Tag Archives: winslow

Top 5 Weekend Destinations (Spring-Summer 2012)

Top 5: Weekend Destinations (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Weekend Destinations — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Canyon de Chelly

Visitor Center is 3 miles from Route 191 in Chinle
Chinle, AZ 86503
928-674-5500
nps.gov/cach
The cultural resources of Canyon de Chelly include distinctive architecture, artifacts, and rock imagery while exhibiting remarkable preservation integrity that provides outstanding opportunities for study and contemplation.


Grand Canyon Railway

233 N. Grand Canyon Blvd., Williams, AZ 86046
800-843-8724
thetrain.com
Book your Grand Canyon
vacation online and enjoy
historic train travel on one of four classes of service on a vintage train from Williams to Grand Canyon National Park.


Lake Powell

P.O. Box 1507,
Page, AZ 86040
928-645-2741
page-lakepowell.com
More than 400 feet deep, 150 miles long with nearly 2,000 miles of shoreline. Spectacular rock canyons, sand beaches and activities such as boating, fishing, swimming, hiking or four-wheel driving.


Tubac

P.O. Box 1866,
Tubac, AZ 85646
520-398-2704
tubacaz.com
Tubac has a 250-year-old Spanish history. Tubac is the perfect shoppers’ paradise with more than 80 galleries and shops that feature hand-crafted items, sculpture, paintings, clothing and some of Southern Arizona’s
best import shops.


Winslow

523 W. Second St.,
Winslow, AZ 86047
928-289-2434
winslowarizona.org
Take just a moment to stop and look around, and you’ll discover a whole new dimension to this unique Western city. Winslow is home to The Standin’ on the Corner Park, which has become a draw for music fans who remember the line “standin on the corner in Winslow Arizona,” from the No. 1 hit “Take It Easy,” by the Eagles.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012

Route 66 - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Route 66: What Bridges Arizona To The Rest Of The Nation

Once dubbed the “Main Street of America,” Route 66 Twin Arrows Trading Post - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011not only is a landmark in U.S. history, but also played a vital role in developing Arizona’s economy as a major piece of the state’s infrastructure not long after statehood in 1912.

Arizona has always been known as a gateway to California. First, with the California Gold Rush of 1849, when thousands of people traveled through Arizona on their way to hunt for riches in the Golden State. Since there were no established routes through Arizona, these pioneers blazed their own trails, eventually creating a travel corridor. When built in Arizona, Route 66 followed this same path.

Commissioned in 1936, Route 66 began in Chicago and spanned all the way to Santa Monica, Calif. It was not fully paved until 1937.

Taking Route 66 through Arizona to California not only was popular because it was the easiest way to California, but also because of the tourist attractions and small towns that thrived along the route’s path. From the 1930s into the mid-1950s, Arizona’s tourism industry experienced a golden age as this historic route ran near the Grand Canyon and was a short jaunt away from the Painted Desert and Meteor Crater. In time, Route 66 took its place in American folklore, inspiring a popular song.

Route 66 entered Arizona through Holbrook, which attracted Easterners. Tourism instantly became an important part of its economy. It is reported that the first tourist camp in the U.S. was built in Holbrook. When Route 66 became the official transcontinental highway, tourism took off. It ceased during World War II when gasoline was rationed, but resumed after the war.

The advent of the automobile also was an economic boon to Winslow, which was a major stopping point along Route 66. Cafes, trading posts, motor courts and garages thrived. Similarly, Flagstaff’s economy grew. For years its motor courts and cafes catered to weary travelers.

Seligman, a railroad town founded in 1886, was referred to as the “Historic Birthplace of Route 66.” Its economy flourished when the Santa Fe Railroad established repair facilities there, including the Harvey House Road House.

The last major Route 66 town in Arizona was Kingman, although Oatman and Topock were officially the last towns along the old route. Again, the stretch of 66 that ran through Kingman’s downtown was rich in motels, restaurants and shops. That downtown is listed in the Historic Register for Historic Places. The neon signs of the 1940s proclaiming “Motel Row” remain intact.

But as the nation’s infrastructure grew and improved in the post-war boom years, Interstate-40 arose and Route 66 became irrelevant. Soon, much of the old route was decommissioned.

If it’s “fun in the sun” that attracts people to Arizona these days, it was Route 66 that paved the way for millions to visit and even more to stay and call the Grand Canyon State home.

For more information about Route 66, visit historic66.com.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011