Tag Archives: financial planning

data.center

Established CFO Brings Tech Experience to IO

IO, a global leader in software-defined data centers, today announced Michael Berry has joined the company as Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Berry will be responsible for financial planning and analysis, accounting, operations, treasury activities and investor relations, and will report to CEO and Product Architect, George Slessman.

“I am very happy to have Mike join IO,” said Slessman. “His experience as a proven operational leader and technology executive will support IO’s growth and provide a solid financial and operational foundation for the organization.”

Berry joins IO from SolarWinds, a publicly held international provider of IT management software with approximately $300 million in annual revenue and over $3.5 billion in market capitalization where he was Executive Vice President and CFO.  He overhauled the company’s financial planning process and was instrumental in completing ten acquisitions and leading the maintenance renewal team to strong and consistent revenue growth. From a financial perspective, during Mr. Berry’s tenure the company achieved non-GAAP operating profit of greater than 50 percent for eleven straight quarters, and increased operating cash flow by 33% while growing total revenue by 28% on an annualized basis. Prior to SolarWinds, Berry was CFO at i2 (NASDAQ: ITWO), a publicly held, international provider of supply chain software and services. At i2, he rebuilt and scaled the finance and investor relations organizations, led the implementation of several financial planning systems, and played a key role in several strategic initiatives including the acquisition of i2 in January 2010 by JDA Software.

“I could not be more excited about joining IO,” said Michael Berry, IO’s new CFO. “Our leadership position in the foundation technology of the cloud, visionary leadership, marquis enterprise customers and disruptive technology, combined with my experience building the financial and operational foundation for proven technology companies, is a once in a lifetime opportunity.  It is truly a great fit that aligns very well with my personal and professional goals and objectives.”

Prior to his CFO experience, Berry served in various executive roles at The Reynolds and Reynolds Company, a provider of software and services to the retail automotive industry, most recently as Senior Vice President of Solutions Management, Development and Operations. He has also held executive management positions at Comdata Corporation and Travelers Express Co. (now MoneyGram International). Berry is currently a Member of the Board of Directors and Audit Committee Chairman for Rapid7, a privately-held security software company based in Boston, Mass.

Soaring College Cost and Financial Planning

Soaring College Cost And Financial Planning

Parents and students today should seriously consider saving for education cost early on. The cost of college tuition is becoming very expensive, specifically if your child is considering attending a private or out-of-state college. These costs have increased nearly 30 percent in the past decade and will most likely continue in the years to come. The cost of a four-year degree at a major university when in 2010-2011 was $21,675 per year — including total tuition, room and board*.

Although these numbers look pretty scary, there are actions we can take now to help our children when the time comes for college — for example, starting a college savings plan and being proactive by saving on monthly, quarterly or annual basis. This can make it easier to absorb the cost of education. I would recommend spending some time on research or speaking with a financial professional to assist in making a decision on the best solution to save for college. Keep in mind, cost usually includes tuition, room and board, books, uniforms, and in some cases transportation.

When there’s a plan in place, parents will usually share their goals with family and friends. This can motivate family and friends to gift money to children for their future education rather than toys. It can also show others that education is important, and by sharing the planning with their children, it may help plant the seeds to furthering their education.

Saving for our children is usually at the top of the list when it comes to financial planning. However, many times parents may feel that putting away for their child’s education is more important than their own retirement. I remind them that they should fund their own retirement saving first, then consider saving for education. There are many options to assist students entering college such as loans, scholarships, and government programs.

Retirees may have social security to help with retirement, but most of the financial burden of retirement is our responsibility. Therefore, remember our kid’s education is important, but it’s critical to prioritize financial planning appropriately. We should first save for retirement, then plan for our children’s education.

*SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2012). Digest of Education Statistics, 2011 (NCES 2012-001), Chapter 3.)

For more information about financial planning for your children’s eduction, visit jacobgold.com.

Securities and investment advisory services offered through ING Financial Partners, Inc. Member SIPC. Jacob Gold & Associates, Inc. is not a subsidiary of nor controlled by ING Financial Partners, Inc. This information was prepared by Michael Cochell of Jacob Gold & Associates, Inc. and is for educational information only. The opinions/views expressed within are that of Michael Cochell of Jacob Gold & Associates Inc. and do not necessarily reflect those of ING Financial Partners or its representatives. In addition, they are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Neither ING Financial Partners nor its representatives provide tax or legal advice. You should consult with your financial professional, attorney, accountant or tax advisor regarding your individual situation prior to making any investment decisions.

September/October 2012

AZ Business Magazine September/October 2012

AZ Business Magazine September/October 2012

Learning Our Lessons

Michael GossieAs an 8-year-old kid in New York, I came up with the bright idea that I would buy packs of Bubblicious bubble gum for 40 cents a pack at the grocery store and then turn around and sell it to my classmates for $1. Sounded like a brilliant plan, until my entire inventory was confiscated five minutes into first period because gum wasn’t allowed in class.

It was the first, but certainly not the last time an investment didn’t pan out like I wanted (I was convinced that Facebook would be the next Google).

“It is important for investors to manage their emotions,” said Michael Weigel, senior vice president and managing director of Investment Management Services at Mutual of Omaha Bank Wealth Management. “This can be challenging in today’s news environment where constant headlines and other noise can lead to an emotional response.”

In this issue of Az Business, Weigel and other experts help us take a closer look at effective financial planning and investing in the wake of the recession.

I can tell you one thing you can take to the bank: None of the experts will be chewing Bubblicious.

Michael Gossie Signature

Michael Gossie, Managing Editor

Read more articles from this issue.

Take it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.

Financial Statements

Using Financial Statements, Tools To Plan Your Future

Know what you have before planning the future using specific financial tools and financial statements.


There are many famous quotes about the importance of enjoying the present and not focusing too much on the past or the future. We do this in our personal lives and with many of our responsibilities, such as work, education and our finances. As a financial planner, I meet with many people seeking assistance with meeting specific financial goals and find that many times they have ideas of what they want and what they have already done. This is great, but before planning the future, it is important to know what you have now, a snapshot of your current situation. This is a critical piece, not only for individuals, but businesses, too.

Before focusing on investment news, what stocks are hot, politics and what might be a new trend in the investment world, investors should focus on understanding their current position. It is nearly impossible to determine the right mix of investments and what strategies may be appropriate without knowing this. Investors can use specific financial tools, including different financial statements, to help them identify what they have. These tools can apply to both individuals and businesses.

The first step is a data-gathering process. The second is imputing the information from various financial statements. For individuals, we would include a statement of financial position and a statement of cash flow. For business owners, we would include a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flow, and a pro forma statement. These are great tools that can help identify one’s financial position.

When creating a statement of financial position, one will clearly list his or hers assets and liabilities. Assets, such as real estate or other valuable items, should be considered at current market value (the price that one is willing to pay today for it). Assets should be categorized as cash and cash-equivalents, such as checking, savings, money market accounts, stocks, bonds, mutual funds and life insurance. Liabilities include credit cards, auto loans, unsecured loans, real estate mortgages, education loans and personal debts. This will provide individuals a balance sheet of assets at a particular point in time.

The next important piece is a statement of cash flow. Some of us may know this as an income statement. This statement will show inflow of income and outflow of income at a particular point in time. The inflow may include salaries, sale of assets, investment dividends, rent and bonuses. Outflows may include mortgage payments, auto payments, credit card payments, insurance, general living expenses and taxes. The statement of financial position and statement of cash flow are valuable tools to have before implementing an investment plan.

A pro forma statement is the last tool to use and includes future projections of the balance sheet and cash flow statement. This is important because as our economy and life situations change, we may need to adjustment our plan as needed. The same process also applies to business owners. However, the business entity will need to consider many more details regarding assets and liabilities, as well as inventory and staff.

Once the financial statement process has been completed, one will have a greater understanding of his or her position when beginning an investment plan. In addition, this process can improve the odds of success and allow more control in an investor’s decisions.

For more information about financial statements and financial planning, visit jacobgold.com.

Securities and investment advisory services offered through ING Financial Partners, Inc. Member SIPC. Jacob Gold & Associates, Inc. is not a subsidiary of nor controlled by ING Financial Partners, Inc.

This information was prepared by Michael Cochell of Jacob Gold & Associates Inc. and is for educational information only. The opinions/views expressed within are that of Michael Cochell of Jacob Gold & Associates Inc. and do not necessarily reflect those of ING Financial Partners or its representatives. In addition, they are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Neither ING Financial Partners nor its representatives provide tax or legal advice. You should consult with your financial professional, attorney, accountant or tax advisor regarding your individual situation prior to making any investment decisions.

Estate Planning: Planning Your Future

Estate Planning: Planning For The Future

Estate Planning: Planning for the Future

When planning your financial future, it is important to consider an investment strategy, risk tolerance and time horizon. These are critical aspects of building wealth.

Although many of us focus on the now, we forget about organizing our finances and personal interests upon our passing. This aspect of planning is neglected many times and can put everything at risk. As investors, we will spend many years saving and planning; we should take the steps to protect all that we have built. This can be done by arranging an estate plan that will allow you to pass on your assets to who you want, how you want, and when you want.

This type of planning may seem overwhelming, but an effective estate plan doesn’t need to be complicated. It can be broken down in two key elements. The first is having a durable power of attorney and the second is a will.

Having a durable power of attorney will allow you to manage your assets while you are still living by appointing someone to act in the event you are unable to do so. A will focuses on managing and distributing your assets after death.

In addition to these key elements, an estate plan can help avoid the problems and expenses of probate, avoid family conflicts, provide flexibility in estate management, and minimize taxes at the time of death. These are some of the benefits and why estate planning is so important. However, how does one get started on setting up an estate plan?

Most estate planning objectives can be accomplished by hiring an attorney or by using an online “do-it-yourself” approach. The cost of hiring an estate planning attorney to assist with the development and implementation of an estate plan is typically far outweighed by the benefits of recruiting experienced council. The person who decides to save money by using an online service is likely to make costly mistakes, says estate attorney Kari Meyrose of Gorman and Jones Law Firm.

“Estate planning attorneys spend many years learning the contours of estate planning rules and methodologies, and they have the ability to forecast the potential outcomes that may result from an individual estate plan,” Meyrose says.

Estate plans range from simple to very complicated, and in some cases the cost of not using an attorney may actually end up being a very costly lesson for loved ones. Either way you decide— do it yourself or use an attorney — don’t procrastinate in making a choice and take action in planning your future.

For more information about estate planning or Jacob Gold & Associates Inc., visit www.jacobgold.com.

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This information was prepared by Michael Cochell of Jacob Gold & Associates Inc. and is for educational information only. The opinions/views expressed within are that of Michael Cochell of Jacob Gold & Associates Inc. and do not necessarily reflect those of ING Financial Partners or its representatives. In addition, they are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Neither ING Financial Partners nor its representatives provide tax or legal advice. You should consult with your financial professional, attorney, accountant or tax advisor regarding your individual situation prior to making any investment decisions.[/stextbox]