Tag Archives: deborah bateman

kids.money

How can you raise financially savvy children?

With school out for the summer, there’s no better time to teach children about money and finances, experts say.

“By teaching children the importance of opportunity costs at a young age, we can better prepare them to become confident and successful members of our community once they enter the real world,” says Jim Lundy, CEO of Alliance Bank of Arizona.

No matter a child’s age, it’s never too early to prepare him or her for a successful future by building financial literacy skills today. Teachable money moments can happen with kids as young as 3 years old and the sooner parents begin to influence positive financial behaviors, the better the chance kids have to succeed in managing money.

“Kids learn a lot by watching what you do,” says Kelly Kaminskas, senior vice president at FirstBank. “I think a lot of parents make the mistake of sheltering kids from money conversations. It’s important to take them to the bank with you, show them how you save for long-term goals, or explain the difference between funding needs versus wants.  These learning opportunities can be extremely valuable as they get older.”

“With almost everything else, we teach our children by talking as we go about our day,” says Christina Burroughs, managing partner at Miller Russell Associates, “but or some reason, that’s not the case with money or financial issues.”

Burroughs says many people grew up in families where it was taboo to talk about money, others worry that children who know that come from well-off families will lose their motivation, while some parents are reticent talk about finances because they don’t want to burden their children with adult concerns.

“But there is a nice middle ground where parents can talk about concepts without burdening children,” Burroughs says. “It’s really helpful for families to talk about the idea behind economy — that people make things or provide services that other people want or need. Then, expand on the idea that when people buy things, it becomes economy and everyone has opportunity to grow and get better because of that. Parents will be thrilled to see how quickly kids become excited by these ideas.”

Burroughs says it’s safe for parents to start talking to children as early as 3 or 4, as long as the conversation is age appropriate.

“The best thing parents can do is simply talk to their kids about the importance of budgeting, saving, and managing credit,” says Joe Bleyle, senior vice president and director of commercial real estate for Enterprise Bank & Trust. “Specifically, kids can participate in developing the family’s budget and open a savings account with encouragement to save for larger purchases.”

With high-school age kids, experts say the conversations can expand into how to get a job, how to dress to impress in the professional world, how to build a business network and the basic principles of business and entrepreneurial thinking.

“The lessons children learn while they are young will shape how financially successful they will be as adults,” says Michael Lefever, senior vice president and business banking area manager for Wells Fargo. “Just as regular exercise and a good diet are essential for physical fitness, knowing the basics of saving, budgeting and planning are essential for financial fitness.”

In order to prepare children for financial success, Deborah Bateman, vice chairman of National Bank of Arizona, says it’s imperative to show them that money is just paper without a purpose or a goal.

“As parents, the most important lesson we can teach our kids is the value of money, and we can teach that lesson and help our kids create a healthy relationship with money by teaching them to give money ‘purpose,’” Bateman says. “We teach our kids to give money purpose  by teaching them to set goals. As soon as a child can articulate their goals, we should help them to monetize those goals. It is the purpose we give our money that makes it valuable and guides our kids to make confident money decisions.”

Summer school lessons for finances

Here are five money lessons that parents can teach their children at home this summer, according to financial experts at Alliance Bank of Arizona:

How to build a balanced budget: Vacation planning is the perfect time to teach kids about budgeting. Questions like, “Where will we go?”, “What will we do?” and “How much will we spend?” can guide children through the decision-making and conscious-spending process. First, start allocating funds to basics like hotel, food and gasoline. Then, discuss that fun activities and souvenirs can only be purchased if you budget the right amount of money.

How to make important buying decisions (wants vs. needs): Review your household budget or a sample budget with your kids. Help them understand what a balanced budget is and that the goal is to save more money than you spend. Explain that there are items we need like shelter and food. But, there are also things that we want, like new shoes, a cell phone and toys, which can wait until we have saved enough to purchase them.

The importance of interest: Say you’re in a store and your child points to a toy and says, “Can you buy that for me?” Instead of handing over the toy, offer to loan your child a small amount of money, provided that they pay you back the same amount within 30 days. Remind them often that if they can’t pay on time, you’ll add more money to what they owe until they pay the money back. One day past the deadline, add to the amount and explain why they owe more.

The correlation between learning and earning: Set up a sample budget based on what your kids want. Then, determine the average monthly income of a high school graduate, someone with post-secondary training, someone with a Bachelor’s degree, and someone with a Master’s degree. This shows how much money they need to earn to have the things they want and how that correlates with their level of education.

The importance of being a contributing member of their community: Chores that are tied to earning money are a great way to help kids learn about their role in a family unit and gives them a glimpse at what is required of community members. An effective tool is myjobchart.com which helps parents set up and track chores for their children, along with prompting discussions about saving, giving and spending.

87665813

2015 Positively Powerful Women Awards on June 5

Nicole Stanton

Nicole Stanton

This year, the 8th Annual Positively Powerful Women Awards Luncheon celebration will be a part of the Positively Powerful Leadership Conference, a day filled with outstanding local and national speakers who will empower and inform participants in an exciting, dynamic and uplifting environment. The Positively Powerful Leadership Conference will be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday, June 5 at the Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix. The Awards Luncheon will begin at 11:30 a.m.

“The speakers that we have selected this year exhibit this year’s theme of collaboration,” said Dr. Joel P. Martin, international trainer, speaker, coach, and creator of the Positively Powerful Woman Awards Program. “These speakers will invigorate and inspire participants to take action on their goals and purpose. When you attend this conference, I know you will leave with business, personal, professional strategies and transformational tools that you can use immediately.”

MaryLynn Mack copy

MaryLynn Mack

This year’s Positively Powerful presenters are:

  • Deborah Bateman, coach, author and Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors for National Bank of Arizona, will present “The Journey to Success Begins Within.”
  • Rev. Dr. Helen Hunter, Pastor of The Great Koinonia and President of the East Valley NAACP, will speak on “Being A Positively Powerful Spirit-Filled Woman.”
  • Loretta Love Huff, author and Owner, Emerald Harvest Consulting, will present “Talking Business, Taking Action, Being Strategic.”
  • Kristi Lee, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, TruNorth Global and successful entrepreneur with Send Out Cards, will help “Turn Your Connections Into Collaborations & Contacts.”
  • Debbie Waitkus, author, business/golf networking consultant and President and Founder of Golf for a Cause, will talk about “How to Have It All As a Business Woman Without Losing It!”
    Dr. Duku Anokye

    Dr. Duku Anokye

    Joining the Positively Powerful presenters is the dynamic Suzan Hart, an inspirational speaker, author and master trainer. Hart has shared the stage with Jack Canfield, John Gray and Robert Allen and has trained on CDs with David Wood and Steven Covey. She is the founder of co-host of the “Fit is the New Sexy” blog talk radio show and will present “Branding and Marketing Sales Success!”

Closing the conference with “Reflections of the Day,” will be charismatic and inspiring Dr. George Fraser, Chief Executive Officer of FraserNet, Inc., Producer of the PowerNetworking Conference and author of five best-selling books. Upscale Magazine named him as one of the “Top 50 Power Brokers in Black America” and Black Enterprise Magazine called him “Black America’s #1 Networker.” He has received 350 awards and citations including induction into the Minority Business Hall of Fame and Museum.

Bonnie Lucas

Bonnie Lucas

During the 8th Annual Positively Powerful Woman Awards Luncheon, six extraordinary women will be honored for their professional accomplishments and their contributions to the community. This year’s honorees are:

  • Philanthropic Leadership Award: Nicole Stanton, Partner/Phoenix Office Managing Partner, Quarles & Brady LLP, First Lady, City of Phoenix and Founder, Stop Bullying AZ
  • Arts & Culture Leadership Award: Isola Jones, Internationally Recognized Mezzo-Soprano
  • Visionary Leadership Award: MaryLynn Mack, Deputy Director, Desert Botanical Garden
  • Entrepreneurial Leadership Award: Bonnie Lucas, President/CEO, Law Enforcement Specialists, Inc.
  • Educational Leadership Award: Dr. Duku Anokye, Director of International Initiatives for the ASU New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
  • Spiritual Leadership Award: Rev. Delphine Rodriquez, Minister and Educator
    Rev. Delphine Rodriquez

    Rev. Delphine Rodriquez

    Emceeing this year’s luncheon is Terri Ouellette (Terri O), co-host of ABC15’s Sonoran Living Live. The awards presentation will include a keynote address by Dr. Martin, followed by a luncheon favorite, the honoree panel discussion. Each year, a nonprofit organization is highlighted during the luncheon. The 2015 non-profit organization is Achieving My Purpose. The mission of Achieving My Purpose is to inform, inspire and empower women to achieve their purpose through exposure to successful role models, resources, personal discovery and creation of an authentic life plan.

    Tickets for the luncheon and conference may be purchased at http://positivelypowerful.com/womanawards/register/.

    For event information, visit the Positively Powerful website at www.positivelypowerful.com. Sponsorship information: http://positivelypowerful.com/womanawards/1194-2/.

law

O’Connor House becomes Sandra Day O’Connor Institute

O’Connor House is now the Sandra Day O’Connor Institute.  O’Connor House, a non-profit organization, is dedicated to solving complex issues through civil discourse and collaborative action.  In recognition of the need to continue to expand and enhance its endeavors, the Board of Directors voted to change the name of the organization from O’Connor House to the Sandra Day O’Connor Institute.

Sarah Suggs, President and CEO said, “The O’Connor Institute is a significant step forward and exciting chapter in our organization’s life.  We continue Sandra Day O’Connor’s important work to advance society, inspired by her leadership, intellect and vision.”

The mission of the Sandra Day O’Connor Institute is to:

  • Continue Sandra Day O’Connor’s lifetime work of solving important social, economic and political problems through civil dialogue and civic action.
  • Create an environment where important policy decisions are made through a process of civil discussion, critical analysis of facts and informed participation of all citizens.
  • Build consensus and collaborate on state and national levels to help solve complex issues.

“Given the polarized, highly politicized approach to current issues, the non-partisan O’Connor Institute offers civil discourse and collaborative problem solving to constructively address the complex challenges that face our state and nation,” stated Peter M. Hayes, Chairman of the Board.

The Sandra Day O’Connor Institute current programmatic areas include Social Justice, Public Policy and Civics Education.  In addition, the history of Sandra Day O’Connor’s extraordinary life is being documented and preserved. Plans also call for a future location of the O’Connor Institute to include a civic center, auditorium, educational classrooms, internships, collaborative workspace, public forums and debates, library, tours, a permanent exhibit honoring the lifetime work of Sandra Day O’Connor and administrative offices.

The historic O’Connor House itself will remain an asset of the Sandra Day O’Connor Institute.  The adobe home was relocated to the campus of the Arizona Historical Society and became a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization in 2009.

The work begun by O’Connor House which will be continued by the Sandra Day O’Connor Institute includes:

  • Public Policy: Providing a greater understanding of critical issues through thoughtful discussion, critical analysis of facts and informed participation of all citizens.
  • SAFE Action Project: Delivering hospitality industry training developed by O’Connor House to combat the commercial sexual exploitation of children (child sex trafficking).
  • Social Justice: Creating solutions and collaborative partnerships to reduce domestic violence against women and children.
  • Civics Education: promoting civics education, particularly in middle schools, including the use of iCivics.org, an online education portal founded by Sandra Day O’Connor as a free civics resource for teachers and students.
  • Distinguished Speakers Series: Presenting national and international leaders and luminaries who foster the ideals of statesmanship

Sandra Day O’Connor made history in 1981 when President Ronald Reagan nominated her as an associate justice and first woman on the U.S. Supreme Court, where she served 25 years until her retirement in 2006.   Prior to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sandra Day O’Connor had previously worked in the Arizona Attorney General’s office, in the Arizona State Senate as Majority Leader, later as a judge in the Maricopa County Superior Court and the Arizona Court of Appeals before her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Peter M. Hayes is Chairman of the Board and Sarah E. Suggs serves as President and CEO.

Board Members include Joseph P. Anderson, Tracy Bame, Deborah Bateman, Rich Boals, Nikal Conti, Harold Dorenbecher, Shelley Duane, John Evancevich, Leonard Gaby, Dr. Rufus Glasper, Lucia Howard, Hon. Douglas Hunt, Rick Jones, Francis Najafi, Michael Rooney, James Rose, Stephen M. Savage, Richard H. Silverman, Kim Sterling-Heflin, Gay Firestone Wray, Kari Yatkowski and Kathleen Zeider. Justice Sandra Day O’Connor (ret.) and Ambassador Barbara Barrett serve as Advisors.

woman

YWCA Honors Valley Women at Tribute to Leadership

The YWCA of Maricopa County has announced its Tribute to Leadership Honorees who will be honored at the 20th Anniversary Tribute to Leadership Gala on Saturday, February 1, 2014 at The Ritz Carlton in Phoenix, Arizona.

The Tribute to Leadership Gala is a special evening set aside to recognize the outstanding individuals who have given selflessly of their time and talent to make our community, and the world, a better place to live and work.

The awards are presented across a variety of categories and recognize those who have made substantial contributions to eliminating discrimination and empowering women in the community.

This year’s honorary chairs are Tim and Deborah Bateman. Cindy McCain will receive the YW’s “Global Justice Leadership Award”.

2014 Tribute to Leadership Honorees:

Mrs. Cindy McCain
The McCain Institute
2014 Global Justice Leadership Award

Alejandra Amarilla Nash
Landfill Harmonic Project
Community Service Nonprofit Leader

MaryLynn Mack
Desert Botanical Garden
Education Leader

Chevy Humphrey
Arizona Science Center
Health & Science Leader

Martha Kuhns
Women’s Overseas Service League
Military or Armed Service Leader

Karen Johnson
Midwestern University
Dorothy Willey Award

Pam Conboy
Wells Fargo
Community Service Corporate Leader

Leon Silver
Polsinelli
Advocacy Leader

Judge Roxanne Song Ong
City of Phoenix- Phoenix Municipal Court
Public Service Award

Dr. Joel Martin
Positively Powerful | Triad West Inc
Racial Justice Leader

NBA Check Presentation Photo

National Bank of Arizona Partners with YWCA

YWCA Maricopa County announced its new partnership with National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ), to expand the YW’s Own It Financial Education Program, providing financial literacy to primarily low-income women and families at no-charge.

The YW is proud to be the foremost agency in Maricopa County providing financial education to people from all walks of life, many of whom are among the working poor, struggling to pay their bills and feed their families, even while working 40 hours or more a week. For 101 years in Arizona, the YW has provided women’s education, mentoring, and leadership to fulfill a common vision; equal opportunity for all people.  The YW believes a woman that is financially educated provides a better quality of life for herself and her family.

NB|AZ has always been a great supporter of the YW and its programs. Several of their employees volunteer to teach Own It classes, they sponsor major events like the YW’s Tribute to Leadership gala, and one of their employees, Mary Holman, has served on the YW Board for several years. This year, the NB|AZ Women’s Financial Group, a forum of professional women who join together to collaborate, network, and succeed in finance, business and life, will be joining forces with the YW to support its Athena PowerLink program. Athena PowerLink is a mentoring service that matches established professionals with upcoming women and minority business owners, in the hopes of helping them succeed.  By forming a partnership with YWCA Maricopa County, NB|AZ sends a shared message to our Arizona community; we care and are committed to its most vulnerable residents. With the support of NB|AZ, the YW will be able to expand its financial education program to reach more underserved individuals, and provide them with the tools they need to become financially stable.

“We could not be more pleased to award a $25,000 grant to the YWCA of Maricopa County in support of its ‘Own It’ Financial Education Program. Financial literacy for women is a mission that is shared and deeply valued by NB|AZ,” said Deborah Bateman, Executive Vice President, Director of Wealth Strategies at National Bank of Arizona. “The grant will enable the program’s expansion into smaller communities throughout Arizona, changing the lives of countless women through financial empowerment, education and awareness.”

If you are interested in learning more about Own It, you can visit www.ywcaaz.org, call the YW office at 602-258-0990, or email Financial Education Coordinator Bev Strom, at bev.strom@ywcaaz.org.

 

money management

National Bank of Arizona sponsors ThriveTime Challenge

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced its sponsorship of the second annual ThriveTime Challenge, a statewide financial literacy initiative that aims to educate high school students about money management.

ThriveTime Challenge, founded by the 2013 NB|AZ Woman of the Year Sharon Lechter, is a tournament involving playing the award-winning ThriveTime for Teens board game. The board game was named the 2010 Creative Child Magazine Game of the Year and takes players on a financial rollercoaster where they must make crucial life decisions like buying cars and paying for college.

“We were honored to sponsor the ThriveTime Challenge for the second year in a row,” said Deborah Bateman, executive vice president and director of wealth strategies at NB|AZ. “Financial literacy is an important initiative to NB|AZ and we are pleased to support a program that encourages responsible money management beginning at a young age.”

Each participating school hosted its own single-round tournament and winners from each school progressed to a state-level competition on April 20 at Arizona State University West campus in Glendale.

The top three finalists of the state competition received scholarship dollars ranging from $2,500 to $5,000, and the home schools of each finalist received $1,000. Participation in the tournament was free for all participating schools and students.

For more information about the ThriveTime Challenge, contact Angela Totman at angela@pyff.net or visit www.thrivetimechallenge.com. For more information about National Bank of Arizona, visit www.nbarizona.com.

Sharon Lechter - headshot

NB|AZ names Lechter 2013 Woman of the Year

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced Sharon Lechter as the winner of its fourth annual Women’s Financial Group (WFG) Woman of the Year Award. The award, designed to honor outstanding professional women throughout metropolitan Phoenix, was presented to Lechter during a ceremony last week.

Lechter is a local businesswoman, investor and financial literary activist whose philanthropic work has helped establish, educate and train professional women in the Valley. Lechter is the founder and CEO of “Pay Your Family First,” a money management program aimed to increase financial literacy among youth. She also is the co-author of “Rich Dad Poor Dad,” a financial self-help book that has sold more than 26 million copies worldwide.

“As host to the Women’s Financial Group, National Bank of Arizona continues to demonstrate its dedication to building a stronger community for us all,” Lechter said. “I am deeply honored and humbled to be chosen as the 2013 Woman of the Year and pledge my continued support of the bank’s efforts to encourage and ignite results driven collaboration among the fabulous women of Arizona.”

Woman of the Year Award finalists included Dena Patton and Stella Shanovich. Patton is the co-founder and president of “The Girls Rule Foundation,” has sat on the board of NAWBO and regularly coaches women on entrepreneurship, confidence and building business. Shanovich is a partner at Grant Thornton where she spearheaded “Women at Grant Thornton,” an in-house networking and leadership organization for professional women.

“At NB|AZ we take great pride in supporting local professional women who are making a positive impact in their communities,” said Deborah Bateman, executive vice president, director of wealth strategies of National Bank of Arizona. “We received many nominations for women qualified for this prestigious award and are honored to recognize Sharon Lechter as our 2013 Woman of the Year.”

All nominations for the Woman of the Year Award were reviewed by a selection committee comprised of industry leaders and the National Bank of Arizona Women’s Financial Group Advisory Council.

For more information about NB|AZ and the Woman of the Year award, please visit www.nbarizona.com.

Sharon Lechter - headshot

NB|AZ names Lechter 2013 Woman of the Year

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced Sharon Lechter as the winner of its fourth annual Women’s Financial Group (WFG) Woman of the Year Award. The award, designed to honor outstanding professional women throughout metropolitan Phoenix, was presented to Lechter during a ceremony last week.

Lechter is a local businesswoman, investor and financial literary activist whose philanthropic work has helped establish, educate and train professional women in the Valley. Lechter is the founder and CEO of “Pay Your Family First,” a money management program aimed to increase financial literacy among youth. She also is the co-author of “Rich Dad Poor Dad,” a financial self-help book that has sold more than 26 million copies worldwide.

“As host to the Women’s Financial Group, National Bank of Arizona continues to demonstrate its dedication to building a stronger community for us all,” Lechter said. “I am deeply honored and humbled to be chosen as the 2013 Woman of the Year and pledge my continued support of the bank’s efforts to encourage and ignite results driven collaboration among the fabulous women of Arizona.”

Woman of the Year Award finalists included Dena Patton and Stella Shanovich. Patton is the co-founder and president of “The Girls Rule Foundation,” has sat on the board of NAWBO and regularly coaches women on entrepreneurship, confidence and building business. Shanovich is a partner at Grant Thornton where she spearheaded “Women at Grant Thornton,” an in-house networking and leadership organization for professional women.

“At NB|AZ we take great pride in supporting local professional women who are making a positive impact in their communities,” said Deborah Bateman, executive vice president, director of wealth strategies of National Bank of Arizona. “We received many nominations for women qualified for this prestigious award and are honored to recognize Sharon Lechter as our 2013 Woman of the Year.”

All nominations for the Woman of the Year Award were reviewed by a selection committee comprised of industry leaders and the National Bank of Arizona Women’s Financial Group Advisory Council.

For more information about NB|AZ and the Woman of the Year award, please visit www.nbarizona.com.

woman

National Bank of Arizona seeks Woman of the Year

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announces its fourth annual Women’s Financial Group (WFG) Woman of the Year Award, which is designed to honor outstanding professional women throughout metropolitan Phoenix. Nominations are being accepted now through January 31, 2013.

The Woman of the Year Award recognizes professional women who have successfully made a positive impact in their community, both through business and philanthropy.

“At NB|AZ we take great pride in supporting local professional women who are dedicated to improving their communities,” said Deborah Bateman, executive vice president, director of wealth strategies of National Bank of Arizona. “We look forward to reviewing the applications and honoring the winner with this prestigious award.”

All nominations for the award will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of industry leaders and the National Bank of Arizona Women’s Financial Group Advisory Council. The selection committee will determine the finalists and the winner. Nominees must either be headquartered in Maricopa County or do business in Maricopa County on a regular basis to be eligible for the award.

The winner will be announced at an award ceremony, for which details will be announced in 2013.

The award nomination packet is available on the NB|AZ website, www.nbarizona.com. Nominations should be submitted to Stephanie Poure via e-mail at stephanie.poure@nbarizona.com or by mail to 6001 N. 24th St., Phoenix, AZ, 85016, postmarked by January 31, 2013.

Women in Construction AZ - AZ Business Magazine September/October 2011

Women in Construction AZ Provides A Women-Only Environment To Network

Women in Construction AZ provides a women-only environment to congregate, relate concerns and network

The blueprint for success in the construction industry is no longer signed with ink and set in stone. It’s going through a few revisions, redrafting from a predominately male world to a more level, coed playing field.

Women are throwing on their hard hats and utilizing their unique strengths, too, to gain opportunity and improve the business aspect of the industry.

However, with their unique strengths come unique problems and concerns, and Nate Sachs, founder of Blueprints for Tomorrow, is recognizing such.

In fact, Sachs is digging into his own wallet and providing an environment and outlet strictly for women owners within the construction world to congregate — Women in Construction AZ.

Women in Construction AZ is an organization that provides free monthly luncheons where women can share ideas, listen to keynote speakers and network. The idea was inspired from a Wall Street Journal article Sachs read that stated a high percentage of construction companies are either being owned by women or run by women. This got Sachs thinking.

“Women are very different,” Sachs says. “They’re very nurturing; they’re caring, and those aren’t actually conducive traits to running a company in the construction industry. Their needs are very different; there really wasn’t a forum that was catering to those needs.”

Women run business differently, according to Sachs, by thinking as a tradesman, a businessman — unlike many of their male counterparts.
“The women come in a different angle,” Sachs says. “They were never on the job site for the most part. They look at it as a business, and they run it as a business. They’re more business oriented.”

Thus, Women in Construction AZ was formed, and each month the event attracts about 200 attendees.

The first Women in Construction AZ luncheon held in October last year featured the senior vice president of National Bank of Arizona, Deborah Bateman, as the keynote speaker. All speakers are women as well.

“There are different organizations in the Valley that are specific to your trade, but this is the only one specific to women,” says Colleen Hammond, co-owner of Creative Environments. “With some of the issues we deal with, we’re provided good information, and it’s very apropos for this time.”

Since the first luncheon, attendance continues to increase, from 63 to more than 200 attendees every month.

While the speakers and their respective topics — ranging from HR issues, social networking, and how to evaluate your business properly, to insurances and exit strategies — are relevant and a hit with the attendees, it’s the networking aspect that has proven to not only help the women find business and gain exposure, but bond with one another as well.

“They talk about what’s happening in their world, and I see a lot of business cards exchanged,” Sachs says. “A lot of people are receiving work from one another. They’re meeting people they didn’t know were in the industry, so it has become a real camaraderie.”

Carla Brandt, CEO and founder of Cobra Stucco, agrees and says Women in Construction AZ provides a forum where women can collaborate on the challenges they face in business and their personal lives.

“Women tend to be very competent with communication and, typically, strive to be correctly understood,” Brandt says. “It doesn’t always feel like a wise thing for women in construction to share their fears and perceived foibles with men because of some of the lingering prejudices that still exist in the industry.”

While Brandt says women are still under-represented in the industry, Hammond says their presence is becoming more widely accepted, with more women playing a primary role. Because it’s such a niche market, meeting other women in construction has proven to be beneficial to improve business.

“It helps to share some of the problems we struggle with as well as some of the successes we and they have had and point each other in the right direction,” Hammond says. “It has also definitely helped to make contacts with certain vendors.”

With the industry beginning to turn around with more available jobs and projects, according to Sachs, women want to help one another and show their support. The luncheons provide such an outlet. Not only that, but more jobs means more opportunities for the construction industry becoming more female friendly, expanding the talent pool from which to draw, according to Brandt.

“As women continue to enter the construction field with good results, attitudes begin to change,” Brandt says, “and more and more women continue to enter the arena, bringing fresh talent, new ideas and, oftentimes, better ways to do things.”

[stextbox id=”grey”]For more information about Women in Construction AZ, call (480) 596-1525.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine September/October 2011