’s cultural groups.

“The Gila River Indian Community is thrilled to be a sponsor of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and to have the opportunity to help make the big game and all its associated events a success for Arizona. Our Community emphasizes partnership, economic opportunity and giving back to our neighbors in all we do and with every dollar we invest,” said Gila River Indian Community Governor, Gregory Mendoza. “So do the NFL and the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. That’s why we’re committed to joining forces and hosting quality events in association with the Super Bowl.”

To officially kick off the partnership, Arizona Cardinals alumni Kwamie Lassiter and Frank Sanders, along with SPIKE, hosted a football clinic for 25 kids of the Gila River Indian Community. The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee will continue to support the efforts of the Gila River Indian Community to promote education, health, and fitness to its youth.

“The partnership between the Cardinals and Gila River Indian Community dates back to the opening of University of Phoenix Stadium in 2006,” said Cardinals President Michael Bidwill. “Like us, they believed that it would be a game-changer not only for our team but the entire community. Super Bowl XLIX is another critically important event for our state and it’s no surprise that Gila River is stepping up to help provide the considerable community support required to make it a success.”

Future community initiatives and events will be announced leading up to Super Bowl XLIX.

From left: David Rousseau, Chairman of Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, Jay Parry, President & CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, Greg Stanton, Mayor of Phoenix, Kate Gallego, Councilwoman District 8, Jim Waring, vice mayor of Phoenix and Michael Nowakowski, Councilman District 7.

Super Bowl Central will take over downtown

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announced several major initiatives that will take over 12 city blocks in downtown Phoenix and together will serve as the hub of fan, sponsor, media and NFL activities for Super Bowl XLIX.

The activities will cover 5th Street to First Avenue and Jefferson Street to Monroe Street and be anchored by the iconic Super Bowl roman numerals, which will tower 30 feet into the air.

Super Bowl Central, will feature live performances by national recording artists and local musical talent, community groups and schools, football themed activities, and beer and wine gardens. The festival will feature family-friendly activities for fans of all ages, will be free to the public and incorporate street level merchants and restaurants. Local culture and food will be showcased. This is a new addition to Arizona’s line-up of Super Bowl activities since the state last hosted the Super Bowl in 2008, and one million visitors are expected to participate.

“We are thrilled to be providing extensive and engaging events and activities that will showcase the energetic and vibrant culture of Arizona to fans, sponsors and media alike,” said David Rousseau, Chairman, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

Typically one of Super Bowl’s most popular activities, NFL Experience is the world’s largest interactive football theme park. For Super Bowl XLIX, it will be located at the Phoenix Convention Center and feature attractions such as kids’ football clinics, interactive football games, free autograph sessions and more.

NFL House, a VIP hospitality headquarters, is another new addition to Arizona’s Super Bowl activities and will be located at CityScape.

“Super Bowl Central, along with NFL Experience and NFL House, will turn
downtown Phoenix into the Super Bowl epicenter. It will provide both local and
visiting fans an amazing opportunity to be part of this global event. Super Bowl
Central delivers direct economic benefits to local businesses,” said Greg Stanton, Mayor of Phoenix.

NFL Media Center, located at the Phoenix Convention Center, will provide working facilities for 5,000 members of the media from over 30 countries around the world.

National broadcast networks — NBC, NFL Network and others — will broadcast live from Super Bowl Central.

Additionally, NFL Headquarters will be at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix.

The average temperature in the Valley in February is 71 degrees, showcasing the ideal weather conditions for an outdoor fan festival as well as the Super Bowl game.

Super Bowl XLIX will be played at the University of Phoenix Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals, on February 1, 2015. This marks Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years and the third overall. In Super Bowl XLII at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, the New York Giants bet the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devils Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

Jay Parry

Jay Parry – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Jay Parry – President and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

Parry oversees all aspects of planning and executing the 2015 Super Bowl, working closely with the NFL and numerous constituents in Arizona. The Super Bowl Host Committee is responsible for achieving a $25 million fundraising goal and then executing Arizona’s plan to maximize the impact of hosting the Super Bowl.

Surprising fact: “I come from a family of birds, meaning, my two sisters’ names are Robin and Piper. I was surrounded by strong women ‘in the nest’ from an early age.”

Biggest challenge: “Succeeding in male-dominated industries and professional sports has its challenges. I wear higher heels and what that really means is be yourself and true to your leadership philosophies no matter what the circumstances are.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Jay Parry Headshot

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Hires CEO

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee today announced the appointment of Jay L. Parry to head the organization as Chief Executive Officer. As CEO, Parry will oversee the Host Committee and will work closely with the NFL to deliver a successful Super Bowl XLIX to the State of Arizona, including driving marketing efforts, developing and implementing NFL and Host Committee programs, spearheading sponsorships, fundraising and community relations, and managing financials.

Super Bowl XLIX will be the third Super Bowl played in Arizona, and the second played at University of Phoenix Stadium. Super Bowl XLII in 2008 had an economic impact of $500 million, according to a study conducted by the W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona State University.

Parry brings a sports and business acumen uniquely suited to lead the Host Committee’s efforts for Super Bowl XLIX. Most recently, she was senior vice president of Brand and Business Development for the Phoenix Suns. Parry also spent seven seasons as president and chief operating officer of the Phoenix Mercury. During her tenure, the Mercury won two WNBA championships and generated double-digit business growth in corporate partnerships and attendance. Prior to her career in professional sports, Parry was an executive in a variety of roles with Bank of America, most recently as executive vice president in the Central Region. She served on the MVP Host Committee when Arizona hosted Super Bowl XXX in 1996. Currently, Parry serves as a director on the boards of several local organizations, including Arizona Women’s Education and Employment (AWEE,) BMO Harris Bank Arizona Advisory Board and Thunderbirds Charities. See www.AZSuperBowl.com for Parry’s full biography.

Parry was named a Most Admired CEO by the Phoenix Business Journal in 2010 and in 2008, was selected one of the Arizona Woman magazine’s “20 Women Who Will Shape Arizona by 2020.”

Parry will report to David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman and president of Salt River Project.

“Jay’s appointment is an amazing coup for the Host Committee,” said Rousseau. “She is the ideal candidate for this role because of her deep experience in sports marketing, business and her strong ties to the community. Jay’s proven leadership skills make her well-suited to drive all facets of the organization from sponsorship and community activation and engagement, to the complex logistics involved in putting on the Super Bowl.”

“Arizona has so much to offer, and I’m honored and excited to be a part of demonstrating this to the world through the Super Bowl,” said Jay Parry, CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “Sports and business are not only my expertise, but my passion. Super Bowl is an exciting opportunity for Arizona that will leave a lasting legacy for our entire community.”

The successful 2015 game bid was prepared by the Host Committee, led by Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals, Mike Kennedy, former chairman of the Host Committee, and Winnie Stolper. Stolper has worked with the Host Committee since 2006 and will take on the role of Chief Administrative Officer reporting to Parry.

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee will bring together influential business leaders, senior government representatives, Convention and Visitors Bureau personnel, and thousands of volunteers to insure Super Bowl XLIX is a success, and results in positive economic impact under a global spotlight that enhances community pride.