Tag Archives: arizona state school

Entrepreneurs

W. P. Carey School Launches New Major in Entrepreneurship

If you’ve ever thought about starting your own business — about turning your passion into a moneymaking company – then entrepreneurship may be for you. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University announces a new major in business entrepreneurship that can offer you access to incredible resources and the knowledge to help you succeed.

“The W. P. Carey School has been delivering entrepreneurship coursework for almost 30 years, and ASU has a wide variety of resources for budding entrepreneurs,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “However, until now, we’ve only formally offered a concentration and certificates in entrepreneurship. Starting this fall, we want to give our entrepreneurs a full major, so their degrees and resumes reflect the intense training and preparation they’ve received. This can help when presenting themselves to potential backers, partners or even employers at existing companies looking for true innovators.”

The recent uncertainty in the economy has produced a keen interest in entrepreneurship, as many people try to create their own jobs and business opportunities. As a result, the number of entrepreneurship programs at universities across the country is booming.

“Entrepreneurship students can look forward to potentially connecting with mentors, peers, possible investors and top faculty members who understand how to start and maintain a business,” says Sidnee Peck, director of entrepreneurial initiatives at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “They also get great feedback from industry experts, and they have the ability to try and fail in a safe environment, instead of risking real money in the real world.”

The W. P. Carey School already has a tremendous record of producing great student entrepreneurs. Over just the past few years, the school has had a Forbes magazine “All Star Student Entrepreneur” and two finalists for Entrepreneur magazine’s annual “College Entrepreneur” award. The school has also had many winners of ASU’s Edson Student Entrepreneurship Initiative, which provides funding, mentorship and office space to teams of students and helps them develop their ideas into viable businesses. In the last academic year alone (2011-12), W. P. Carey School students won more than $130,000 in new-venture competitions.

In 2011, Peck was invited to speak at a White House event about the benefits of teaching entrepreneurship to college students. Her entrepreneurship classes at the W. P. Carey School include some groundbreaking new coursework in Lean LaunchPad, an experience-oriented concept introduced in Silicon Valley. Several of her students have successfully launched businesses.

“Our major in entrepreneurship helps you acquire the educational foundation, experiences and network to negotiate obstacles and be successful,” says Professor Gerry Keim, chair of the W. P. Carey School’s Management Department, where the new major is housed. “This country has always encouraged the risk-taking needed to be an entrepreneur. In our program, students can learn whether something is feasible, whether an idea is a good fit for the marketplace, how to get capital, and other key skills, so they only spend time developing business concepts that create value.”

ASU also boasts many other opportunities to help students get their firms off the ground, including:

·         Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS), a sequence of classes at the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering that joins students of various majors to help solve real-world problems.
·         Student Teams for Entrepreneurship Projects (STEP), a program from the W. P. Carey School of Business Spirit of Enterprise Center that matches teams of business students with Valley companies to solve existing problems.
·         CTI Maker Week through the College of Technology and Innovation, where students can pitch ideas, make devices and launch them.
·         InnovationSpace — a joint program between the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering and the W. P. Carey School of Business – that teaches students how to develop products that create market value, while serving social needs and minimizing impacts on the environment.
·         ASU’s SkySong, which offers the Edson Student Entrepreneurship Initiative and other funding competitions, among many other services for entrepreneurs.

The new entrepreneurship degree will officially be available starting in fall 2013, but applications are already being accepted. Two other new bachelor’s degrees will also be offered at the W. P. Carey School this fall: Bachelor of Arts in Business with concentrations in human resources or sports & media studies. A new concentration is also being introduced in digital and integrated marketing communication.

Visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu for more information on the school’s stellar undergraduate program, ranked Top 25 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

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New Global Rankings Laud W. P. Carey School

New rankings and ratings are out from three prestigious groups that examine the best business schools in the world. The Financial Times, The Economist and The Princeton Review all give the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University extremely high marks for excellence.

“The new rankings from The Economist and Financial Times show the W. P. Carey School is consistently recognized among the best business schools in the world,” says Robert Mittelstaedt, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The new book from The Princeton Review delivers high praise in the form of reviews from our own students. Recognition from highly regarded media outlets is gratifying, but acclaim from students who actually attend our school and learn from our stellar faculty also really validates our mission and accomplishments.”

In the new rankings out today from the Financial Times, the W. P. Carey School’s executive MBA program in China ranks as one of the Top 25 executive MBA programs in the world. The Financial Times is considered to be Britain’s equivalent of The Wall Street Journal. It specifically ranks the W. P. Carey School program in Shanghai as No. 21 globally and the No. 2 executive MBA program affiliated with any U.S. public university.

“Our students in the Shanghai program are senior-level executives at businesses and government agencies responsible for decisions influencing literally millions of people,” says Professor Buck K. W. Pei, associate dean of Asia Programs at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The new Financial Times ranking speaks to the commitment of our faculty members and partners in China, who provide world-class management education for key members of the global business community.”

Students in the Shanghai program have included three vice mayors of China’s major provinces, six vice mayors of Shanghai, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange (the fifth-largest stock exchange in the world), several bank chairmen, the chairman of Shanghai Airlines, the chief executive officer of Baosteel, the deputy commissioner of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, and many other top leaders. The program includes high-level visits to some of the world’s biggest companies and classes taught by faculty members from both Arizona State University and other prominent universities.

The new rankings from The Economist, also released this month, review the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program in Arizona. This marks the first time the school has been invited to participate in the global rankings survey, and it debuted high on the Top 100, at No. 59. It is the only Arizona school on the entire list and Top 10 in the western United States. The full-time W. P. Carey MBA program is known for its small, personal classes and a high return-on-investment for tuition. The Economist, based in London, is renowned for its intellectual appeal and boasts a readership of 2.5 million.

The Princeton Review releases its new edition of “The Best 296 Business Schools” this month. The new book is based largely on student surveys and praises the W. P. Carey School for its peer network, cutting-edge classes, satisfied students, career services, and solid preparation in management and teamwork. The book gives the school a 96 rating for academic experience and a 93 rating for career (graduate employment/salaries), on a scale with a maximum of 99.

“All of these new reviews point to our consistence in striving for and achieving excellence,” says the school’s executive dean, Amy Hillman. “We’ll continue to educate many of the best students in the world, and we’re now unveiling a new scholarship program to help with that.”

The school is unveiling a new scholarship program called The Wm. Polk Carey Memorial Scholarship Fund this month. It will provide financial support for some of the highest-achieving individuals who apply to the W. P. Carey School of Business. The exclusive scholarship is named after the school’s benefactor, real estate investor and acclaimed philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey, who donated $50 million to the school in 2002/2003. No additional application is required for the new scholarship program; all successful full-time MBA applicants will be considered for the scholarships.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School, which also has highly ranked undergraduate business, evening MBA and online MBA programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

Tartesso Elementary

Elementary School Leaves A Small Carbon Footprint

Buckeye’s Tartesso Elementary School is receiving high marks, but it has nothing to do with the kids in the classroom.

On Aug. 19, 2010, the United States Green Building Council awarded the 3-year-old school with a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certification for sustainable building design.

Tartesso, a part of the Saddle Mountain Unified School District, is the first fully state-funded LEED Silver School in Arizona with this recognition.

“Having the certification is a big bonus to our district,” said Dr. Deborah Garza-Chavez, principal of Tartesso. “It’s nice to be noticed as a small district by trying to provide the best learning environment for our students and staff.”

The school had just a little more than 200 students upon opening in 2008 and only served kindergarten through 6th grade. Now fully functioning up to 8th grade, more than 600 students walk the halls of a completely sustainable and environmentally conscious building.

Architects and engineers from DLR Group were responsible for the building designs of the school and worked with budgets allocated by the Arizona State School of Facilities Board.

“Before we started designing the facility in early 2006, we brought our team into a brainstorming session where we could evaluate and strategize as to what sustainable products we wanted to use,” said Bill Taylor, a LEED-accredited professional with DLR Group.

The staff and students at Tartesso have a wide variety of energy saving technologies and products that create a healthy learning environment.

In an effort to reduce water shortages, the building design provides a plumbing system that conserves water. All of the boys’ restrooms contain waterless urinals and the kitchen sinks have low flow water fixtures, a reduction that saves half a million gallons of water per year.

The school provides a high performing mechanical system that goes above and beyond state standards.

A completely computer controlled airflow system continuously brings in new air circulation and automatically turns off air conditioning in an unoccupied room.  This reduces the annual energy cost by 20 percent, in comparison to a building that just meets the state code requirements.

In addition to significant energy savings, DLR Group improved the indoor environmental quality of Tartesso.  The building is positioned so that natural daylight offsets the artificial lighting in all occupied academic spaces, reducing energy and improving the educational environment.

Only low organic compound paint was used and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) free carpets were installed to promote a healthy interior for students and staff.

“[Students] have benefited from not having those harsh smells,” said Angel Tellez, Facilities Engineer for Saddle Mountain Unified School District. “Everything is kid friendly and environmentally friendly and that is improving the learning environment.”

Not only has the school been a leader in sustainable innovations, but it has served as an asset to the economy by purchasing materials from local companies. Ingredients in the concrete were all locally harvested and nothing was shipped long distance.

“This is a place that has students, staff and the community in mind,” said Premnath Sundharam, Senior Associate for DLR Group. “It’s an educational tool for what can be done on limited funds while still making an impact on the environment.”