Tag Archives: university of arizona

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

rsz_the_bridges

Pair of University of Arizona Projects Recognized as Best by IEDC

The University of Arizona received national recognition from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) for two economic development projects that have had a significant impact on the Tucson region.

The Bridges/UA Bio Park was recognized as one of the top economic development projects in the U.S. during 2012. The project earned a silver award for Public‐Private Partnerships.

“The project was recognized as an outstanding and innovative development that has significantly enhanced the economic revitalization of a distressed communities, state or region.”

Projects recognized in this area represented efforts in which larger private contributions have been added to smaller, vital public commitments. The other winners were Space Florida and NASA/Kennedy Space Center Commercial Partnership, Ogden City/Boyer Company Public‐Private Partnership, and Brick City Development Corporation’s Food Depot project.

The Bridges is a master‐planned, 350‐acre mixed‐use development in south central Tucson. It is a partnership of UA, 5151 LLC (Lennar Homes and KB Home) and Retail West/Eastbourne Investments.

The Bridges is anchored by the UA’s 65-acre bio park which is being developed and managed by the UA Office of University Research Parks. The Bridges is bringing much needed retail and residential development to Tucson’s central city. It is home to two large retailers with several smaller retail pads under development.

The UA Bio Park is being developed as a site for high technology companies, especially those in the fields of biosciences, life sciences and health care. The park will include commercial facilities, a science high school hotel and conference center and multi‐family housing.

UA recently completed construction of the core site improvements and infrastructure including roads, water, sewer, and utilities. The UA Office of University research parks has developed the park through strong partnerships with the surrounding neighborhoods, community organizations, and the city and county governments.

The Solar Zone at the UA Tech Park was recognized as the best project for Sustainable & Green Development for communities with populations of greater than 500,000.

The UA Tech Park, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), created the Solar Zone to accelerate the growth and development of the solar industry in Southern Arizona.  The Solar Zone is a business and research zone aimed at new product development, test, evaluation, demonstration and generation of solar energy to spur industry growth. 

Phase One of the Solar Zone, dedicated to projects selected by TEP, occupies 165 acres of land and hosts seven companies demonstrating a variety of solar energy technologies.  With a combined capacity of 23 MW, Phase One arrays are designed to generate power that is fed directly into TEP’s electrical grid and delivered to TEP customers through long-term purchase power agreements or utility ownership. When fully complete in early 2013, Phase One will be the largest multi-technology solar demonstration site in the world.

Companies can demonstrate their technology at the “utility” or grid level (MW). Phase Two focuses on research, development and production of new solar technology and applications.The Solar Zone at the UA Tech Park is managed by the UA Office of University Research Parks and received a gold award in this category.

IEDC’s Excellence in Economic Development Awards recognize the world’s best economic development programs and partnerships, marketing materials, and the year’s most influential leaders. These awards honor organizations and individuals for their efforts in creating positive change in urban, suburban, and rural communities.

The UA projects competed with 741 submissions from economic development organizations, corporations and public/private entities throughout the country. The awards were presented at an awards ceremony on Oct. 2, during the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) Annual Conference in Houston.

“We recognize UA Office of University Research Parks for creating innovative and successful strategies to promote economic development in this period of global recovery,” said Jay Moon, IEDC chair. “Our awards honor organizations and individuals for their efforts in creating positive change in communities. The UA Office of University Research Parks demonstrates that they are at the forefront of the economic development profession and are using cutting‐edge, effective practices that can be replicated in other communities.”

 

Tucson Adventures - EAZ Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Tucson Adventures (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Tucson Adventures — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Old Tucson Studios

201 S. Kinney Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85735
(520) 883-0100
oldtucson.com
Old Tucson Studios is an Old West theme park and a working movie location where you’ll find Western movie history, historical tours, shopping, seasonal events and more.


Biosphere 2

32540 S. Biosphere Rd.,
Oracle, AZ 85623
(502) 838-6200
b2science.org
The $150-million facility opened in 1991 as a massive closed system that would last for 100 years to test nature, technology and human endurance. Opened to the public in 2002, visitors to Biosphere 2 can explore inside the 3.15-acre structure on a fully-guided tour.


University of Arizona

1200 E. University Blvd.,
Tucson, AZ 85721
(520) 621-2211
arizona.edu/visit-ua
With its main campus covering 380 acres in Central Tucson, this university offers plenty of attractions and activities, including the Arizona State Museum, the University of Arizona Museum of Art, the Campus Arboretum and more.


Mission San Xavier Del Bac

1950 W. San Xavier Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85746
(520) 294-2624
sanxaviermission.org
Mission San Xavier del Bac is referred to as the “White Dove of the Desert.” This active Franciscan mission is located on the Tohono O’Odham Indian Reservation.


Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

2021 N. Kinney Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85743
(520) 883-2702
desertmuseum.org
A world-renowned zoo, with more than 300 animal species and 1,200 kinds of plants, a natural history museum and a botanical garden — all in one place.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

117321013

UA earns grant to study biodiesel effects

Researchers at the University of Arizona have won a $1.4 million grant to study the occupational and environmental health effects of underground mining equipment that runs on biodiesel-blend fuels.

The university says mining operators are shifting from diesel to biodiesel-blend fuels in a bid to lower exposure to pollutants.

Biodiesel is made from vegetable oil or animal fat and can be added to diesel as a blend or used on its own.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health awarded the grant to the university’s public health college and mining department.

rsz_park_ave_tucson

Beal | Derkenne Construction to Build Student Housing Project in Tucson

 

Beal | Derkenne Construction has entered a pre-construction agreement for a student housing project in Tucson.

The project, Park Avenue, is being developed by Campus Acquisitions (CA) of Chicago.

Work is scheduled to begin in 1Q 2013, with completion expected to be finalized by 3Q 2014.

Park Avenue is representing the second phase of a student housing project close to the University of Arizona.

Park Avenue, bordering the UA campus, will allow Beal | Derkenne to go beyond the realm of ordinary student living by being part of the extensive, high end, luxury, student housing project, which will be home to 386 student residents with 166 units in total.

“Campus Acquisitions is pleased to announce the start of its second high-rise, luxury student housing project at the University of Arizona, adding to CA’s legacy of building the premier buildings on campuses nationwide,” said Stephen G. Bus, VP Acquisitions & Development of Campus Acquisitions.

“We are looking forward to work with BDC on an exceptional project with a demanding schedule and trust BDC’s experience to deliver with their remarkable standards.”

 

Linthicum - Tucson Aloft

Linthicum Starts Construction For Aloft Hotel Conversion In Tucson

Linthicum has started construction for Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, converting a seven-story Four Points by Sheraton hotel to Aloft Tucson University located at 1900 E. Speedway Blvd. in Tucson.

Located adjacent to the University of Arizona, the 154-room hotel conversion is being built on a fast-track, nine-month construction schedule transforming the existing hotel into Starwood’s popular “next generation” brand.

Linthicum is building a completely new glass and stucco exterior, creating a contemporary urban interior, the re:fuel eatery, buzzing re:mix lounge and happening w xyx bar by Aloft, second-level pool and subterranean parking garage.

The 95,000 SF Aloft hotel demonstrates Starwood’s commitment to the fast-growing, three-year-old Aloft brand.

“It’s encouraging to see brand leaders like Starwood once again investing in the Arizona market,” said Linthicum CEO Eric Linthicum. “The Aloft Hotel’s second conversion nationwide is great for Tucson and the construction industry.”

Vann Allan of Linthicum is serving as the project manager for the Tucson Aloft hotel. Linthicum’s Tom Decker is project superintendent.

Linthicum is a builder of high-quality custom commercial, golf and residential properties in the Western U.S. Founded in 1984, the company’s work has included projects in Arizona, California and Hawaii, including the Kukui’ula Resort and Spa on the island of Kauai in Hawaii.

For further information on Linthicum visit linthicumcorp.com.

Air Quality

A Better Environment: Improving Air Quality And Our Health

Did you know 13 million deaths could be prevented every year by making our environment healthier? The fact is, public health is intricately connected to our environment regardless of where we live. This link between health and the environment has increasingly become a focal point for the medical community, policymakers and the general public. Some of the foremost factors are air pollution and exposure to pests and chemicals, which can have a significant impact on not only our health but also our quality of life.

The EPA considers indoor air quality one of the top five environmental risks to public health. It is a serious health issue for people who work inside, and furthermore, Americans spend 90 percent of their lives indoors.

Air quality is closely linked to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the leading cause of hospitalization in adults, and it can also contribute to asthma and cardiovascular diseases.

Did you know the main reason for school absenteeism is asthma? It accounts for more than 12.8 million missed school days in a single academic year, and every day, nearly 40,000 people miss school or work due to this chronic disease.

The annual cost of asthma is estimated at nearly $18 billion in direct and indirect costs, such as hospitalizations and lost earnings, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation. Household pests also contribute to health problems with German cockroaches and dust mites a key risk factor for asthma development and exacerbation of asthma symptoms.

Green building emphasizes ventilation and non-toxic, low-emitting materials that create healthier and more comfortable living and working environments. The built environment has also recently been recognized as an important potential contributor to reduced levels of physical activity. An important element of sustainable design is the preservation of natural environments that afford a variety of recreation and exercise opportunities. Green buildings also seek to facilitate alternatives to driving, such as bicycling and public transport, which eases local traffic while encouraging personal health and fitness.

An interactive panel of local healthcare experts discuss the impact of the environment on our health at Valley Forward’s Quarterly Luncheon on Tuesday, April 3 at the Hyatt Regency Phoenix.

Dawn Gouge, Ph.D., entomologist specialist at University of Arizona, will talk about how public health is affected by pests and pesticides, including the rising bed bug crisis our nation is facing. In addition, Fred Karnas, Ph.D., president and CEO of St. Luke’s Health Initiatives, will spotlight health impacts in relation to the built environment and what constitutes livable, walkable communities. The program will be moderated by Bob England, M.D., director of the Maricopa County Department of Public Health.

Join us for this enlightening perspective on how our health is impacted by where we live, work and play — and how we can improve our environment, including improving air quality and reducing exposure to pests and chemicals. Visit valleyforward.org for more information.

Quality Education and Jobs Initiative

Quality Education and Jobs Initiative To Prevent Cuts To Education

The Quality Education and Jobs Initiative was filed today with the Secretary of State’s Office. The initiative renews the voter-approved one-cent sales tax to provide dedicated statewide funding for education for students of all ages tied to performance and accountability, scholarships for university and community college students, reinvestment in vocational education and new jobs.

“This added investment from preschool through university represents a game-changer in the quest for quality education and offers voters a once-in-a-generation opportunity to take a giant leap forward,” Cunningham says.

This grassroots-led effort will prevent the Legislature from making any further cuts to K-12 education and reinvests in our state’s education system to prepare our students, teachers and schools for more rigorous academic Common Core standards that will go into effect in the 2015-2016 school year.

“We are expecting more from our students, our teachers and our schools statewide,” says Ann-Eve Pedersen, a parent leader who chairs the Quality Education and Jobs Committee. “To help them succeed and to help our economy grow, we must provide targeted resources to ensure we meet our goals to significantly improve education across the spectrum in Arizona.

“Strong schools, vocational education programs, community colleges and universities help create the strong workforce that makes Arizona attractive to the higher-wage employers we need,” adds Pedersen, president of the Arizona Education Parent Network, a statewide nonpartisan, non-profit organization founded in 2009. “This initiative helps us succeed in strengthening education for students of all ages and meeting goals set by policymakers to increase high school graduation rates, ensure more children are reading at grade level by third grade, improve performance on nationally-normed tests and increase the number of students receiving bachelor’s degrees.”

A percentage of incentive funds will be tied to system-wide performance and will only be released to school districts and charter schools statewide if overall performance improves. Funding for career and technical programs in our high schools and community colleges as well as university funding will also be tied to performance and auditing requirements. A poverty factor will ensure that resources go to school districts and charter schools serving students living in poverty to help them achieve and to fund voluntary preschool programs in those school districts and charter schools.

“This is great news for Arizona university and community college students,” says James Allen, University of Arizona student body president. “This initiative brings real solutions and will ensure we can graduate students to fill the jobs of the future.”

While 80 percent of the resources raised will be dedicated to education, additional components in the measure ensure that there are jobs awaiting students when they graduate and that children come to school healthy, safe and ready to learn. The measure restores KidsCare, a program that provides healthcare for children living in poverty. It also creates the Family Stability and Self-Sufficiency Fund, administered by the Governor’s Office, which provides resources to state agencies and non-profits to help reduce family violence, provide childcare, and reduce hunger and homelessness.

To help create new jobs and protect public safety, the initiative prevents the Legislature from diverting funds from the Highway User Revenue Fund (HURF) and the Vehicle License Tax.

The HURF funds can continue to be used for highway patrol officers and will help fund transportation projects. The initiative will also create a state infrastructure fund that will help build road, rail and transit projects in our communities – another boost to our economy by creating new jobs and ensuring that modes of transporting goods and people are safe and high-functioning.

“Educating our children will prepare them for quality jobs in the future, but it is also of the utmost importance that jobs are created now for them to fill later,” says Matt Gully, President of Tempe-based FNF Construction and a member of the Board of Directors of the Arizona Chapter-Associated General Contractors. “The preservation of HURF and creation of the infrastructure fund will result in immediate job creation that will help jumpstart our economy’s recovery.”

With today’s filing, the Quality Education and Jobs Committee will immediately begin collecting the 172,809 signatures needed to qualify for the November ballot.

For more information about the Quality Education and Jobs Initiative, please visit qualityeducationandjobs.com or call 1-888-530-2297.

 

University Of Arizona

The University Of Arizona Celebrates Innovation

The University of Arizona (UA) hosted its ninth annual Innovation Day on March 6.  The event, attended by over 300 people, celebrated the UA’s success in technology development and innovation by highlighting the research achievements of students, staff, and faculty.

Innovation Day opened with UA at the Leading Edge, which showcased the cutting edge research of leading UA faculty members.  The session was chaired by Dr. Len Jessup, Dean of the Eller College of Management.

This year’s Leading Edge researchers included:

  • Eric A. Betterton, Ph.D. focuses on atmospheric and environmental chemistry exploring an atmospheric model to forecast wind-blown dust from natural and man-made sources.  This research supports the development of dust forecasting technology for health and traffic advisories.
  • Leslie Gunatilaka, Ph.D. explores novel compounds synthesized by exotic plants from the arid zones of Asia, S. America and the Sonoran desert, and evaluates these compounds for medicinal value.
  • Larry Head, Ph.D. specializes in systems and industrial engineering.  His research on priority based traffic signals is working to save the lives of fire and rescue first responders.
  • Sharon Megdal, Ph.D. concentrates on state and regional water resource management and policy.  Her work on environmental water needs, aquifer recharge and assessment, and planning to meet future water needs of growing, semi-arid regions contributes to improved development and understanding of state water management strategies.
  • James T. Schwiegerling, Ph.D. is developing a design for an accommodating intraocular lens, which behaves just like the flexible human lens in the eye, which can be used as a replacement in cataract surgery.

The celebration of University of Arizona innovation continued with the Technology Innovation Awards Luncheon, which honored an outstanding faculty member and student for their achievements in translating original ideas from the laboratory to the marketplace.

This year’s faculty Technology Innovation Award recipient is Ronald S. Weinstein, M.D.  Dr. Weinstein has pursed a wide variety of projects in his medical career.  He has pioneered original research in cancer diagnostics and the human-computer interface, championed the translation of his inventions into commercial products, and founded companies in the technology-based sector to market their products.  Dr. Weinstein is an internationally acclaimed academic physician who invented, patented, and commercialized “telepathology” a transformational healthcare delivery system that leverages the power of broadband telecommunications.  He is the founding director of the award-winning Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP).

Alexandra Armstrong, a final-year PhD candidate in Veterinary Sciences and Microbiology, received the student Technology Innovation Award.  Alexandra Armstrong is a leading force in the area of preventing bacterial food borne diseases. Ms. Armstrong’s doctoral project resulted in a novel, reproducible, effective vaccine to reduce Campylobacter jejuni. The commercial potential of this vaccine is enormous.

The UA also recognized the extraordinary accomplishment of Michael Drake (1946-2011), a leader in the cosmochemistry scientific community.   He was the guiding force in the Phoenix Mars Mission and the recently announced OSIRIS-Rex mission.

A special video titled “Thinking the Impossible” premiered during the luncheon and highlighted how the University of Arizona has been a global leader in scientific and technological innovation for over a hundred years.

Following the luncheon, the Innovation Showcase provided an opportunity for participants to interact with UA departments, start-up companies from the Arizona Center for Innovation, as well as get an early glimpse at the business plans of students from the McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship.

The Innovation Showcase Awards recognized student teams who developed business plans from the McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship at the Eller College of Management.  The companies were judged on various aspects of their business presentation.  The People’s Choice Award was presented to the business venture that received the most Innovation Bucks from showcase attendees.  Mindful Monkee, received the People’s Choice award and $200 cash prize.  Top student ventures overall were selected by a panel of judges comprised of angel investors and entrepreneurs.  Two student teams won booth appeal.  First place winner for booth appeal, OnwardPacks, received $250 cash prize and second place winner, Advanced Armor Applications, won $150 cash prize.  Two student teams won communication and fluency awards.  First place winner, MistoBox, received $250 cash prize and second place winner, Testab, won $150 cash prize.

Innovation Day at the UA was organized by the Office of University Research Parks and the Arizona Center for Innovation in partnership with the UA’s Senior Vice President for Research, UA External Relations, Office of Technology Transfer, and the McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship.

Innovation Day’s title sponsor was Research Corporation for Science Advancement.  Other sponsors included: Arizona Commerce Authority, Arizona Tech Council, BizTucson, Hecker and Muehlebach, PLLC., Tucson Electric Power and Strategy 1.

Innovation Day at the UA was an official Arizona Centennial Event as well as a signature event of the Arizona SciTech Festival.

W.J. Maloney Plumbing

W.J. Maloney Plumbing Changes Name To W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling

W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling — previously known as W.J. Maloney Plumbing — has changed its name in an attempt to promote the company’s new contracting and service offerings.

According to company president Kathryn “Kitty” Maloney-Langmade, W.J. Maloney has been a leading plumbing contractor in Arizona for almost 50 years. HVAC was added in the past two years and the new name reflects this change, allowing for a more accurate description of the company.

Kathryn Maloney, president of W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling

Maloney-Langmade explains the reason behind the addition of HVAC, “We have adapted to the changing marketplace,” she says. She also adds that, “Our HVAC division handles both commercial and residential cooling and heating.”

W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling was founding in 1964 by William Joseph Jr. and Mary Kathryn Maloney. The company worked with some of the largest contractors in the state. W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling’s exemplary design build plumbing includes parking structures, penthouses, technical process piping and complex multi-story projects, including many of the prominent buildings in the Valley.

W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling’s recent projects include the Orthopedic and Spine Inpatient Surgical Hospital in Phoenix, the solar thermal project at the University of Arizona, the Sky Train Project at Sky Harbor International Airport and the Mariposa Land Port of Entry expansion near Nogales.

W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling provides both commercial and residential services, maintenance and repair. The company is Small Business Enterprise (SBE) and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) certified.

For more information about W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling, call (602) 944-5516 or visit wjmaloney.com

Arizona Inventors, Innovators - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Inventors, Innovations Leave Indelible Mark In American History

Arizona inventors and innovations leave an indelible mark in American history

Arizona may have been one of the last states to join the Union, but in its first 100 years, it’s been a leader in revolutionizing America. From nature’s mysteries to healthcare miracles, from sports to education and the exploration of outer space, Arizonans have had a hand in shaping our lives and the way we view the world.

Arizona Inventors & Innovators:

Name that sound

Arizona Inventors, Karsten Solheim
Frustrated with his putting, avid golfer Karsten Solheim created his “Ping” putter in 1959, named for the sound created when the putter hit the golf ball. Two years later, he moved from California to Arizona and continued to revolutionize golf. His success led to the start of a company that still calls Phoenix home today.

Rings of time

A.E. Douglass, an American astronomer, began researching the idea of tree-ring dating, or dendrochronology, prior to Arizona’s statehood. But the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona wasn’t formed until 1937. He is credited with pinpointing the age of ruins that include the Aztec Ruins in New Mexico and the Mesa Verde cliff dwellings in Colorado.

A,B,C and 1,2,3

Joan Ganz Cooney, who received her B.A. degree in education from the University of Arizona in 1951, was part of a team who captured the hearts and imaginations of children around the world with the development of Sesame Workshop, creators of the popular “Sesame Street,” now in its 42nd season.

Mars brought to life

Launched into space in August 2008, the Phoenix Mars Lander was the first mission to Mars led by an academic institution, which was the University of Arizona and its principal investigator, Peter Smith, a professor at the school’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory.

Heart to heart

Arizona Inventors, Jack Copeland, artificial heart - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011
The first successful surgery and use of an artificial heart was conducted at the University Medical Center in Tucson by Dr. Jack Copeland in 1985. His patient lived nine days using the Jarvik 7 Total Artificial Heart before he received a donor heart.

The ripe test

Dr. Mark Riley at the University of Arizona has developed a sticker that, when placed on fruit or vegetables that emit ethylene gas, will change color. If the fruit is ripe, the sticker will appear dark blue. Once the fruit stops producing the gas, the color fades. The color change takes just a couple of minutes. Tests have been successful on both apples and pears, but the stickers aren’t available yet to consumers.

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

Arizona State Credit Union Awards Scholarships

Arizona State Credit Union Awards $34,000 To College Students, Graduates

Arizona State Credit Union awarded $34,000 in scholarships to 18 individuals – a combination of both college students and recent college graduates of Arizona schools.

The scholarships were awarded through Arizona State Credit Union’s Community Leaders Scholarship and Loan Reduction program.

The Community Leaders Scholarship provides help for students to pay for tuition, books and other academic expenses, whereas the Load Reduction Grant helps graduates pay for student loans. The graduates were awarded for their academic achievements and commitment to the community.

Recipients of the scholarships are from various Arizona schools, including Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, University of Arizona, University of Phoenix, Gila Community College, Mesa Community College and Paradise Valley Community College.

“I commend each of these students for the commitment they have made to their education,” said David E. Doss, President/CEO of Arizona State Credit Union.

These scholarships are only one part of the scholarships and grants that Arizona State Credit Union supports. The Credit Union is a supporter of sustainability and providing assistance to the Arizonans and local communities that it serves.

Arizona State Credit Union is a non-profit, statewide financial cooperative. The company has 21 branches across Arizona that provides financial products and services.

The 18 award recipients are Casey Lee Green, Brigitte Steinken, Eric Lehnhardt, Mathew Wadsworth, Maria Pina, Sawsan Hamad and Kevin Denhardt, all of Arizona State University.

Camille Adkins-Rieck, Daniel Cheek, Noam Dorr and Alegra Savage are the recipients from the University of Arizona.

Timothy O’Donnel and Chelsea Wilson are of Mesa Community College, James Burgos and Angela Towner are of the University of Phoenix, Jacquelina Blanch of Gila Community College and Joseph Cook of Paradise Valley Community College are also recipients.

“It is a privilege to be associated with some of the state’s brightest and most deserving individuals,” Doss said. “I am certain their dedication will enhance not only their futures but the future of Arizona as well.”

For more information about Arizona State Credit Union or its Community Leaders Scholarship and Loan Reduction program, please visit www.azstcu.org.

 

UA Cancer Center

Medical: University of Arizona Cancer Center


UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA CANCER CENTER

Developer: City of Phoenix
General contractor: Hensel Phelps
Architect: ZGF Architects
Location: NWC of Seventh and Fillmore streets, Phoenix
Size: 250,000 SF

The $135M, 6-story UA Cancer Center will be the latest addition to Downtown Phoenix’s Biomedical Campus. UA will partner with St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and provide inpatient care and clinical operations. Expected start and completion dates: 4Q 2011 to 1Q 2014.

AZRE Magazine, September/October 2011
100 Years of Notable Arizonans, Arizona Centennial Series

Centennial Series: 100 Years of Notable Arizonans

Arizonans who made a notable impact to Arizona & American history:

100 Years of Notable Arizonans - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

 

100 Years of Notable Arizonans:

 

Dr. Richard Carmona

Served as the 17th U.S. Surgeon General during the Bush Administration

Raul H. Castro

First Hispanic governor of Arizona; U.S. ambassador to Argentina

Cesar Chavez

(1927–1993)

Labor rights activist; union organizerNotable Arizonans, Arizona Centennial

Barry Goldwater

(1909–1998)

U.S. Senator; 1968 Republican presidential nominee

Carl Hayden

(1877–1972)

U.S. Senator; still holds the record for the longest service in Congress

Percival Lowell

(1855–1916)

Astronomer; founder of the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff

Frank Luke

(1897–1918)

World War I ace fighter pilot; Luke Air Force Base is named in his honorFrank Luke, 100 Years Notable Arizonans, Centennial

Rose Mofford

First woman governor of Arizona

John McCain

U.S. Senator; 2008 Republican presidential nominee; Vietnam War POW

Evan Mecham

(1924-2008)

First Arizona governor to be impeached
Sandra Day O’Connor

First woman on the U.S. Supreme Court; ASU Law School named after her

Sandra Day O'Connor, 100 Years Notable Arizonans, Centennial

Lori Piestewa

(1979–2003)

First Native American woman killed in combat while serving in the U.S. military

Pat Tillman

(1976–2004)

Arizona Cardinals player; U.S. Army Ranger killed by friendly fire in AfghanistanPat Tillman, 100 Years Notable Arizonans, Centennial

Morris “Mo” Udall

(1922–1998)

U.S. Representative; pro basketball player; presidential candidateMorris "Mo" Udall, 100 Years Notable Arizonans, Centennial

Frank Lloyd Wright

(1867–1959)

Renowned and highly influential architect

Frank Lloyd Wright, 100 Years Notable Arizonans, Centennial

[stextbox id="grey"]Photos: Cesar Chavez/Jon Lewis; Pat Tillman/Gene Lower (Slingshot); Morris Udall/University of Arizona Library; Frank Luke/U.S. Air Force; Sandra Day O’Connor/Arizona Board of Regents; Frank Lloyd Wright/Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation[/stextbox]

AZ hospitals, how to attract top talent, AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona Hospitals Share Strategies For Recruiting, Retaining Top Performers

The health care industry in Arizona managed to hold its own during the worst of the recession. But the challenges aren’t over yet.

Human resources experts have been warning companies across industries about the next big wave of change as the economic recovery takes hold: retaining the top talent that helped a company survive.

In good economic times, the health care industry often was faced with shortages of nurses and other professionals, so it’s an old hand at devising ways of attracting and retaining talent. Arizona Business Magazine asked four hospitals and health care systems about how they attract the best.

Abrazo Health Care

Currently, Abrazo Health Care’s website is the No. 1 way candidates are found when applying for an open position. Additionally, Abrazo Health Care utilizes social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to attract and hire future employees. A large number of new hires comes from referrals within the organization.

Other recruitment efforts include the new graduate development program, a unique opportunity available to 100 nursing graduates per year. This competitive program gives new nurses 12 weeks of education and training to become an acute care nurse at an Abrazo Health Care facility. New graduates entering a specialty area also will be part of a bridge program for additional training.

Another opportunity available is the nurse-specialty training program for current nurses, which is offered four times per year. Nurses can apply to receive training to transition to a specialized nursing position in the operating room, emergency room or intensive care unit.

All applicants must complete a web-based interview developed in partnership with the Gallup Organization. The assessment helps to ensure a candidate will align with the cultural environment at Abrazo Health Care.

Abrazo Health Care employs more than 5,000 people. Currently, there are 400 positions available. Abrazo Health Care offers competitive salaries, health benefits and tuition reimbursement.

[stextbox id="grey"]Carmen Hern is regional manager of talent acquisition at Abrazo Health Care, abrazohealth.com. [/stextbox]

Banner Health

Banner Health recruits talent through strategic work force planning such as:

  • Targeted media events
  • Academic relationships
  • Social media
  • Banner Health’s website


Banner’s approach to recruiting top talent aligns with the strategies of the organization by emphasizing Banner’s vision on patient care. Its hiring incentives are centered on total rewards compensation.

The Banner journey begins with a potential employee’s first experience (the website, at an event, videos or even as a patient). Once they have joined Banner, there is an ongoing, one-year, onboarding program. Throughout their time at Banner, there are opportunities for learning, coaching and developing employees’ careers.

There are three main reasons an employee stays at Banner are:

  • The relationship with their manager
  • The people they work with
  • Learning and growth opportunities


In addition, employees have a choice in their selection of benefits. They also get to participate in a 401k plan, life insurance, food discounts, transportation discounts, and childcare at some facilities. We look at each employee’s needs to determine which benefits are best for them

Banner prides itself on having created an environment of innovation and teamwork. It offers opportunities for employees to spread their wings, in addition to pay for performance. There is compensation for all when Banner meets and exceeds goals in the areas of patient satisfaction, financial performance and employee retention.

Recognizing that Banner Health is competing with many other health care systems in Arizona for quality employees, the company tries to stay in tune with the community. Banner may have more hospitals than anyone else, but we have to pay attention because we know there are other good hospitals out there.
[stextbox id="grey"]
Shyrl Johnston is senior director of talent acquisition at Banner Health, www.bannerhealth.com.[/stextbox]

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Phoenix Children’s strategy to attract new talent includes expanding space, growing programs and services, and aggressive recruiting.

Phoenix Children’s continues to grow and expand, thus offering exciting new prospects for top talent in the health care industry. An 11-story patient tower, which opened in June, will raise the hospital’s bed count from 345 rooms to 626 private rooms by early 2012. The hospital also added 96 PCIU/CICU rooms, 12 operating rooms, new services and programs, innovative research supported by leading clinical trials, and advanced education/training for clinical providers.

Collaborations and partnerships with Arizona State University, University of Arizona, Mayo Clinic, Banner Good Samaritan, and a Strategic Alliance with St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center also add jobs and opportunities for attracting the best and brightest.

The hospital’s six Centers of Excellence also are growing. Phoenix Children’s is the only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in Arizona; the Children’s Heart Center is recognized as one of the nation’s best; there is the Phoenix Children’s Center for Pediatric Othopaedic Surgery; the Newborn Intensive Care Unit, with 110 licensed beds, is one of the largest NICUs in the country; the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders is Arizona’s only fully dedicated facility of its kind; and the Children’s Neuroscience Institute provides comprehensive care for children with neurological and behavioral disorders.

For the past four years, Phoenix Children’s Hospital has been steadily and aggressively increasing recruitment of nationally known physicians and superior staff. Medical staff at the hospital has increased to include more than 1,000 pediatric specialists with 40 pediatric specific specialties.

Recent prominent additions, to name a few, include: David Adelson, MD, a renowned neurosurgeon, recruited to lead the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s; Richard Towbin, MD, a top neuro-radiologist who has served at children’s hospitals in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Michigan; Lee Segal, MD, who came from Hershey Children’s to initiate the Center for Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery; Heidi Dalton, MD, section chief critical care, who was recruited from Children’s Medical Center in Washington, DC; and Tamir Miloh, MD, a hepatologist recruited from Mt. Sinai, NY, who will create and lead Arizona’s first pediatric liver transplant center.

[stextbox id="grey"]Jane Walton is head of media relations at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, www.phoenixchildrens.com.[/stextbox]

UA Healthcare

UA Healthcare is a private, nonprofit health-care entity located in Tucson. It was formed by the merger of two highly respected and well-established organizations: University Medical Center (UMC) and University Physicians Healthcare (UPH). The organization consists of the largest physician practice plan in Arizona, including a Health Plan Division, two academic medical centers and Southern Arizona’s only Level 1 Trauma Center.

UA Healthcare employs more than 6,000 people and is ranked one of the top 10 employers in Southern Arizona. University Medical Center was the first hospital in Arizona to earn the Magnet designation — the American Nurses Association’s highest honor for nursing excellence. The designation recognizes hospitals that provide the best nursing care and a supportive, professional environment. As the only academic medical center in Arizona, UMC offers many opportunities for professional growth, personal enrichment and career development.

UA Healthcare’s 2011 benefits package is designed to promote wellness and encourage healthy lifestyle choices. UA Healthcare considers staff members to be its most valuable resource and it is dedicated to providing a culture that keeps patients healthy.

The system provides managers with the tools required to retain its first-rate staff. It offers learning opportunities that ensure high levels of patient and employee satisfaction, as well as a strong financial position. UA Healthcare gives total rewards that are competitive in the Arizona employment market. UA Healthcare ensures individual and group accountability for performance, rewards and growth through ongoing communication.
[stextbox id="grey"]
John Marques is vice president for human resources at UA Healthcare, www.azumc.com.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

University of Arizona Plaza Centro, AZRE July/August 2011

Education: Plaza Centro


PLAZA CENTRO

Developer: OasisTucson (Capstone Communities, operator)
General contractor: TBD
Architect: Aleks Instanbullu/SmithGroup
Location: 4th Ave. and Congress St. / 2 S. 4th Ave., Tucson
Size: 380,000 SF residential/25,000 SF retail

The University of Arizona student-housing project includes two 11-story towers and another site with 3 stories residential. The $50M project is expected to break ground in 1Q 2012 with completion expected in 3Q 2013.


AZRE Magazine, July/August 2011
PLAZA CENTRO
centennial top 10, AZ Big Media

10 Top Discoveries In Arizona

10 Top Discoveries in Arizona

There are many mysteries about Arizona. Before it was officially established as the 48th state in 1912, and far before colonization, there was life here. Archaeologists and investigators have been discovering ancient life and civilizations across the state, telling stories about the land before it became what it is today — as well as helping us learn about our potential future. Here are 10 of the top discoveries made that have changed Arizona as well as the world that we know.

10.

Ruins of 10 Villages Found — 1924

Byron Cummings, a professor of anthropology at University of Arizona, and his students discovered villages over 1,000 years old near Tucson. Read More >>

Hills by squeaks2569

9.

700-Year-Old Relic Found — June 22, 1965

21-year-old Lynda Bird Johnson, President Lyndon Baines Johnson’s daughter, helped uncover remains in eastern Arizona during a two-week vacation study at the University of Arizona archaeological camp on the Fort Apache reservation. Read More >>

8.

20,000-Year-Old Butcher Shop — 1931

The discovery of large elephant-like mammoth bones in Yuma County, hacked with flint knives, indicates that America has been inhabited for at least 20,000 years. Dr. Harold J. Cook of the Cook museum of natural history explains this and the significance to the finding. Read More >>

Columbian Mammoth by edenpictures

7.

Hohokam Village of Pueblo Grande — 1920s

The site which can be viewed by the public at the Pueblo Grand Museum, includes an 800-year-old platform mound — where ancient buildings were constructed — and excavated prehistoric ballcourt. The central part of what is now the museum was first preserved in 1924. Read More >>

6.

Rich Uranium Ore Found — April 7, 1950

Three new high-grade uranium minerals — which were used in building atomic bombs — were reported by the Geological Survey. The minerals were discovered by Dr. Charles A. Anderson in the Hillside Mine in Yavapai County. Read More >>

Uranium by Marcin Wichary

5.

Columbian Mammoth Found — 2005

Now known as Tuskers, the remains of a Columbian Mammoth were discovered in a construction site when one of the workers found the first cervical membrane of the mammoth. The area located in Gilbert is now known as Discovery Park as a result. Read More >>

4.

Dinosaur Tracks Found — 1929

It was reported to be one of the most important discoveries of dinosaur tracks, with a group of 300. They were found near Tuba City and the largest print was found to be nine inches long. Visitors are now invited to walk where these ancient reptiles did. Read More >>

Dinosaur Tracks by Dave Boyer

3.

Winona Meteorite — 1928

This meteorite was found near the ruins of the prehistoric Elden pueblo. It was in a stone cist on the ancient burial ground, suggesting that the people of the area treated it like a living being and buried it after witnessing it fall. Read More >>

2.

Oldest Dinosaur Found — 1985

A 200-pound, plant-eating creature’s remains were discovered in the Petrified Forest by paleontologist Robert Long. The almost-intact skeleton was 225 million years old, four million years older than any previous dinosaur fossil discovered at the time. Read More >>

Dinosaur by Ivan Walsh

1.

Las Capas Canals — 1998-2009

Irrigation canals built as early as 1200 B.C. were discovered in the Tucson area. They are the oldest known canals north of central Mexico. This site has revealed much about ancient irrigation and agriculture. Read More >>

ACA Board of Directors

Arizona Commerce Authority Board Of Directors Comprised of Statewide Leaders

The Arizona Commerce Authority aims to boost Arizona’s economy by creating jobs for Arizonans, attract and bring in new business, as well as show corporations Arizona is a better operating environment and a better place to collaborate and grow.

The following ACA Board of Directors are leaders within their respective fields:

Metro Phoenix

Chair: Gov. Jan Brewer
Co-Chair: Jerry Colangelo, Partner, JDM Partners
President and CEO: Don Cardon
Hon. Kirk Adams, Speaker, Arizona House of Representatives
Richard Adkerson, CEO, Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold
Benito Almanza, State President, Bank of America Arizona
Dr. Craig Barrett, Chairman of the Board and CEO (Retired), Intel
Michael Bidwill, President, Arizona Cardinals
Donald Brandt, Chairman of the Board and CEO, APS
Drew Brown, Chairman of the Board, DMB Associates
Les Brun, Chairman and CEO, SARR Group
Hon. Robert Burns, President, Arizona Senate
Steve Cowman, CEO, Stirling Energy
Dr. Michael Crow, President, Arizona State University
Jerry Fuentes, President, AT&T Arizona/New Mexico
Dr. William Harris, CEO and President, Science Foundation Arizona
Linda Hunt, President, Catholic Healthcare West Arizona
Mike Ingram, CEO and President, El Dorado Holdings
Sherman Jennings, Chair, Governor’s Workforce Policy Council/
Human Resources Site Leader, The Boeing Company
Anne Mariucci, Regent, Arizona Board of Regents
Dr. Vicki Panhuise, Chair, Arizona’s Aerospace & Defense Commission/
Vice President, Honeywell Military Aircraft
Mary Peters, President, Mary E. Peters Consulting Group
Doug Pruitt, Chairman and CEO, Sundt Construction
Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, Executive Chairman, Abraxis BioScience
Mo Stein, Principal and Senior Vice President, HKS Architects
Pat Sullivan, CEO, Flypaper Studio
Roy Vallee, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Avnet

Tucson

Gary Abrams, CEO and President, Abrams Airborne Manufacturing
Peter Herder, Chairman of the Board and CEO, Herder Companies
Dr. Robert Shelton, President,  University of Arizona
Judith Wood, Chair, Governor’s Council on Small Business/ President, Contact One Call Center

Flagstaff

Dr. John Haeger, President, Northern Arizona University
Michael Manson, Co-Founder and CEO, Motor Excellence

Prescott

Dr. Jeanne Swarthout, President, Northland Pioneer College

Yuma

Victor Smith, President and Owner, JV Farm
BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Mark Kranz ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Mark Kranz, SmithGroup

Mark Kranz, SmithGroup

Mark Kranz, AIA, LEED AP, is the design principal and lead designer for the Phoenix office of SmithGroup’s Higher Education and Science and Technology Studios.  Mark’s work has been published locally, regionally and nationally.

He speaks publicly about sustainable design strategies for laboratory and academic facilities, and his work is consistently recognized by the design and construction industries.  Kranz works regionally within the Western United States with research institutions and institutions of higher education creating laboratory and instructional facilities that elegantly reflect their specific context and function.

He has spent the past 11 years with SmithGroup, creating the vision for some of the most significant architectural contributions for some of the most prominent institutions and public entities in the Southwestern United States including Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, the City of Phoenix, the State of Utah, The City and County of Denver, and the Maricopa County Community College District.

He is currently behind the design visions for numerous landmark projects for clients including the National Renewable Energy Laboratories in Golden Colorado, The University of Hawaii at Hilo, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command in Honolulu, Hawaii, as well as Gateway Community College in Phoenix, Arizona.


Topic: Sustainable Strategies for Higher Educational Facilities: A case study of four sustainable educational facilities in four unique settings.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Sponsors:

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Mark Roddy ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Mark Roddy, SmithGroup

Mark Roddy, SmithGroup

Mark Roddy, AIA, a design principal and lead designer for the Phoenix office of SmithGroup’s Office Workplace Studio, has over 18 years in the architectural field.

Mark received his bachelor degree from the University of Arizona in 1991 and a Masters in Architecture from UCLA in 1996. He has taught architecture design at the University of Arizona, Montana State University and Arizona State University.

His expertise produces civic/municipal spaces that respond to the surrounding community and its culture, while his office/workplace designs are efficient without sacrificing environmental responsiveness. This is most evident in the recently completed Chandler City Hall that is tracking LEED Gold Certification. This commitment to sustainability is also demonstrated in the “green” addition to his historic home in Central Phoenix that has won numerous awards including a Crescordia from Valley Forward. Mark’s work has been exhibited locally, nationally and internationally.

He believes architecture should be expressive and environmentally responsible, but above all it should seek and find a balance between beauty and function.


Topic: Sustainable Office Design, Two Case Studies in Regional Office Design: Strategies and benefits of sustainable office building design, focusing on three main topics — regional design-buildings, performance strategies and employer & employee benefits.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011


BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Sponsors:

RED Awards Banner

General Contractor Of The Year 2011

Sundt Construction

It’s no surprise that Sundt just celebrated its 120th anniversary. It is one of Arizona’s most respected businesses and among the 100 largest general contractors in the U.S. The company was founded in 1890 by Norwegian ship carpenter Mauritz Martinsen Sundt and has prospered and thrived ever since. General Contractor of Year 2011: Sundt Construction

The company has gained and kept the respect of its clientele because of the quality and service it provides. Sundt employees take pride in their work, because they not only work for Sundt, they own it. The company is 100% employee owned.

The high-caliber work Sundt performs can be seen through  many projects in Arizona, around the U.S. and abroad. Sundt has completed projects for the U.S. military, Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, the Metro Light Rail, Sea World and condominiums in Saudi Arabia, to name a few.

Sundt prides itself not only on the relationships it develops with its customers, but also its relationship with the community. Sundt’s community service includes work with Habit for Humanity and participating in various walks for different organizations.

Through Sundt’s many years in the business, it has created a core philosophy: we are only as good as our people. This motto has helped it achieve the respect of the community, clients, and fellow contractors.

www.sundt.com

Sea Life Interior

Paramount Promotions Puts Its Products On The National Stage

Each year Paramount Promotions transforms the University of Phoenix Stadium from the home of the Arizona Cardinals into the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl with colorful and eye-catching graphics.

 

 

Paramount Promotions Tostitos

Photo: Paramount Promotions

 

 

Phoenix-based Paramount Promotions designs and manufactures most of the graphic signs, banners and inflatables for the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl held in Glendale annually.

The company created 25-foot tall inflatable Tostitos chip bags for the Fiesta Bowl, along with most of the banners and signs in the University of Phoenix stadium that can be seen during the game.

The 2011 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl was the second year of a five-year agreement between Paramount Promotions and the Fiesta Bowl. In addition to the Fiesta Bowl, Paramount Promotions also creates graphic signs for the Insight Bowl, held in Tempe at Sun Devil Stadium each year. The company also created graphic banners for the University of Arizona’s football stadium.

“Working with bowl games have always been probably my favorite,” says Brad Bergamo, president of Paramount Promotions. “It’s always fun to go in and take a stadium and completely change the look of it. … So, you go from a stadium that’s just a lot of concrete, colorless, to having a lot of color and graphics.”

Although making over the stadiums is Bergamo’s favorite project, Paramount Promotions does much more.

The company, which was established in 1992, also designs and manufactures wraps for boats, cars, trailers, golf carts and more, all at its Phoenix location.

Paramount Promotions produces light boxes, banners, billboards, fence wraps, window graphics, inflatables, flatbed boards and more that can be seen across the country. The company also makes “fly guys,” the dancing or wiggling inflatable “men” often seen on the side of the road.

Paramount Promotions, which employs 11 people, serves clients nationwide, but about 85 percent of the company’s business comes from Arizona companies and individuals, Bergamo says.

 

 

Sea Life Exterior

Photo: Paramount Promotions

 

 

Another large project Paramount Promotions undertook was creating all of the signs and wall graphics for the Sea Life Aquarium at Arizona Mills.

With the use of digital printing machine, the Nur Expedic, Paramount Promotions prints an average of 1,800 square feet per hour. At that speed, the company could wrap 30 semi-trucks per day.

Even though Paramount Promotions works with large clients such as the Fiesta Bowl and the University of Arizona, it also offers many services for individuals and small companies.

Currently, the most common product for individual clients is canvas paintings of personal photos. The company has also done life-sized wall graphics — similar to Fathead sports wall graphics — of individuals or their children playing sports.

One of the more creative ways people use Paramount Promotions is to create a large graphic photo, whether it be of the beach, mountains or snow, to cover the boring brick walls that are so common in Phoenix.

“We’re pretty diverse right now. So as of right now, we’re not looking to expand into other products or services,” Bergamo says. “We’re trying to specialize in what we do now.”

The company has been growing steadily, even in the recent down economy, Bergamo adds. In the fall of 2010, Paramount Promotions acquired MonsterColor, a local, large-format printer. The acquisition has expanded Paramount’s capabilities.

Arizona Business Magazine's Editor-in-Chief Janet Perez

The Buzz on AZNow.Biz – October 12, 2010

This week on AZNow.Biz, the University of Arizona’s McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship is making it easy for entrepreneurs and small business owners to expand their knowledge with three unique online certificate courses. Our personal finance columnist, Jacob Gold, writes about Americans putting more money into savings and how that benefits the economy. Plus, see some majestic views of the Grand Canyon in our Snap Shot feature.

AA035979

The University of Arizona Brings Online Education To Entrepreneurs

As the state pulls itself out of the recessionary hole, small business owners and entrepreneurs have to re-think how they get things done. Getting advice from experts is critical, but who has the time?

The University of Arizona’s McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship at the Eller College of Management is making it easy for entrepreneurs and small business owners to expand their knowledge.

On Aug. 15, the McGuire Center launched three unique online certificate courses that offer entrepreneurs a “practical university education,” said Randy Accetta, mentor-in-residence and communications mentor at the center, a top-tier university-based center for entrepreneurship.

The three areas of study are commercializing an innovation, starting a small business and growing an existing venture. The courses go along with the UA’s land grant mission, and are funded in part by a United States Department of Labor Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) grant. The courses are offered through the non-credit arm of the UA’s Outreach College.

The UA is still marketing the courses, and online classes haven’t started yet, Accetta said.  Credit-bearing versions of the courses will most likely be offered during the spring 2011 semester at the UA.

What makes these online courses different is the amount of hands-on, one-on-one work students will do with Eller College of Management mentors and faculty members, Accetta said. Currently, the classes are structured as mentor-based and comprised of small cohorts.

Since the courses haven’t started yet, their structure can be modified and could range from small cohorts, as originally planned, to an independent study, according to what the market needs.

However the structure of the courses turns out, Accetta, the UA and the McGuire Center are committed to a high-quality educational experience that is focused on interaction between student and professor.

The UA and the McGuire Center wanted to provide entrepreneurs in the Southwest region with a university-type education in which students can end the course with a comprehensive understanding of the theories and concepts behind growing a business, Accetta said.

He added that the UA has been slow to offer distance learning and online courses, and these programs are part of the university’s effort to enter the world of online-based education. Distance learning is important, because the UA is pushing to “extend the intellectual quality of the university throughout the region,” Accetta said.

“Our long-range vision is to grow a more educated, more motivated entrepreneur community,” he said.

In these difficult times, courses like these can have an impact beyond the classroom, or computer screen in this case, Accetta said, adding that building a business community that can identify and act on opportunities to stimulate entrepreneurial growth will result in a stronger economy for Southern Arizona.