Tag Archives: Tucson

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Tucson Commercial Real Estate Market Review

PICOR released the following Tucson commercial real estate market review:

Office

The Tucson office vacancy rate ended 2013 in familiar territory, at 12.2%, with medical and associated uses continuing to shine more brightly than financial and service sector requirements. Investment activity picked up in the fourth quarter, with seven of the ten largest buildings sold to users in service and technology fields. We expect mild improvement across the market in 2014 with job creation the key to meaningful absorption.

Retail

On the strongest annual net absorption since 2008 (728,000 sf), the Tucson retail market improved to 7.1% vacancy at year end 2013, versus 7.9% a year before. Lease rates appear to have bottomed out, with average asking rates citywide at $14.32 psf/year. Deliveries for the year totaled almost 400,000 sf, the highest level of construction in four years. This construction was driven by tenant activity, rather than speculative development.

Industrial

The Tucson industrial market made significant headway over the course of 2013. Positive absorption of 770,000 sf allowed vacancy to improve 1.5 percentage points (pps) year over year to end the year at 10.5%, led by small business growth. Upward pressure on rents became more notable in small spaces, but not significantly enough to impact values. On the investment side, pricing pressure remained as continued REO product washed through the market. Look for continued gradual improvement in the year ahead.

Multifamily

2013 saw increases in unit absorption, average rental rates and occupancy rates, ending at a 9.41% vacancy rate on absorption of 754 units. Monthly rents increased $8 per unit to $637. Sale activity dropped sharply in 2013 due to stagnant NOIs and the midyear jump in interest rates. Expect a multi-year increase in trading activity beginning this year, thanks to improving fundamentals and heightened investor interest as other markets become overpriced.

River Center_Whole Foods, Lee and Associates

Lee & Associates Sells Tucson Shopping Center for $24.8M

River Center, a 117,563 SF Whole Foods- and Petco- anchored shopping center at 555 E. River Rd. in Tucson, has sold for $24,775,000. The sale posted a cap rate of 5.5%.
The January 9 closing was lead by Lee & Associates Arizona principals Patrick Dempsey and Jan Fincham. The buyer was Global Retail Investors, LLC, a subsidiary of First Washington Realty, Inc. of Bethesda, MD. The seller was River Center Canada, LLC.
“We were pleased to have sourced this signature Tucson project and worked diligently to provide valuable guidance for both parties,“ said Dempsey.
River Center was constructed in 1986 and remodeled in 1997 and in 2013. The center is located at the base of the Catalina Foothills in northeastern Tucson.

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Arizona Telemedicine Sets Standard of Innovation

Investments by state governments in their own state universities can yield large returns and help create new industries.  In Arizona, telemedicine is a good example of a success story.

The Arizona Telemedicine Program’s Telehealth Technology Innovation Accelerator (TTIA) supports the development of telemedicine programs in independent health-care delivery systems throughout Arizona. The Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) operates one of the largest broadband health-care telemedicine service networks in the United States, delivers federally funded distance education and training programs throughout the Southwest and supports clinical studies on innovative health-care delivery systems.

Headquartered at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, the ATP began in 1996, when then-State Representatives Robert “Bob” Burns (R-Glendale) and Lou Ann Preble (R-Tucson) championed the creation of an eight-site telemedicine program.  Ronald S. Weinstein, MD, a pioneer in telemedicine and telepathology, was recruited as its founding director. Since then, the eight-site Arizona Telemedicine Rural Network has grown 20-fold, and now extends to 160 sites in 70 communities.

“Our goal from the start was to use state funding as seed money for something far greater,” said Dr. Weinstein. “Our University of Arizona physician faculty members and basic scientists saw an opportunity to create a new type of federation of telemedicine programs, in which the UA would have multiple roles for an Arizona state-wide consortium of telemedicine programs. These roles now include creating and operating a shared broadband telecommunications network; developing inclusive training programs that address the telemedicine training needs of personnel across the entire health-care industry in Arizona; and promoting telemedicine, telehealth and mobile health (or mHealth).”

Today, a number of nationally recognized telemedicine programs are affiliated with ATP.  Personnel in these programs have received telemedicine training and technical assistance from ATP in Tucson and Phoenix or online.

The Yuma Regional Medical Center (YRMC) in Yuma, Ariz., signed on with ATP in 2006.  Greg Warda, MD, and his YRMC staff now have daily access to pediatric cardiologists led by Daniela Lax, MD, at The University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN) in Tucson. Doctors in YRMC’s 20-bassinet Neonatal Intensive Care Unit have immediate access to UA telecardiologists in Tucson over the Arizona Rural Telemedicine Network. Immediate medical decisions can be made about transferring babies born with life-threatening congenital heart defects to Tucson or Phoenix hospitals with world-class pediatric cardiothoracic surgery specialists on their staffs. Said Dr. Warda, “I can’t say enough about the cardiologists in Tucson. They’ve all been wonderful.”

Each week, the UAHN cardiology group consults on four to five YRMC cases by telemedicine video conferencing and UA cardiologists also spend a day and a half each month in Yuma following up on the babies and children they have diagnosed. ATP engineers are available 24/7 to provide technical support for this pediatric service, which has handled more than 400 expedited cases in the past five years.

Another innovative program—Phoenix-based Banner Health’s eICU (electronic intensive care unit) program, one of the largest in the nation—utilizes clinical decision support systems (CDSS), computerized diagnostic aids that automate continual analysis of patient vital signs and provide electronic access to electronic health records, lab results, medications, medical imaging and other patient data. The CDSS alerts care teams to adverse trends as well as to acute events. Spotting adverse trends in a patient’s status is challenging in any care environment due to factors such as caring for multiple patients simultaneously and routine shift changes, but is critical to preventing adverse outcomes. The CDSS allows remote intensivists (physicians who specialize in the care and treatment of patients in intensive care units) and bedside care teams to focus their efforts on the patients who need them the most.

Banner’s eICU enterprise is built around a CDSS developed by faculty in the Department of Anesthesia at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., and is led by Deborah Dahl, vice president for patient care innovation and director of telemedicine at Banner. Currently, 430 eICU rooms at 20 Banner hospitals are equipped with a fixed two-way audio-video system linked to a call center in Mesa, Ariz., from which intensivists remotely monitor patients. In addition to providing the Banner Health “teleteam” video access, the system continuously gathers data from the bedside monitors and each patient’s electronic medical record. A single intensivist can follow hundreds of patients a day by telemedicine. The eICU system saves Banner Health tens of millions of dollars a year. It improves patient care, results in discharging patients earlier and lowers 30-day readmission rates.

Another ATP teaching affiliate, the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, has a network of rural telestroke sites. Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, professor of neurology and director of the telestroke and teleneurology programs at the Mayo Clinic, and Ben Bobrow, MD, professor of emergency medicine at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix created a state-wide rural telestroke and teleneurology program that serves 1,500 patients annually, preventing permanent brain damage and death. Their telestroke network is bringing “golden hour” diagnostic services to patients at Bisbee’s Copper Queen Community Hospital and other rural hospitals in Casa Grande, Cottonwood, Flagstaff, Globe, Kingman, Parker, Show Low, Tuba City and Yuma. (The “Golden Hour” for neurology patients is the one-to-three hours after stroke symptoms first appear, when the majority of strokes may be averted by intravenous thrombolytic therapy.)

The “granddaddy” of telemedicine services in Arizona is teleradiology, the most commonly used telemedicine application in the United States. Faculty in the UA Department of Medical Imaging (formerly Department of Radiology) pioneered the development of digital radiology, the foundational technology for teleradiology. Today, teleradiology services like those developed at the UA a decade ago are offered by hundreds of teleradiology companies in the United States. Since 1998, UA radiologists have diagnosed more than 1.3 million radiology cases for patients in 25 communities in Arizona and adjacent states.

“Today a number of our outstanding telemedicine programs, owned by different health-care organizations, work together on telemedicine challenges ranging from legal and regulatory issues to telecommunications challenges to reimbursement issues of mutual concern,” said Dr. Weinstein. The ATP is proud of the fact that “the Arizona State Legislature had a strong sense of ownership of the ATP at the time of its creation 17 years ago, and is engaged in these activities of ATP more than ever today.”

Dr. Weinstein noted, “Telemedicine is everybody’s business.”

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CBRE Completes 2,700SF Dickey’s BBQ Lease in Tucson

CBRE has completed a 2,700 SF retail lease at the Plaza Escondida Shopping Center at 7850 N. Oracle Rd. in Tucson.

Jesse Peron and Peter Villaescusa with CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Newport, Calif.-based Roseville Tucson LLC. The tenant, Dickey’s BBQ Pit, was represented by Gary Best of Keller Williams Southern Arizona in Tucson.

Dickey’s BBQ Pit is one of the fastest growing chains in the country, ranking fourth on Nation’s Restaurant News Second 100 list. The Texas-based BBQ franchise has four other locations in Arizona, all in the Phoenix metro area. This lease marks the first location in Tucson and southern Arizona.

CampusTI-2, CBRE

HSL Properties Repositions Former Texas Instruments Facility

CBRE has been awarded the marketing assignment for The Campus at Tucson International in Tucson, Ariz. The six-building, 253,393-square-foot business park campus sits on 17.6 acres two blocks from Tucson International Airport. The property was formerly home to Texas Instrument’s operations in Tucson.

William DiVito and Jesse Blum with CBRE’s Tucson office will handle the marketing of the property for owner HSL Properties of Tucson. DiVito and Blum also brokered the transaction for HSL, which purchased the property in September from Texas Instruments of Dallas, Texas for an undisclosed price. HSL is currently making improvements to the property with plans to reposition and bring new life to the project and the Tucson market.

We believe Tucson is a market that can and will attract major employers with the right kind of real estate. The Campus at Tucson International is that kind of real estate,” said Humberto Lopez, president of HSL Properties. “Our goal is to attract companies that will add value to the Tucson market in the form of jobs and commerce.”

This campus once housed over 1,400 employees,” said Omar Mireles, HSL’s executive vice president. “Our vision is to see that happen again. We are committed to bringing new businesses and the jobs that come with them to Tucson.”

The Campus at Tucson International is unique in that it offers a campus environment with amenities and infrastructure that are matched only by the properties that currently house Honeywell, Ratheon and IBM,” said CBRE’s DiVito. “It’s really well positioned to attract quality tenants and we’ve already experienced a flurry of interest from a variety of potential users after officially being on the market only a few weeks.”

We’ve had interest from companies looking to utilize the property for uses ranging from basic manufacturing to high-tech optics, and even back-office and data-center operations,” said CBRE’s Blum. “Some users have inquired about the entire property, while others have interest in portions of the property. That’s the great thing about The Campus at Tucson International; there are so many possibilities for potential users which opens us up to a really wide variety of user types.”

The Campus at Tucson International is a multi-use site that includes offices, labs, a conference center with a full commercial grade kitchen and cafeteria, as well as manufacturing and warehouse space. The multi-building campus is serviced by a sophisticated on-site central utility core that offers seven megawatts of power, which makes it an attractive option for users with significant power needs. Entirely secured with multiple access points, The Campus at Tucson International is two blocks from the Tucson International Airport and within walking distance to hotels and restaurants.

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CBRE Negotiates 2KSF Office Lease in Tucson

CBRE has negotiated a 2,006 SF office lease at 2500 N. Tucson Blvd. in Tucson. David Montijo and Jeff Casper with CBRE’s Tucson office negotiated the transaction on behalf of the landlord, AEH Investors V LLC, and the tenant, The Law Offices of Annie M. Rolfe PLLC, both of Tucson.

diversity

Quarles & Brady Earns Inclusive Workplace Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that the firm’s Phoenix and Tucson offices received the Inclusive Workplace Leader Award for a medium-size company from Diversity Leadership Alliance (DLA) at their Annual Conference on Friday, November 1.

The DLA award is designed to recognize companies that are leaders in the area of Diversity & Inclusion and model the mission of DLA. In particular, they create an environment where individuals are treated and respected equally, and they are considered an “Inclusive Workplace Leader.”

“We’ve worked long and hard to create an environment in which any productive person can succeed,” says firm chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “It’s satisfying to see that our efforts have not gone unnoticed, and the workplace we’ve created is its own reward as well.”

Quarles & Brady makes diversity a central component of its strategic plan. The firm is a recognized industry leader in mentoring and developing outstanding diverse attorneys, routinely ranking above average and among the best law firms for women and diverse attorneys. The firm has women and diverse attorneys heading four of the firm’s eight offices and offers family-friendly policies, informal training and other initiatives that promote a diverse workplace.

In addition, the firm’s Executive Committee appointed a Diversity & Inclusion Committee that consists of representatives from offices across the country and includes partners, associates and staff to ensure that diversity is a part of the organization. The firm also created the position of Director of Employee Relations, Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility, held by Darlene M. Austin, to provide firm leadership on diversity efforts.

diversity

Quarles & Brady Earns Inclusive Workplace Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that the firm’s Phoenix and Tucson offices received the Inclusive Workplace Leader Award for a medium-size company from Diversity Leadership Alliance (DLA) at their Annual Conference on Friday, November 1.

The DLA award is designed to recognize companies that are leaders in the area of Diversity & Inclusion and model the mission of DLA. In particular, they create an environment where individuals are treated and respected equally, and they are considered an “Inclusive Workplace Leader.”

“We’ve worked long and hard to create an environment in which any productive person can succeed,” says firm chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “It’s satisfying to see that our efforts have not gone unnoticed, and the workplace we’ve created is its own reward as well.”

Quarles & Brady makes diversity a central component of its strategic plan. The firm is a recognized industry leader in mentoring and developing outstanding diverse attorneys, routinely ranking above average and among the best law firms for women and diverse attorneys. The firm has women and diverse attorneys heading four of the firm’s eight offices and offers family-friendly policies, informal training and other initiatives that promote a diverse workplace.

In addition, the firm’s Executive Committee appointed a Diversity & Inclusion Committee that consists of representatives from offices across the country and includes partners, associates and staff to ensure that diversity is a part of the organization. The firm also created the position of Director of Employee Relations, Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility, held by Darlene M. Austin, to provide firm leadership on diversity efforts.

heart

Sweitzer Named Head of UA Sarver Heart Center

Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, PhD, a board-certified advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist and physiologist, will become director of the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center and chief of the Division of Cardiology in the UA College of Medicine, Department of Medicine, effective March 1, 2014, announced Steve Goldschmid, MD, dean of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson.

“It is very clear that Dr. Sweitzer has a passion for professional excellence and delivery of high-quality cardiovascular care, combined with a curiosity that drives collaborative scientific discovery,” Dr. Goldschmid said.  “She also displays a deep commitment to seeking ways to improve. She personifies the UA’s ‘Never Settle’ vision – a vision that guides our strategic planning at the College of Medicine.”

Currently, Dr. Sweitzer is an associate professor of medicine and director of numerous programs, including clinical research, quality, and the heart failure and cardiac transplant programs (interim director) at the University of Wisconsin Cardiovascular Medicine Division in Madison. She also directs the cardiovascular medicine and heart failure and cardiac transplant fellowship programs there.

“Dr. Sweitzer is nationally recognized for her strong leadership and experience in clinical research. These unique talents will help her build impactful bridges between the clinical and basic science enterprises, and increase discovery in the areas of translational and personalized cardiovascular medicine,” said Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia, MD, senior vice president for health sciences and professor of medicine at the University of Arizona.

Dr. Sweitzer has a clinical research program focused on the interaction of the dysfunctional heart muscle in heart failure with the vasculature and kidneys to better understand how to improve symptoms and organ function in heart failure patients.  She has done extensive work on the physiology of heart failure with preserved systolic function, a disease that disproportionately affects elderly women. She has led and collaborated on numerous studies sponsored by the National Institutes of Health as well as studies supported by industry and academic sponsors. She also has served on numerous NIH committees and currently serves as a member of its Clinical and Integrative Cardiovascular Science Study Section and the American Heart Association’s Cardiac Biology and Regulation Committee.

“I believe in the mission of the current leadership of the University of Arizona, the College of Medicine, and The University of Arizona Health Network. Together, we are able to provide the highest level of unique advanced and specialized service to patients with heart disease in Tucson and the Southwest  and to support other cardiovascular and primary care providers in the region. The leadership at UA, combined with the strong faculty already in place, offer tremendous opportunity to grow the division’s regional and national presence and increase its prestige and recognition. I plan to build the cardiovascular division so that we will provide consistently excellent and comprehensive advanced and specialized cardiovascular disease services. As an advanced heart failure and transplant cardiologist, my focus has always been on providing the best care to the sickest patients with heart disease,” said Dr. Sweitzer.

“Dr. Sweitzer’s expertise will have a huge impact on the future advances that come from the Sarver Heart Center. Her experience as a translational researcher will be extremely valuable in terms of boosting collaboration between Sarver Heart Center members who have a strong basic science focus on cardiovascular diseases and those who understand the clinical advances that are within our grasp. We are grateful for the support we received from both the College of Medicine and The University of Arizona Health Network for making this recruitment possible,” said Carol C. Gregorio, PhD, director of the Molecular Cardiovascular Research Program and head of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the UA College of Medicine, who has served as interim director of the Sarver Heart Center since July 2013, following the retirement of Dr. Gordon A. Ewy, who served as director since 1991. Dr. Gregorio also chaired the director search committee.

“I am looking forward to the unique opportunity to lead both cardiology and cardiovascular research efforts, coupled with a successful center of excellence in the UA Sarver Heart Center. The potential to make a significant impact is far greater than most cardiology opportunities. This is largely due to the tremendous legacy of Dr. Gordon Ewy. His amazing work in both research and public outreach, saving lives and increasing understanding and awareness of cardiovascular disease is an awe-inspiring and motivating legacy. The Sarver Heart Center and the talented and dedicated staff are poised to be a real force in the Tucson community as well as the regional Southwest for improvement of care disparities and cardiovascular disease awareness, and large-scale preventive heart disease efforts,” said Dr. Sweitzer.

2106 N. Forbes | Photo credit: CoStar

PICOR Releases Recent Transaction List

APX International, Inc. leased 20,078 SF at 2106 N. Forbes, Suite 101 & 102 in Tucson from MRI Saddlehorn Investment Fund II, LLC. Rob Glaser, Industrial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord.

TAP Royal leased 500 SF at 621 N. Grand Avenue, Suite D in Nogales from Angel Mendoza.  Denisse Angulo, Industrial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord.

Filipino American Christian Fellowship of Tucson leased 1,075 SF at 6506 E. 22nd Street in Tucson from Tierra del Sol Commercial Center, LLC.  Aaron LaPrise, Retail Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord.

Tom Harrison leased 1,500 SF at 220 E. 27th Street, Suite F in Tucson from Tin Cup Properties, LLC.  Ron Zimmerman, Commercial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord.

Witt Company leased 1,732 SF at 1200 E. Ajo, Suite 109 in Tucson from Ajo/Evans Business Park, LLC. Steve Cohen and  Russ Hall,  SIOR, GSCS,  Industrial Specialists with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR represented the tenant and Pat Welchert, SIOR, Industrial Specialist and Jeff Zellet, Commercial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord.

Mort Kranitz Automotive Sales and Service, LLC. leased 1,926 SF at 2761 N. Stone Avenue in Tucson, Arizona from Wholesale Auto Exchange, Inc. Greg Furrier, Principal and Rob Tomlinson, Retail Specialists with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services represented the landlord and the tenant.

Filta Environmental Kitchen Solutions leased 2,500 SF at 3640 S. Campbell Ave, Unit 1 in Tucson from Strauss Revocable Living Trust. Paul Hooker, Industrial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represent the landlord.

Swisher Hygiene USA Operations, Inc. leased 2,500 SF at 3640 S. Campbell Ave., Unit 2 in Tucson from Strauss Revocable Living Trust. Paul Hooker, Industrial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the landlord and Sam McGill with Grant Street Associates represented the tenant.

Kachina Business Solutions, an Image 2000 Company, leased 3,883 SF at 1951 W. Grant Road, Suite 180 in Tucson from Wright and Case Holdings, LLC. Paul Hooker, Industrial Specialist with Cushman & Wakefield | PICOR, represented the tenant and David Carroll with Romano Real Estate represented the landlord.

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Ogletree Deakins Named a ‘Law Firm of the Year’

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. (Ogletree Deakins), one of the largest labor and employment law firms representing management, has been named “Law Firm of the Year” in two categories, Employment Law – Management and Labor Law – Management, in the 2014 edition of the U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms” list. Only one law firm in each practice area receives the “Law Firm of the Year” honor. This is the third consecutive year that Ogletree Deakins has been named a “Law Firm of the Year.” It is also the second consecutive year that the firm has been named “Law Firm of the Year” in the Employment Law – Management category.

In Arizona, Ogletree Deakins’ offices in Phoenix and Tucson earned “First-Tier” rankings in three practice area categories: Employment Law – Management; Labor Law – Management; and Litigation – Labor & Employment. Nationally, the firm has been recognized with six “First-Tier” rankings: Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law; Employment Law – Management; Immigration Law; Labor Law – Management; Litigation – Labor & Employment; and Construction Law. A complete list of honorees is available today at http://bestlawfirms.usnews.com/.

“We are very excited to have received ‘Law Firm of the Year’ designations again this year,” said Kim Ebert, managing shareholder of Ogletree Deakins. “We will continue our focus on providing outstanding service and value to our clients.”

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Ogletree Deakins Named a 'Law Firm of the Year'

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. (Ogletree Deakins), one of the largest labor and employment law firms representing management, has been named “Law Firm of the Year” in two categories, Employment Law – Management and Labor Law – Management, in the 2014 edition of the U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms” list. Only one law firm in each practice area receives the “Law Firm of the Year” honor. This is the third consecutive year that Ogletree Deakins has been named a “Law Firm of the Year.” It is also the second consecutive year that the firm has been named “Law Firm of the Year” in the Employment Law – Management category.

In Arizona, Ogletree Deakins’ offices in Phoenix and Tucson earned “First-Tier” rankings in three practice area categories: Employment Law – Management; Labor Law – Management; and Litigation – Labor & Employment. Nationally, the firm has been recognized with six “First-Tier” rankings: Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law; Employment Law – Management; Immigration Law; Labor Law – Management; Litigation – Labor & Employment; and Construction Law. A complete list of honorees is available today at http://bestlawfirms.usnews.com/.

“We are very excited to have received ‘Law Firm of the Year’ designations again this year,” said Kim Ebert, managing shareholder of Ogletree Deakins. “We will continue our focus on providing outstanding service and value to our clients.”

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CBRE Completes 2,550 SF MOB Lease in Tucson

CBRE has completed a 2,550 SF medical office lease at 3395 N. Campbell Ave. in Tucson.

David Montijo with CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Sante Fe, N.M.-based H.P. Enterprises LP. The tenant, Scottsdale-based internalist and men’s health specialist Dr. Charles B. Evans, was represented by Alan Laulanien with Coaction Group LLC in Phoenix.

This transaction continues the trend of expanding medical users in the market,” said CBRE’s Montijo.

This lease marks a second practice location for the tenant, who currently practices in Scottsdale. The tenant plans to take occupancy in early November.

The property is located in Rillito Corporate Park, which is also home to other medical related tenants like Pima Heart Phsycians. Built in 1986, Rillito Corporate Park in now 74.5 percent leased with 21,635 square-feet of vacant, available space.

Virtual Schools, Online Education

Pima Community College gets interim director

The retired president of a New Mexico community college has been named the interim director of a two-year college campus in Arizona.

Former Santa Fe Community College President Sheila Ortega said she starts her job at Pima Community College on Monday.

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that Ortega will be paid $173,000 a year as interim president of the college’s Community Campus, which focuses on adult basic education, workforce training and online learning.

Ortega is under contract to serve in the job through June 2014.

The college in Tucson has six locations throughout Pima County.

Ortega retired as president of the community college in Santa Fe in 2012, after a nearly 30-year career at the two-year school.

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CBRE Closes Three Deals in Tucson

Industrial:

  • Calvary Christian Fellowship of Tucson has leased 17,100-square-feet of industrial space at North Tucson Business Center 3850 and 3875 N. Business Center Dr. in Tucson. Peter Villaescusa and Jesse Peron of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the tenant in negotiating the lease agreement. The landlord, Wilson Property Services of Phoenix, Ariz., was represented by Rob Glaser and Sarah Rushing of Picor Commercial Real Estate in Tucson. The tenant took occupancy in mid-September.

Retail:

  • Kalina Russian Restaurant of Tucson has leased 2,750 SF of retail space at Bear Canyon Shopping Center at 8987 E. Tanque Verde Rd. in Tucson. Peter Villaescusa and Jesse Peron of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the landlord, Bear Canyon Associates LLC of Tucson, in negotiating the lease agreement. This lease marks an expansion for Kalina, which previously occupied the neighboring 1,400 SF space.
  • JB Restaurants IV LLC of Tucson has leased 2,400 SF of retail/restaurant space the River Crossing shopping center located at 2040 W. River Rd. in Tucson. Peter Villaescusa and Jesse Peron of CBRE’s Tucson office represented the tenant in negotiating the lease agreement. The landlord, La Cholla & River Road Associates LLC of Phoenix, was represented by Craig Finfrock of Commercial Retail Advisors in Tucson. JB Restaurants will operate as Jerry Bob’s restaurant and will open later this year.
IP

Lewis Roca Rothgerber’s IP Team earns No. 1 ranking

Lewis Roca Rothgerber’s Intellectual Property Group received more mentions by Fortune 500 companies for IP litigation than any other firm in the United States, according to Corporate Counsel Magazine’s 2013 survey, “Who Represents America’s Biggest Companies.”  The survey also recognized the firm’s patent prosecution practice.

Michael McCue, Co-Practice Group Leader of the firm’s Intellectual Property practice, said, “The survey is a testament to our practical, cost-effective representation.”  “We are focused on client service and value, not billable hours and maximizing our own profits to the detriment of our clients.”  The firm’s IP practice has been built by hiring laterals from top firms and offering flexible and creative pricing customized to clients’ needs.  The firm’s IP group serves clients across the U.S. from offices in Silicon Valley, Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver and Tucson.

IP

Lewis Roca Rothgerber's IP Team earns No. 1 ranking

Lewis Roca Rothgerber’s Intellectual Property Group received more mentions by Fortune 500 companies for IP litigation than any other firm in the United States, according to Corporate Counsel Magazine’s 2013 survey, “Who Represents America’s Biggest Companies.”  The survey also recognized the firm’s patent prosecution practice.

Michael McCue, Co-Practice Group Leader of the firm’s Intellectual Property practice, said, “The survey is a testament to our practical, cost-effective representation.”  “We are focused on client service and value, not billable hours and maximizing our own profits to the detriment of our clients.”  The firm’s IP practice has been built by hiring laterals from top firms and offering flexible and creative pricing customized to clients’ needs.  The firm’s IP group serves clients across the U.S. from offices in Silicon Valley, Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver and Tucson.

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CBRE Awarded Leasing Assignment for Innovation Park

CBRE has been awarded the marketing and leasing assignment for Innovation Park in Tucson. The 535-acre, master-planned business park in sits in the heart of Tucson’s bio-science region in Oro Valley.

A collaborative team of brokerage professionals with CBRE’s Tucson office will handle the marketing and leasing of the property for owner/developer, Venture West. Tim Healy and Bob DeLaney will focus on the industrial space, David Montijo and Jeff Casper will handle office and medical space and Nancy McClure and Michael Laatsch will oversee retail space.

Innovation Park is Southern Arizona’s only best in class business park and probably one of the nicest business parks in the western United States,” said Healy. “IP’s great bioscience foundation, with companies like Ventana Medical Systems, Sanofi and Oro Valley Hospital within IP and the U of A Bio5 Institute less than two miles away, combined with one of the most visually stunning settings and a wide selection of recreational options nearby makes this a place where companies’ employees will want to live, work and play.”

Purchased by Venture West in 2007, Innovation Park is home to world-class technology and science companies, including divisions of two of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies: Ventana Medical Systems, a member of the Roche Group, and Sanofi. The Western National Parks Association, a nonprofit cooperating association of the National Park Service and the first company to build in Innovation Park, is also located in within the complex. Additionally, Securaplane Technologies, a leading supplier of avionics products for business, commercial and military aircraft, will move into a newly-constructed, 55,000 square-foot build-to-suit space in December 2013. Construction of Securaplane’s new space marks the first project facilitated by the Economic Expansion Zone at Innovation Park.

The Economic Expansion Zone (EEZ), approved by the Town of Oro Valley in October 2012, is an overlay district that covers Innovation Park and is meant to encourage economic development by reducing the time required to establish or expand a business by making the approval process administrative for projects that meet all zoning standards.

Oro Valley, and Innovation Park, has become a major base for biotech firms in recent years, partly fueled by nearby Tucson’s University of Arizona. The U of A is a rich source for area start-ups and provides robust incubator support, and Innovation Park’s proximity to the University’s Biosphere 2 research complex and Bio5 Institute, coupled with a local pro-business government, allow for unique opportunities in the form of private and public partnerships.

In addition to a talented labor force and intellectual assets, Oro Valley was recognized as one of the best places to raise kids in Arizona by Bloomberg Business Week in 2012. Set against a beautiful Santa Catalina Mountain backdrop, Oro Valley boasts excellent schools, medical facilities and golf courses making it a true live, work, play environment.

Innovation Park is located at the intersection of Tangerine and Oracle Roads in the town of Oro Valley, Ariz. with easy access to Interstate 10. In addition to world class business amenities, Innovations Park’s 565-acre, master planned campus features 193 acres of natural open space, walking paths and hiking trails and proximity to Catalina State Park.

trauma

Abrazo Health Announces New Trauma Medical Director

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced Dr. Christopher Salvino as West Valley Hospital’s new Trauma Medical Director. Dr. Salvino is an accomplished trauma surgeon with experience in leading American College of Surgeons (ACS)-verified trauma centers.

As Trauma Medical Director (TMD), Dr. Salvino will be responsible for the development of the trauma program at West Valley Hospital. Specifically, he will develop a trauma service inclusive of a specialist on-call panel, treatment protocols, and oversee the hospital’s peer review and performance improvement process.  Additionally, he will provide leadership in the development of the regional Trauma System by continuing to serve on national, regional and local committees.

“I am thrilled to be part of the Abrazo team in developing a modern, high-quality and professional Trauma service at West Valley Hospital.” said Dr. Salvino, “The opportunity to help develop the only high-acuity trauma program in western region of Metro-Phoenix to the California border and to help integrate the other Abrazo hospitals into our system’s approach to trauma is exciting. West Valley Hospital’s world-class Trauma program will be able to care for the most critically injured trauma patients and I predict we will be very proud of our outcomes as the program launches.”

Dr. Salvino currently serves as the Clinical Assistant Professor for the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine in Tucson. He is also a board member of the Arizona Trauma and Acute Care Consortium (AzTRACC). He is a member of the State Trauma Advisory Board (STAB) serving as co-chair for the workgroup charged with revising the State Trauma Plan. Additionally, Dr. Salvino developed the first formal training course for trauma laparoscopy in the United States as a surgical resident.

medical.research

UA Seeking People for Breast Cancer-Vegetable Study

University of Arizona Cancer Center researchers are seeking participants in Maricopa County for a study designed to determine if a compound found in broccoli can enhance the health-promoting effects of the breast cancer drug Tamoxifen in women at risk of developing breast cancer or those previously treated for early-stage breast cancer.

Since receiving a $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2011, UACC researcher Cynthia Thomson, PhD, RD, and her team have recruited 106 women who are taking Tamoxifen for the DIME study. Enrollment will continue both in Tucson and Phoenix, through the early part of 2014 with a goal of 170 participants.

Tamoxifen is an accepted treatment for breast cancer. Dr. Thomson, a professor of Health Promotion Sciences in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of Arizona, notes that data from diet studies of people who have a higher intake of cruciferous vegetables – cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and broccoli – suggest that intake may reduce the risk of certain cancers, including breast, colorectal, bladder and possibly prostate.

“We have previously shown that women taking Tamoxifen who eat more vegetables may decrease cancer recurrence risk. This study will test the potential health-promoting effects using one isolated bioactive compound found in cruciferous vegetables, diindolylmethane (DIM), and compare it to a placebo intervention in favorably changing hormone levels and breast characteristics like breast density,” Dr. Thomson says.

Alison Stopeck, MD, a co-investigator in the study and the director of the Clinical Breast Cancer Program at the UA Cancer Center, sees this research as a unique opportunity to determine the potential of non-invasive imaging to be a reliable biomarker for breast cancer risk. Women in the study will complete periodic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures for measuring breast characteristics.

Study participants will be asked to take the supplement or placebo for 18 months and complete periodic clinical evaluation visits. The supplement is a patented, absorption enhancing formulation of diindolylmethane known as BioResponse DIM® (also known under the tradenames Indolplex® or BR-Dim®) supplied by BioResponse, LLC, of  Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the DIME study in Maricopa County, call Dianne Parish, RN, at 602-264-4461 for Central Phoenix or Patti Blair, RN, at 480-461-3772 for Mesa. More information is also available at azcc.arizona.edu/node/3628.

The DIME Study is supported by grant number CA149417 from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

Aerospace and defense industry - AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

Aerospace & Defense Forum launches Arizona Chapter

The Aerospace & Defense Forum, a global aerospace and defense organization promoting collaboration and commerce among industry leaders, has established an Arizona chapter which will launch in October.

An impressive line-up of Arizona business leaders will lead the Arizona Chapter Steering Committee and host monthly meetings and networking events. The Phoenix meetings will be hosted by the international law firm Greenberg Traurig and the Tucson meetings will be hosted by law firm Snell & Wilmer. Monthly chapter meetings will take place the second Tuesday of each month, alternating between Phoenix and Tucson, and include networking opportunities, presentations by aerospace and defense industry experts and small group discussions and at least once a year, a tour of an A&D facility not generally available to the public.

Ivan Rosenberg, President and CEO of Frontier Associates is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of A&D Forum. Stephane Frijia, Director, Research and Strategy at the Greater Phoenix Economic Council will serve as Chapter Chair of the Arizona A&D Forum.

In addition, those serving on the founding Arizona A&D Steering Committee include:
* Jerry Fellows, Shareholder, Greenberg Traurig, Phoenix
* Brett Johnson, Partner, Snell & Wilmer, Phoenix
* Richard Katz, Counsel, Snell & Wilmer, Tucson
* Bruce Macdonough, Co-Managing Shareholder, Greenberg Traurig, Phoenix
* Peter Vedder, Director, Civil Space and Space Services, General Dynamics C4 Systems

“We’re thrilled to bring this proven collaborative format to the Arizona A&D community,” said Rosenberg. “A&D companies have discovered that A&D Forum membership and group involvement provides an unmatched source of new ideas for improving both their top and bottom lines, as well as a forum for learning best practices and solving problems.”

The inaugural meeting of the Arizona chapter will take place Oct. 8, with a keynote presentation by Lt. Gen. Gene Tattini, Deputy Director, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), entitled,  “Dare Mighty Things: Turning Around Two A&D Organizations.” Tattini is also former Commander of the United States Air Force Space and Missile System Center.

Currently, there are more than 700 international leaders involved in the A&D Forum. Other A&D Chapters are located in Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange County, Calif. In Arizona, there are more than 2,000 companies in the aerospace and defense industry providing more than 43,000 jobs and significant positive economic impact.

“The Greater Phoenix Economic Council reported more than $13 billion in defense contracts with Arizona ties in 2012 alone. These high-paying jobs make a significant economic impact in our state and we are proud to support and encourage industry growth,” said Greenberg Traurig Co-Managing Shareholder Bruce Macdonough. “We also look forward to raising the visibility of Arizona a top-tier destination for the best aerospace and defense companies to grow and prosper.”

Each monthly meeting is free of charge, but registration is required. To RSVP for the Oct. 8 meeting, visit: https://adfazoct13.eventbrite.com.

Aerospace and defense industry - AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

Aerospace & Defense Forum launches Arizona Chapter

The Aerospace & Defense Forum, a global aerospace and defense organization promoting collaboration and commerce among industry leaders, has established an Arizona chapter which will launch in October.

An impressive line-up of Arizona business leaders will lead the Arizona Chapter Steering Committee and host monthly meetings and networking events. The Phoenix meetings will be hosted by the international law firm Greenberg Traurig and the Tucson meetings will be hosted by law firm Snell & Wilmer. Monthly chapter meetings will take place the second Tuesday of each month, alternating between Phoenix and Tucson, and include networking opportunities, presentations by aerospace and defense industry experts and small group discussions and at least once a year, a tour of an A&D facility not generally available to the public.

Ivan Rosenberg, President and CEO of Frontier Associates is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of A&D Forum. Stephane Frijia, Director, Research and Strategy at the Greater Phoenix Economic Council will serve as Chapter Chair of the Arizona A&D Forum.

In addition, those serving on the founding Arizona A&D Steering Committee include:
* Jerry Fellows, Shareholder, Greenberg Traurig, Phoenix
* Brett Johnson, Partner, Snell & Wilmer, Phoenix
* Richard Katz, Counsel, Snell & Wilmer, Tucson
* Bruce Macdonough, Co-Managing Shareholder, Greenberg Traurig, Phoenix
* Peter Vedder, Director, Civil Space and Space Services, General Dynamics C4 Systems

“We’re thrilled to bring this proven collaborative format to the Arizona A&D community,” said Rosenberg. “A&D companies have discovered that A&D Forum membership and group involvement provides an unmatched source of new ideas for improving both their top and bottom lines, as well as a forum for learning best practices and solving problems.”

The inaugural meeting of the Arizona chapter will take place Oct. 8, with a keynote presentation by Lt. Gen. Gene Tattini, Deputy Director, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), entitled,  “Dare Mighty Things: Turning Around Two A&D Organizations.” Tattini is also former Commander of the United States Air Force Space and Missile System Center.

Currently, there are more than 700 international leaders involved in the A&D Forum. Other A&D Chapters are located in Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange County, Calif. In Arizona, there are more than 2,000 companies in the aerospace and defense industry providing more than 43,000 jobs and significant positive economic impact.

“The Greater Phoenix Economic Council reported more than $13 billion in defense contracts with Arizona ties in 2012 alone. These high-paying jobs make a significant economic impact in our state and we are proud to support and encourage industry growth,” said Greenberg Traurig Co-Managing Shareholder Bruce Macdonough. “We also look forward to raising the visibility of Arizona a top-tier destination for the best aerospace and defense companies to grow and prosper.”

Each monthly meeting is free of charge, but registration is required. To RSVP for the Oct. 8 meeting, visit: https://adfazoct13.eventbrite.com.

Michael Crow (current)

TREO Luncheon features university presidents

Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities, Inc. (TREO) will feature state university presidents, Dr. Ann Weaver Hart, of the University of Arizona and Dr. Michael M. Crow, of Arizona State University, at its 8th Annual Luncheon on Wednesday, September 25th at the Westin La Paloma Resort in Tucson.

Strong economies are defined by well-paying jobs, held by individuals possessing knowledge and skills that are in demand. Post-secondary education most often provides these skill sets. While US citizens have traditionally been among the best-educated in the world, the nation now ranks 12th in the number of 25- to 34-year olds with college degrees. Businesses often cite the difficulty of finding qualified workers as a barrier to growth. Talent is always the number one factor in site selection decisions.

What is being done in the Sun Corridor to address talent development? Join TREO for a higher education update and a frank discussion on educating the next generation for jobs of today and the future.

When: Wednesday, September 25, 2013
Where: Westin La Paloma Resort, 3800 East Sunrise Drive, Tucson, AZ
Time: 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Luncheon and Presentation
Registration: http://conta.cc/12e195U

 

iPhone Business Apps

‘Bring Your Own Device’ trend a growing concern

The rise in popularity of smart phones, tablets and laptops has blurred the increasingly thin line between professional and personal life, between work time and personal time. But it’s is also creating security concerns for business owners who let their employees use those tech toys for work.

“Employers need to address the question of how to react to the inevitable or current use of personal or shared devices by their employees,” said Cheri Vandergrift, a staff attorney for Mountain States Employers Council, a leader in human resource and employment law services for the business community. “From IT issues to privacy and litigation concerns, companies that ignore the rising ‘Bring Your Own Device’ tide may find that BYOD brought nothing but disaster.”

While an AccelOps Cloud Security Survey of IT security personnel ranked BYOD as the top source for fear of incurring data loss, there are also concerns regarding employee privacy should litigation ensue and the question of using personal devices goes into the courtroom. The use of personal devices in the workplace stirs questions within the IT, legal and human resources departments of companies.

“Data access and ownership are significant legal issues that surround the BYOD trend,” said John Balitis, director at Fennemore Craig. “Employees accessing employer systems with personal devices can create major network security risks and employer IT staff accessing the devices to support them can infringe on employee privacy. Further, how to define who owns what information on the devices is challenging.”

Laurent Badoux, a shareholder in Greenberg Traurig’s Phoenix office, said there are a number of legal issues that could arise from the BYOD trend. Among them:

* Breach of confidentiality — especially with medical or financial data.
* Commercial espionage or unfair competition.
* Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) claims of unreported or unpaid time.
* Dispute as to ownership of data stored on personal devices.
* Claims of harassment, defamation, invasion of privacy, etc. from improper social media posting of workplace conduct.
* Negligence torts if an exployee tries to answer a work text or email while driving and causes an accident.

“The most glaring risk (an employer takes) is that sensitive confidential corporate data becomes compromised, either because an outsider is able to access that data through an employee’s device or to copy data stored on that device,” Badoux said. “When their sensitive data becomes compromised, companies face damage to the bottom lines and public image.”

According to Travis Williams, senior counsel at the Frutkin Law Firm, if a company believes information is jeopardized, or upon termination of an employee’s employment, the employer may have the right to seize the device for a short time to ensure proper protection or removal of company’s sensitive information.

“Employees need to understand that business information on their device is the property of the employer,” Williams said. “The employer has the right to protect the information. The protection may allow the employer to seize or force ‘wipe’ the device to ensure proper removal of the information.”

While there is no doubt that the BYOD trend has given tech-savvy employees the opportunity to create a more flexible schedule and therefore increase their productivity, experts said it’s imperative that companies find a balance between protecting sensitive work data, while still providing employees flexibility and independence.

“Have a policy that specifically addresses what employees can and cannot do with PEDs (personal electronic devices) used for work-related purposes and enforce that policy,” said Tibor Nagy, Jr., a shareholder at the Tucson office of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart. “Be sure the policy addresses what happens to employer data when the employee leaves employment.”

Experts said companies who worry about issues related to the BYOD trend should look to impose tighter security constraints, develop technology guidelines and policies or employ mobile-device management tools, services and systems.

“An employer absolutely should implement a BYOD policy if the employer allows or encourages employees to use personal devices for work,” Balitis said.

Badoux said an effective BYOD program should include:

1. Mandatory Mobile Device Management software
2. Clarification of expectations on ownership of data, privacy and access to dual-use devices.
3. “Acceptable Use” procedures harmonized with the employee handbook or agreement).
4. A well-crafted social media policy.

“Do not allow highly sensitive employer, personnel, health information, or customer data to be stored on an employee’s PED, unless you are certain that device will be used and protected to the same degree as an employer-owned device,” Nagy said. “Only allow PEDs that are ‘enterprise; enabled. Enterprise requirements include encryption of storage media; the ability to remotely wipe or clean a device; the ability to enforce password changes and password complexity; the ability to apply upgrades and patches; and the ability to revoke rights to data or corporate network access.”