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Kirk McClure elected to MCC Foundation board

Kirk McClure, McCarthy Building Companies

Kirk McClure, McCarthy Building Companies

Kirk McClure, Director of Business Development for McCarthy Building Companies, was recently elected to the board of directors for Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation.

“Kirk has a passion for higher education and is extremely active within business circles here in Arizona,” said Dr. Steve Helfgot, president & CEO of the Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation.  “We look forward to the experience he will provide our board in guiding our Foundation’s activities.”

In addition to the Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation, McClure also serves on the board of directors for the Arizona Association of Economic Development (AAED). He is also a member of National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), Southwest Chapter of American Association ofAirport Executives (SWAAAE) and has been an active member of CoreNet Global, Valley Partnership, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the American Planning Association (APA), and the Urban Land Institute (ULI).  He is also the founder and organizer of the monthly A/E/C Golf Invitational at Grayhawk Golf Club, which includes a league of professionals that work and support the development industry.

He earned his MBA from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University (ASU) and also holds abachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Design, also from ASU.

edde_awards

EDDE Awards

Every year, the Arizona Association for Economic Development fields nominations for individuals and organizations that have a significant impact on a city, a community and the state. These Economic Development Distinguished by Excellence (EDDE) awards are a tough-earn and a new year doesn’t always guarantee a winner; the “Best of Arizona” has only been awarded six times in the last two decades. This year’s awardees were recognized at AAED’s Spring Conference in Tucson, Ariz. on May 2.

Economic Developer of the Year

William Jabjiniak
Economic Development Director, City of Mesa
Bill-JabjiniakAs Economic Development Director at the City of Mesa, Bill Jabjiniak leads a team of 14 professionals focused on business attraction, retention and expansion, workforce development and revitalization. He has focused on the City of Mesa’s Healthcare, Education, Aerospace/Aviation and Technology/Tourism (HEAT) program in order to attract businesses and create quality jobs in Mesa.

In the past seven years, the Office of Economic Development (OED) attracted, expanded or assisted in 134 projects. In the last two years, the OED created and retained more than 3,600 jobs and generated nearly $2B of capital investment in Mesa.

The largest economic development was the attraction of Apple, Inc. This will be one of the first U.S. manufacturing facilities for Apple, which will result in 700 full-time jobs, 1,300 construction jobs and $1.5B in new capital investment for Mesa. Some other technology developments include Able Engineering, Bridgestone Corporation, Matheson Tri-Gas, Arizona Laboratories for Security and Defense and Launchpoint. These other companies will result in hundreds of jobs with average salaries above $50,000 and millions of dollars invested.

For education, Mesa attracted five new higher education institutions that created 44 new full-time jobs and contributed more than $6.5M in private investment to the city.

For tourism, Mesa houses two spring training baseball teams with new and updated stadiums. The Cubs Stadium Complex is estimated to bring $138M annually to Arizona. Mesa announced a 20-year agreement with the Oakland Athletics at a $28M newly renovated Hohokam Stadium.

Jabjiniak holds a master’s degree in Community Economic Development and a MBA from Southern New Hampshire University, works with the Economic Development Advisory Board, city management and City Council to protect areas that offer significant potential for economic growth as employment centers. He also leads as a voice of the region on policy issues and regional collaboration as a member of several local, regional and national boards. He participates in more than a dozen forums on economic development including AAED, Urban Land Institute, Valley Partnership, CoreNet and IEDC.

Economic Developer of the Year, Small Community

Mignonne Hollis
Executive Director, Sierra Vista Economic Development Foundation
Mignonne-HollisAs Executive Director of the Sierra Vista Economic Development Foundation (SVEDF), Mignonne Hollis received the 2013 Governor’s Excellence in Economic Development Award. The award recognized SVEDF for The Business Complex, which includes a 4,300 SF co-working facility that provides workspaces and resources to entrepreneurs. Eleven startups have utilized the facility and resources. Two of those businesses grew enough to move into another space, three businesses hired additional staff and four businesses expanded or relocated to Sierra Vista.

Hollis supported development and expansion of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) industry by creating a private UAS test site when Arizona failed to receive the FAA national test site designation. More than 100 testing hours of airspace are committed, and $250,000 of facilities construction are planned.

Hollis collaborates within the UAS industry as an appointee to the Greater Arizona Development Authority. She serves as President of the AZTRC UAS Industry Consortium and was nominated to be treasurer of the local Association for Unmanned Vehicles System International. She is on the IEDC’s Public Policy Advisory Board, which allows her to monitor and review the legislative affairs and federal relations by providing a list of legislative issues, recommending strategic and policy actions and providing guidance for the Economic Development Summit.

Hollis completed the requirements for the CEcD and plans to take the exam in December. She participates in the AAED Southern Arizona Membership Committee and helped form the southeastern Regional Economic Development Group, which brings synergy to the economic development efforts of Cochise County communities.

New Member of the Year

Marcelino Flores
Council Member, Pascua Yaqui
Marcelino-FloresDuring his first year as an AAED member, Marcelino Flores recruited three new members and worked with the Southern Arizona Membership Committee and Casino Del Sol in organizing the Southern Arizona Luncheon.

Flores embodies the three AAED organization pillars of education, advocacy and collaboration. As a pivotal contributor in organizing a tribal visit for AAED’s Tribal Economic Development Committee, Flores showed his belief in helping Arizona tribes strengthen their relationships with the state and local municipalities. The luncheon occurred during the Pascua Yaqui Tribe’s Annual Recognition Day, which provided AAED members an opportunity to learn about the challenges the tribe encountered in establishing federal recognition. Members had an opportunity to meet with other council members and speak with Tribal Chairman Peter Yucupicio and historian David Ramirez.

Flores participates in Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) and Pima Association of Governments (PAG). He is an active member of AAED’s Tribal Economic Development Committee and has attended a multitude of AAED functions. He is involved in other community and professional organizations such as the Metro Chamber of Commerce, Tucson Regional Economic Opportunity, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Imagine Greater Tucson, Pima Association of Governments and Nineteen Tribal Nations Workforce Investment Board.

Workforce Practitioner of the Year

Richmond Vincent
Chairman & CEO, Goodwill of Central Arizona
Richmond-VincentRichmond Vincent’s vision is to eliminate unemployment in Arizona. He led Central Arizona’s division in setting new records in people served and job placements achieved, 66 percent and 88 percent respectively, which resulted in an economic impact of $734M. His team provided job training and employment placement services to 60,000 Arizonans, filled 23,500 local jobs and raised $500,000 in new revenue.

Vincent helped develop and implement programs to improve job seeker employability such as the Computer and Customer Service Training program. Vincent’s team partnered with local employers to develop a curriculum with vocational training in career preparation, human relations and basic computer skills. Five-hundred and seventy-eight individuals attended and 73 percent achieved job placement.

His team opened five new Goodwill Career Centers and hosted its first Goodwill Career Expo, bringing 150 employers hiring for nearly 7,000 open positions. More than 6,000 people attended, leading it to be one of the largest hiring events ever held by Goodwill. Goodwill of Central Arizona is No. 1 in job placements in the organization.

Large Organization of the Year

City of Mesa, Office of Economic Development

Cubs Park, Mesa

Cubs Park, Mesa

The City of Mesa invests in increasing the number of its staff joining AAED each year. Staff members participated in more than 22 trainings, classes, luncheons, conferences and events, including the IEDC Annual Conference, ICMA conference and training session, NBIA Incubator Management Training Program and GPEC training seminar.

The City of Mesa OED sponsored and hosted two AAED exclusive events: the Legislative Luncheon and the AAED Business 2 Baseball day at Cubs Park.

It partnered with the Neighborhood Economic Development Corporation and the Sustainable Communities Consortium to host Mesa’s Urban Redevelopment Summit. More than 100 members attended and were instructed on topics such as emerging urban markets, community banks, the value of walkability in real estate investments and sustainable communities to spur redevelopment opportunities in the community.

Mesa collaborates with neighboring cities and public-private partnerships to create jobs, capital investment and education in the area. It opened five new colleges and universities, began offering 25 full-time undergraduate programs and launched the Mesa Educates U campaign. One major project includes the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport that was crucial in keeping Able Engineering in Arizona.

Small Organization of the Year

Verde Valley Regional Economic Organization, Inc.
verde_valleyVerde Valley Regional Economic Organization (VVREO) strongly supports AAED and economic development in Arizona. Many of the members of the Board of Directors have been active in AAED activities and committees. VVREO also sponsored a speaker series featuring the “BoomTown USA’s Millenials: Supercharged Entrepreneurs” presentation. VVREO secured sponsors for several high school seniors and recent graduates to attend, which helped spark on-campus entrepreneurial clubs at Red Rocks High School and on the Yavapai-Apache Nation Reservation. Many members work with regional teams, such as the Yavapai County Sector Strategy Team, that focus on industry collaboration to grow the economic sectors of medical technology, precision manufacturing, renewable energy and viticulture. VVREO served as an incubator for the Verde Valley Wine Consortium, the regional wine industry trade association and the Verde Valley Agriculture Coalition and is working to establish a major food hub for the area.

Another regional project focus is the completion of Highway 260, which will provide access to the Verde Valley from I-17. Numerous VVREO Directors worked with the regional committee and testified before the ADOT Board of Directors, obtaining $66M commitment to complete the highway.

William Lampkin Award

Brian Dalke
Brian-DalkeAs the first Economic Development Director and Deputy City Manager for the City of Goodyear, Brian Dalke has contributed significant growth in economic development. It’s only appropriate that he also wins one of the most prestigious EDDE awards this year. According to the latest census, when Dalke started in 1994 the city had 10,473 citizens and by the time he left in 2004, the city had grown to more than 40,000 residents. Dalke has contributed to the economic development of Goodyear as a lead negotiator for Goodyear’s Development Agreement with Westcor for its 1.2 MSF regional mall, negotiated $55M improvements of infrastructure, recruited the Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds Spring Training baseball stadiums, facilitated key locates with major corporations and negotiated with Cancer Treatment Centers of America, which created more than 650 jobs and $150M in capital investment.

Dalke has affected AAED as a member and president. He coordinated the search and interview process for the association’s director in 2011, helped the AAED take on the Arizona Basic Economic Development Course from the University of Arizona in 2012, and for the past two years has taught the Economic Development Finance module for the course. As a constant supporter of Luke Air Force Base, Dalke has ensured that the city updated its general plan, limiting the encroachment of housing and helped bring the F-35 to the state. He also strongly supported the Greater Phoenix Economic Development Council, which brought many corporations to Goodyear.

Best of Arizona

Arizona State University
Crow_MichaelIt’s all in the name. This award, last given to Arizona Tourism and Sports Authority in 2008 and to IGC/TGen in 2003, is one of the least frequently awarded by AAED. Since 1996, five entities have been named “Best of Arizona,” an award that recognizes statewide contributions to economic development. Over the last decade, Arizona State University has developed a New American University with which the school assumes responsibility for the economic, social and cultural vitality of the communities that surround it.

Since 2001, ASU has grown its classroom, lab, library, residential spaces by more than 76 percent.

ASU is the seventh largest employer in Arizona with a payroll of $910M. The University was responsible for $275M in labor income and consumer spending by staff, students and visitors supported an estimated $422M. Each ASU football game also raised $9.4M for Tempe. It’s estimated that out-of-towners spend 230,000 visitor-days in Phoenix because of University-related activities.

The University also plays a role in business retention and expansion, from the General Motors Innovation Center to GoDaddy Global Technology Center at ASU’s Research Park.

Outside of Arizona, ASU is making an impact on other institutions looking for a working model by which to shape their New American University program. ASU President Michael Crow fielded a few questions about the university’s progress and its effect on Arizona.

This is actually the second time ASU has won an EDDE. The first was in 2001, when it recognized the ASU Research Park. This year’s award is largely due to ASU’s adoption of the New American University. The Best of Arizona award is given in recognition of statewide contributions to economic development.

In just a few words, how has the relationship between the University and state changed in the last 10 years?
The relationship is one in which we’ve taken down the walls of the university to the extent that the university is responsive to needs of the community. Our design aspirations (there are eight of them) are of a university that’s more impactful and linked to Arizona. In the past, many universities are marginally linked to the outcomes of the community.

What were the needs that led to the New American model?
The needs were far too cut off from the ebb and flow of economic opportunity and far too cut off from being, if you will, a force for change, growth and success. That’s our motivation. Our university was not being all it could be for the university.

Did you expect the scale of economic impact caused by the university’s evolution?
We desired to be of more value, more impactful, something that was a more powerful asset.

With regards to the New American University, what has been the most surprising/proud moment in the last decade?
I think that the exciting thing for me has been the responsiveness from our faculty and staff, their commitment to Arizona, the families of Arizona.

You’ve been quoted as saying higher education cannot assume that its competitive position in the world is unassailable. What’s the key to keeping up the momentum you’ve achieved?
I think the key is to be more deeply committed to the community and its success than the university.

economic.development

AAED Presents Annual EDDE Awards

Currently celebrating its 40th anniversary, the Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) has announced the recipients of its annual Economic Development Distinguished by Excellence (EDDE) awards. The awards were presented during an evening awards dinner at the AAED Spring Conference in Tucson.

The prestigious EDDE awards honor individuals and companies who have made significant contributions to the advancement of the organization and to economic growth within the state of Arizona. Recipients are selected from a pool of nominations made by members of AAED. Overall eight EDDEs and a Best of Arizona Award were presented.

The William Lampkin Award for Long Term Excellence in Economic Development was given to Brian Dalke, CEcD, city manager for the city of Goodyear. This award recognizes outstanding achievements by an individual that has made significant contributions to economic development efforts in Arizona and demonstrated a sustained commitment to AAED.
Susan Hyatt, economic development program manager for the city of Phoenix, was cited as Member of the Year.

William Jabjiniak, economic development director for the city of Mesa, received the Economic Developer of the Year, Large Community Award. The award for Economic Developer of the Year, Small Community, was presented to Mignonne D. Hollis, executive director of the Sierra Vista Economic Development Foundation (SVEDF).

The award for Large Organization of the Year was presented to the city of Mesa Office of Economic Development, while the Verde Valley Regional Economic Organization, Inc. (VVREO) was named AAED Small Organization of the Year.

Richmond Vincent, vice president of workforce development for Goodwill of Central Arizona, covering Maricopa County, Prescott and Yuma, was named Workforce Practitioner of the Year.

Pascua Yaqui Tribe Councilman Marcelino Flores was recognized at AAED’s New Member of the Year.

Arizona State University received the rarely-awarded Best of Arizona Award for its new American university model and the positive economic development impact it has.

AAED, founded in 1974, has a mission to serve as Arizona’s unified voice advocating for responsible economic development through an effective program of professional education, public policy, and collaboration.

For more information on AAED, visit www.aaed.com or call (602) 240-2233.

Marina Heights rendering courtesy of DAVIS.

Arizona Commercial Real Estate Experts predict slow recovery leading to better 2015

In the ’90s, the joke was that the state bird was a construction crane, says AAED’s Executive Director Joyce Grossman. She motions out the window of her downtown Phoenix office and says, “You look around here, and you see cranes in the air. That means jobs.”
Arizona isn’t seeing the growth it did in the ’90s, Gorssman continues, but at least we’re not going backward. Arizona is slated to be one of the fastest growing states over the next five years, and GPEC CEO Barry Broome predicts 2014 will see a lot of creative and risky development.
“It’s going to be a developer’s paradise around here for the ones who are really smart and creative, and it’s gonna take some guts,” says Broome. “So, if you’re waiting for your building to be 50 percent leased before you break ground, you’re going to miss a lot of opportunities.”
Phoenix is running out of space, as far as large-scale investment goes, but Broome says  that will be cause for in-fill and urban development. Also, next year will bring spec business development opportunities to people who own land in the West Valley.
“If you have a building, it’s going to go off the market,” Broome says. “If you don’t’ have a building, you might not be in business. In the next two years, there’s going to be so much capital moving from the balance sheets of corporations and into the economy that you’re gonna see a lot of large-scale appetite for buildings.”
Another prediction, looking 25 years ahead, is the importance of transit-oriented development — particularly that along the light rail and Loop 303.
“The old model is going to be in business, but the new model is where the action’s going to be,” Broome says. “My concern is the Valley is an increasingly more complicated market to understand.”
Rural America is growing at a faster rate than the urban areas, and Mignonne Hollis, executive director of the Sierra Vista Economic Development Foundation, suggests the state is headed in the right direction with Arizona Commerce Authority’s rural grants.
The East Valley has seen significant increase in development and business attraction — “I can point to almost any point of the city and say, ‘There’s the growth,’” says Mesa’s Director of Economic Development Bill Jabjiniak. “It’s just a matter of figuring out how the city helps.” (See page 26 for more details on SE Valley development.)

LAYING A NEW FOUNDATION
The economic developers aren’t the only ones touting innovation. Construction costs and a labor shortage meant a modest year of growth in 2013.
“Twenty-thirteen was a year of reinvention,” says Weitz Executive Vice President Mike Bontrager of the construction industry.
The recession and evolving technological tools were the two major incentives in expanding the company’s services.
“We took a big, hard look at how we were building and how we could add more service and more value to our customer base.”
For Weitz, that meant expanding its front-end services, from site selection to in-house designing and equity and debt prototypes.
“The cautionary forecast is that if (construction costs) go up too much and rents and revenues do not go up to match that, building stops and so construction stops. Some inflation on the material side is being seen but it goes up and down.”
The labor shortage is an issue, Bontrager says.
“In some cases, projects will have to be redesigned,” he says, adding, “Arizona is a race horse in the gate; We just need to get the gate open.”
Next year will be one of recovery. Bontrager forecasts that in the fourth quarter the construction sector may see some pickup in projects.
“I don’t think 2014 is going to be the breakout year a lot of people have forecasted,” Bontrager says.
“Last year was another modest growth year coming out of the recession,” says McCarthy Building Companies Southwest President Bo Calbert. “I say modest, but we were up 20 percent in revenue from last year. We’re experiencing a trend back to normalcy. There’s nothing booming. There’s nothing really taking off. It’s just slow steady growth in a lot of different market sectors.”
Similar to Weitz, McCarthy diversified its company. McCarthy is taking interest in utility-scale solar work and wastewater treatment plants.
“There’s a lot in planning, and I think the commercial developers are seeing that and there are some projects being planned now we won’t see for a year or two.”
As far as education goes, Calbert says, K-12 development is at the mercy of bonds and most of the opportunities remain in community college expansion. Calbert also foresees a slowdown in healthcare projects.
McCarthy has found success in developing its job order contracting market and may see more P3 opportunities due to lack of funding.
“It’s still important to be diversified geographically because of the size of the market out there,” Calbert says. “Most people will tell you it’s going to be that way for another two or three years. You really have to have some market penetration outside of Arizona.”
“The only way we’re going to attract the workforce to Arizona is to raise wages,” Calbert says.

FROM THE MOUTHS OF BROKERS
It’s tale of several submarkets, says Colliers International researcher Pete O’Neill of the Valley. There will be some vacancy challenges in the East Valley and north Phoenix retail markets, he says, adding that some submarkets — Chandler, Tempe and 44th Street — are seeing better absorption.
“Because of so many mixed messages in the national marketplace, it’s hard to deal with uncertainty (and gage demand),” says Colliers International Managing Director Bob Mulhern. “It tends to work against clear decisions.”
Ultimately, brokers expect more of the same in 2014 — industrial and multi-family will be strong participants, retailers may circle around in the pro-business climate and with the exception of a few submarkets office is still dragging its feet.
“An interesting event recently occurred in the office market,” Mulhern says. “There’s no trend yet, since it’s just a one-quarter trend. Rent has decreased every quarter for the last five years. In the (3Q, 2013), action has picked up a bit.”
Based on absorption numbers to date, and with companies such as Apple and State Farm coming to the Valley, Cushman and Wakefield’s Vice Chairman Larry Downey predicts Tempe will be the next big employment hub and where users will look to buy.
“Where there is activity in the office submarket, there will be gains,” Downey says. “Right now, that’s the Southeast Valley.”
As for markets that will need some more time to recover, Downey looks to retail and office within some submarkets.
“Retail needs to shed some inventory before any new product can come online,” he says. “Office in some suburban submarkets will continue to decline or bounce along the bottom.”
“The difference between 2013 and 2014 is going to be from large users to medium and small users taking advantage of the market who are feeling comfortable expanding in the market,” says John Bonnell, managing director of office at Jones Lang LaSalle. Dennis Desmond, senior managing director at JLL, says coastal cap rates are below those in Phoenix, which makes the Valley more attractive.
“We’re seeing a shift back to Phoenix,” Desmond says, adding that JLL recently sold a building at the aggressive rate of 6.15 to a German investor. “Investors realize the worst is behind us now, housing’s going up, we’re getting strong employment numbers again, so from a macro-perspective, acquisition directors can come to Phoenix and go back to their investment committee and say this is why (we should invest).”
Desmond is also excited by the prospect of core product coming back onto the marketplace. Concessions, he said, are also beginning to diminish. Desmond suggests that educating investors about lesser known, burgeoning markets such as those in the East Valley is going to be an important step in office.
The industrial market had a great 2013, says Steve Sayre, executive vice president of industrial services at JLL. He adds the Valley has announced the kind of spec development that hasn’t been seen in years taking the form of the 900KSF industrial business park planned for development near Sky Harbor Airport by a Clarion-Wentworth Property parternship. Sayre predicts more build-to-suits in the Southwest Valley from businesses moving out of Los Angeles. Bill Honsaker, managing director of industrial at JLL, is seeing more confidence in the market.
“I tell people there is more good money out there looking for good product than there is good product,” he says, adding that lease terms are lengthening and more specialized, large spaces are coming to the Valley.
Multi-family will see year-end numbers just under 2012’s $2B for 4,000 units. JLL’s Vice President of Multi-family Investments, Charles Steele, says 2014 will see a bigger influx of delivers between 5,000 and 5,500 and at rents that haven’t been introduced to the Valley before.
“Most are being built at $200 per SF, which is very expensive for Phoenix,” he says. “Typically, we’re asking for rents that haven’t been achieved previously in Phoenix.”
The Broadstone on Camelback is close to 50 percent occupied with rents close to $2 a SF, which is about 50 cents higher than rent prices previously in the submarket. Steele rhetorically asks, if there are enough people making more than $100,000 a year who want to rent in north Tempe and Scottsdale; it takes nine jobs to absorb one unit in Phoenix over the last 25 years, he says.
One of the biggest challenges brokers will face in 2014, Downey says, is the price of land. As it continues to escalate, he says, it will be difficult to break ground on new projects.
Multi-family has already started to adapt its construction from garden-style apartments to podium or wrap projects built around parking garages. Before this cycle, there were less than 10 structure-park apartments, at the end of 2013 there were 25.
About half of the units in 2014 will be structure-park apartments.
“This is uncharted territory,” Steele says. “Houston went through it last cycle. We’re hoping we will go the same way. So far it’s been well-received. The question is how deep is that pool?”

Most Challenging Project 2011: Soleri Bridge

Utilities aim to provide infrastructure to meet Arizona’s continued growth and ensure a vibrant economy

When economic developers head into the marketplace to sell Arizona’s benefits to interested relocation prospects, one item on that list is plentiful: reliable and well-priced utilities. While some cities deliver electric power in addition to sewer and water, the power grid is essentially divided between Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project and Tucson Power & Electric.
With multiple agencies busy knocking on doors around the world to bring home the business, Arizona’s utilities plan to deliver that promise.

Alan Bunnell

Alan Bunnell

“APS is typically looking 15 to 20 years into the future to anticipate future power generating resources,” explains Alan Bunnell, external and media relations representative for APS. “We want to be sure we have the infrastructure to meet Arizona’s continued growth and ensure a vibrant economy.”
Over at SRP, Senior Economic Development Project Manager Ed Grant says, “SRP’s resource plan is designed to meet our peak demand requirements plus a 12 percent planning reserve. We use a mix of conventional resources, renewables, energy efficiency programs and market purchases.” SRP works with its various planning groups to maintain a long-term resource plan to meet growing needs.
Arizona’s economy is a roller-coaster ride over the decades. Each climb is higher than the last. As the economy exits the latest recession, Arizona looms as an economic powerhouse with new businesses coming into the market. As each peak rises higher, utilities planning efforts ensure the power is not a stumbling block.
“APS has experienced the full weight of Arizona’s economic recessions many times in the past,” Bunnell says. “We have a reasonable sense of how to meet future demands. We’re already working on the power generation of the future. We are prepared for how and when those supplies will be developed and delivered.”

Ed Grant

Ed Grant

SRP has responsibility for delivering power and water in its service area. Grant explains that the future is bright, “Extensive planning efforts at SRP ensure the region enjoys an abundant supply of water and power. Long-term planning for power means SRP is able to meet long-term area needs.”
Water for America’s sixth largest metro is a challenge SRP is well-prepared to handle. “SRP has a diverse water supply,” says Grant. “We’re obtaining water from the Colorado River, our own system and treated wastewater. Developers are required to demonstrate an assured, renewable water supply.”
Recently, SRP joint-ventured with the Gila River Indian Community for the Gila River Water Storage program. The program creates a system of Central Arizona Project water credits and storage credits covering more than 100 years of usage.

Charlie Duckworth

Charlie Duckworth

APS and SRP are among the co-owners of the Navajo Generation Station in the Four Corners Region. The coal-fired power plant has been operating under an EPA-generated regulatory cloud that may require unaffordable air quality improvements to the facility. The generator powers the CAP project and serves Arizona, the Navajo Nation and the metro area.
“NGS is one piece of a large and diverse generation portfolio,” says Charles Duckworth, SRP’s senior director of energy management reports. “SRP is working on steps necessary to affordably keep the Navajo Nation operating. However, we have a highly flexible resource plan that gives SRP confidence in its ability to meet long-term customer needs.”

Joyce Grossman 1 © Lillian Reid

The Voice of Development: Joyce Grossman, AAED

Joyce Grossman became executive director of AAED in 2011. She has a B.A. from the University of California-Davis and a M.P.A. from California State University, Sacramento. Prior to joining AAED, Grossman was a deputy director with the City of Phoenix. She helped in attracting the International Genomics Consortium/Translational Genomics Research Institute to Phoenix. AZRE caught up with Grossman to talk about the development issues that impact Arizona’s commercial real estate industry.

What is AAED’s mission?
AAED’s mission statement, “AAED serves as Arizona’s unified voice advocating for responsible economic development through an effective program of professional education, public policy and collaboration,” should actually be called an “action statement.” We are proud of our Economic Development Academy of Arizona, which provides quality professional training specific to Arizona. In 2014, we will award the AZED PRO designations to our first Academy graduating class. Beyond education, we are busy working on economic tools to strengthen our economy. To that end, AAED works with lawmakers and is visible at the state capitol.

Who are the members?
AAED has a statewide membership of 480. It is a tight-knit community that works collaboratively for a strong economy in Arizona. Fifty-three percent of the membership is comprised of economic development and workforce practitioners. The other 47 percent are service providers who work in support of economic development in the fields of real estate, banking, construction, architecture, engineering and communications. Membership is open and encouraged for individuals who have a vested interest in advancing the economic development success of Arizona. A benefit of membership will be the lasting business relationships that will come from joining.

What are economic developers saying about Arizona’s economy?
Our members are lacing them up and running. If you can get economic practitioners to stop long enough to talk, they will likely tell you building permits are up and the retail dollar continues to be strong. They tell me that their phones are busier than they have been in years with quality prospects. This is great news for a state that dropped from No. 2 in job growth in 2007 to No. 49 in 2010. I was gratified to read that Forbes Magazine and Moody’s Analytics recently ranked Arizona at the top of U.S. states for projected job growth over the next five years. One thing I know for sure is our members are in the economic development race to win projects that produce quality jobs for Arizona.

Any other observations?
Arizona is being lauded nationally for its comeback, particularly in the housing market. In addition, the health industry grew during the recession and continues to outperform other sectors for growth in the state at the moment. While I am optimistic about our economy, I would be remiss if I did not note that we still have pockets of high unemployment in rural areas of the state. AAED counts many rural economic developers amongst our ranks. We hold rural economic development roundtable discussions to learn what impediments are impeding economic development and our Governmental Affairs Committee uses the dialogue in development of our legislative agenda for the year.

How is AAED different from when it started 40 years ago?
AAED predated many of the economic development organizations that exist today. In the early days of AAED, then the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID), the association organized annual sales trips that would include industry leaders, services providers and the governor of Arizona. As regional organizations and cities opened their own economic development offices, AAID evolved its mission to be in support of economic development through professional education, advocacy and a place for collaboration and networking amongst like minds.

AAED Member Profiles 2014

Grenee Celuch

Grenee Celuch

Grenee Celuch
Director of marketing and business development
Concord General Contracting

Years with Concord: 6.5 years
Years with AAED: 2 years
Impact of membership in AAED: Part of Concord’s long-term goals are to be a more active player in the municipal market sector. AAED has been a valuable resource by connecting me to economic developers throughout the state to expand our network and build business. If I had to put a number on my network, I would say 50 percent of my connections come from AAED.
Most rewarding aspect of AAED: It is by far the people I meet. I regularly attend the luncheons in both Phoenix and Tucson and always walk away with a new contact. Not only do I grow professionally in AAED, but I have also gained many friendships from the organization.
Value of AAED membership: You get out of an organization what you put into it.” This statement is one of my favorites because of the honest truth that it holds. As I continue to get more involved in AAED, it continues to pay me back in immeasurable value. I do not look at value from a financial aspect but from personal and professional development, which is absolutely priceless.

 

Misty Kimball

Misty Kimball

Misty Kimball
Client relations
Ashworth Construction, Inc.
Years with company: 1

Impact of membership in AAED: AAED opens doors to both the public and private sectors statewide for its member and that’s what it has done for me as well.  The ability to stand beside folks that advocate for our economic future, educating its members in so many capacities, while creating and building both professional and personal relationships is invaluable.
Most rewarding aspect of AAED: I believe in service. So servicing our members and our leadership in the capacity of vice chair and now chair of the PR/Communications Committee provides me , specifically, the fulfillment of connectedness, value and friendship that I think we all desire.
Value of AAED membership: To add to the first question; It has been a challenging year, both professionally and personally, being a part of this organization helped with not only business opportunities but the support needed to remain focused.

Dave Couture. Photo by David Sanders/TEP

Dave Couture. Photo by David Sanders/TEP

David Couture
Manager, key account services and economic development
UNS Energy Corporation, parent company of Tucson Electric Power
Years with company: 16
Years with AAED: 2

Impact of membership in AAED: As the largest publicly traded company based in Tucson, TEP is committed to helping the community thrive. We care about where we live and that’s why we strongly support efforts to strengthen and expand our regional economy. As a member of AAED, I have contact with some of the most knowledgeable and influential economic development professionals in the state. With the many events and gatherings hosted by AAED, I have multiple opportunities to interact and learn from individuals who are talented and resourceful.
Most rewarding aspect of AAED: The AAED has been a very valuable organization for me and Tucson Electric Power. Continuing education is an important part of the organization’s philosophy and they offer exceptional learning opportunities. Members are active and knowledgeable and AAED’s collaborative programs give them the opportunity to interact. Although AAED is dedicated to improving economic development in Arizona, its members’ breadth of knowledge about economic development opportunities extends beyond the state’s borders.
Value of AAED membership: I attended this year’s AAED Spring Conference in Tucson and was extremely impressed with the program presenters and conference attendees. I realized that AAED’s membership was not just worthwhile but essential  for companies like TEP that are truly interested in growing our local and state economy.

Pillars, WEB

Pillars for the Future: AAED’s strategic plan strengthens its economic development role

Hear the word “pillars” and you envision strength, tall and straight.
There have been three pillars standing on the foundation of the Arizona Association for Economic Development. The association starts its next 40 years with a new strategic plan minted early last month by its board of directors. The timing meshes with Arizona’s exit from the dark days of the recession into recovery’s light.
“It’s a new chapter in AAED’s history,” says AAED president Eric Larson, who is also AVB Development Partners’ director of acquisitions. “We’ve invested a lot of thought into the process. This is going to move the organization forward by growing and broadening our position in Arizona.”
Larson is responsible for the first months of the plan’s implementation and is shepherding soft previews around the state this month. The association’s December 13 meeting is the formal deployment.

“What does AAED want to be when it grows up? The new strategic plan answers the question and sets out a plan for the next five years. We reinforced that our ‘three pillars’ are still what holds us up.” — Eric Larson, president, director of acquisitions, AVB Development Partners

“What does AAED want to be when it grows up? The new strategic plan answers the question and sets out a plan for the next five years. We reinforced that our ‘three pillars’ are still what holds us up.” — Eric Larson, president, director of acquisitions, AVB Development Partners

Firming AAED’s strategic plan as 2014 begins is fortuitous. Larson, and next year’s president Danielle Casey, economic development director for Scottsdale, envision the organization becoming the “go-to” source for economic development information and advocacy.
“The recession gave us a number of lessons about Arizona’s economy and an overdependence on home construction and real estate,” says Casey. “We need to share experience from across the state and use what we’ve learned to keep a stronger focus on a diverse and healthy economy.”
“What does AAED want to be when it grows up?” asks Larson rhetorically. “Using this as the foundation, we seriously looked at the relevancy and representativeness of our organization’s ‘pillars.’ The strategic plan answers those questions and sets out a plan for the next five years. We reinforced that our ‘three pillars’ are still what holds us up.”

The three pillars

“Local governments have to understand tax policy, effective incentives and business decision-making. AAED is the forum where all the players come together and share knowledge.” — Angela Tablot, board member, vice president of business development, GPEC

“Local governments have to understand tax policy, effective incentives and business decision-making. AAED is the forum where all the players come together and share knowledge.” — Angela Tablot, board member, vice president of business development, GPEC

Education, advocacy and collaboration are the three pillars raising AAED’s membership of public and private economic development professionals. The sum of the effort is improving Arizona’s economic competitiveness. While the economic development agencies — Arizona Commerce Authority, Greater Phoenix Economic Council and Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities and others — are the state’s sales representatives, AAED members are the faces of implementation.
“It’s a marriage in growing the economy,” emphasizes Angela Talbot, GPEC vice president of business development. “[ACA], GPEC and others go out and bring businesses into Arizona. It’s the collaboration that closes the deals. That impresses businesses thinking about an Arizona move.
“No matter how we represent the state to businesses in the U.S. and globally,” Talbot continues, “the local governments have to understand tax policy, effective incentives and business decision-making. AAED is the forum where all the players come together and share knowledge.”

Education

“It’s not just that AAED puts on conferences and training seminars,” Casey says, “The members share knowledge. When I started in economic development, I had a steep learning curve. With AAED, I not only had training, but, more important, mentors. Members share experience and knowledge. We’re not competing in the AAED forum.”
“The collaboration and education is really important to my colleagues,” explains Mignonne

“Our plan is to ensure elected officials understand responsible economic development.” — Danielle Casey, president-elect, economic development director, Scottsdale

“Our plan is to ensure elected officials understand responsible economic development.” — Danielle Casey, president-elect, economic development director, Scottsdale

Hollis, executive director of the Sierra Vista Economic Development Foundation. Hollis chairs AAED’s rural committee. “AAED helps bring together rural and remote Arizona,” she says. “My markets don’t have the budgets to travel for training, AAED brings opportunities to learn to our area.” One size doesn’t fit all, she says, “but, all benefit when we bring everyone to high standards of professionalism.”
Getting training across the state is one of AAED’s major strategies. The International Economic Development Council (IEDC) is the major organization certifying economic development professionals. It offers continuing education programs certified economic developers (CEcD) are required to pass.
“IEDC is expensive, but we have to take courses every year,” says Casey. “With agency budget cuts, it’s a real burden. AAED now offers accredited courses in Arizona that are much more affordable. I can send my staff and keep the training budget under control.”
The new strategic plan puts an emphasis on more of those courses. Professional demand drives the topics as well. This fall, the association offers courses in infrastructure as economic development tools. “This teaches cities and developers how an effective incentive can be developed for project backbones,”
Larson says.

“It’s a very valuable tool for small economic development groups. We find AAED sharing best practices and keep us connected with trends.” — Joe Snell, president and CEO, TREO

“It’s a very valuable tool for small economic development groups. We find AAED sharing best practices and keep us connected with trends.” — Joe Snell, president and CEO, TREO

Collaboration

“AAED is a positive, valuable organization,” says Joe Snell, president and CEO of TREO. “Our organization participates and serves in the association. It’s a very valuable tool for small economic development groups. We find AAED shares best practices and keeps us connected with trends.”
“We used to say ‘networking’,” says Casey. “But it really is collaboration. You can see it at every level. I learn a lot, not only from my mentors, but sharing ideas with other members in all sectors. You can’t help but learn when we get together.”
With the variety of members on its rolls, AAED creates opportunities to bring parties with common challenges together. “For the first time, we have rural and tribal economic developers collaborating,” Hollis explains. “Although we sit on separate committees, we’re now jointly meeting to pool resources and opportunities. Without AAED, this couldn’t happen.”
“(Small markets) don’t have the ability to draw the types of businesses that Tucson and Phoenix pull in, but AAED collaboration helps us in two ways,” says Hollis. “It gives us a

Mignonne Hollis

Mignonne Hollis

voice at the table when economic development decisions are being made and it helps leverage stronger economic development tools.”
The organization is continuing its lunch meetings and quarterly roundtables. The strategic plan stretches the collaborative sessions further into the state with meetings slated in the various regions.
“The real value in AAED is the convening of members and sharing of ideas,” concludes Snell.

Advocacy

Talbot says AAED wants to strengthen its advocacy role.
“AAED is the dominant force and knowledgeable source of economic development education and collaboration,” she says. “We want to be the one place the legislature looks to when it needs information about economic development. The large cross-section of members means all voices are heard when it comes to policy.”
AAED was heavily involved in the governor’s policy changes for Arizona over the past few years. It was a major participant in legislation leading to the state’s new tax and incentive policies for business.
“We were very much in the loop with the governor’s Competitive Package in 2011,” says Larson. “That [$25-million closing cost] fund is paying off today for business recruitment.”
“Economic development and quality job growth is key to what we need to do for the next five years,” says Casey, who’ll be at the organization’s helm for its first full year of plan implementation. “We’re transcending the boundaries of individual agencies’ economic development with state-level toolkits. Our plan is to ensure elected officials understand responsible economic development.”

Michael Rauschenberger

Michael Rauschenberger

DPR’s Michael Rauschenberger views AAED as an advocate for more responsible development.
“Their involvement with the solar energy incentive made a difference with the legislature,” he says. The Renewable Energy Tax Incentive Program has added more than 6,300 jobs and close to $2 billion in capital investment, making Arizona a leader in solar energy opportunities.
“We’ve seen 14 new companies come into the market and stay as a result of the program,” Larson says.
“Our government affairs committee is really strong,” Casey says about AAED’s role in upcoming legislative year, “We want AAED to be in a position of providing the legislature with economic development information that they trust.”
AAED’s objectives for the coming legislative year were in front of its board on the same agenda with the strategic plan. Becoming the “go-to” group for economic development puts the government affairs committee in a crucial role this fall. The group sees advancing Arizona’s competitiveness as an important legislative focus. As economic developers, the vision is not only bringing in new jobs but growing Arizona’s export markets.
“We have a lot to sell to bring business in,” says Talbot. “However, the AAED program places as much importance on supporting current businesses — large and small.”
“There are a lot of diverse opportunities in the state,” echoes Hollis. “AAED’s legislative committee is tasked with looking at impacts for all regions.”
AAED works for legislation specific to helping the state’s economy and also provides the legislature with a sounding board at how other legislative issues may affect Arizona’s attractiveness to new companies.

Building on success

Larson has half his term remaining to kick the new strategic plan into effect. Casey will be accountable for making it the fundamental theme of her term next year.
“I’ll be rolling it out in December,” says Larson. “The board and I will need to reach our full membership to demonstrate how the three pillars are going to be part of everything AAED accomplishes. Then it’s Danielle’s (Casey) turn.”
It’s an ambitious agenda for the organization over the next five years. An extensive effort went into drafting the strategic plan. Being the ‘go-to’ organization is not a slogan for AAED, it’s the plan’s objective.
“The key to AAED’s future is keeping everything in focus,” says Snell. “It’s important we don’t spread our strategies beyond the capacity of our budget and members’ energy.”
“We’ve got a great staff working with Joyce (Grossman, AAED executive director). It makes a president’s role a lot simpler,” says Casey. “I’ve got to carry the standard a long line of strong leaders have passed to me. My job is to find ways to education leadership and community and stay within the resources we bring to economic development.” The AAED member experience and resources, Casey enumerates, are very formidable.

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Jane Morris Of Phoenix-Mesa Gateway To Speak At July AAED Lunch

 

Jane Morris, A.A.E., executive director of Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, will be the speaker at the Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED)’s July luncheon on Tuesday, July 9 from 11 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at 2901 N. Seventh St. in Phoenix.

rsz_jane_morrisMorris, who was named executive director in March, will discuss Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport’s economic impact on the region.

The cost of the luncheon is $40 for AAED members and guests and $50 for non-members and late registrants. To register, visit aaedjuly9th.evenbrite.com. For more information, call AAED at (602) 240-AAED (2233) or visit aaed.com.

Registration deadline is Friday, July 5. Vegetarian meals must be requested in advance.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID). The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

Ann Weaver Hart

U of A President to Speak At AAED Luncheon

University of Arizona President Ann Weaver Hart will be the speaker at the Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED)’s May luncheon on Tuesday, May 7 from 11 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at the Phoenix Country Club, located at 2901 N. Seventh St. in Phoenix.

Hart will discuss the university’s role in economic development throughout the state.
The cost of the luncheon is $40 for AAED members and guests and $50 for non-members and late registrants.  To register, visit http://aaedmay7th.eventbrite.com. For more information, call AAED at 602-240-AAED (2233) or visit www.aaed.com.  The registration deadline is Monday, April 29.  Vegetarian meals must be requested in advance.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID).  The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

The strategic vision of AAED is to be the leading advocate of responsible economic development for all of Arizona by leading the facilitation of public/private cooperation and fostering teamwork to address the growth and quality of life issues that face Arizona.  For more information on AAED, visit www.aaed.com or call (602) 240-2233.

shopping

Retail: It’s a New Reality

As municipalities all across Arizona have seen their general funds strongly impacted over the last several years due in part to significant drops in sales tax revenue, the importance of a vibrant/strong retail sector has once again taken on a prominent role.

With Arizona cities in some instances relying on retail sales taxes for up to one-third of their general fund revenue, there is today a quiet, but forceful emphasis – particularly in rural areas – being placed on economic development professionals to make sure their programs help retain and attract new retail businesses to their communities, with the progressive municipalities leading the way.

In addition to the general fund ramifications of retail sales tax collection, another significant new reality of the retail sector has been recognized.  Todd Sergi, co-chair of the AZ/New Mexico Alliance for the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC), said the stigma of retail jobs being associated only with unattractive, part-time or low-paying jobs is changing.

“With bankers, pharmacists, medical professionals and other non-traditional retail businesses more commonly becoming a part of the new, redefined mainstream shopping environment, the retail sector is now creating well-paid jobs not traditionally seen before,” Sergi said.

The recession in Arizona provided examples in many instances of what a well-designed, well planned center does, or does not, look like.  Successful retail centers have common themes.  Municipalities have realized what it takes for retailers to have success in their cities, including ample parking, un-obscured visibility and easy access from the surrounding streets and easy-to-see signage.  These elements are routinely found in the more highly occupied centers that fared better through the economic down cycle.
Sergi said, “Everyone realizes that a hard-to-get-to retail center hidden behind large over grown landscaped settings with bad signage and limited parking is a lose-lose.  We don’t need more empty buildings.”

Fortunately, the design and planning barriers for retailers to enter a market have been noted.  Lessons were learned.  Statewide, both elected leaders and municipality staff have seen first-hand examples where dated or onerous policy cost their communities opportunities for new sales tax revenue.  The demand and competition to attract those businesses, in some instances, sent potential new entrants to neighboring communities viewed as more reasonable and forward thinking.

The retail industry has been adapting, as well.

Garrett Newland, vice president of development for Macerich, said we are seeing these adaptations every day with continuing anchor changes and new retail concepts.
“Retail is reinventing itself right before our eyes,” he said.  “What malls look like today is vastly different than what we saw in the ‘80s and ‘90s and it doesn’t matter if it’s a super-regional mall or a corner strip center.”

With empty stores and some poorly designed centers dotting Arizona’s retail landscape, a number of existing centers will have to be retrofitted, or possibly redeveloped, to make them assets to the community that can be counted on to generate needed sales and/or real estate tax revenue.

The evolution of retail e-commerce is also changing the face of retail.

An ICSC report recently indicated that retail e-commerce has grown seven-fold since 2000 and at its current growth rate will double again by 2016.  Legislation that requires e-commerce retailers to capture sales tax dollars for government coffers to some degree may level the playing field for the bricks and mortar retailers.

But even so, to remain competitive the storefront of tomorrow is changing.  Retailers now understand the need to integrate their physical and on-line presence, how to balance the product search, selection, transaction and delivery processes desired by today’s consumer and the ability to offer a variety of delivery and return options.

Michael P. Niemira, vice president, chief economist and director of research for ICSC, said the partnerships being established between the private and public sectors, the ability of retail to adapt and meet the needs of today’s customers and the willingness of economic developers to embrace retail bode well for the future economic success of each of our communities.
Eric Larson is president-elect of the Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) and board chair for the Scottsdale area Chamber of Commerce. AAED and ICSC will co-present a retail symposium Jan. 8 in which these topics will be discussed in detail by those quoted and others, as well as presentations made by representatives of new/expanding Arizona retailers.  For information, call (602) 240-2233 or visit www.aaed.com.

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AAED to Host Symposium on Conducting Business in Indian Country

 

The Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) will host a symposium, “Rising to New Heights: How to do Business in Indian Country,” Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Phoenix Country Club,  2901 N. Seventh St.

Luncheon keynote speaker will be Jonodev Chaudhuri, counselor to the assistant secretary – Indian Affairs, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, who will address “Emerging Opportunities for Business Collaboration” between the federal government and tribal businesses and will highlight examples of successful partnerships among government and business partners.

The morning keynote speaker will be Diane Humetewa, special advisor to ASU President Michael Crow, special counsel, general counsel’s office & professor of practice, college of law.

A session titled “The University of Arizona and Arizona’s Native Nations: Providing Access to Opportunities,” is also scheduled. Presenters will be Maryilyn Robinson, associate director, Drachman Institute, office of the vice president for research, and Claudia E. Nelson, director, Native Peoples Technical Assistance Office

A mid-morning panel discussion on “Building Communities” will also be part of the programming. Panelists will be Vice Chairman Shan Lewis of the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe, Eddie Calnimptewa, project director, Moenkopi Development Corp., Hopi Tribe, and Levi Esquerra, program director at the Center for American Indian Economic Development at Northern Arizona University.

The cost is $65 for members, $75 for non-members and $90 for late registrants. Registration deadline is Friday, Sept. 28. Lunch is included. Please request vegetarian meal in advance. Call AAED with questions at 602-240-AAED (2233), or visit the AAED website, www.aaed.com.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID). The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

 

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AAED plans tribal symposium

Arizona Association for Economic Development to Host Symposium:
“Rising to New Heights: Tribal Economic Development Impact in Arizona”

The Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) will host a symposium, “Rising to New Heights: Tribal Economic Development Impact in Arizona,” Tuesday, Oct. 2 from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Phoenix Country Club, located at 2901 N. Seventh St. in Phoenix.

Luncheon keynote speaker will be Jonodev Chaudhuri, counselor to the assistant secretary – Indian Affairs, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, who will address “Emerging Opportunities for Business Collaboration” between the federal government and tribal businesses and will highlight examples of successful partnerships among government and business partners.

The morning keynote speaker will be Diane Humetewa, special advisor to President Michael Crow, special counsel, general counsel’s office & professor of practice, college of law, Arizona State University.
The cost is $65 for members, $75 for non-members and $90 for late registrants. Registration deadline is Friday, Sept. 28.  Lunch is included.   Please request vegetarian meal in advance.  Call AAED with questions at 602-240-AAED (2233), or visit the AAED website, www.aaed.com.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID).  The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

The strategic vision of AAED is to be the leading advocate of responsible economic development for all of Arizona by leading the facilitation of public/private cooperation and fostering teamwork to address the growth and quality of life issues that face Arizona.  For more information on AAED, visit www.aaed.com or call (602) 240-2233.

AAED Luncheon - Arizona Transportation

AAED Will Discuss Arizona Transportation

The Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) will host its June luncheon on Tuesday, June 5 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. at the Phoenix Country Club, located at 2901 N. Seventh St. in Phoenix.

The topic of this month’s luncheon will be “Roads and Rails: Future of Arizona’s Transportation.” Guest speakers will be Scott Omer, director of the Multimodal Planning Division for the Arizona Department of Transportation, and Tim Kanaval, economic development manager for Pima County.

The two will discuss the economic impact from both the proposed Interstate 11 that would connect Phoenix and Las Vegas and Union Pacific’s new 950 acre classification yard in southern Pinal County.

The cost of the luncheon is $40 for AAED members and guests and $50 for non-members and late registrants.  To register or for more information, call AAED at 602-240-AAED (2233) or visit www.aaed.com.  The registration deadline is Friday, June 1.  Vegetarian meals must be requested in advance.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID).  The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

The strategic vision of AAED is to be the leading advocate of responsible economic development for all of Arizona by leading the facilitation of public/private cooperation and fostering teamwork to address the growth and quality of life issues that face Arizona.

For more information on AAED, visit www.aaed.com or call (602) 240-2233.

Phoenix AAED

AAED Announces New Board Members

The Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) has announced its new officers and new board members for 2012-2013.

Teri Drew

Teri Drew, regional director for NACOG-EWD

Teri Drew, regional director for NACOG-EWD, has been elected president. Serving with her on the executive committee will be Eric Larson, director of acquisitions for AVB Development, president-elect; Danielle Casey, assistant city manager for the city of Maricopa, vice president;  Julie Engel, CEcD, president and CEO, Yuma Economic Development Corporation, secretary/treasurer; and Chris Camacho, vice president of development for Greater Phoenix Economic Council, immediate past-president.

Newly-elected AAED board members include: Caroline Bowen of SOS Staffing Services and Amanda Jacobs of the town of Oro Valley, both representing metro Tucson, and David Drennon of the Arizona Commerce Authority and Jennifer Graves, CEcD, of  the city of Mesa, who represent metro Phoenix.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID).  The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

The strategic vision of AAED is to be the leading advocate of responsible economic development for all of Arizona by leading the facilitation of public/private cooperation and fostering teamwork to address the growth and quality of life issues that face Arizona.  For more information on AAED, visit www.aaed.com or call (602) 240-2233.

economic development - 8 honored

8 Earn Economic Development Awards

The Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) has announced the recipients of its annual Economic Development Distinguished by Excellence (EDDE) awards. The awards were presented during an evening awards dinner at the AAED Spring Conference in Sedona.

The prestigious EDDE awards honor individuals and companies who have made significant contributions to the advancement of the organization and also to the economic growth within the state of Arizona. Recipients are selected from a pool of nominations made by members of AAED. Overall eight EDDEs were presented.

The William Lampkin Award for Long Term Excellence in Economic Development was given to Sally Odette, CEcD, senior consultant, Economic and Community Development for APS.

Julie Engel, CEcD, president and CEO of the Greater Yuma Economic Development Corporation, was the recipient of the Economic Developer of the Year, Large Community Award. The award for Economic Developer of the Year, Small Community, was presented to Richard Wilkie, senior management analyst for the city of Casa Grande.

Brandon Kavanagh, a partner with Mangum, Wall, Stoops & Warden in Flagstaff, was cited as Member of the Year.

Angela Talbot of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council was named AAED’s 2012 New Member of the Year.

Kari McCormick of Kitchell Contractors was recognized as Economic Developer of the Year – Tribal Communities.

The award for Large Organization of the Year was presented to the city of Phoenix and the award for Small Organization of the Year was bestowed upon Sigma Contracting.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID). The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

The strategic vision of AAED is to be the leading advocate of responsible economic development for all of Arizona by leading the facilitation of public/private cooperation and fostering teamwork to address the growth and quality of life issues that face Arizona.

For more information on the Arizona Association for Economic Development, visit www.aaed.com or call (602) 240-2233.