Tag Archives: london bridge

Northern AZ Must Do's - EAZ Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Northern AZ Must Do's (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Northern AZ Must Do’s — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Lake Powell Resorts & Marinas Tours

100 Lakeshore Dr.,
Page, AZ 86040
(888) 896-3829
lakepowell.com
Whether you’re a seasoned houseboater or a first-timer, Lake Powell Resorts & Marinas provides everything you need to have the vacation of a lifetime — from instruction and advice to sheets and towels.


Hoover Dam

Nevada-Arizona border
(702) 494-2517
usbr.gov/lc/hooverdam
The Bureau of Reclamation started conducting tours through the Hoover Dam in 1937. Today, close to one million visitors a year take the tour and millions more drive across the dam. Hoover Dam is the highest concrete dam in the U.S.


London Bridge

314 London Bridge Rd.,
Lake Havasu City, AZ 86403
(800) 242-8278
golakehavasu.com
In 1962, the 130-year-old London Bridge was discovered to be sinking into the Thames. In 1968, the bridge was put up for auction and Robert P. McCulloch was the winning bidder. He spent $7 million to move the bridge to Lake Havasu City.


Navajo National Monument

End of State Highway 564 off US Highway 160,
Tonalea, AZ 86044
(928) 672-2700
nps.gov/nava
The monument preserves and protects three large ancestral Puebloan cliff dwellings. At the largest cliff dwellings in Arizona, experience first-hand the museums, picnic areas, campgrounds and short trails.


Antelope Canyon

5975 E. Hwy. 98,
Page, AZ 86040
(928) 698-2808
navajonationparks.org
Antelope Canyon is one of the most photographed areas of Northern Arizona and one of the most popular slot canyons. The upper canyon is translated as “the place where water runs through rocks” and the lower canyon as “spiral rock arches.” The canyon can be visited when accompanied by authorized tour guides.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

Top 5 Cultural Attractions (Spring-Summer)

Top 5: Cultural Attractions (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Cultural Attractions — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Biosphere 2

32540 S. Biosphere Rd., Oracle, AZ 85623
502-838-6200
b2science.org
The $150 million facility opened in 1991 as a massive closed system that would last for 100 years to test nature, technology and human endurance. Opened to the public in 2002, visitors to Biosphere 2 can explore inside the 3.15-acre structure on a fully-guided tour.


Hoover Dam

Nevada-Arizona border
702-494-2517
usbr.gov/lc/hooverdam
The Bureau of Reclamation started conducting tours through the Hoover Dam in 1937. Today, close to 1 million visitors a year take the tour and millions more drive across the dam. Hoover Dam is the highest concrete dam in the U.S.


London Bridge

314 London Bridge Rd., Lake Havasu City, AZ 86403
800-242-8278
golakehavasu.com
In 1962, the 130-year-old London Bridge was discovered to be sinking into the Thames. In 1968, the bridge was put up for auction and Robert P. McCulloch was the winning bidder. He spent $7 million to move the bridge to Lake Havasu City.


Mount Lemmon SkyCenter

933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721
520-626-8122
skycenter.arizona.edu
Mount Lemmon SkyCenter is an exceptional science learning facility located at Steward Observatory’s “sky island” observing site. The SkyCenter builds upon the uniqueness of the 9,157 feet summit of Mt. Lemmon and on the extensive knowledge base at the University of Arizona to deliver educational adventures.


Navajo National Monument

End of State Highway 564 off of US Highway 160, Tonalea, AZ 86044
928-672-2700
nps.gov/nava
The monument preserves and protects three large ancestral Puebloan cliff dwellings. At the largest cliff dwellings in Arizona, experience first-hand the museums, picnic areas, campgrounds and short trails.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012

Grand Canyon - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Make Arizona Your Destination To Get Away From It All

There’s No Place Like Home

Arizona has something for everyone, which is probably why most of us choose to live here: sunshine, great scenery, Western history and multiple cultures.

Our state is also a favorite destination for travelers seeking a reprieve from cold weather in the Midwest and East. It has golf and spring training baseball and some of the best resorts in the U.S. But when was the last time you made Arizona a destination for you or your family? Hopefully this will remind you of treasures in your own backyard as Arizona’s Centennial celebration draws near.

Lake Havasu City

London Bridge, Lake Havasu - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Try counting the number of bricks it took to reconstruct the London Bridge, which spans the Colorado River. Our London Bridge is based on the 1831 London Bridge that crossed the River Thames until it was dismantled in 1967.

The Grand Canyon

Take a trail ride on a burro to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, one of the world’s greatest natural wonders. Go out on a ledge — OK, it’s horseshoe-shaped — at the Grand Canyon Skywalk. If that makes you nervous and you prefer solid footing, take a ride on the Grand Canyon Railway.

Tombstone/Bisbee

If you have the desire to see ghosts, some are bound to be strolling down the streets of Tombstone, “The Town too Tough to Die.” They even conduct nightly ghost tours. If you’re curious about the once-flourishing mining industry in Bisbee, you can go on the Queen Mine Tour.

Prescott

Prescott Rodeo, Photo: Arizona Tourism & Travel - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Have a cold one at an old-time saloon on Whiskey Row. If you enjoy watching rodeos, 4th of July weekend brings alive the oldest rodeo in the world during Frontier Days.

Route 66

Follow the “Mother Road” from Holbrook to Oatman or vice versa. Stop off at Meteor Crater or stand on a corner in Winslow. The Petrified Forest National Park is a sight to see as well.

Tucson

See and be seen at the semi-annual Fourth Avenue Street Fair. Then there’s Mount Lemmon, a winter (skiing) and summer (cabins in Summerhaven) playground. You can also take a tour of the missions in and around the Old Pueblo. In addition, check out a part of American 20th-century history with a visit to the Titan Missile Museum. It’s the only publicly accessible Titan II missile site in the U.S. The coolest part of the museum is experiencing a simulated launch.

Flagstaff/Sedona

Sedona Fiesta del Tlaquepaque, Photo: Arizona Tourism & Travel - AZ Business Magazine Apr/Mar 2011Ski during the winter or take the Snowbowl Skyride during the summer. Jazz it up in October in Sedona at Jazz on the Rocks. You can also go for an artsy shopping trip at Tlaquepaque, or slip, slide away at Slide Rock State Park.

Sonoita/Patagonia

In the mood for wine? You don’t have to travel to Napa Valley or the vineyards of Italy and France. Just jump off I-10 south of Tucson and hit the vineyards of Elgin, Patagonia and Sonoita.


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Looking over rocks towards a replica lighthouse at sunrise

The Lighthouses Of Arizona

When people think of Arizona, they typically think of the majestic Grand Canyon, the endless stands of saguaros, and the stately lighthouses.

Lighthouses? In Arizona?

In fact, a total of 19 lighthouses grace the shoreline of Lake Havasu, with at least six more in the works in the middle of a landlocked desert.

“We started this as navigational lights,” explains Bob Keller, the president and co-founder of the Lake Havasu Lighthouse Club, “Coincidentally, they look like lighthouses.”

The initial idea to build lighthouses originated from a misconception. As a historical re-enactor, Keller often portrayed Robert P. McColloch, who established Lake Havasu City in 1964 and brought the world-renowned London Bridge to his new city in 1971. While researching McColloch’s storied past, Keller discovered an old city brochure featuring a curious image of a lighthouse standing at the Lake Havasu Marina entrance.

Knowing no lighthouse currently stood at the Lake Havasu Marina entrance, Keller pondered reconstructing the one featured on the brochure cover in order to celebrate and preserve the city’s history. To ensure accurate reconstruction, Keller sought guidance from McColloch’s son, Richie, since the elder McColloch passed away in early 1977.

Keller learned the lighthouse in the brochure never existed. Brochure designers drew the lighthouse into the scene for the publication. Discouraged, but not defeated, Keller built the Lake Havasu Marina Lighthouse replica anyway in 2000, thinking the lighthouse would “be good for the city.”

While building the Lake Havasu Marina Lighthouse, Keller, also an avid boater, realized the entire lake lacked enough navigational lights to keep boaters safe. So, why not build navigational lights along the shores of Lake Havasu that look like actual North American lighthouses?

Thanks to the Lake Havasu Lighthouse Club, a nonprofit organization relying exclusively upon volunteer efforts, famous lighthouses like Cape Hatteras, East Quoddy, Vermilion, Split Rock, and Alpena now shine in the Arizona desert.

Lake Havasu currently claims the title of “the city with most lighthouses in America,” and thanks to the Lake Havasu Lighthouse Club, Arizona someday could surpass Michigan as the state with the most lighthouses. Club members have cited at least 35 additional locations along Lake Havasu where a new navigational light could help safely guide boaters along the lake’s deceptively dangerous shores. Keller hopes a navigational light resides at every mile along the lake for 85 miles from Davis Dam to Parker Dam.

Men building a lighthouse

Sandy Hook Lighthouse from the distance

Split Rock Lighthouse - Looking up at a lighthouse from ground level

Sputnik - red metal lighthouse

Sandy Hook Lighthouse - Men painting a lighthouse replica

Dedication Plaque Man attaching plaque to lighthouse

Hanging Trim - Man hanging trim on lighthouse replica

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse - Sunrise behind a replica lighthouse

East Quoddy Lighthouse - Looking across rocks towards a replica lighthouse during sunrise